[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - September 11, 2016

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Sep 11 10:31:35 PDT 2016


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

----------------------------------------------------------
*******************************************

******
------
Index
------
****** 

Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.

———————————
Monday, September 12
——————————— 

8:30am  - 10am  Environmental Advocacy Roundtable
11:30am  Empower the Defender with Unpredictability: Game-Theoretic Approaches for Real-World Security and Sustainability Challenges
12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Peter Huybers (Harvard)
12pm  Webinar: Building an AI Product to Improve High-Tech Sales
12pm  Loeb Fellows Talks:  Greta Byrum, David Molander, Mark Lamster
12pm  BITS City Competition Kickoff
12:10pm  Plant responses to climate from genomic to community levels
3pm  Climate Ride Arrival Rally
4pm  A Precinct Too Far: Distance to the Polling Place and Turnout Inequality
4pm  Decoding Dating: A different perspective on building relationships 
6pm  The Terror Years:  From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series:  Energy, Temperature, Heat
7pm  Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman:  Conservation Heroes of the American Heartland

————————————
Tuesday, September 13
———————————— 

12pm  Election 2016 and the Media
12pm  American Plants for American Gardens": The The Early History of Ecological Restoration
12pm  Loeb Fellows Talks:  Karen Abrams, Pallavi Mande, Emmanuel Pratt
2:45pm  Nation Building Through Foreign Intervention: Evidence from Discontinuities in Military Strategies
4pm  Solar Geoengineering and International Affairs: An Introduction
4:30pm  The Art of Discovery
4:30pm  Saudi Arabia's Sectarian Strategy at Home and Abroad
5:30pm  The impact of indoor biomass fuel use on stunting in Indian children
6pm  Ingredients - film showing
6pm  Artist Talk: Leo Villareal
6pm  Boston New Technology September 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT69
6:30pm  How Restorative Development Can Address Climate Change

————————————— 
Wednesday, September 14
————————————— 

12pm  Hardware for Deep Learning
12pm  Vision & Justice: The Nexus of Art, Race, and American Citizenship
4pm  Abrupt Climate Change and Extreme Events - the non-linear world
4pm  Neurobiology and Genetics of Fear and PTSD: From Mice to (Wo)Man
4pm  Blockstack: A Global Naming and Storage System Secured by Blockchains
4pm  Safe Decision Making Under Uncertainty
4:10pm  Book talk with Stein Ringen, author of The Perfect Dictatorship: China in the 21st Century
4:15pm  Federal Coal Program Reform, the Clean Power Plan, and the Interaction of Upstream and Downstream Climate Policies
4:30pm  Back to Square One: The Three Dilemmas of the Turkish and Kurdish Question and Turkey’s New Makeover
5:30pm  CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap (Viewing & Panel)
6pm  The Environment Forum at the Mahindra Center: Terry Tempest Williams, "The Hour of Land: Our National Parks As Breathing Spaces”
6pm  Mass Innovation Nights #90
6:30pm  Old North Speaker Series: Jared Hardesty - Beyond Slavery and Freedom: New Perspectives on the Lives of Enslaved Bostonians

———————————— 
Thursday, September 15
———————————— 

7:30am  BOSTON’S CLIMATE VULNERABILITIES AND SOLUTIONS SYMPOSIUM
11am  Civic Media: Education and Service Learning
12pm  Lighting Up Africa:  Reaching low income customers with prepaid electricity
12pm  Role of Renewables in Indian Power Sector
12pm  Bikini Atoll as 'the World in Miniature': Ecological Fieldwork and World War
12pm  Loeb Fellows Talks:  Alessandro Petti, Emi Kiyota, Rahel Shawl Zelleke
3pm  Venture Caf̩e in Session: Robotics
4pm  Topics in Ecology and Evolution:  Microbial Communities
4pm  Building with artificial atoms: The design of multifunctional nanomaterials and devices through nanocrystal self-assembly
4pm  IBM Watson Analytics LIVE!
4:30pm  BRAIN POWER
5pm  Knowledge's Allure: Surveillance and Uncertainty
5pm  2016 Cleantech Energy Storage Finance Forum
6pm  Gandhi’s Forgotten Campaign: The Abolition of Indenture and the Mahatma
6pm  Make It Real: a manufacturing panel discussion
6:30pm  TCN Upstart: Robotics with Joe Jones, Pioneer in Creating Practical Robots with IRobot, Harvest Automation and Franklin Robotics
6:30pm  Science by the Pint:  Genetically Modified Organisms: A Plant’s Perspective
6:30pm  Science Royale: An Innovators Event

——————————
Friday, September 16
——————————

9am  Disasters and Development in South Asia
12pm  Environmental and Energy Applications of Graphene Oxide Nanoarchitectures
12pm  MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar - Karin van der Wiel (GFDL)
3pm  The Politics of Mourning:  Death and Honor in Arlington National Cemetery
3pm  Artificial Intelligence in Robotics
4pm  Advocating for Science FoR/AFS/MIT-GSC 2016 Symposium
5pm  Architecture Lecture: Reporting (Back) from the Front

———————————— 
Saturday, September 17
———————————— 

9am  National Drive Electric Week Event
10am  BostonVR and BostonAR Devs Hackathon at Brookline Interactive Group (BIG)
10:30am  Green Building Bike Tour
12pm  Pirates Rally for Your Freedom!
6pm  Living in the Future: Where Science Fiction Meets Science Reality

——————————— 
Sunday, September 18
——————————— 

9am  SWAPFEST
11am  7th Annual Boston Local Food Festival
4pm  TEDxHarvardCollege: Incite Insight
6pm  Amazing Biochar: How to Use It, How to Make It - with Hugh McLaughlin

——————————— 
Monday, September 19
——————————— 

12pm  Coastal Water Quality, Climate Change & Ocean Acidification along the U. S. Northeast
12:15pm  The Competing Imaginaries of Solar Geoengineering
4pm  Evidence for Action: Changing Public Priorities in India
4pm  The Materials of Imperialism: Engineering Arid Landscapes in Washington’s Columbia Basin and Afghanistan’s Helmand Valley
5pm  Fragments of A Life in Film
5:30pm  Divestment and Reinvesting in Massachusetts Companies
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series:  The Science of Sugar
7pm  A Truck Full of Money:  One Man’s Quest to Recover from Great Success
7pm  Water — and Climate — Solutions in Plain Sight

———————————— 
Tuesday, September 20
———————————— 

8:15am  Mechanotherapeutics:  From Drugs to Wearables, Wyss Institute's 7th Annual Symposium
8:30am  NECEC Energy Storage Forum 2016
12pm  New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  The Role of Sustainable Seafood
12pm  Brown Bag: Issues in Curating the Open Web at Scale - with Gary Price
12pm  Thinking Fast Makes Changing Slow: Human Thought Processes Interfere with Achieving Diversity
4pm  The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
4:15pm  Modern Environmental Politics: big data, behavioral science, and getting environmentalists to vote
4:15pm  "Brexit Means Brexit": But What Does Brexit Mean for the UK and the EU?
4:30pm  Immigration, Democracy, and Discrimination in Small Town America
5pm  The Power of Network: A Lecture by Dr. Chang-Gyu Hwang
6pm  Putting the 2016 Election Into Perspective: A Conversation with Bob Schieffer, Ann Compton and Nicco Mele
6pm  Morphogenesis of Flux Structure: The New Field of Structural Design
7pm  CaféSci Boston presents "The Learning Caféteria," a 4-part series of science cafés inspired by NOVA's School of the Future

----------------------------------------------------------
*******************************************

My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

The Politics of PT Barnum
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/09/11/1568848/-The-Politics-of-PT-Barnum

The Confidence Game: A Guide to the 2016 Presidential Election?
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2016/09/the-confidence-game-guide-to-2016.html

----------------------------------------------------------
********************************************

———————————
Monday, September 12
——————————— 

Environmental Advocacy Roundtable
Monday, September 12
8:30 AM to 10:00 AM (EDT)
50 Milk Streetm EDISON room on the 16th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/environmental-advocacy-roundtable-tickets-27340054840

The purpose of the Environmental Advocacy Roundtable is to bring together the many diverse groups advocating for awareness, education, legislation, and regulation to maximize the positive environmental impact of the built environment in Massachusetts. The roundtable allows organizations to set goals, plan, and network towards this purpose.

The discussion will be lead by the Advocacy Committee of the USGBCMA and AIA of Massachusetts. We’re looking forward to another robust roundtable like the one we had in May.

Please, feel free to share this event link with others in your organizations. Also, please, send along your thoughts for the agenda to Kate Bubriski. 

———————————— 

Empower the Defender with Unpredictability: Game-Theoretic Approaches for Real-World Security and Sustainability Challenges
Monday, September12 
11:30AM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin 119, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Fei Fang, Center for Research on Computation and Society 
The framework of game theory can be powerful when addressing resource allocation problems in security and sustainability domains, e.g., protecting critical infrastructure and cyber network, and protecting wildlife, fishery and forest. Motivated by these problems, I propose models and algorithms to handle massive games with complex spatio-temporal settings, leading to real-world applications that have fundamentally altered current practices of security resource allocation.

First, focusing on games where actions are taken over continuous time (for example games with moving targets such as ferries and refugee supply lines), I provide an efficient solution while accurately modeling the continuous action space. Second, for problems with repeated interaction such as preventing poaching and illegal fishing, I introduce the green security game model which accounts for adversaries' behavior change and provide algorithms to plan effective sequential defender strategies. Third, I incorporate complex terrain information and design PAWS (Protection Assistant for Wildlife Security) which generates patrol routes to combat poaching. The applications of my game-theoretic algorithms include deployments for protecting the Staten Island Ferry in New York City (used by the US Coast Guard) and for tiger conservation in Southeast Asia.

Speaker Bio: Fei Fang received her Ph.D. from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Southern California in 2016. Prior to that, she received her bachelor degree from the Department of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University in July 2011. Her research lies in the field of artificial intelligence and multi-agent systems, focusing on real-world challenges with societal impacts. Her work has won the Deployed Application Award at Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence (IAAI'16), the Outstanding Paper Award in Computational Sustainability Track at the International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI'15).

Center for Research on Computation and Society Seminar 
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/92061

Contact Name:  Carol Harlow
harlow at seas.harvard.edu

———————————— 

PAOC Colloquium - Peter Huybers (Harvard)
Monday, September 12
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 54-923, (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Peter Huybers, Harvard
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. 

https://eapsweb.mit.edu/paoc-colloquium-peter-huybers-harvard
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Chen
ccy at mit.edu 

———————————— 

Webinar: Building an AI Product to Improve High-Tech Sales
Monday, September 12
12:00p–1:00p
RSVP at https://sdm.mit.edu/building-an-ai-product-to-improve-high-tech-sales/

Speaker: Bryan Pirtle, SDM Fellow; Co-Founder and CTO, Nova.ai
Abstract:  Today, almost every industry is being disrupted by the emergence of intelligent software. While software was once used simply to improve efficiency and workflow, now more and more businesses are demanding that software help them make smarter, more data-driven decisions. Perhaps surprisingly, this is even true in sales, especially in the high-technology sector. Modern technology sales teams demand software that offers a competitive edge in an increasingly complex and globalized world. 

In this webinar, SDM fellow Bryan Pirtle, chief technology officer of Nova.ai, a sales technology startup, will: 
1) provide an overview of the current technology sales ecosystem; 
2) explain how his team successfully built an artificial intelligence (AI) product for the contemporary technology sales organization; and 
3) explore how the trend toward smarter software and AI products is changing the way people buy and sell. 

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series 

Sponsored by the System Design & Management(SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Web site: https://sdm.mit.edu/building-an-ai-product-to-improve-high-tech-sales/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free and open to all 
Tickets: Pre-registration recommended. See url above 
Sponsor(s): MIT System Design & Management
For more information, contact:  Lois Slavin
sdm at mit.edu 

Editorial Comment:  I for one welcome our new robotic sales overlords.

————————————

Loeb Fellows Talks:  Greta Byrum, David Molander, Mark Lamster
Monday, September 12
12pm - 1:30pm
Harvard Graduate School of Design, Stubbins Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

More information at http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/loeb-fellowship/events/

———————————— 

BITS City Competition Kickoff
Monday, September 12
12:00 PM to 2:00 PM (EDT)
Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, 1 Amherst Street E40-160, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bits-city-competition-kickoff-tickets-27494444624

The platform of the future isn’t a phone. It’s a place: Boston. The city is investing in new technologies, new applications, and new policies to make Boston smarter, friendlier, and more livable for everyone. But the city of the future needs citizen technologists, designers, and dreamers. That’s why we’re opening Boston to your apps, hardware, design, and policy innovations in the first-ever BITS City Competition (aka Boston Is The Smartest City). Form teams and solve problems in four challenge areas: Reappropriating Infrastructure, Waiting Places, Sensors in the City, and Other. Win cool prizes, bragging rights, and recognition from the Mayor’s Office. Any undergraduate student, graduate student, postdoc, or faculty in the Boston-area is eligible to enter. For more details, see bitscity.github.io, or come to the kickoff on September 12, 12pm at the MIT Martin Trust Center. Applications open September 12.
In the meantime, take a look at Boston’s Smart City Playbook for a sense of the criteria.
Key dates
Kickoff: September 12, noon @ MIT Martin Trust Center (E40-160) 
Lunch! + Networking: noon - 12:40pm
Smartest City Panel: 12:50pm - 1:30pm, featuring
Anne Schweiger (Chief Equity Officer @ City of Boston)
Andrea Chegut (Research Scientist @ MIT Real Estate Innovation Lab)
Chris Rezendes (Founder @ IoT Impact Labs)
Formal contest open: 1:30pm
Office Hours @ MIT: after 2pm
Applications open: September 12, noon
Office hours @ City Hall: TBA
Applications close: September 25, 11:59pm

———————————— 

Plant responses to climate from genomic to community levels
Monday, September 12
12:10PM
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Lecture Hall, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Jesse Lasky, Penn State

Arnold Arboretum Research Talk
http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/
arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu

———————————— 

Climate Ride Arrival Rally
Monday, September 12
3pm
Boston Common, Boston

———————————— 

A Precinct Too Far: Distance to the Polling Place and Turnout Inequality
Monday, September 12
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E52-164, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Enrico Cantoni (MIT)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:
economics calenda

———————————

Decoding Dating: A different perspective on building relationships 
Monday, September 12
4:00pm - 5:30pm
MIT Media Lab, E14-633, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker:  John Miller 
John Miller will examine different aspects of dating and relationships from the perspective of a person who is on the autism spectrum, a perspective that tends to be more systematic than most people's. Some of the issues encountered apply broadly, while others may be unique to people with autism. The problems will be analyzed and solutions provided on how they can be overcome. Miller will offer strategies to foster more success in dating and to create a sound foundation for a potential relationship. A wide range of topics will be reviewed, including dating etiquette, interacting with a partner's friends and family, personality types, and sexuality, among other topics. The presenter will bring his own personal point of view.

Participants will learn why it is difficult for individuals with autism to attempt dating and relationships.
Participants will learn the steps towards successful dating and relationships.
Participants will learn strategies to interact in a variety of different settings.
Participants will learn how to be more aware of their partner's needs. 

Biography: 
John Miller was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1968. During his childhood he worked hard to overcome many academic and social obstacles. He received a Master’s in Special Education from Florida Atlantic University to help young people succeed academically and in life. During this period, he was diagnosed with autism, which answered many questions. For over a decade he has taught a variety of students from various settings including many with different degrees of autism. Beyond teaching, he has consulted, creating pragmatic and organizational programs for individuals with autism. For over a half a decade he has presented on a variety topics that deal with pragmatics, inclusion, transition, and more. Presently, he sits on the Florida board of the Autism Society and Florida Atlantic University CARD Constituency Committee. In September of 2015, he became a member of an education and programming committee at Autism Society of America. His book Decoding Dating received the Dr. Temple Grandin Award for Outstanding Literary Work of the Year for 2015. Earlier this year Miller was named to the Autism Society of America's Panel of People on the Spectrum of Autism.

———————————

The Terror Years:  From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State
Monday, September 12
6:00 PM (Doors at 5:30)
Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge,
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/lawrence_wright2/
Cost:  $5 - $29.75 (book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Looming Tower LAWRENCE WRIGHT for a discussion of his latest book, The Terror Years: From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State.
About The Terror Years

With The Looming Tower, Lawrence Wright became generally acknowledged as one of our major journalists writing on terrorism in the Middle East. Here, in ten powerful pieces first published in The New Yorker, he recalls the path that terror in the Middle East has taken, from the rise of al-Qaeda in the 1990s to the recent beheadings of reporters and aid workers by ISIS.

The Terror Years draws on several articles he wrote while researching The Looming Tower, as well as many that he’s written since, following where and how al-Qaeda and its core cultlike beliefs have morphed and spread. They include a portrait of the “man behind bin Laden,” Ayman al-Zawahiri, and the tumultuous Egypt he helped spawn; an indelible impression of Saudi Arabia, a kingdom of silence under the control of the religious police; the Syrian film industry, at the time compliant at the edges but already exuding a feeling of the barely masked fury that erupted into civil war; the 2006–11 Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Gaza, a study in the disparate value of human lives. Other chapters examine al-Qaeda as it forms a master plan for its future, experiences a rebellion from within the organization, and spins off a growing web of worldwide terror. The American response is covered in profiles of two FBI agents and the head of the intelligence community. The book ends with a devastating piece about the capture and slaying by ISIS of four American journalists and aid workers, and our government’s failed response.

On the fifteenth anniversary of 9/11, The Terror Years is at once a unifying recollection of the roots of contemporary Middle Eastern terrorism, a study of how it has grown and metastasized, and, in the scary and moving epilogue, a cautionary tale of where terrorism might take us yet. 

——————————— 

2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series:  Energy, Temperature, Heat
Monday, September 12
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Spike Gjerde, (@spikegjerde), Woodberry Kitchen
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Sept. 12
"Energy, Temperature, Heat"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Spike Gjerde, (@spikegjerde), Woodberry Kitchen
Monday, Sept. 19
“The Science of Sugar”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Joanne Chang ’91, (@jbchang), Flour Bakery, author of “Flour” and “Flour Too”
Tuesday, Sept. 27
“Medical Technology Producing Hamburgers”
Science Center Lecture Hall B, 7 p.m.
Mark Post, (@MarkPost6), Professor of Physiology at Maastricht University, co-inventor of cell cultured beef
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

——————————— 

Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman:  Conservation Heroes of the American Heartland
Monday, September 12
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge,

Harvard Book Store welcomes bestselling author of Earth: The Sequel MIRIAM HORN for a discussion of her latest book, Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman: Conservation Heroes of the American Heartland—the story of a huge, largely hidden, and entirely unexpected conservation movement in America.
About Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman

Many of the men and women doing today’s most consequential environmental work—restoring America’s grasslands, wildlife, soil, rivers, wetlands, and oceans—would not call themselves environmentalists; they would be too uneasy with the connotations of that word. What drives them is their deep love of the land: the iconic terrain where explorers and cowboys, pioneers and riverboat captains forged the American identity. They feel a moral responsibility to preserve this heritage and natural wealth, to ensure that their families and communities will continue to thrive.

Unfolding as a journey down the Mississippi River, Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman tells the stories of five representatives of this stewardship movement: a Montana rancher, a Kansas farmer, a Mississippi riverman, a Louisiana shrimper, and a Gulf fisherman. In exploring their work and family histories and the essential geographies they protect, Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman challenges pervasive and powerful myths about American and environmental values.

————————————
Tuesday, September 13
———————————— 

Election 2016 and the Media
Tuesday, September 13
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 5th Floor, Allison Dining Room, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Molly Ball is a staff writer for The Atlantic, where she is a leading voice in the 158-year-old magazine’s coverage of U.S. politics. She has been awarded the Toner Prize for Excellence in Political Reporting, the Sandy Hume Memorial Award for Excellence in Political Journalism, and the Lee Walczak Award for Political Analysis for her coverage of political campaigns and issues. She appears regularly as an analyst on NBC’s Meet the Press, CBS’s Face the Nation, PBS’s Washington Week, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, and NPR.

Ball previously reported for Politico, the Las Vegas Review-Journal, and the Las Vegas Sun. She has worked for newspapers in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Cambodia, as well as the New York Times and the Washington Post. She is a graduate of Yale University and was a 2009 recipient of the Knight-Wallace journalism fellowship at the University of Michigan.

More information at http://shorensteincenter.org/molly-ball/

—————————————— 

American Plants for American Gardens": The The Early History of Ecological Restoration
Tuesday, September 13
12:00pm to  1:00pm
HUH Seminar Room, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Laura Jane Martin, Harvard Ziff Environmental Fellow

More information at http://huh.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/taxonomy/term/20301

—————————————— 

Loeb Fellows Talks:  Karen Abrams, Pallavi Mande, Emmanuel Pratt
Tuesday, September 13
12pm - 1:30pm
Harvard Graduate School of Design, Stubbins Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

More information at http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/loeb-fellowship/events/

—————————————— 

Nation Building Through Foreign Intervention: Evidence from Discontinuities in Military Strategies
Tuesday, September 13
2:45p–4:00p
Harvard, Harvard Hall 104, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

Speaker: Pablo Querubin (NYU)

Web site: http://economics.mit.edu/files/11968
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Development Economics Seminar
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

——————————————

Solar Geoengineering and International Affairs: An Introduction
Tuesday, September 13
4–7 pm
Harvard, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

Learn about solar geoengineering, technological proposals to counter climate change by reflecting sunlight to reduce global warming. Speakers will discuss scientific, political, economic, and social aspects of this emerging technology, addressing the wide range of potential benefits and risks.

Speakers:
David Keith, Faculty Associate. Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS); Professor of Public Policy, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
Joshua Horton, Research Director, Geoengineering, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
Gernot Wagner, Research Associate, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS); Lecturer on Environmental Science and Public Policy; Fellow, Harvard University Center for the Environment, Harvard University.
Sheila Jasanoff, Faculty Associate. Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Harvard Kennedy School; Director, Program on Science, Technology and Society, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

——————————————

The Art of Discovery
WHEN  Tuesday, September 13, 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery, Byerly Hall, 8 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Exhibitions, Humanities
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO  events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS	 Opening Reception: , Johnson-Kulukundis Family Gallery, Byerly Hall, 8 Garden Street, Radcliffe Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138
From September 14–October 29, the exhibition will be open Monday through Saturday from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.
At the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, art is integrated with other forms of study and deeply embedded in its programming. Each year, fellows pursue individual projects in a community dedicated to inquiry across the arts, sciences, social sciences, and humanities. The Art of Discovery introduces viewers to the bold work of members of our 2016–2017 fellowship class, which transcends the fault lines of standard academic disciplines to explore complex topics and reveal new insights about their own fields of study.

The event is open to the public and provides a chance to see the new exhibition and meet the participating fellows, including:
Amahl Bishara, Anthropology
Alexei Borodin, Mathematics and Applied Sciences
Chris Bowler, Biology
Tania Bruguera, Visual Arts
A.K. Burns, Visual Arts 
Gidon Eshel, Earth and Planetary Sciences
Alyssa A. Goodman, Physics
Lamia Joreige, Visual Arts
Kathleen Ossip, Poetry
Dimitrios Psaltis, Astronomy
Adam Tanaka, Urban Planning
Conevery Bolton Valencius, History
Hala Zreiqat, Material Science
LINK  http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2016-art-discovery-exhibition-opening

————————————— 

Saudi Arabia's Sectarian Strategy at Home and Abroad
Tuesday, September 13
4:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building E51-315, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Prof. David Commins
Sectarian enmity toward Shiism is a constant in Saudi history. It goes back to Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab's attack on all forms of idolatry. Today's anti-Shiite discourse blends classic Wahhabi doctrine with contemporary political concepts in ways that cast Shiism as a threat to national unity. The new discourse developed in the 1980s in response to the Iranian revolution and Shiite activism at home. Since then, Al Saud have alternately mobilized and curtailed anti-Shiite narratives according to political calculations. Presently, Saudi Arabia's sectarian strategy draws on latent Sunni prejudice against Shiism to achieve two goals: To defeat Iran's ambitions in the Gulf and the Levant, and to suppress internal dissent. There is nothing remarkable about a state seeking to maximize its international security and domestic stability. Riyadh's mobilization of xenophobic theology, however, creates strains with the United States, carries the risk of blowback from wars in Yemen, Iraq, and Syria that is reminiscent of the 1980s Afghan jihad, and may jeopardize plans for internal structural reform. 

David Commins is professor of History at Dickinson College.

Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar 
The Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar is organized under the auspices of the MIT Center for International Studies, which conducts research on contemporary international issues and provides an opportunity for faculty and students to share perspectives and exchange views. Each year the Bustani Seminar invites scholars, journalists, consultants, and other experts from the Middle East, Europe, and the United States to MIT to present recent research findings on contemporary politics, society and culture, and economic and technological development in the Middle East.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cis/bustani/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Radius/T&C, Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Dain Goding
617-252-1888
dain at mit.edu 

————————————

The impact of indoor biomass fuel use on stunting in Indian children
Tuesday, September 13
5:30 - 6:30 PM 
MIT, Building E19-319 (MITEI Conference Room), 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHZTSAunylxWrawelLRRMB-XJ286sfiYuL-nGO1iVFRE1jCw/viewform

Dr. Anca Balietti, a post-doctoral research fellow in the Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) Lab at the Center for International Development in the Harvard Kennedy School. 

Stunted growth is present at an alarmingly high frequency in India, with about half of children under three years of age being affected. Stunting refers to a reduced growth rate in human development and is commonly indicated by a height-for-age ratio that is more than two standard deviations below the WHO Child Growth Standards median. We rely on data from the 2005-2006 National Family Health Survey in India to identify the main drivers of stunting among Indian children. Our results show that childhood stunting prevails where poverty levels are higher, and where parents are less healthy themselves and with lower education levels. In particular, we evaluate the impact of being exposed to indoor air pollution from burning biomass fuels on child stunting. We find strong evidence that the exposure to biomass fuel smoke increases the probability of being stunted among Indian children. However, we show that air ventilation practices can mitigate the adverse impacts of biomass fuel use and reduce stunting. As India continues its development path, until cleaner fuels become available and affordable on a large scale to households of all income levels, ventilation emerges as the low-hanging fruit that can be explored to reduce the contribution of burning biomass fuels to child stunting.

There will be a free dinner available at this presentation. If you plan on attending, please RSVP via this link so that we can accurately judge the number attending. All are welcome, and we hope to see new faces at our weekly series this semester.

————————————

Ingredients
Tuesday, September 13
6pm
Brookline Interactive Group theater, 46 Tappan Street, Brookline (Third Floor of BHS' Unified Arts Building) 
Cost:  $5

This film explores the shortcomings of America's industrialized food system against the rising local food movement.

2016 Summer Film Series:  The Real Cost of Food
Another tantalizing selection of engaging films and local food snacks

Learn more and reserve your ticket at http://www.bountifulbrookline.org/p/programs.html

Questions?
Contact us at bountifulbrookline at gmail.com 
See you at the movies! 

————————————

Artist Talk: Leo Villareal
Tuesday, September 13
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E-15, Bartos Theater, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Leo Villareal
Join us for a talk given by Leo Villareal in Bartos theatre followed by a reception in the lobby of the building E52. 

6:00 PM Talk by Leo Villareal in Bartos Theatre E15 
7:00 PM Dedication of Light Matrix (MIT) and Reception in lobby of E52 

MITs Public Art Collection reaches across the Institute and may be enjoyed by MIT students and visitors alike. Outstanding examples of work by Alexander Calder, Pablo Picasso, and other major artists grace the MIT campus for all to view. Leos work is the latest in a long line of outstanding commissions of public art at MIT and we hope you can join for this talk with Leo.  

Leo Villareals work is focused on stripping systems down to their essence to better understand the underlying structures and rules that govern how they work. He is interested in lowest common denominators such as pixels or the zeros and ones in binary code. His most well known works include the Bay Lights on the San Francisco Bay Bridge and his work in the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. 

The talk and reception are free and open to the public but registration is required.

Web site: https://listart.mit.edu/events-programs/artist-talk-leo-villareal-his-new-work-light-matrix-mit
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/leo-villareal-artist-talk-and-dedication-tickets-27004499184 
Sponsor(s): List Visual Arts Center
For more information, contact:  Mark Linga
617-253-4680
mlinga at mit.edu 

————————————

Boston New Technology September 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT69
Tuesday, September 13
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Foley Hoag, 155 Seaport Boulevard, Boston
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Boston_New_Technology/events/233498606/

Free event! Come learn about 7 innovative and exciting technology products and network with the Boston/Cambridge startup community!  

Foley Hoag is in the Seaport West building (entrance on B Street). Please bring identification and check in at our desk in the lobby. Then, take an elevator to the 13th floor. Enter the glass doors and walk down the hall to your right.

————————————

How Restorative Development Can Address Climate Change
Tuesday, September 13
6:30 PM
Belmont Media Center, 9 Lexington St, Belmont MA

William Moomaw, Ph.D. is a former professor emeritus of International Environmental Policy at Tufts University's Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (he retired in 2014). Dr. Moomaw was founding director of both the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy (CIERP) and Tufts Climate Initiative, and co-founder for the Global Development and Environment Institute.

Dr. Moomaw was a lead author for a number of United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports, and was a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the IPCC. He serves on the boards of major organizations, such as The Climate Group, the Consensus Building Institute, and the Center for Ecological Technologies. He is also on the board of Soil4Climate.

Dr. Moomaw discusses the concept and strategy of restorative development. Here's a quote from a Tufts Fletcher Forum article: "Restorative development seeks to restore degraded systems. Restorative development has the potential to address some of the gravest of climate risks and adaptation priorities: increased droughts, floods, and extreme events, as well as their associated impacts on different sectors. By increasing the resilience of natural systems, these socio-ecological systems may be able to better manage extreme events associated with climate change."

Dr. Moomaw has worked for decades on legislation in energy, forestry, and ozone layer protection. He was an early innovator in cross-disciplinary training of students to address global environment issues and climate change. His many research contributions included quantitative indicators of environment and development, negotiation strategies for environmental agreements, water and climate change, and technology and policy implications for climate change.

William Moomaw was an author for the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment on Nitrogen and serves on the Integrated Nitrogen Committee of the EPA Science Advisory board. He was the first director of the Climate, Energy and Pollution program at the World Resources Institute, and directed the Center for Environmental Studies at Williams College where he held an endowed chair in chemistry.

Contemporary Science Issues and Innovations

————————————— 
Wednesday, September 14
————————————— 

Hardware for Deep Learning
Wednesday, September 14
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 34-401, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: William Dally, Stanford University
Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) have come to dominate application areas including speech recognition, image understanding, and natural language processing. Most of the technology of DNNs was developed by 1990. However, they were not widely applied until after 2010 when large data sets and powerful GPUs for training became available. These networks place heavy demands on computing hardware for both training and inference. GPUs are ideally suited to training DNNs because of their high floating-point efficiency and memory bandwidth. Efficient communication is essential to scale training across multiple GPUs. For inference, hardware accelerators can offer advantages particularly on sparse and compressed networks. This talk will examine the current state of the art in hardware for deep learning.

MTL Seminar Series 
MTL seminar speakers for the series are selected on the basis of their knowledge and competence in the areas of microelectronics research, manufacturing, or policy. This series is held during the academic year on Wednesdays at noon. The seminars are open to the public. Lunch is served at 11:30am

Web site: https://www-mtl.mit.edu/mtlseminar/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Microsystems Technology Laboratories
For more information, contact:  Shereece Beckford
253-0086
beckford at mit.edu 

—————————————

Vision & Justice: The Nexus of Art, Race, and American Citizenship
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 14, 2016, 12 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center
SPEAKER(S)  Sarah Lewis, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture and African American Studies, Harvard University.
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS  A Q+A will follow the talk.
LINK	http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-14-2016-1200pm/fall-colloquium-sarah-lewis

————————————— 

Abrupt Climate Change and Extreme Events - the non-linear world
Wednesday, September 14
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Paul Mayewski, Explorer, Glaciologist, Climate Scientist, University of Maine

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

Professor Paul Andrew Mayewski is an internationally acclaimed scientist and explorer, leader of more than 50 expeditions to some of the remotest reaches of the planet. His expeditions have taken him across the Antarctic, Arctic, Himalayas, Tibetan Plateau, and Andes in search of cold hard answers to globally significant issues - acid rain, greenhouse gas warming, the Antarctic ozone hole, toxic metal pollution, natural climate variability, and abrupt climate change.

More information at http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/paul-mayewski.html#more

—————————————

Neurobiology and Genetics of Fear and PTSD: From Mice to (Wo)Man
Wednesday, September 14
4:00pm to  5:00pm 
Harvard, William James Hall, Room 1, Basement Auditorium, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge

Kerry J. Ressler, MD, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, McLean Hospital;  James and Patricia Poitras Chair in Psychiatry, Chief, Division of Depression & Anxiety Disorders;  Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
http://www.mcleanhospital.org/biography/kerry-ressler

Abstract:  Fear-related disorder such as post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder and phobia manifest in ways that are consistent with an uncontrollable state of fear. Their development involves heredity, previous sensitizing experiences, association of aversive events with previous neutral stimuli, and inability to inhibit or extinguish fear after it is chronic and disabling. I will highlight recent progress in fear learning and memory, differential genetic susceptibility to disorders of fear, and how these findings are being applied to the understanding, treatment and possible prevention of fear disorders. Promising advances are being translated from basic science to the clinic, including approaches to distinguish risk versus resilience before trauma exposure, methods to interfere with fear development during memory consolidation after a trauma, and techniques to inhibit fear reconsolidation and to enhance extinction of chronic fear. Cutting edge approaches to understand the genetic and epigenetic regulation at a cell-type specific level within amygdala, medial prefrontal, and hippocampal circuitry as it relates to fear extinction will also be discussed.  It is hoped that this new knowledge will translate to more successful, neuroscientifically informed and rationally designed approaches to disorders of fear regulation.

————————————

Blockstack: A Global Naming and Storage System Secured by Blockchains
Wednesday, September 14
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
MIT, Building 32-G882, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Muneeb Ali , Princeton/Blockstack 
Abstract:  Blockchains like Bitcoin and Namecoin and their respective P2P networks have seen significant adoption in the past few years and show promise as naming systems with no trusted parties. Users can register human meaningful names and securely associate data with them, and only the owner of the particular private keys that registered them can write or update the name-value pair. In theory, many decentralized systems can be built using these blockchain networks, such as new, decentralized versions of DNS and PKI. As the technology is relatively new and evolving rapidly, however, little production data or experience is available to guide design tradeoffs. In this paper, we describe our experiences operating a large deployment of a decentralized PKI service built on top of the Namecoin blockchain. We present various challenges pertaining to network reliability, throughput, and security that we needed to overcome while registering and updating over 33,000 entries and 200,000 transactions on the Namecoin blockchain. Further, we discuss how our experience informed the design of a new blockchain-based naming and storage system called Blockstack. We detail why we switched from the Namecoin network to the Bitcoin network for the new system, and present operational lessons from this migration. Blockstack is released as open source software and currently powers a production PKI system for 55,000 users.

Bio:  Muneeb Ali is co-founder and CTO of Blockstack Labs, a Y Combinator and Union Square Ventures backed startup focusing on blockchain technologies. Muneeb is also a final-year PhD candidate at Princeton University, where he has worked in the Systems and Networks group and at PlanetLab. He helped start a new course at Princeton on “How to be a CTO” and gives guest lectures on cloud computing at Princeton. Muneeb has been awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship and has served as the Program Co-Chair of ACM NSDR.

—————————————

Safe Decision Making Under Uncertainty
Wednesday, September 14
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
MIT, Building 32-D507, Conference Room G575, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Ashish Kapoor , MSR 
Abstract:   Machine Learning is one of the key component that enables systems that operate under uncertainty. For example, robotic systems might employ sensors together with a machine learned system to identify obstacles. However, such data driven system are far from perfect and can result in failure cases that can jeopardize safety. In this talk we will explore a framework that aims to preserve safety invariants despite the uncertainties in the environment arising due to incomplete information. We will first describe a method to reason about safe plans and control strategies despite perceiving the world through noisy sensors and machine learning systems. At the heart of our approach is the new Probabilistic Signal Temporal Logic (PrSTL), an expressive language to define stochastic properties, and enforce probabilistic guarantees on them. Next, we will consider extensions of these ideas to a sequential decision making framework that considers the trade-off in risk and reward in a near-optimal manner. We will demonstrate our approach by deriving safe plans and controls for quadrotors and autonomous vehicles in dynamic environments. 

Bio: Ashish Kapoor is a senior researcher at Microsoft Research, Redmond. Currently, his research focuses on Aerial Informatics and Robotics with an emphasis on building intelligent and autonomous flying agents that are safe and enable applications that can positively influence our society. The research builds upon cutting edge research in machine intelligence, robotics and human-centered computation in order to enable an entire fleet of flying robots that range from micro-UAVs to commercial jetliners. Various applications scenarios include Weather Sensing, Monitoring for Precision Agriculture, Safe Cyber-Physical Systems etc. Ashish received his PhD from MIT Media Laboratory in 2006. He also holds FAA Commercial Pilot certificate (SEL), FAA Flight Instructor certificate (Airplane Single Engine and Instrument Airplane) and is an avid amateur aircraft builder.

—————————————

Book talk with Stein Ringen, author of The Perfect Dictatorship: China in the 21st Century
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 14, 2016, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mt Auburn Street, Suite 200 North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Research study, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ash Center, Harvard Kennedy School
Co-sponsored by the Harvard University Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Stein Ringen, author of The Perfect Dictatorship: China in the 21st Century
Moderated by Tony Saich.
DETAILS  Please join us for a book talk with Stein Ringen, author of The Perfect Dictatorship: China in the 21st Century, and moderated by Tony Saich.
LINK	http://ash.harvard.edu/event/book-talk-stein-ringen-author-perfect-dictatorship-china-21st-century

————————————— 

Federal Coal Program Reform, the Clean Power Plan, and the Interaction of Upstream and Downstream Climate Policies
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 14, 2016, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Room Littauer-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
SPEAKER(S)  James Stock, Harvard University
LINK	https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

————————————— 

Back to Square One: The Three Dilemmas of the Turkish and Kurdish Question and Turkey’s New Makeover
WHEN  Wed., Sep. 14, 2016, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CMES/WCFIA Seminar on Turkey in the Modern World
SPEAKER(S)  Murat Somer, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations, Koç University
CONTACT INFO  Liz Flanagan, elizabethflanagan at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Unless otherwise noted in the event description, CMES events are open to the public (no registration required), and off the record. Please note that events may be filmed and photographed by CMES for record-keeping and for use on the CMES website and publications.
LINK  http://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/back-square-one-three-dilemmas-turkish-and-kurdish-question-and-turkey’s-new-makeover

—————————————

CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap (Viewing & Panel)
Wednesday, September 14
5:30 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
VMware Inc, 355 Main Street 13th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/code-debugging-the-gender-gap-viewing-panel-tickets-27285833663

Please join us for a free viewing of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap at VMware's office in Cambridge. Immediately following the movie, we will have a panel of industry leaders to discuss the movie as well as other issues the movie elicits.
CODE documentary exposes the dearth of American female and minority software engineers and explores the reasons for this gender gap and digital divide. The film highlights breakthrough efforts that are producing more diverse programmers and shows how a critical gender gap can be closed. CODE asks: what would society gain from having more women and minorities code and how do we get there? 
Movie will start at  6pm (80 min long) - Panel will immediately follow.
Light appetizers, beverages, and popcorn will be provided.
Link to movie web site:  http://www.codedocumentary.com/

PANEL BIOGRAPHIES
Yanbing Li
Yanbing is a globally minded high tech executive with extensive leadership experience in general management and engineering. She is currently the Senior VP and GM for the Storage and Availability BU at VMware. Yanbing is a graduate of both Princeton and Stanford Business School.  In 2015, Business Insider named her one of the 23 most powerful women engineers in the world. 
Ellen Rubin
Ellen Rubin is CEO & Co-founder at ClearSky. She is an experienced entrepreneur with a proven track record in leading strategy, market positioning and go-to-market for fast-growing companies. Ellen holds an holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and an undergraduate degree from Harvard College. She has been recognized as one of the Top 10 Women in the Cloud by CloudNOW, as a Woman to Watch by Mass High Tech and Rising Star Entrepreneur by the New England Venture Capital Association. In 2015, Forbes said "Ellen Rubin has raised money not once, but twice, with just a slide deck and no product. Few men and even fewer women can say that." 
Margo Seltzer
Margo Seltzer is the Herchel Smith Professor of Computer Science in the Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. She is a graduate of Harvard/Radcliffe College and the University of California, Berkeley. Before pursuing an academic career, professor Seltzer spent several years working at startup companies designing and implementing file systems and transaction processing software and designing microprocessors. Dr. Seltzer was a founder and CTO of Sleepycat Software, the makers of Berkeley DB. 

————————————— 

The Environment Forum at the Mahindra Center: Terry Tempest Williams, "The Hour of Land: Our National Parks As Breathing Spaces"
WHEN  Wed., Sep. 14, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Tsai Auditorium S010, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Environmental Sciences, Ethics, Health Sciences, Humanities, Lecture, Poetry/Prose, Science, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Terry Tempest Williams is the author of The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks, Finding Beauty in a Broken World, and Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place; an activist who recently purchased BLM leases in Utah; and Provostial Scholar, Dartmouth College. Introductions by Homi Bhabha and Robin Kelsey (Harvard University).
CONTACT INFO  humcentr at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS	  The Environment Forum at the Mahindra Center is convened by Robin Kelsey (Dean of Arts and Humanities, Harvard University) and Ian Jared Miller (Professor of History, Harvard University).
LINK  http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/hour-land-our-national-parks-breathing-spaces

——————————————

Mass Innovation Nights #90
Wednesday, September 14
6pm-8:30pm
Autodesk, 23 Drydock Avenue, Boston  
RSVP at http://mass.innovationnights.com/node/add/rsvp

We are back for our fourth time at Autodesk AND this time in their super cool BUILD space at their new Seaport District location! 11 innovative products will be showcased in this space dedicated for digital fabrication. When? Wednesday, September 14th at 6pm.

Check out the new PRODUCTS and VOTE for your favorites - click on the words VOTE HERE (http://mass.innovationnights.com/events/mass-innovation-nights-90) and once on the product voting page, click LOVE IT (only four times)!     
RSVP to attend the event on Wednesday, September 14th (free to attend and open to all)    
See who else is planning on attending (click the ATTENDEES tab)   
Help spread the word - blog, tweet (using the #MIN90 hashtag), like and post!  
Support local innovation -- network and have fun at the same time! 
Don't miss it —    

———————————————— 

Old North Speaker Series: Jared Hardesty - Beyond Slavery and Freedom: New Perspectives on the Lives of Enslaved Bostonians
Wednesday, September 14
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT) 
Old North Church, 193 Salem Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/old-north-speaker-series-jared-hardesty-beyond-slavery-and-freedom-new-perspectives-on-the-lives-of-tickets-27072881718

Discussing his new book, Unfreedom: Slavery and Dependence in Eighteenth-Century Boston, Jared Ross Hardesty takes us inside the lives and worlds of enslaved Bostonians in the 18th century. In doing so, this lecture will reconstruct an 18th century Atlantic world of unfreedom that stretched from Europe to Africa to America. Boston’s slaves lived in this place that was characterized by many different forms of dependence and oppression, including Indian slavery, indentured servitude, and apprenticeship. In this hierarchical and inherently unfree world, enslaved Bostonians were more concerned with their everyday treatment and honor than with emancipation, as they pushed for autonomy, protected their families and communities, and demanded a place in society. By reassessing the lives of Boston’s slave population as part of a social order structured by ties of dependence, Hardesty not only demonstrates how African slaves were able to decode their new homeland and shape the terms of their enslavement, but also tells the story of how marginalized peoples engrained themselves in the very fabric of colonial American society.
The book is of particular interest to Old North as Hardesty describes the black congregation of Old North, both free and enslaved, in some detail. Hardesty also describes the role of slave owners, including Old North’s chocolatier, Captain Newark Jackson, the namesake for Captain Jackson's Historic Chocolate Shop. Please join us for this lecture followed by a book signing and reception.

Are you an academic, graduate student, or educator? Extend your experience by participating in a small, intensive seminar led by Professor Hardesty on Thursday, September 15. Separate registration and attendance at this lecture required. This program is offered in partnership with the Royall House & Slave Quarters.
Jared Ross Hardesty is an Assistant Professor of History at Western Washington University. A native of Ohio, Hardesty graduated from Ohio Northern University in 2008 and received his PhD from Boston College in 2014. His work has been published in a number of different venues, including scholarly journals and online where he is a blogger for the African American Intellectual History Society (aaihs.org). He is the author of Unfreedom: Slavery and Dependence in Eighteenth-Century Boston, published by New York University Press as part of the Early American Places initiative in 2016. He lives in Bellingham, WA with his wife Dana and dog Georgia. 

———————————— 
Thursday, September 15
———————————— 

BOSTON’S CLIMATE VULNERABILITIES AND SOLUTIONS SYMPOSIUM
Thursday, September 15
7:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, The Beehive/Morris Auditorium, 600 Atlantic Avenue,, First Floor, Boston
RSVP at http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ecv18ossd0a022e1&llr=i7ljcybab

A Better City and the Green Ribbon Commission are hosting a solution-oriented Symposium and Expo on climate preparedness. The Symposium will mark a shift from planning to action in the citywide Climate Ready Boston initiative and will focus on technologies, policies and actions to prepare the City’s buildings, businesses and districts for the future.

The Symposium will:
Inform the business community about the Climate Ready Boston climate projections and vulnerability assessment results for Greater Boston
Introduce a series of site and district-level resiliency technologies applicable to Boston’s commercial real estate sector and built environment community through a panel and  vendor expo
Host a panel session on steps to enable the implementation of solutions to projected climate challenges

———————————

Civic Media: Education and Service Learning
Thursday, September 15
11:00 AM to 2:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard Graduate School Of Education, 13 Appian Way Gutman Conference Center Room 1 (Basement of Gutman Library), Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/civic-media-education-and-service-learning-tickets-26590584153

Join Boston Civic Media faculty for it's first quarterly event of the 2017 academic school year to discuss civics education with a focus on service learning centers. We will follow our traditional lightning talk format followed by a deeper dive into how to best leverage service learning centers for social impact.
A special thank you to Helen Haste (P.I., New Civics Early Career Scholars’ Program), Meira Levinson (Professor of Education, HGSE), Brent Maher (Doctoral Candidate, HGSE), and Carrie James (Research Director, Project Zero) for hosting at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
Lunch will be provided.

————————————

Lighting Up Africa:  Reaching low income customers with prepaid electricity
Thursday, September 15 
12pm 
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford      

Kelsey Jack  
Electrification rates are generally low in Sub-Saharan Africa. Expanding access is often seen as key to economic growth. However, with new electricity connections come new challenges.  If unable to pay, customers face disconnection, the utility loses revenue, and the service provision model is undermined. A possible solution to this problem is prepaid metering, in which customers buy electricity upfront and use it until the prepaid amount is consumed. The effect of prepaid metering on electricity consumption and the costs and benefits to the electric utility will shape the way that electricity access expands in the coming decades. 

———————————— 

Role of Renewables in Indian Power Sector
Thursday, September 15
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM (EDT)
MIT, Building E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/luncheon-with-praveer-sinha-tata-power-ddl-tickets-27602021389

Please join us for a luncheon on September 15th in the MITEI conference room. Mr. Praveer Sinha, CEO & MD, Tata Power DDL, will give a presentation on the electricity system in India.

Speaker Biography:  Praveer Sinha is the CEO & Managing Director of Tata Power Delhi Distribution Limited (TPDDL). TPDDL is a Public Private Partnership (Joint Venture) of Tata Power and Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi. The company has a registered customer base of 1.4 million and it reaches out to over 7 million consumers in North and North-West part of Delhi through its services.
 
Under his leadership, TPDDL has become the first utility in India to have a fully integrated Smart Grid Technology Roadmap which uses state of the art technologies such as SCADA, GIS, ICT SAP, DMS, DA, OMS etc. This has enabled TPDDL to implement Automated Demand Response, Demand Side Management and Roof Top Solar to meet the City's rising energy demand.
He is also extremely passionate towards using CSR programs for bringing about inclusive growth within the society. Mr. Sinha has helped TPDDL in creating an exhaustive sustainability model which reaches out to all its consumers including those in the bottom of the pyramid.

————————————

Bikini Atoll as 'the World in Miniature': Ecological Fieldwork and World War
Thursday, September 15
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room (440), MCZ, 26 Oxford Street, 4th Floor, Cambridge

with Laura Martin (Environmental Fellow, Harvard University Center for the Environment).

Environmental History Working Group
http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/envihist/upcoming-events

Contact Name:   Laura Martin
lauramartin at fas.harvard.edu

————————————

Loeb Fellows Talks:  Alessandro Petti, Emi Kiyota, Rahel Shawl Zelleke
Thursday, September 15
12pm - 1:30pm
Harvard Graduate School of Design, Stubbins Room 112, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

More information at http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/loeb-fellowship/events/

————————————

Venture Caf̩e in Session: Robotics
Thursday, September 15
3:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe (5th floor)m 1 Broadway, Cambridge

A weekly program offered by The Venture Caf̩e Foundation. Venture Caf̩e opens its doors to the entrepreneurial, innovation, and creative communities around Greater Boston every Thursday.

Mix and mingle with fellow entrepreneurs, find serendipitous connections, get advice and feedback during office hours, and attend entrepreneurship- and innovation-focused events.
Caf̩e-goers are expected to participate in a manner consistent with the Caf̩e’s Credo. For a complete description of this Thursday’s events, please see our calendar.

To support The Venture Caf̩e Foundation’s mission and to act as a community hub, Venture Caf̩e reserves the right to dis-invite any individual that its management feels, in their sole judgment, detracts from achieving its mission.

Venture Cafe Foundation
Website:  http://vencaf.org/

—————————— 

Topics in Ecology and Evolution:  Microbial Communities
Thursday, September 15, 2016
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: J. T. Lennon, Dept. of Biology, Indiana University

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) 
Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00
Sponsor(s): Parsons Lab, Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
6172588685
dstewart at mit.edu 

———————————

Building with artificial atoms: The design of multifunctional nanomaterials and devices through nanocrystal self-assembly
Thursday, September 15
4pm
MIT, Building 6-104, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Prof. Christopher B. Murray, Richard Perry University Professor, Departments of Chemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, University of Pennsylvania

Materials Science and Engineering Seminar Series 
The Center for Materials Science and Engineering, the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and the Materials Processing Center welcome a wide variety of outside speakers to deliver lectures to the MIT community.

Materials Science & Engineering Seminar

Web site: web.mit.edu/cmse
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Tickets: n/a
Sponsor(s): Materials at MIT, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Materials Science & Engineering, Materials Processing Center
For more information, contact:  Gina Franzetta
617.253.6850
materials at mit.edu 

———————————

IBM Watson Analytics LIVE!
Thursday, September 15
4pm - 6pm 
Harpoon Brewery, 306 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www-01.ibm.com/events/wwe/grp/grp004.nsf/v17_agenda?openform&seminar=8Q3MUEES&locale=en_US

Introducing IBM® Watson™ Analytics Professional Edition. 

IBM Watson Analytics is a revolutionary smart data discovery service on the cloud that helps business people quickly discover patterns and meanings in their data—all on their own. 

Please join us at Watson Analytics LIVE!, an event running in a city near you. Watson Analytics LIVE! introduces the concept of smart data discovery and how it will enhance the way you work. Watson Analytics capabilities such as guided exploration, automated pattern and data visualization, and effortless dashboard creation enable business users to do more than simply consume analytics. 

See a live demonstration of Watson Analytics and spend time networking with your peers and experts.  

We look forward to seeing you there!

Agenda
Time	Description
4:00 pm - 4:15 pm	Welcome and Introduction
4:15pm - 5:00 pm	Interactive Demonstration of the Power of Watson Analytics
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm	Networking, refreshments, tasting and tour

——————————

BRAIN POWER
Thursday, September 15
4:30 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Raytheon Amphitheater, Northeastern University, 120 Forsyth Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/brain-power-tickets-27202869515

President Aoun welcomes alumna and neuroscientist Beth Stevens, a 2016 MacArthur Genius Grant recipient whose research into the brain's circuitry is revolutionizing the way we think about diseases like Alzheimer's and schizophrenia. 
This event will be broadcast live on Facebook

—————————— 

Knowledge's Allure: Surveillance and Uncertainty
Thursday, September 15
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

The present age is one of growing faith in machinic knowledge. From state surveillance to self-tracking technologies, we find lofty promises about the power of "raw" data, sensing machines and algorithmic decision-making. But new claims to knowledge invariably entail a redistribution of uncertainty, of those in the know and those left ignorant, of proofs "good enough" and "negligible" risks. Today, the U.S. government struggles to "prove" the efficacy of its own surveillance programs. The calculability of terrorist threat becomes profoundly indeterminable, exemplified by the figure of the "lone wolf". Meanwhile, the self-tracking industry promises unerringly objective self-knowledge through machines that know you better than you know yourself. The present struggles with "big" data and surveillance are not just a question of privacy and security, but how promises of knowledge and its bounty enact a redistribution of authority, credibility and responsibility. In short, it is a question of how human individuals become the ingredient for the production of truths and judgments about them by things other than themselves. 

Sun-ha Hong is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at CMS/W @ MIT, and has a Ph.D. from the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. His writing examines the collective fantasies invested in technology, media and communication.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

———————————

2016 Cleantech Energy Storage Finance Forum
Thursday, September 15
5:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, 63 Franklin St, 3rd Floor, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/2016-cleantech-energy-storage-finance-forum-tickets-26639823429
Cost:  $27.24
	
Please join us on Thursday, September 15, 2016 from 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM for the 2016 Cleantech Energy Storage Financing Forum.  The forum will feature short “pitches” from several startup companies in the clean energy storage market space, a panel presentation, and a diversified networking session. Take advantage of this opportunity to learn from and network with others members of the cleantech community, investors, industry experts and strategic partners.
 
 See Below for Agenda (Subject to Change)
 
5:00 – 5:50    Registration and Networking
5:50 – 6:00    Welcome – Stephen Pike, Interim CEO, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center
                     Introductions – Paul Aresta, Program Manager, CCAT/NEESC
6:00 - 6:20    Company Pitches – Tom Kinneman, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, North Shore InnoVentures, Inc (Moderator)
(Potential Pitching Companies)
Greg Cipriano – WattJoule
Tim Havel – Energy Compression
Fabrizio Martini – Electra Vehicles
Qichao Hu – SolidEnergy Systems Corp.
Sean Becker – Sparkplug Power, Inc.
Kristin Brief – Ambri Inc.
Alex Yu – Lionano Battery
Steve Weiss, Xilectric
6:20 – 7:00   Energy Storage Panel - Kavita Ravi, Director of Strategic Analysis, MassCEC (Moderator)
Will Lauwers  – Emerging Technology Director, MA Dept. of Energy Resources 
Jeff Wiener  – Global Sales Executive, Energy Storage, Current, powered by GE
Sandeep Dudhwewala – Director US Strategy, National Grid
Brendan Endicott  – Director, Business Development, NEC Energy Solutions, Inc
7:00 – 8:00    Q&A and Networking Reception 

———————————

Gandhi’s Forgotten Campaign: The Abolition of Indenture and the Mahatma
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 15, 2016, 6 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel, K262 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	South Asia Across Disciplines Workshop, South Asia Institute, and the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute
SPEAKER(S)  Mrinalini Sinha, Alice Freeman Palmer Professor of History; Professor (by courtesy) of English and Women’s Studies; Senior Fellow, Michigan Society of Fellows (2015-), University of Michigan
Respondents: 
Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies, Professor of History 
Mou Banerjee, PhD Candidate, Dept. of History, Harvard University 
CONTACT INFO	sainit at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The indentured labor system—put in place in the aftermath of Atlantic slavery to replace emancipated African slaves with indentured Indians on colonial plantations overseas—came under widespread attack by the early decades of the 20th century. M.K. Gandhi’s involvement in the movement for the abolition of indenture, or what following the abolition of Atlantic slavery has been called the “second abolition,” helped launch his political career in India. Yet the campaign against indenture occupies an obscure and undigested role in the scholarship on Gandhi and on modern India. What might it mean to restore abolitionism to its role in the advent of Gandhi’s career in India? What might abolitionism tell us about Gandhi’s signature concepts of swaraj and satyagraha? This talk will shed light on the abolition movement in India and explore its implications for understanding Gandhi’s politics.
LINK	http://southasiainstitute.harvard.edu/event/gandhis-forgotten-campaign-the-abolition-of-indenture-and-the-mahatma/

———————————

Make It Real: a manufacturing panel discussion
Thursday, September 15
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT) 
WeWork Fort Point, 51 Melcher Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/make-it-real-a-manufacturing-panel-discussion-tickets-27198587708

Local entrepreneurs gather to discuss what it takes to build a product company
Boston is home to some incredible designers, manufacturers, and makers of all stripes. How do great product ideas get designed, built and brought to market? To find out, we’ve invited a diverse panel of entrepreneurs to discuss how to go from idea, to company, to product on the shelf. The panel will be moderated by startup consultant and media personality Scott Mullen. Panelists - including Josh Resnikoff, founder of Cuppow and Kathryn Carlson, founder of BucaBoot - will discuss their own experiences across a broad range of topics, including:
Prototyping – Importance and Resources
Manufacturing in the USA – Costs and Opportunities
Manufacturing overseas – Advantages and Pitfalls
Managing a supply chain – Sourcing Materials, Finding a Factory, and Getting It Made
Bringing Product To Market – Timelines, Design Changes, and Quality Control
Protecting Intellectual Property – Costs, Considerations, and Strategies

Presented By Fort Point Legal PC and WeWork

——————————— 

TCN Upstart: Robotics with Joe Jones, Pioneer in Creating Practical Robots with IRobot, Harvest Automation and Franklin Robotics
Thursday September 15
6:30 – 7:30pm
Venture Cafe, One Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.thecapitalnetwork.org/events/tcn-upstart-robotics-with-joe-jones-pioneer-in-creating-practical-robots-with-irobot-harvest-automation-and-franklin-robotics/

TCN UpStart Roundtables are monthly gatherings at the Venture Cafe that bring together Boston-area early-stage startups and seasoned entrepreneurs. This free series with The Capital Network, Venture Cafe, and Silicon Valley Bank is a great opportunity for you to ask burning questions about starting a company and meet other like-minded entrepreneurs in a casual cafe setting.

Joe Jones
Joe’s passion is to create practical robots. Robots that interest him are machines that do work people want done at a price people are willing to pay. A pioneer in the field, Joe was IRobot’s 1st full-time hire back in 1992, as their Senior Roboticist and is the co-inventor of the Roomba Vacumming Robot. After 14 years at IRobot Joe went on to co-found Harvest Automation, a company focused on creating mobile robots for industrial productivity in agriculture. Joe’s current venture is Franklin Robotics, a mobile robot used for gardening by consumers themselves.
“An area of acute need where practical robots could provide great benefit is agriculture. To feed the growing world population, food production must be expanded quickly and substantially. At Harvest Automation we adopted a top-down approach to the problem—there I worked to create robots for commercial agriculture.” At my new venture, Franklin Robotics, we follow a bottom-up strategy developing robots for gardening. In a few years we will, hopefully, meet in the middle.”

Pete Macdonald
Pete is the Relationship Manager the Emerging Technology Practice at Silicon Valley Bank.
Pete has over 20 years of experience working with startups and works primarily with early stage Technology and Life Science companies. Pete moderates The Capital Network’s Upstart program which is a series of fireside chats with entrepreneurs held at the Venture Cafe (CIC Cambridge) once a month.

——————————————

Science by the Pint:  Genetically Modified Organisms: A Plant’s Perspective
Thursday, September 15
6:30-8:30pm
Aeronaut Brewery, 14 Tyler Street, Somerville

Jing-Ke Weng & Chip Celenza
Dr. Jing-Ke Weng is a member of the Whitehead Institute and an Assistant Professor of Biology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Weng lab has broad interests in understanding the 450 million year old origin and evolution of plant metabolism at enzyme, pathway, and systems levels, as well as how plants exploit discrete small molecules to interact with their surrounding biotic and abiotic environments. Their work in plant metabolic evolution impacts a fundamental question in biology – how do complex traits evolve in a Darwinian fashion? In addition, they actively seek opportunities to utilize plants as a unique model system to study human diseases, including metabolic syndromes and protein-misfolding diseases. In the long run, Jing-Ke also aims at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the “matrix effect” known from many traditional herbal remedies used for thousands of years. This basic scientific research motivated by curiosity will be key to address the societal challenges of tomorrow.

Dr. Chip Celenza is an Associate Professor of Biology at Boston University and director of BU’s Program in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The Celenza lab uses genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry to better understand how plants defend themselves against microbes and insects. While plants in general are quite capable of defending themselves against herbivores and pathogens, resistance can evolve in the attacker and thus present a threat to a particular plant species. Thus understanding how plant species evolve different mechanisms for defending themselves is of importance for sustainable agriculture in the face of climate change and an increasing population. As models for studying plant defense compound synthesis, the Celenza lab uses Arabidopsis thaliana and the related oilseed mustard Camelina sativa. In these species the amino acid tryptophan is used as a precursor for both anti-herbivory compounds and antimicrobial compounds. While both species make similar defense compounds, regulation of their biosynthesis in response to various biotic and abiotic stresses differs between the two species. Understanding the differences and similarities in the regulation of these defense compounds is of central interest to the Celenza laboratory and this understanding will give insight into how defense regulatory networks evolve in plants.

More at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/science-by-the-pint/

—————————————— 

Science Royale: An Innovators Event
Thursday, September 15
6:30 PM to 9:30 PM (EDT) 
Museum of Science, 1 Science Park, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/science-royale-an-innovators-event-tickets-26583243196
Cost:  $0 - $50

Join The Innovators, the young professionals group of the Museum of Science, as we kick off the fall season with a  007- inspired evening of socializing and science on our picturesque Washburn Pavilion looking out onto the Charles River
How do experts use probability to hit the jackpot or the science of risk on the roulette wheel? What’s the actual difference between shaken and stirred? You can find out all of this (and more!) while meeting new friends and supporters of the Museum.
Sign Up now! Last year’s fall kick-off event completely sold out! 
This event is free for Innovators. $50 for each adult (21+). Tickets include dinner and complimentary parking. Business or cocktail attire; Bond-themed flair encouraged. 

Questions? Contact rsvp at mos.org or 617-589-0185

The Innovators are the Museum’s community of philanthropic young professionals who enjoy a year-long program of exclusive social and networking activities with their peers, geared toward fresh technology, innovative science, and more.

For more information visit mos.org/innovators or e-mail innovators at mos.org. 

——————————
Friday, September 16
——————————

Disasters and Development in South Asia
WHEN  Fri., Sep. 16, 2016, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Kresge G1, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Chan Office of the Dean and Harvard Chan Students for Nepal with support from the Office of the President, Harvard University
SPEAKER(S) See link for full list of speakers
DETAILS	  Over a year after Nepal’s earthquake, this conference brings together practitioners, policy-makers, academics, students, and experts in disaster response to examine the importance of risk mitigation, and to discuss the role of development partners, aid accountability and the role of the media in disaster response.
LINK  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/deans-office/upcoming-symposia/nepal_symposium/

————————————

Environmental and Energy Applications of Graphene Oxide Nanoarchitectures
Friday, September 16
12:00am to 1:00am
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Chad Vecitis, Harvard University
Here, we present two methods to control the interlayer spacing of ultrathin graphene oxide (GO) laminates on the nm-scale and discuss their potential environmental and energy applications.  The first method involves ultrasound GO morphology control then vacuum filtration followed by UV or HI chemical reduction to control GO laminate nanochannel dimensions on the Angstrom-scale. The nanochannel dimension determines GO laminate permeability and selectivity, which makes it a versatile membrane material. The second method involves Langmuir-Blodgett deposition and a novel 2D phase analysis technique to control GO laminate wrinkle height between 1-20 nm.  GO wrinkles act as a spacer preventing face-to-face aggregation, which improves the specific capacitance of 3D electrodes. 

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar

Contact: Jill Larson
Email: jlarson at seas.harvard.edu

————————————

MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar - Karin van der Wiel (GFDL)
Friday, September 16
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Karin van der Wiel, GFDL

The MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar (MASS) is an informal student-run weekly seminar series within PAOC. Seminar topics include all research concerning the atmosphere and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars usually take place on Fridays from 12-1pm. The presentations are either given by an invited speaker or by a member of PAOC and can focus on new research or discussion of a paper of particular interest. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Martin Wolf
mjwolf at mit.edu 

———————————— 

The Politics of Mourning:  Death and Honor in Arlington National Cemetery
Friday, September 16
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Associate Professor of History at the University of Connecticut MICKI MCELYA for a discussion of her book The Politics of Mourning: Death and Honor in Arlington National Cemetery.

About The Politics of Mourning
Arlington National Cemetery is America’s most sacred shrine, a destination for four million visitors who each year tour its grounds and honor those buried there. For many, Arlington’s symbolic importance places it beyond politics. Yet as Micki McElya shows, no site in the United States plays a more political role in shaping national identity.
Arlington commemorates sacrifices made in the nation’s wars and armed conflicts. Yet it has always been a place of struggle over the boundaries of citizenship and the meaning of honor and love of country. A plantation built by slave labor overlooking Washington, D.C., Arlington was occupied by Union forces early in the Civil War. A portion was designated a federal cemetery in 1864. A camp for the formerly enslaved, Freedman’s Village, had already been established there in 1863, and remained for three decades.
The cemetery was seen primarily as a memorial to the white Civil War dead until its most famous monument was erected in 1921: the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, symbolizing universal military sacrifice through the interment of a single World War I Unknown. As a century of wars abroad secured Arlington’s centrality in the American imagination and more Unknowns joined the first at the tomb, inclusion within its gates became a prerequisite for broader claims to national belonging. In revealing how Arlington encompasses the most inspiring and the most shameful aspects of American history, McElya enriches the story of this landscape, demonstrating that remembering the past and reckoning with it must go hand in hand.

——————————————— 

Artificial Intelligence in Robotics
Friday, September 16
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G125, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Tao Zhang, Tsinghua University (Visiting Professor, MIT)
In recent years, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Robotics are two hot research fields in the world.  Actually, AI and Robotics have very intimate relations.  This talk will focus on the AI in Robotics.  Comparing traditional industrial robot, the research scope of robotics has been remarkably extended.  The robot can refer to manipulator, space robot, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), marine robot, service robot, unmanned vehicles, rehabilitation robot, etc.  Facing to these types of robots, AI has gradually penetrated into the various technologies of robot.  This talk will introduce small part of applications of AI in robotics, studied consistently by our group in the past ten years, including intelligent navigation and control of robot, intelligent coordinative network platform for multi-robot system, computer vision, etc.  By means of these developed technologies for robot, we finally introduce our proposals on the intelligent robot application in the near future in this talk.

Speaker Bio:   Tao Zhang, Dr, Professor, Chair of the Executive Board of the Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, and Director, Control Science and Engineering Division, Tsinghua National Laboratory of Information Science Technology, China.  He received the B.S. degree, M.S. degree and Ph.D. degree from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 1993, 1995 and 1999 respectively.  He received his second Ph.D. degree from Saga University, Saga, Japan, in 2002.  From 2002 to 2003 he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Advanced Systems Control Engineering of Saga University and from 2003 to 2006 he was a research scientist in the Division of Intelligent Systems of National Institute of Informatics in Japan.  In 2006, he joined the Department of Automation of Tsinghua University.  Currently, he is a visiting Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.  His research interests include control theory, robotics, artificial intelligence, and signal processing.  He is the author or coauthor of more than 200 papers and three books.  He was awarded the Natural Science Award of Ministry of Education of China, Natural Science Award of Chinese Association of Automation, Electronic Information Science and Technology Award of Chinese Institute of Electronics, National Education Achievement Award of China, etc.  He was a Principle Investigator of more than 20 research projects, such as NSFC, China National 973 Project, China National 863 Project, etc.  He is now a senior member of IEEE, member of IFAC Technical Committee on Robotics, member of AIAA, council member of China Association of Artificial Intelligence, etc.

Electrical Engineering Seminar Series

Host: Na Li
Contact: Gioia Sweetland
Phone: 617-495-2919
Email: gioia at seas.harvard.edu

——————————————— 

Advocating for Science FoR/AFS/MIT-GSC 2016 Symposium
Friday, September 16 at 4:00 PM - Saturday, September 17, 2016 at 6:00 PM (EDT)
MIT, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/advocating-for-science-forafsmit-gsc-2016-symposium-registration-26685644481
Cost:  $0 -$15

The Future of Research, Academics for the Future of Science (AFS) and the MIT Graduate Student Council (GSC) are announcing the “Advocating for Science” Symposium and Workshop which will take place at MIT, Boston, September 16-17, 2016. The purpose of the meeting is to give an opportunity to those with a passion for advocating for science to develop their advocacy skills, meet like-minded young scientists and develop focused efforts together to effect positive change. 
The Advocating for Science Symposium begins on Friday 9/16 at 4pm. with a panel discussion, a keynote address featuring former congressman and AAAS CEO Rush Holt and a reception and networking event.  The session will discuss ongoing advocacy efforts to promote systemic changes within the scientific enterprise and how it is funded. On Saturday 17th September 9am – 6pm, we will build on this with the Advocating for Science Workshop: an intense "boot camp" for a focused group of participants who want to gain practical skills in advocacy. The program will progress through the many aspects of effectively advocating for change: from leading, and inspiring a group of likeminded individuals to collecting and using effective data, creating an overall message and communicating that message to the appropriate audiences.  Spaces are limited for the workshop and accordingly we ask that all participants attend the entire day, along with the Friday Symposium.

Confirmed Speakers:
Advocating for Science Symposium - Friday 9/16 4pm
Keynote Address: Rush Holt, Former Congressman & CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
Panel Discussion: 
Adam Fagen, Director Early Career Scientist Segment, AAAS
Kate Stoll, Senior Policy Advisor at MIT Washington Office
Benjamin Corb, Director of Public Affairs, ASBMB
and more…
Advocating for Science Workshop - Saturday 9/17 9am
Workshops include:
How to Communicate your Message - David Cameron, Director of Media Communications, Harvard University
Developing a Broader Communications Strategy - Ray Howell, Howell Communications
How to Collect Data Effectively - Philip Brenner, University of Massachusetts Boston
Effective Visual Communication - Christine Oslowski, Biotechnology Communications Specialist at AsisChem Inc. and Freelance Social Media Content Specialist. 

Location & Schedule
Friday, September 16, 2016
4 PM Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Ground floor of 50 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA

4PM- 8PM Advocating for Science Symposium 
7 PM- Keynote Address: Rush Holt, former Congressman and CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
Reception and Networking Event: 8:30 PM – Meadhall, 4 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA

Saturday, September 17, 2016
9 AM - 6PM Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Ground floor of Stata Center, 32 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA

9 AM- Breakfast and Registration
9:30- 6pm Advocating for Science Workshop 

Note: meals are included with registration  –
Should cost of this event prevent your attendance, please contact: sarah.mazzilli at gmail.com

———————————————

Architecture Lecture: Reporting (Back) from the Front
Friday, September 16
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Faculty Alexander D'Hooghe, Anton Garcia-Abril and Debora Mesa, Rania Ghosn, John Ochsendorf, Gediminas and Nomeda Urbonas present their projects for the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, Reporting from the Front, curated by Alejandro Aravena.

MIT Architecture Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, School of Architecture and Planning
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

———————————— 
Saturday, September 17
———————————— 

National Drive Electric Week Event
Saturday, September 17
9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Larz Anderson Auto Museum, 15 Newton Street, Brookline
See the sign up: https://driveelectricweek.org/event.php?eventid=778

———————————

BostonVR and BostonAR Devs Hackathon at Brookline Interactive Group (BIG)
Saturday, September 17
10:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Brookline Interactive Group, 46 Tappan Street, Brookine
Cost:  $8.00 /per person

Come join us for a whole day of techno-frolic with the other BostonVR devs at Brookline Interactive Group (BIG) (http://brooklineinteractive.org/) under the auspices of their Public VR Lab project ( http://publicvrlab.com/ ), a truly exellent resource for the community.  For directions see:  http://brooklineinteractive.org/location-and-hours/.

We'll have the whole day to hack VR & AR code, spitball new ideas, share code, swap feedback, and make cool stuff. Anybody ready to write code, craft environments, explore VR art, hack on hardware, or otherwise build VR is invited to come! 

Bring your own laptop & gear! But we'll probably have one or two HTC Vives to share.

If you have never seen VR before, you would be better off coming to one of our regular meetings on June 29th or July 27th. You'll see a much wider range of demos, have more people to talk to, and everyone will be set up to receive the general public.

The $8 charge will go to pay for pizza or some other kind of lunch, that day.

———————————

Green Building Bike Tour
Saturday, September 17
10:30 AM to 1:30 PM (EDT) 
East Boston Greenway, Maverick T Station 220 Sumner Street, East Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/green-building-bike-tour-tickets-26706775685
Cost:  $0 – $25

Join us for another year of green buildings by bike tour.  This tour is a unique opportunity to hear insights into recent sustainable building and development projects in our back yard. 
This year we are taking the tour through the East Boston Greenway. We are joined by Alison Richardson, Principal at Brown, Richardson & Rowe, Inc., and prime designer of the East Boston Greenway. Alison will walk (and ride!) us through the highs and lows of transforming the underserved community of East Boston into a vibrant and healthy green corridor. 
We will meet at the Maverick T Station at 10:30AM. Our tour will include the following stops, ending with a celebratory meal at KO Pies
Our stops will include: 
1. Maverick T Station, Blue Line
2. Piers Park
3. Bremen Street Park
4. East Boston Public Library
5. Wood Island Park (Frederick Law Olmstead historic park)
6. Constitution Beach
7. Belle Aisle Marsh
Bring your helmet for safety, bike lock for when you go in the buildings and good vibes for this fun event. Sign up now while there is still room and cycle on!

Alison Richardson, Principal, Brown, Richardson + Rowe, Inc. Landscape Architects + Planners
Special thanks to Women in Design for helping promote the event

——————————— 

Pirates Rally for Your Freedom!
September 17, 12pm – September 18, 6pm
Boston Common

This is an important event for civil liberties, and for winding down the war on drugs. It’s also really festive, and a great opportunity for outreach.

We’re looking for a few volunteers to help staff our table. If you can swing by for a few hours, please “Register Now”, let us know who you are, and when you can help out:

https://masspirates.org/crew/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=17

———————————

Living in the Future: Where Science Fiction Meets Science Reality
Saturday, September 17
6:00p–8:00p
MIT Museum, Building N51, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

How do today's technologies reflect what we've seen on the big screen? Sit back, grab some pizza and popcorn, and hear from scientists and inventors about how close we are to realizing Hollywood's hopes for the future! Learn about the real life technology that may or may not take us back to the future.

Open to: the general public
Cost: $10
Sponsor(s): MIT Museum
For more information, contact:  Jennifer Novotney
617-253-5927
novotney at mit.edu 

——————————— 
Sunday, September 18
——————————— 

SWAPFEST
Sunday, September 18
9:00a–2:00p
MIT, N4, Albany Garage and Lots, Albany Street between Massachusetts Avenue and Main Street, Cambridge 

MIT's monthly Hi Tech, Computer, Electronics and Ham Radio Fleamarket. 
Buy Sell or Swap all things nerdly. 
Held the third Sunday of each month April thru October. 
Rain or Shine covered space is available for all sellers. 
In the Albany St Garage and adjacent lot. 
On Albany St between Mass Ave and Main St, Cambridge. 
$6 Buyers admission from 9AM to 2PM. 
$4 with MIT/ Harvard Student ID 
Free for MIT and Harvard Undergraduates with current ID

Web site: www.swapfest.us
Open to: the general public
Cost: $6
This event occurs on the 3rd Sunday of every month through October 16, 2016.
Sponsor(s): MIT Radio Society, Electronic Research Society, MIT, UHF Repeater Assn. W1XM, MIT
For more information, contact:  Mitchell Berger
617-253-3776

———————————— 

7th Annual Boston Local Food Festival
Sunday, September 18
11:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway, 70 Rowes Wharf, Boston

Join local farmers, restaurants and food trucks, and chefs for New England's largest one-day farmer's market! Get ready for some fun, health and fitness activities and live, local music. Support the hard work of your local farmers for this one-day event!

———————————

TEDxHarvardCollege: Incite Insight
WHEN  Sunday, Sep. 18, 2016, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	TEDxHarvardCollege
COST  Full Price: $50.00; Students: $25.00, Harvard Students: $20.00 (8/29-9/4 Harvard Student discount = $15)
TICKET WEB LINK  http://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu
TICKET INFO  The Harvard Box Office 617-496-2222
DETAILS  "We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them" - Albert Einstein
Humanity's pursuit of progress has been boxed in by the same modes of thought that we once used to propel it. What we need to spur revolutionary breakthroughs is a new mode of thinkingÑshattering new perspectives that break down old boundaries of thought.
We believe that innovation is the life-force of this era of change, and we want to spark creativity in the entrepreneurs, inventors, and political minds that will shake up tomorrow's reality. In TEDxHarvardCollege's 2016 Conference, you will have the opportunity to listen to internationally-acclaimed professors, speakers, and thought leaders on how current topics can be turned, reconsidered, and seen from an angle to Incite Insight.

——————————— 

Amazing Biochar: How to Use It, How to Make It - with Hugh McLaughlin
Sunday, September 18
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
1 Fayette Park, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Biodiversity-for-a-Livable-Climate/events/233425960/

Potluck and Discussion - Co-Sponsored by Green Cambridge 

Potluck starts at 6, with a brief introduction to the biochar stove ("pyrolyzer") at 6:15; presentation and discussion start at 7.   

There has been much buzz about biochar lately, and this Meetup will provide an overview and answer many common questions.  How does biochar work? How can you use it in your garden? How can it help address global warming? 

Biochar is a product of natural fires, and has a history going back thousands of years in human cultures (the "terra praeta" of the Amazon and elsewhere). Soils with biochar retain more water, increase soil life, and dramatically enhance the growth of many plants, including crops. The positive effects of just a few applications may last for years.

During this Meetup we'll make some biochar in the backyard and learn how to apply it. Everyone will get a sample and larger quantities will be available for sale. 

Our speaker, Hugh McLaughlin, holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  He is an expert in biochar and activated carbon and is a leader in the rapidly developing field of biochar, the precursor to all activated carbon products, with many years of experience in development and implementation of new processing technologies on a commercial scale.  He has presented at national conferences on biochar and has published extensively on the biochar's measurable physical properties. He is currently the Chief Technology Office at NextChar in Amherst, Massachusetts. 

We're a small non-profit so a $10 donation is requested, but no one will be turned away based on ability to pay. 

If you have questions please post to this Meetup, or call Helen at 617-547-1326.

——————————— 
Monday, September 19
——————————— 

Coastal Water Quality, Climate Change & Ocean Acidification along the U. S. Northeast
Monday, September 19
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Scott Doney, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)

EPS Colloquium Series 
http://eps.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/event-type/department-colloquium

Note: The colloquium talks are now at noon. Please plan to come to Haller Hall at 11:45AM to help yourself to lunch. 

Contact Name:   Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

————————————— 

The Competing Imaginaries of Solar Geoengineering
Monday, September 19
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Jeremy Baskin, University of Melbourne

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

sts at hks.harvard.edu

—————————————

Evidence for Action: Changing Public Priorities in India
Monday, September 19
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building 10-250, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Rukmini Banerji
Dr. Rukmini Banerji is CEO of Pratham, one of India's largest NGOs working in education, and has emerged as a leading international voice on primary and secondary education. Pratham began in 1994 and has reached millions of children and youth through their education and vocational programs. Dr. Banerji's leadership on the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) has garnered international recognition for its innovative model to measure child learning outcomes which has transformed education policy in India and around the world. She also serves as a member of India's Central Advisory Board of Education. Dr. Banerji was a Rhodes Scholar and completed her PhD at the University of Chicago.

D2P2: Data, Decisions & Public Policy 
The D2P2 Lectures feature leading academics and other experts who share knowledge derived from modern applied economics research to demonstrate how it can inform better public policy decision-making. Speakers will discuss their groundbreaking research and practice, and how it can be applied to improve people???s lives.

Web site: https://www.povertyactionlab.org/d2p2
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE
Sponsor(s): Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, Economics Department
For more information, contact:  Taylor Sweazey
tsweazey at mit.edu 

——————————— 

The Materials of Imperialism: Engineering Arid Landscapes in Washington’s Columbia Basin and Afghanistan’s Helmand Valley
Monday, September 19
4:00PM TO 5:30PM

http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/envihist/upcoming-events
with Linda Nash, University of Washington 

Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room (440), MCZ, 26 Oxford Street, 4th Floor, Cambridge
Environmental History Working Group

Contact Name:   Laura Martin
lauramartin at fas.harvard.edu

——————————— 

Fragments of A Life in Film
September 19
5:00 - 6:00pm 
BU, COM 101, 640 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Graham Townsley, Documentary Producer/Director, Shining Red Productions

Bio:  Graham Townsley is an Emmy-nominated TV documentary filmmaker who has made films for PBS, National Geographic, and the Discovery Channel. His work has also been aired internationally on BBC, Channel 4, ARTE. and ZDF. His most recent documentaries are 'E.O. Wilson: Of Ants and Men;' and 'Dawn of Humanity;' both of which aired in 2015. 

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

More information at http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/09/fragments-of-life-in-film-bus-seminar.html

——————————— 

Divestment and Reinvesting in Massachusetts Companies
Monday, September 19
5:30 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT)
Old West Church, 131 Cambridge Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/divestment-and-reinvesting-in-massachusetts-companies-tickets-27197251712

Over the past five years, Massachusetts has become the national incubator for social ventures, clean technologies, and innovative business solutions to climate change. The Climate Action Business Association has developed a new series of reports, Local Emerging Market Reports (LEMR) to offer a spotlight on further opportunities for leadership in the transition to a carbon free economy. The goal is to support local entrepreneurs, early adopters, investors, and others looking for market solutions to fuel the transition to a carbon free economy.

Join CABA and BASIC as we look at these reports from the perspective of sustainable and clean tech investors.  Matt Patsky, CEO of Trillium Asset Management and David Miller, Executive Director of Clean Energy Venture Group will provide their perspective on the report and the future of sustainable investments in Massachusetts' local economy.  

Report authors Michael Green and Kate Galbo from CABA will moderate the conversation and discuss how the reports can be used to fuel local investments.

——————————— 

2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series:  The Science of Sugar
Monday, September 19
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Joanne Chang ’91, (@jbchang), Flour Bakery, author of “Flour” and “Flour Too”
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Sept. 19
“The Science of Sugar”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Joanne Chang ’91, (@jbchang), Flour Bakery, author of “Flour” and “Flour Too”
Tuesday, Sept. 27
“Medical Technology Producing Hamburgers”
Science Center Lecture Hall B, 7 p.m.
Mark Post, (@MarkPost6), Professor of Physiology at Maastricht University, co-inventor of cell cultured beef
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

———————————

A Truck Full of Money:  One Man’s Quest to Recover from Great Success 
Monday, September 19
7:00 PM (Doors at 6:30)
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/tracy_kidder/
Cost:  $5 - $28.75 (book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes Pulitzer Prize winner TRACY KIDDER, author of The Soul of a New Machine and Mountains Beyond Mountains, and entrepreneur PAUL ENGLISH for a discussion of Kidder's latest book, A Truck Full of Money: One Man’s Quest to Recover from Great Success, the inspiring story of Kayak.com and Lola founder Paul English.
About A Truck Full of Money

Tracy Kidder, the “master of the nonfiction narrative” (The Baltimore Sun) and author of the bestselling classic The Soul of a New Machine, now tells the story of Paul English, a kinetic and unconventional inventor and entrepreneur, who as a boy rebelled against authority. Growing up in working-class Boston, English discovers a medium for his talents the first time he sees a computer. As a young man, despite suffering from what would eventually be diagnosed as bipolar disorder, he begins his pilgrim’s journey through the ups and downs in the brave new world of computers. Relating to the Internet as if it’s an extension of his own mind, he discovers that he has a talent for conceiving innovative enterprises and building teams that can develop them, becoming “a Pied Piper” of geeks. His innovative management style, success, and innate sense of fair play inspire intense loyalty. Early on, one colleague observes: “Someday this boy’s going to get hit by a truck full of money, and I’m going to be standing beside him.” Yet when English does indeed make a fortune, when the travel website Kayak is sold for almost two billion dollars—the first thing he thinks about is how to give the money away: “What else would you do with it?” The second thing he thinks is, What’s next?

With the power of a consummate storyteller, Tracy Kidder casts a fresh, critical, and often humorous eye on the way new ideas and new money are reshaping our culture and the world. A Truck Full of Money is a mesmerizing portrait of an irresistibly endearing man who is indefatigable, original, and as unpredictable as America itself.

———————————— 

Water — and Climate — Solutions in Plain Sight
Monday, September 19
7:00–8:30pm
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain
RSVP at http://my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.
Cost:  $0 - $5 nonmember

Judith D. Schwartz, MA, MSJ, Journalist and Author
Judith Schwartz, who has looked deeply into the challenges and solutions around Earth’s soil in her 2013 book, Cows Save the Planet, has since turned her sights towards water. In this talk and discussion, she will focus on reframing our global environmental challenges in a way that illuminates potential solutions. For once we broaden our perspective to include how water moves across the landscape and through the atmosphere, we'll find many opportunities to restore ecological cycles, even entire ecosystems. Judith will offer examples from around the world that she's encountered in her reporting for her newest book, Water in Plain Sight: Hope for a Thirsty World.

———————————— 
Tuesday, September 20
———————————— 

Mechanotherapeutics:  From Drugs to Wearables, Wyss Institute's 7th Annual Symposium
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 20, 2016, 8:15 a.m. – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University
SPEAKER(S)	
Georg Duda, Ph.D., Julius Wolff Institut, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin
Philip Gottlieb, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo
Simon Hoerstrup, Ph.D., Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Zurich
Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., Wyss Institute, Harvard University
Helene Langevin, M.D., Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital
David J. Mooney, Ph.D., Wyss Institute, Harvard University
Dennis Orgill, M.D., Ph.D., Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital
David Paydarfar, M.D., Wyss Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Clinton T. Rubin, Ph.D., Stony Brook University
Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, Ph.D., Columbia University
Conor Walsh, Ph.D., Wyss Institute, Harvard University
Valerie M. Weaver, Ph.D., Center for Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration, University of California, San Francisco
COST	This event is free, however registration is required.
CONTACT INFO	info at wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-7038
DETAILS	
The Wyss Institute's 7th annual international symposium will focus on advances in the field of Mechanobiology that have resulted in the development of new types of pharmaceuticals, drug delivery systems, engineered tissues, and wearable therapeutic devices that leverage physical forces or target mechanical signaling pathways as a core part of their mechanism of action. Organized by Wyss Institute Core Faculty members Dave Mooney and Don Ingber, the day will include a number of distinguished speakers who will provide examples of how mechanics is being harnessed in ways that can transform the future of medicine.
LINK  http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewevent/551

———————————— 

NECEC Energy Storage Forum 2016
Tuesday, September 20
8:30 AM to 10:30 AM
Foley Hoag LLP, 155 Seaport Boulevard Seaport West, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/necec-energy-storage-forum-tickets-25490831764

Join NECEC and Foley Hoag’s Energy and Cleantech practice for a not-to-be-missed discussion with energy storage experts in policy, deployment and investment who have their finger on the pulse of the energy storage market.

The Energy Storage Forum will take place in Boston and New York with a live video stream connecting panelists and guests from both locations. Register here

Event Contact
necec at necec.org

————————————

New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  The Role of Sustainable Seafood
Thursday, September 20
12pm – 1pm
Webinar
RSVP at https://nertnetwork.org/2016/07/28/collective-inquiry-local-and-regional-food/

————————————

Brown Bag: Issues in Curating the Open Web at Scale - with Gary Price
Tuesday, September 20
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building  E25-401, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Gary Price
Much of the web remains invisible: resources are undescribed, unindexed or simply buried -- as many people rarely look past the first page of Google searches or are unavailable from traditional library resources. 

At the same time many traditional library databases pay little attention to quality content from credible sources accessible on the open web. 

How do we build collections of quality open-web resources (i.e. documents, specialty databases, and multimedia) and make them accessible to individuals and user groups when and where they need it? 

This talk reflects on the emerging tools for systematic programmatic curation; the legal challenges to open-web curation; long term access issues, and the historical challenges to building sustainable communities of curation.

Web site: http://informatics.mit.edu/event/brown-bag-discussion-gary-price?type=month&month=2016-08
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries
For more information, contact:  Kelly Hopkins
6172533044
khopkins at mit.edu 

———————————— 

Thinking Fast Makes Changing Slow: Human Thought Processes Interfere with Achieving Diversity
Tuesday, September 20
Noon–1:00 p.m.
BU, Instructional Building, Hiebert Lounge, 72 East Concord Street, Boston

Speaker
Lydia Villa-Komaroff
Board Member, Cytonome/ST, LLC; Board Member, American Type Culture Collection (ATCC); Board Member, Massachusetts Life Sciences Center (MLSC)

Please Register at http://www.bu.edu/sph/news-events/signature-events/diversity-inclusion-seminar-series/2016-series-schedule/thinking-fast-makes-changing-slow-human-thought-processes-interfere-with-achieving-diversity/

Live-Streaming Available During Event at http://www.bu.edu/sph/news-events/signature-events/sph-live/

————————————

The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 20, 2016, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Stephen L. Carter, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Yale University
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS	
A Lecture in 3 parts. A Q&A and reception will follow each talk.
9/20 – “Thinking Property” 
9/21 – The Invisible Race 
9/22 – The Visible Future 
LINK	http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-20-2016-400pm/stephen-l-carter-w-e-b-du-bois-lecture-series-1-3

————————————

Modern Environmental Politics: big data, behavioral science, and getting environmentalists to vote
Tuesday, September 20
4:15p–6:00p
MIT, Building 4-270, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Nathaniel Stinnett
Big data has completely revolutionized how modern political campaigns target and communicate with voters. Simultaneously, a new generation of behavioral scientists has completely changed our understanding of why and how people decide to vote. These changes present a large number of counter-intuitive and exciting discoveries and they also suggest both good and bad news for the environmental movement. Join Nathaniel Stinnett for a discussion of how modern political campaigns work and how that impacts environmental policy at the local, state, and federal level.

Nathaniel Stinnett is the Founder & CEO of the Environmental Voter Project, a non-partisan nonprofit that uses big data analytics and behavioral science to identify non-voting environmentalists and then get them to vote. Recently dubbed “The Voting Guru” by Grist, Stinnett was named one of the 50 environmental visionaries that you’ll be talking about in 2016. He has over a decade of experience as a senior advisor, campaign manager, and trainer for US Senate, Congressional, and mayoral campaigns as well as issue-advocacy nonprofits. Formerly an attorney at the international law firm of DLA Piper, Stinnett holds a B.A. from Yale University and a J.D. from Boston College Law School. He lives in Boston, MA with his wife and daughter.

The Environmental Voter Project: http://www.environmentalvoter.org

ESI Lecture Series in Environment and Sustainability

Web site: https://environmentalsolutions.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Sponsor(s): Environmental Solutions Initiative
For more information, contact:  Hannah Loomis
617-715-4048
esi at mit.edu 

—————————————

"Brexit Means Brexit": But What Does Brexit Mean for the UK and the EU?
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 20, 2016, 4:15 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Hoffman Room, Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	EU Law and Government
SPEAKER(S)  Jeff Kenner
DETAILS	  The United Kingdom's vote for Brexit on June 23, 2016 was an unprecedented rejection of the European integration process by an EU Member State. But what exactly does Brexit mean? Professor Kenner will examine the process of Britain's withdrawal from the perspective of the UK and the EU 27. The talk will explore various options for a negotiated settlement open to both the UK and the EU. Is it possible for the UK to have access to the EU's Single Market with some control over people's freedom of movement? If so, can this objective be achieved without Brexit and would that be desirable? If not, what alternative models for future relations are most suitable for the UK and the EU 27?
LINK  https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2016/09/brexit-means-brexit-but-what-does-brexit-mean-for-the-uk-and-the-eu

—————————————

Immigration, Democracy, and Discrimination in Small Town America
Tuesday, September 20
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Justin Steil, Assistant Professor of Law and Urban Planning, MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, Inter-University Committee on International Migration
For more information, contact:  Phiona Lovett
253-3848
phiona at mit.edu 

—————————————

The Power of Network: A Lecture by Dr. Chang-Gyu Hwang
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 20, 2016, 5 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Haarvard, Sanders Theare, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Conferences, Information Technology, Lecture, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Korea Society
SPEAKER(S)  Dr. Chang-Gyu Hwang
DETAILS  Dr. Hwang is a renowned entrepreneur and engineer, and currently he is the President of KT Corporation which is the largest telephone company in South Korea.  He is also well-known for Hwang’s Law, which refuted Moore’s Law by re-predicting the rate of advance in semiconductor in early 2000s. He already gave several invited lectures at different schools in Harvard; in particular, when he had a speech at Burden Auditorium in Harvard Business School in 2005 as the President of the Semiconductor Division at Samsung Electronics, more than 800 students were attended and the speech was featured in the Harvard Crimson (www.thecrimson.com…).
In the lecture, Dr. Hwang will be speaking regarding his experiences as an entrepreneur and his views on the future developments in the telecommunications industry. We believe his speech will be inspiring and helpful not only for students in business and engineering but also for the entire Harvard society.

—————————————

Putting the 2016 Election Into Perspective: A Conversation with Bob Schieffer, Ann Compton and Nicco Mele
Tuesday, September 20
6:00 p.m. 
Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, Littauer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

A conversation on the state of the 2016 presidential campaign and its coverage in the media, with Bob Schieffer, Ann Compton and Nicco Mele (moderator). Co-Sponsored by the Institute of Politics.

Bob Schieffer is the current Walter Shorenstein Media and Democracy Fellow. He has been a reporter for more than half a century and was a part of CBS News for 46 years. He is one of the few reporters in Washington to have covered all four of the major beats: the Pentagon, the White House, Congress and the State Department. Schieffer anchored the Saturday edition of the “CBS Evening News” for 23 years, became the network’s chief Washington correspondent in 1982 and was named the anchor and moderator of “Face the Nation” in 1991. Within these roles he has interviewed every president since Richard Nixon and moderated three presidential debates. Throughout his career Schieffer has written four books, won numerous awards and covered every presidential race and nominating convention since 1972.
Ann Compton is a visiting fellow at the Institute of Politics for the Fall 2016 semester. She was the first woman assigned by a television network to cover the White House and her longevity and impact have been considered unmatched over the span of her 41 years on the air for ABC News. After retiring from daily coverage in 2014, Ann was brought back to cover the 2016 political conventions for ABC. Ann’s career at ABC News spanned 7 presidents and 10 presidential campaigns for the network. She was assigned to the White House in 1974, as the Watergate scandal came to an end. She reported for all ABC News broadcasts and online from the lawn of the White House, from Capitol Hill, from the campaign trail, and from around the globe traveling with Presidents, Vice Presidents, and First Ladies. Her retirement was announced by President Barack Obama who called on her at a West Wing news conference saying, “Ann Compton, everybody here knows, is not only the consummate professional but is also just a pleasure to get to know.”
Nicco Mele (moderator) is the Director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy. He took over leadership of the Center in 2016 after serving as Senior Vice President and Deputy Publisher of the Los Angeles Times and as the Wallis Annenberg Chair in Journalism at the University of Southern California. He is the author of The End of Big: How The Internet Makes David the New Goliath and co-founder of EchoDitto (now Echo & Co.), a leading internet strategy and consulting firm. Mele also is a board member of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard and a Senior Fellow at the USC Annenberg Center on Communication Leadership & Policy.

————————————— 

Morphogenesis of Flux Structure: The New Field of Structural Design
Tuesday, September 20
6:00p–7:30p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Mutsuro Sasaki: The Edward and Mary Allen Lecture in Structural Design

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, Building Technology Program
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

—————————————— 

CaféSci Boston presents "The Learning Caféteria," a 4-part series of science cafés inspired by NOVA's School of the Future
Tuesday, September 20
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT) -
Le Laboratorie Cambridge, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-learning-cafeteria-series-tickets-27097159333

Airing September 14th during PBS “Spotlight Education” week, School of the Future is a 2-hour documentary that will introduce viewers to the science of learning—a complex and interdisciplinary new field that encompasses neuroscience, physiology, and the psychology of children.
The show examines how, in a new age of information, rapid innovation, and globalization, can we prepare our children to compete. Once the envy of the world, American schools are now in trouble. Test scores show our kids lag far behind their peers from other industrialized countries, and as the divide between rich and poor grows wider, the goal of getting all kids ready for college and the workforce gets harder by the day. How can the latest research help us fix education in America? Can the science of learning —  including new insights from neuroscientists, psychologists, and educators — reveal how kids’ brains work and tell us which techniques are most likely to engage and inspire growing minds?  What role should technology play in the classroom? Teachers, students, parents, and scientists take center stage as NOVA explores a new vision for the School of the Future.

Meet the Speakers
Dr. Nancy Hill, Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education
September 20, 2016
Professor Hill is a developmental psychologist and her research identifies the unique and interactive ways in which race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status influence parenting beliefs, practices and child outcomes, especially among African American, Latino, and Euro-American children. Her research has identified the ways in which similar parenting practices may have different meanings for and impacts on children’'s mental health and development based on cultural, community, and economic contexts.
Dr. Charles Nelson, Professor of Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital
October 18, 2016
Charles A. Nelson III, PhD, is Professor of Pediatrics and Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and holds the Richard David Scott Chair in Pediatric Developmental Medicine Research at Boston Children’s Hospital.  His research interests center on a variety of problems in developmental cognitive neuroscience, including:  typical and atypical memory development; the development of social perception; developmental trajectories to autism; and the effects of early adversity on brain and behavioral development.
Dr. Gigi Luk, Associate Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education
November 15, 2016
Gigi Luk's research on the cognitive consequences of bilingualism extends across the lifespan. These cognitive consequences include literacy acquisition in children and executive functions in young and older adults. The main research finding is that bilingualism, as a language experience, results in some cognitive advantages and linguistic limitations at different developmental stages. She investigates bilingual consequences using both behavioral and neuroimaging techniques. In addition to investigating the science of bilingualism, Dr. Luk has examined how to harness scientific findings on bilingualism to improve educational experience for children from diverse language backgrounds.
Dr. Luba Falk Feigenberg, Research Director, Making Caring Common
December 20, 2016
Luba Falk Feigenberg, EdD, is the Research Director for Making Caring Common. Luba has nearly two decades of experience working in a variety of non-profit and educational settings, including schools, early childhood education, after school programs, the juvenile justice system, and community mental health. At the core of her work is a focus on children’s social-emotional development, school-community partnerships, and effective schools and services for children. She regularly consults with schools, school districts, and mental health organizations about how to build a culture of continuous quality improvement, sustainable systems for student support services, and strategies to best promote children’s social-emotional development.
Directions to Le Laboratoire Cambridge, 650 East Kendall Street
Public Transit: Red line to Kendall Square, walk straight down 3rd Street, turn right onto Athenaeum Street, and left onto East Kendall
Parking: There is a parking deck - the 650 East Kendall Street Garage - accessible by Linskey Way. If you purchase food or drink from Le Lab, your parking ticket can be validated for discounted rates.
Le Laboratoire, is a unique art and design center that invites visitors to explore the experiments and wonders of innovators of all kinds discovering at frontiers of science. 

"School of the Future" is part of American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen, a public media initiative made possible by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for "School of the Future" is also provided by Carnegie Corporation of New York. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of the author.

*****************
----------------------
Upcoming Events
----------------------
*****************  

————————————— 
Wednesday, September 21
————————————— 

September Boston Sustainability Breakfast
Wednesday, September 21
7:30 AM to 8:30 AM (EDT) 
Pret A Manger, 101 Arch Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/september-boston-sustainability-breakfast-tickets-27424507440

Happy Fall!!
Join us for the September Sustainability Breakfast - Net Impact Boston's informal breakfast meetup of sustainability professionals together for networking, discussion and moral support. It's important to remind ourselves that we are not the only ones out there in the business world trying to do good! Feel free to drop by any time between 7:30 and 830 am.

———————————

Social Innovation in Africa: A Practical Guide for Scaling Impact
WHEN  Wed., Sep. 21, 2016, 9 – 10 a.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at the Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Ndidi Nwuneli, Director, African Philanthropy Forum and Founder, LEAP Africa
CONTACT INFO	Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  This seminar, will be given by former M-RCBG senior fellow Ndidi Nwuneli, who has recently published the book "Social Innovation in Africa: A Practical Guide for Scaling Impact." She is the director of the African Philanthropy Forum and founder of LEAP Africa.
Breakfast will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

———————————

Soul City: The Lost Dream of an American Utopia
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 21, 2016, 12 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center
SPEAKER(S)  Thomas Healy, Professor of Law, Seton Hall Law School
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS	
A Q&A will follow the talk
LINK	http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-21-2016-1200pm/fall-colloquium-thomas-healy

——————————— 

Strategies of Insurgent Diplomacy: Evidence from the Iraqi Kurdish Liberation Movement
Wednesday, September 21, 2016
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cabmridge

Speaker: Morgan L. Kaplan (Harvard)

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu 

——————————— 

The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 21, 2016, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Stephen L. Carter, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Yale University
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS  A Lecture in 3 parts. A Q&A and reception will follow each talk.
9/20 – “Thinking Property” 
9/21 – The Invisible Race 
9/22 – The Visible Future 
LINK  http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-20-2016-400pm/stephen-l-carter-w-e-b-du-bois-lecture-series-1-3

———————————

Countdown to #Campaign2016
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 21, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, L-166, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  Ann Compton
COST  Free and Open to the Public
CONTACT INFO	deisy_carrera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Come take a front row seat to history in the final 8 weeks of #Campaign2016.  For ABC News,  Ann Compton covered ten presidential elections and seven presidents. She asked questions at two formal general election debates. Each week her study group and national guests will track the polls, dissect the rhetoric, and put a special focus on how the age of digital media makes for the most unconventional candidates and news coverage in modern times.
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/fellows-study-groups

——————————— 

Capital versus Output Subsidies: Implications of Alternative Incentives for Wind Energy
WHEN  Wed., Sep. 21, 2016, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Room Littauer-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
SPEAKER(S)  Todd Gerarden, Harvard University
LINK  https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

—————————— 

The Citizens' Choice: Legalizing Recreational Marijuana
Wednesday, September 21
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Edward M. Kennedy Institute, 210 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-citizens-choice-legalizing-recreational-marijuana-tickets-27154241066

Admission is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 
WGBH and the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate are proud to present The Citizens' Choice: Legalizing Recreational Marijuana. Join us as we explore both sides of this issue – and attempt to answer the question, would legalizing recreational marijuana affect Massachusetts for better or for worse? Hear a variety of experts discuss this initiative, and prepare yourself to make an informed decision when you head into the voting booth this fall. Jim Braude, host of WGBH's Greater Boston will moderate. 

———————————— 
Thursday, September 22
———————————— 

Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 22, 2016, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Littauer Building, Fainsod Room (3rd Floor Littauer), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Law, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar Rahmani Center for Business & Government, HKS
SPEAKER(S)  Prof. Malcolm Sparrow, HKS
CONTACT INFO	Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS	  This seminar will be given by Malcolm Sparrow, Professor of the Practice of Public Management at Harvard Kennedy School on his recently published book "Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform."
Lunch will be served. 

———————————

Modern Environmental Politics:  Big data, behavioral science, and getting environmentalists to vote
Tuesday, September 22
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Nathaniel Stinnett
Big data has completely revolutionized how modern political campaigns target and communicate with voters. Simultaneously, a new generation of behavioral scientists has completely changed our understanding of why and how people decide to vote. These changes present a large number of counter-intuitive and exciting discoveries and they also suggest both good and bad news for the environmental movement. Join Nathaniel Stinnett for a discussion of how modern political campaigns work and how that impacts environmental policy at the local, state, and federal level.

————————————

The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 22, 2016, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Stephen L. Carter, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Yale University
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS  A Lecture in 3 parts. A Q&A and reception will follow each talk.
9/20 – “Thinking Property” 
9/21 – The Invisible Race 
9/22 – The Visible Future 
LINK	http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-20-2016-400pm/stephen-l-carter-w-e-b-du-bois-lecture-series-1-3

———————————— 

Green Think: How Profit Can Save the Planet
Thursday, September 22
5:00 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT) 
Harvard Club of Boston, 374 Commonwealth Avenue Massachusetts Room, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/green-think-how-profit-can-save-the-planet-tickets-26724098498

The environments in which we live are changing fast. To keep people healthy and alive, we must prevent diseases caused by turbulent weather, pollution, and increasingly crowded cities.

Hear from Rick Fedrizzi, Founder and CEO of US Green Building Council, and learn about our new Master of Public Health in Sustainability and the Global Environment.

This speaker series will celebrate the Center for Health and the Global Environment's 20th year, and introduce you to pressing issues students will explore in the Sustainability, Health, and the Global Environment program at the Harvard School of Public Health. In this program students will learn the latest research techniques, and have opportunities to connect with leading edge thinkers in global businesses and governments who are focused on the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings. We are accepting applications beginning Fall 2016. 

Join us to learn from leading global health experts, and talk with faculty members actively working to solve some of the greatest public health challenges facing us today. To learn about other topics in the series visit http://www.chgeharvard.org/events. 

Reception following lecture. 

————————————

Askwith Forums - Education as a Human Right: An Evening with Hanan Al Hroub, Winner of the 2016 Global Teacher Prize
WHEN	Thu., Sep. 22, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE	Longfellow Hall
13 Appian Way
Cambridge, MA 02138
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT	Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM	Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME	Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL	askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE	617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS	  Speaker: Hanan Al Hroub, recipient, 2016 Global Teacher Prize; teacher, Samiha Khalil Secondary School, Palestine
Discussant: Fernando Reimers, Ed.M.’84, Ed.D.’88, Ford Foundation Professor of Practice in International Education and director, International Education Policy Program and the Global Education Innovation Initiative, HGSE
Introduction: James E. Ryan, dean and Charles William Eliot Professor, HGSE
In this Askwith Forum, Hanan Al Hroub, winner of the 2016 Global Teacher Prize, will speak about her experiences as a Palestinian educator and her unique approach to instruction.

———————————

Saving Eden: A Work in Progress
Thursday, September 22
6:00pm
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Film Screening (excerpts) and Discussion
Sylvia Earle, Marine Biologist; Explorer-in-Residence and Rosemary and Roger Enrico Chair for Ocean Exploration, National Geographic Society
Justine O’Brien, Scientific Director, SeaWorld and Busch Gardens Reproductive Research Center, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment
Edward O. Wilson, University Research Professor, Emeritus, Harvard University

The upcoming film, Saving Eden from the Sixth Extinction, tells the story of how animals such as northern white rhinos, polar bears, African elephants, and bonobos have been pushed to the brink of extinction and it highlights the critical work that scientists and activists are doing to save these species. Biologists Edward Wilson, Sylvia Earle, and Justine O’Brien—all featured in the film—will discuss how their research is helping to save endangered species and share their views on animal conservation efforts.

Advance registration required. Check back for ticket information.

Presented in collaboration with Direct Cinema Limited. 

———————————

The 26th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony
Thursday, September 22
6:00 pm*
Harvard, Sanders Theater, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
TICKETS are available exclusively by the Harvard Box Office at https://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu/Online/default.asp

*Pre-ceremony concert —and the webcast —begin at 5:40 pm (US Eastern Time)
The ceremony proper begins at 6:00 pm

The 26th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony will introduce ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners - Each has done something that makes people laugh then think.
Winners travel to the ceremony, at their own expense, from around the world to receive their prize from a group of genuine, genuinely bemused Nobel Laureates, in Harvard's historic and largest theater. Additional info will appear in the Improbable Research blog. 

——————————— 
Friday, September 23
——————————— 

MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar - Karin van der Wiel (GFDL)
Friday, September 23, 2016
10:00a–11:00a
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Karin van der Wiel, GFDL
The MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar (MASS) is an informal student-run weekly seminar series within PAOC. Seminar topics include all research concerning the atmosphere and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars usually take place on Fridays from 12-1pm. The presentations are either given by an invited speaker or by a member of PAOC and can focus on new research or discussion of a paper of particular interest. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Martin Wolf
mjwolf at mit.edu 

————————————— 

IACS Seminar: Machine Learning for Materials Discovery: Low-LTC Compounds, Grain Boundaries and Superlattices
Friday, September 23
12:30pm to 2:00pm
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge
Lunch 12:30pm; Talk 1pm

Koji Tsuda, Professor, The University of Tokyo
Material discovery driven by machine learning is a reality. I report successful case studies in discovery of low LTC compounds from database, grain boundary optimization and automated design of Si-Ge superlattices.

Speaker Bio:  Koji Tsuda is a professor in the Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences Graduate School of Frontier Sciences at The University of Tokyo.  Machine learning, bioinformatics and materials Informatics. Group leader of a national materials informatics project at NIMS (National Institute for Materials Science).
Host: Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS)

Contact: Natasha Baker
Phone: 617-496-2623
Email: nrbaker at seas.harvard.edu

———————————

The Market as God
Friday, September 23
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Hollis Research Professor of Divinity at Harvard University HARVEY COX for a discussion of his book The Market as God.

About The Market as God
The Market has deified itself, according to Harvey Cox’s brilliant exegesis. And all of the world’s problems—widening inequality, a rapidly warming planet, the injustices of global poverty—are consequently harder to solve. Only by tracing how the Market reached its “divine” status can we hope to restore it to its proper place as servant of humanity.
The Market as God captures how our world has fallen in thrall to the business theology of supply and demand. According to its acolytes, the Market is omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent. It knows the value of everything, and determines the outcome of every transaction; it can raise nations and ruin households, and nothing escapes its reductionist commodification. The Market comes complete with its own doctrines, prophets, and evangelical zeal to convert the world to its way of life. Cox brings that theology out of the shadows, demonstrating that the way the world economy operates is neither natural nor inevitable but shaped by a global system of values and symbols that can be best understood as a religion.

Drawing on biblical sources, economists and financial experts, prehistoric religions, Greek mythology, historical patterns, and the work of natural and social scientists, Cox points to many parallels between the development of Christianity and the Market economy. At various times in history, both have garnered enormous wealth and displayed pompous behavior. Both have experienced the corruption of power. However, what the religious have learned over the millennia, sometimes at great cost, still eludes the Market faithful: humility.

————————————

Free Event Brass Band Flash Mob School of HONK! Parade Cambridge!
Friday, September 23
4:00 PM
School of HONK, 119 Winthrop Street, Cambridge 
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/SocialFun/events/233995810/

RAIN OR SHINE if it rains bring your umbrellas and do the twirling umbrella dance  

This is a great danceable event for those who are lucky enough to join in on this Meetup, we'll be following a large number of jolly brass band musicians on their spontaneous local route! Everybody in the neighborhood will be gawking at the marvelous performance and some joining in. Those automobilers honking their horns will be vastly outnumbered.

———————————— 

Berkman Klein Center Fall 2016 Open House
Friday September 23
5:00 pm followed by Reception
Harvard Law, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West, Second Floor, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/node/99552#RSVP
 
Come to the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society’s Fall 2016 Open House to meet our faculty, fellows, and staff, and to learn about the many ways you can get involved in our dynamic, exciting environment.

5:00-6:30 pm - Project Showcase Session: Select Berkman Klein projects will be present with information about their current activities. Staff working with each of these projects are eager to share information about the big research questions they are considering, meet potential future collaborators, and solicit ideas. In addition to the project tabling, there will be space and opportunity to connect with new Berkman Klein community members and Berkman Klein Center Staff and Faculty. You may come for any portion of time during this session.
 
6:30 pm - Reception: Keep the conversations going with the help of light snacks and drinks!
As a University-wide research center at Harvard, our interdisciplinary efforts in the exploration of cyberspace address a diverse range of backgrounds and experiences. If you're interested in the Internet’s impact on society and are looking to engage a community of world-class fellows and faculty through events, conversations, research, and more please join us to hear more about our upcoming academic year.

People from all disciplines, universities, organizations, and backgrounds are encouraged to attend the Open House. We look forward to seeing you there!

————————————

Berkshires 10th Anniversary Party
Friday, September 23
6 – 11 pm 
Prairie Whale, 178 Main Street, Great Barrington
Suggested donation at the door: 5 - 20 BerkShares or Dollars

House-made bar snacks by Prairie Whale
Wandering Star Craft beer on tap
Dance party with DJ BFG!
 
Sponsored by BerkShares, Inc., Prairie Whale, & Wandering Star Craft Brewery
Before the party...become a member!  BerkShares, Inc., is a non-profit, membership organization. Membership is open to any resident of the Berkshires and costs 25 BerkShares or $25 per year. We will hold our Annual Meeting for members on Thursday, October 20thth at 5:30 pm.

Members elect the Board of Trustees, participate on committees, help set policy, and are advocates for a more diverse and sustainable local economy. Membership dues help to support the organization financially.

If you would like to run for a position on the Board of Trustees please submit an inquiry (including name, address, and one or two paragraphs of biographical information) along with your membership dues. The by-laws of the corporation and more information about membership may be found online.

To become a member, send 25 BerkShares or $25 to BerkShares, Inc. P.O. Box 125, Great Barrington, MA, 01230 by September 23rd. Or bring your membership dues to the party!

Editorial Comment:  A little out of our usual geographic area but local currencies are an important tool and BerkShares are a good example of what they can do.

————————————
Saturday, September 24
————————————

Sustainable Model for Bangladesh Garment Industry
Saturday, September 24
9:00 AM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sustainable-model-for-bangladesh-garment-industry-tickets-27641951822

The 3rd Annual International Conference on “Sustainable Models for the Bangladesh Apparel Industry”, to be held on Saturday, September 24, 2016 at Harvard University. The day-long event is being organized by the International Sustainable Development Institute (ISDI).
 
The conference provides a forum for an active discussion on the state of the Bangladesh garment sector. At this year’s conference, we will focus on exploring ways to build a sustainable model for the Apparel Industry that is competitive while benefiting workers and stakeholders. The apparel manufacturing industry and distribution channels have seen dramatic changes in recent years. Exploring new market trends and consumer preferences, the conference participants will discuss strategic approaches for major transformations of the industry. In order for Bangladesh to compete in the global market, it is necessary to be cost-efficient while achieving compliance with heightened standards for worker health and safety.
 
The discussions will focus on the following topics: 1) international trade policies including the TPP and GSP; 2) progress on workers’ conditions, workplace safety, and fair price models that provide resources for upgrades; and 3) stakeholders’ collaboration for environmental sustainability and workplace standards in the context of Bangladesh’s garment and apparel industry. Expert recommendations will be made to help take collaboration among the stakeholders to the next level. There will be efforts at devising strategic action that can overcome the existing challenges and realize Bangladesh’s potential for economic development.
 
We invite you to attend the conference and to participate in the discussion.

———————————————— 

Beantown Jazz Festival
The Berklee Beantown Jazz Festival
The 2016 Berklee Beantown Jazz Festival will be held on Saturday, September 24, 2016. The theme of this year’s festival is “Jazz: A Peace Supreme.”

The Berklee Beantown Jazz Festival is Boston’s biggest block party—a free, annual, outdoor public concert that has delighted hundreds of thousands of music lovers over the years with its host of jazz, Latin, blues, funk, and groove performances, along with KidsJam, an instrument petting zoo, and an array of food vendors. Each year, the festival is the place to be in Boston on the last Saturday of September as the community comes together in a bond forged in the joy of great live music.

The festival offers world-class music on three stages, phenomenal food and drink, arts, crafts, and unique gifts. We look forward to seeing you for Boston's best free outdoor concert.

https://www.berklee.edu/beantownjazz

——————————— 

What the Fluff? Festival
Saturday,September 24 (Rain date September 25)
Union Square, Somerville
http://www.flufffestival.com

————————————

The Ig Informal Lectures
Saturday, Sep 24, 2016, 1:00 pm
MIT, Building 26-100, 60 Vassar Street, Cambridge

A half-afternoon of improbably funny, informative, informal, brief public lectures and demonstrations:
The new Ig Nobel Prize winners will attempt to explain what they did, and why they did it
Special appearance by several past Ig Nobel Prize winners — including a special performance by Dr. Nakamats.
The Ig Nobel Prize winners will be available for you to talk with, both before and after the lectures
The Ig informal Lectures are a free event, organized in cooperation with the MIT Press Bookstore. Seating is limited, so we suggest you arrive a bit early.

———————————

The Wobblies in Their Heyday
Saturday, September 24
2:00 p.m.
Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Avenue, Somerville

Author and former Somerville resident Eric Chester will discuss his recent work, /The Wobblies in Their Heyday: The Rise and Destruction of the Industrial Workers of the World during the World War I Era./

Based on extensive archival research, The Wobblies in Their Heyday, looks at the union during the World War I era when it was able to organize militant strikes that drastically curtailed production in key industries, copper mining and lumber. It also looks at the debates within the union on how to build a broadly based movement to oppose the war. The book also details the coordinated campaign of repression 
launched by the administration of President Woodrow Wilson with the intention of crushing the Wobblies.

This event is free and open to the public.
Sponsored by the Fountain Avenue Labor Support Committee (617) 625-9070

————————————————— 

Saving Eden from the Sixth Extinction: Film Screening and Discussion
Saturday, September 24
2:00pm to  4:00pm
Harvard Museum of Natural History, Haller Hall, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

The upcoming film, "Saving Eden from the Sixth Extinction," tells the story of how animals such as northern white rhinos, polar bears, African elephants, and bonobos have been pushed to the brink of extinction and it highlights the critical work that scientists and activists are doing to save these species. 

A discussion with film producer Mitchell Block will follow the screening.

Regular museum admission rates apply

—————————————————————— 
Sunday, September 25 - Saturday, October 1
——————————————————————

HUBweek
WHEN  Sun., Sep. 25, 9 a.m. – Sat., Oct. 1, 2016, 9 a.m.
WHERE	Across the Greater Boston Area
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Founded by The Boston Globe, Harvard University, Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
SPEAKER(S)  TBD
COST	FREE, $10-50
CONTACT INFO	kkoslick at hubweek.org
DETAILS	
HUBweek is a festival for the future happening now. From September 25 to October 1, 2016, HUBweek will showcase, celebrate, and convene Greater Boston’s most creative and innovative minds in art, science, and technology.
Founded by The Boston Globe, Harvard University, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the inaugural festival in October 2015 convened 46,000 attendees and 600 speakers and artists at 106 events over 8 days. Registration for HUBweek 2016 will open on July 20, with events and speakers to be released throughout the summer.
Sign up at HUBweek.org now through July 15 to secure exclusive 48-hour advance registration.
Curious? Learn more at HUBweek.org
LINK	www.hubweek.org

———————————— 

Somerville AgriCultural Festival
Sunday, October 1
1 to 6
ArtFarm site, corner of Poplar and Linwood Streets, Somerville

First-ever celebration of “everything we grow from the earth, and the people who grow it, here in Somerville.”  A chance for growers to display produce and the rest of us urban ag types to share what we know.  Plus talks, hands-on demos, participatory art.
 
http://somervilleartscouncil.org/artfarm 

——————————— 
Monday, September 26
——————————— 

OUR CONVENTION
Monday, September 26
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, 210 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston

How do you mobilize and empower a generation?

“Today, Boston is home to the largest proportion of young adults of any major US city.” – Catherine Cloutier, The Boston Globe

Young adults comprise about 45 percent of eligible voters and nearly half the Boston’s workforce. They are an economic engine, adding $1 billion annually in goods and services to the city. However, young adults – people between ages of 21 and 39 years old – are often ignored and overlooked when discussing the future of Greater Boston. During HUBweek 2016, City Awake will select up 500 Delegates – nominated representatives from a diverse coalition of up to 200 organizations – to participate in Our Convention. Featuring a series of programs focused on building community and exploring various issues facing Greater Boston, Our Convention Delegates will work together to formalize shared priorities as a generation.

Who it’s for: 500 young thought leaders who want to make an impact
Vibe: meaningful, hands-on, informative
More information at https://hubweek.org/events/our-convention/

—————————————— 

FAIR USE TOWN HALL: Copyright and Fair Use for the Visual Arts
Monday, September 26
11:00 AM to 1:30 PM (EDT)
Harvard University, The Thompson Room at Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fair-use-town-hall-copyright-and-fair-use-for-the-visual-arts-tickets-27466802947

Please join use for this informative townhall. Lunch will be served! 
Are you a professor, artists, museum professional, editor, librarian or archivist who works with copyrighted materials?  The College Art Association (CAA) and the Office of Scholarly Communications (OSC) at Harvard University are pleased to announce that Peter Jaszi, Professor of Law at Washington College of Law, American University and lead principal investigator of CAA's Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts, will be speaking about the Code, and answering questions on Monday, September 26 at Harvard University. The town hall style event will be moderated by Kyle Courtney, Program Manager and Copyright Advisor at OSC. 
Copies of CAA’s Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts will be disseminated. The Code provides visual-arts professionals with a set of principles addressing best practices in the fair use of copyrighted materials. It describes how fair use can be invoked and implemented when using copyrighted materials in scholarship, teaching, museums, archives, and in the creation of art. This event will address questions about fair use of interest to professors, artists, museum professionals, editors, librarians, and archivists. 
Admission to this event is free, but it would be helpful for us to know how many can attend. Please register to this event by Wednesday September 21, 2016. 

—————————————— 

Studying the Greenland Ice Sheet: Implications for climate past and present
Monday, September 26
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geological Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Dorthe Dahl-Jensen (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen).

Note: The colloquium talks are now at noon. Please plan on arriving at 11:45AM to help yourself to lunch. 

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/event-type/department-colloquium

Contact Name:  Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

————————————

New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  Synthesis & Next Steps
Thursday, September 26
12pm – 1pm
Webinar
RSVP at https://nertnetwork.org/2016/07/28/collective-inquiry-local-and-regional-food/

———————————

Get the Structure Right - Lessons from the Israeli Energy Market 
Monday, September 26
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Bldg, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Orit Farkash HaCohen, Chairperson, Israel Electric Authority, 2011-2016

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html
This series is presented by the Energy Technology Innovation Policy/Consortium for Energy Policy Research at HKS. Lunch will be provided.

Contact Name:   Louisa Lund
Louisa_Lund at hks.harvard.edu

———————————

Roxbury Showcase
Monday, September 26
4:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Roxbury Innovation Center, 2300 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/roxbury-showcase-tickets-26578137926

The impact of innovation in Greater Boston spans from art and food to technology and community. At the HUBweek Roxbury Showcase, now’s your chance to taste innovation in Roxbury. Hear from leaders making an impact by promoting inclusive innovation in our city. Meet tomorrow's innovators who are shaping the future of business, technology, design and fashion. Learn, mingle and share experiences to help each other take new ideas and ventures to the next level.
Who it’s for: The curious, those seeking relaxing and de-stress techniques
Vibe: Entrepreneurs, foodies, techies, artists, students
Host: 
HUBweek
Partner Hosts:
Roxbury Innovation Center
The Tech Connection
The Timothy Smith Network
Epicenter Community
Smarter in the City
Microsoft

——————————— 

Alchemical Ecology: Rudolf Steiner and the Environmental Movement
Monday, September 26
5:30pm
Harvard, Barker Center, Room 133, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge

Daniel McKanan, Harvard Divinity School

Synopsis
For nearly a century, students of Rudolf Steiner’s “spiritual science” have made significant contributions to environmental activism. They created the first certification system for organic agriculture, initiated the lawsuit that inspired Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, invented community-supported agriculture, and founded the world’s largest “green banks.” All of this activity is inspired by a spiritual worldview that might surprise other environmentalists: Steiner drew on alchemy and astrology as well as experimental science, and he taught his students “how to know higher worlds” as well as how to care for this one. In this presentation drawing on his forthcoming book, Harvard Divinity School professor Dan McKanan will offer an overview of Steiner’s contributions to environmentalism, and suggest some of the ways Steiner-inspired initiatives challenge all environmentalists to embrace a broader sense of ecological connection.

————————————

Should we engineer the mosquito?
Monday, September 26
6:00 PM
LabCentral, 700 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/BosLab/events/233152367/

BosLab is hosting a public forum to discuss the implications of genetically engineering mosquitoes towards eradicating diseases like Malaria or dengue. Guest speaker Professor Esvelt will discuss the use of gene drive technology for tackling vector-borne diseases, including Lyme disease. Participants will learn how the technology works, weigh in on the potential benefits and risks of this approach, and discuss its ethical and societal implications. Both scientists and members of the public are invited to participate in this engaging public forum! Refreshments and dinner will be served. The event is free and advanced registration begins September 12.

—————————————

The World According to Star Wars
WHEN  Mon., Sep. 26, 2016, 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Coop
SPEAKER(S)  Cass Sunstein
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS	  There’s Santa Claus, Shakespeare, Mickey Mouse, the Bible, and then there’s Star Wars. Nothing quite compares to sitting down with a young child and hearing the sound of John William’s score as those beloved golden letters fill the screen. In this fun, erudite, and often moving book, Cass R. Sunstein explores the lessons of Star Wars as they relate to childhood, fathers, the Dark Side, rebellion, and redemption. As it turns out, Star Wars also has a lot to teach us about constitutional law, economics, and political uprisings.

—————————————— 

Skillshare: What's All the Buzz About? (Honeybees, beekeeping, and our envi…
Monday, September 26
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Avenue, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/skillshare-whats-all-the-buzz-about-honeybees-beekeeping-and-our-environment-tickets-27264402562

About Skillshare: Somerville Skillshare is a free monthly learning event that features classes around any innovative topic and we encourage locals to teach it. It’s a way to learn new skills, jump-start new hobbies, and meet other people with similar interests, all in a fun and informal setting.
Class Description: This will be a one hour talk on what is happening with honeybees and other pollinators in our agricultural system, and how we and our world are affected by these changes and what we can do to help. The talk will include the basics of the hive and beekeeping as well as a short bit on the products of the hive.
This will be a one-time talk on Monday September 26, from 7pm to 8pm. 
About the facilitator: Tony Lulek is a Beekeeper and is the owner of Little Beehive Farm. His products are 100% natural with no preservatives. He developed most of the recipes himself. He was also the president of the Northfolk County Beekeepers Association for 6 years and was teaching bee school throughout that time.

————————————
Tuesday, September 27
————————————

The Science of Addiction: How opioids, from prescription painkillers to her…
Tuesday, September 27
8:00 AM to 9:15 AM (EDT)
Ragon Institute, 400 Technology Square, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-science-of-addiction-how-opioids-from-prescription-painkillers-to-heroin-work-in-the-brain-tickets-27110704848

This panel will examine the mechanisms of opioid addiction and the various and sometimes controversial methods of treatment – from abstinence to medication to a potential vaccine.
Who it’s for: community members, health care professionals, students, medical patients
Vibe: Thought-provoking, educational, pertinent
Hosted by STAT in Partnership with CVS Health
Sponsor: 
CVS Health
Panelists:
Monica Bharel, MD, MPH
Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
Sarah Wakeman, MD, FASAM
Medical Director, Substance Use Disorder Initiative at
Massachusetts General Hospital
Scott E. Lukas, Ph.D.
Director, Behavioral Psychopharmacology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital
Seth Mnookin
Co-Director of MIT’s Graduate Program in Science Writing

—————————————— 

HUB Presents: Expanding Opportunity in the Digital Age
Tuesday, September 27
10:00a–12:00p
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://hubweek.org/events/solve/expanding-opportunity-in-the-digital-age
Cost:  $25

Speaker: ANDREW MCAFEE Co-director, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy; JAMES MANYIKA Senior partner, McKinsey & Company; Director, McKinsey Global Institute (MGI); MICHELLE MOORE Head of Digital Banking, Bank of America

The acceleration of technology growth has led to major benefits for businesses, the economy, and society, but what about workers? 

Expanding Opportunity in the Digital Age will focus on the various challenges and strategies for broadening economic opportunity in a time of rapid technological advancement. This event will feature a mix of short personal stories from policy, industry, institutional and community leaders who are dealing with these issues in various and diverse settings. Followed by a keynote address on inclusive innovation, the event will conclude with an interactive and engaging discussion on the topic amongst experts. 

Who it's for: Business and civic leaders, researchers, entrepreneurs, students, workers 
Vibe: Informative, thought-provoking, action-oriented
Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/solve/expanding-opportunity-in-the-digital-age/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $25
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, MIT Solve, HUBweek
For more information, contact:  HUBweek
hello at hubweek.org 

———————————

Responsive Communities Initiative
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Information Technology, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society
SPEAKER(S)  Susan Crawford
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/responsive-communities-initiative-tickets-26573146998
DETAILS  The Responsive Communities Initiative led by Susan Crawford at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University addresses some of the most important issues of economic development, social justice, and civil liberties of our time – those prompted by Internet access. The program has three areas of research involving the internet, data, and government: Internet Access Infrastructure, Data Governance, and Responsive Communities Leaders. Come learn about the current state of the programs research, what they hope to achieve, and how Internet access could be regulated as a utility and open government data can improve our communities.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/responsive-communities-initiative/

——————————

Solve | MAKE
Tuesday, September 27
2:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

With the world's population poised to grow exponentially by midcentury, Solve's Make pillar addresses issues relating to basic infrastructure, manufacturing, economic opportunity, and how best to accommodate growth. Join our community of technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents to help create solutions to Make pillar challenges. Go here for more information: http://solvecolab.mit.edu. 

Be at Solve at HUBweek on Tuesday, September 27, as Solve | Make finalists selected by a distinguished panel of judges present their proposed solutions to the Inclusive Innovation challenge, answering the question: How do we create a more inclusive, productive, and sustainable economic future for all? 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

——————————

Collaborating at the Intersection of Art and Science
Tuesday, September 27
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM (EDT)
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Auditorium, 415 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/collaborating-at-the-intersection-of-art-and-science-tickets-26589059593

Artists and scientists influence each other in surprising ways. Join us for a fascinating conversation between Broad Institute researchers and artist-in-residence Naoe Suzuki, as they explore ideation as a collaborative effort, with results that potentially enhance both the art and research produced. The artist-in-residence program at Broad Institute provides an environment where revolutionary scientists and forward thinking artists can work, communicate, and learn together to benefit both science and art, and leverage the connection between the two disciplines to collaboratively provoke the creative thinking that drives innovation. 
Who it’s for: Artists, scientists, all creative thinkers
Vibe: Synergy, dialogue, thought-provoking
Host:  Catalyst Conversations
Partner Host:  Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Speakers:   Naoe Suzuki
Before beginning her appointment at Broad Institute, current artist-in- residence Naoe Suzuki has been the recipient of many grants and awards including the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, the Artist Grant in Drawing/Printmaking/Artist’s Book, and Artist Grant in Sculpture/Installation from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation, the Artists’ Fellowship, Inc., Puffin Foundation, and the Blanche E. Colman Award from Mellon Trust of New England. Her residency fellowships include Studios at MASS MoCA (2016), Blue Mountain Center (2015, 2013, 2011, 2008 and 2005), Millay Colony for the Arts (2008 and 2002), Jentel (2006), Centrum (1999), and MacDowell Colony (1998-99). Naoe was born in Tokyo, Japan, and based in Waltham, MA. She holds M.F.A. in Studio for Interrelated Media from Massachusetts College of Art and Design. You can see more of her work on her website at www.naoesuzuki.com.

Todd Golub, M.D.
Founding Core Member, Chief Scientific Officer, and Director of the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School; Charles A. Dana Investigator in Human Cancer Genetics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Investigator at Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Todd Golub is a founding core member of the Broad Institute and serves as the institute’s chief scientific officer and director of its Cancer Program. Golub is a world leader in understanding the basis of cancer, by creating and applying tools of genomics. He has made fundamental discoveries in the molecular basis of childhood leukemia, and laid the foundation for the diagnosis and classification of human cancers using gene expression analysis. He also pioneered the development of chemical screening approaches based on gene expression. He joined the faculty of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in 1997. At the same time he served as the leader of cancer genomics at the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome research, which evolved into the Cancer Program at the Broad. Golub has directed that program since 2004, and is also currently the Charles A. Dana Investigator in Human Cancer Genetics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. He is the recipient of multiple awards, including the Erasmus Hematology Award; the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award and the Outstanding Achievement Award from the American Association for Cancer Research; the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research; the E. Mead Johnson Award from the Society for Pediatric Research; and the Judson Daland Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Clinical Investigation from the American Philosophical Society. In 2014, he was elected as a member to the Institute of Medicine. Golub serves on the scientific advisory boards of the Wistar Institute and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He also serves as chair of the board of scientific advisors of the National Cancer Institute. Golub received his B.A. from Carleton College and his M.D. from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He completed his internship, residency, and fellowship.

Deborah Davidson, moderator 
Deborah Davidson is an artist, curator, and educator. She received her M.F.A. from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University and her B.A. from Binghamton University.  Her current project Catalyst Conversations is an organization devoted to the idea of art and science in dialogue, launched in October 2012. She is also the director of the Suffolk University Gallery and maintains a studio practice as well, exhibiting widely in the greater Boston area.

——————————

Changing Sea Ice Conditions and Arctic Marine Ecosystems
September 27
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Jim McCarthy, Biological Oceanography, Harvard University
The shrinking area of Arctic sea ice in summer is one of the most often cited examples of anthropogenic climate change. The areal extent of sea ice at the time of the September minimum has declined by about 1%/yr since satellite observations began 35 yr ago.  Sea ice is very different from lake ice.  A brine is created as ice crystalizes, a portion which remains in channels within the ice and provides habitat for microscopic plankton.  These organisms include photosynthetic algae and microscopic animals that feed on the algae, and they then become food for shrimp and fish under and at the edges of the ice.  This production is the base of the food web that supports marine mammals and birds that flourish in the Arctic during spring and summer.  Climate models project that with additional warming from greenhouse gases summer sea ice could vanish in the Arctic by mid century, with profound implications for many iconic species.

Bio:  Professor of Biological Oceanography at Harvard and was President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science from Feb 2008-Feb 2009.[1][2]  McCarthy is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Biological Oceanography and former Master of Pforzheimer House. He is also Acting Curator of the Malacology Department in the Museum of Comparative Zoology.  His studies address factors that regulate the processes of primary production and nutrient supply in upper ocean, approached using controlled laboratory studies and field investigations. Study sites range from near shore to the open ocean. Recent and current field research sites include the North Atlantic, equatorial Pacific, and Arabian Sea.

More information at http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/jim-mccarthy.html#more

——————————

How to Talk With Children About Gun Violence and Trauma
Tuesday, September 27
4:30 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Marran Theater, Doble Campus, Lesley University, 34 Mellen Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-to-talk-with-children-about-gun-violence-and-trauma-tickets-27611920999

In the wake of violence around the country and the world, the public is invited to join Lesley University faculty experts for a panel discussion to explore how teachers, parents, and other service providers can talk about gun violence and the related trauma.

Hear from Assistant Professor of Art Therapy Kelvin Ramirez; Associate Professor and social worker Joshua Baldwin; Professor of Photography Andre Ruesch; and Visiting Professor Debbie LeeKeenan, who for 20 years directed the Eliot-Pearson laboratory school for the Department of Child Study and Human Development at Tufts University.

The panel will moderated by Professor Lisa Fiore, an expert in early childhood development and educational psychology.

"Shots Fired"
The panel is presented in conjunction with an exhibit by professional photographer and artist Mark Teiwes (MFA '16), who used a camera-less process to shoot photosensitive material and literally document the effects of a gunshot.  The exhibit is on view in Marran Gallery through October 17th.
Marran Gallery and Theater
34 Mellen St
Cambridge, MA 02138
For more information about this event or the exhibit, contact Beth Tallett at etallett at lesley.edu.
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

Please RSVP, but walk-ins are welcome!

——————————

The New Arab Wars
Tuesday, September 27
4:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building E51-315, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Prof. Marc Lynch
The hopes of the Arab uprisings of 2011 have faded into a nightmarish array of resurgent autocrats, failed states, and civil wars. What went wrong? "The New Arab Wars" highlights the role of regional and global powers, from Saudi Arabia and Iran to the United States. It shows how the interventions by external powers derailed the democratic transition in Egypt and blocked change in other countries. It then explains how those interventions turned Libya, Yemen and Syria into full-scale wars with little prospect in sight for resolution. Finally, it looks at the Obama administration's approach to the uprisings and how the next President will likely adapt America's role in the Middle East. 

Marc Lynch is professor of Political Science at The George Washington University.

Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar 
The Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar is organized under the auspices of the MIT Center for International Studies, which conducts research on contemporary international issues and provides an opportunity for faculty and students to share perspectives and exchange views. Each year the Bustani Seminar invites scholars, journalists, consultants, and other experts from the Middle East, Europe, and the United States to MIT to present recent research findings on contemporary politics, society and culture, and economic and technological development in the Middle East.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cis/bustani/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, Radius/T&C
For more information, contact:  Dain Goding
617-252-1888

——————————

How to Scale Your Big Idea in a Complex World
Tuesday, September 27
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building E51, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Co-sponsored by HUBweek and MIT System Design & Management, this panel of innovators and entrepreneurs will discuss how they are applying systems thinking to groundbreaking work in a wide range of domains. Your questions and ideas are welcome and will be an important part of this event!

Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/reinventing-innovation-with-systems-thinking-how-to-scale-your-big-idea-in-a-complex-world/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: Pre-registration recommended. See url above
Sponsor(s): MIT System Design & Management
For more information, contact:  Lois Slavin
lslavin at mit.edu 

——————————

Askwith Debates: More Charter Schools? The Massachusetts Vote and the National Debate
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE	617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS	
Participants:
Tito Jackson, District 7 city councilor and chairman, Committee on Education, Boston City Council
Marc Kenen, executive director, Massachusetts Charter Public School Association
Additional participants TBA.
Moderator: Paul Reville, Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration, HGSE

Voters will face a decision this November regarding charter school caps – whether or not to authorize up to 12 new charter schools or expand enrollment in existing Massachusetts charter schools beginning as early as January 2017. Will a “yes” vote harm mainstream schools and undermine their funding? What other opportunities are there for parents stuck on charter school waiting lists? Will this decision influence the future of charter schools nationwide? This referendum has attracted national attention in the heated controversy about the future of charter schools in the U.S. public school education system. How do taxpayers/voters determine what’s best to keep mainstream school systems healthy while looking out for what’s best for individual children? Join us as proponents and opponents square off on the merits of charter school expansion in this inaugural of the Askwith Forum Debates.

——————————

What Works: Designing Inclusive Organizations
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Women and Public Policy Program, Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government
SPEAKER(S)  Iris Bohnet and Meghna Chakrabarti
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK	  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-works-designing-inclusive-organizations-tickets-27084615815
DETAILS	  Diversity is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back, and debiasing people’s minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Behavioral design offers a new solution.

Professor Iris Bohnet will discuss what organizations can do to create more inclusive environments, level the playing field, and help diverse teams succeed. There is so much more that can be done – often at a shockingly low cost and surprisingly high speed. Join the Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) during HUBweek for a conversation with Iris Bohnet, Professor of Public Policy, author of What Works: Gender Equality by Design, and Director of the Women and Public Policy Program.

For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit 
http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/what-works-designing-inclusive-organizations/

————————————

Palestinian and Israeli Bereaved Parents for Peace
Tuesday, September 27
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

The Parents Circle Families Forum (PCFF) is a joint Israeli-Palestinian organization made up of more than 600 bereaved families--all of whom have lost a loved one to the violent conflict. 

Join us to hear the stories of bereaved Israeli and Palestinian families as they share their extraordinary journey on the path of reconciliation. 

Also learn about opportunities to teach CS and entrepreneurship to Israeli and Palestinian youth through MISTI MIT-MEET (Middle Eastern Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow.) 

Light fare provided.

Open to: the general public

Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MIT Sloan Executive Education, MISTI MIT-MEET

————————————

Harnessing Evolution to Solve Problems in Biotech and Therapeutics
Tuesday, September 27
6:00 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT) 
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 415 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/harnessing-evolution-to-solve-problems-in-biotech-and-therapeutics-tickets-26576763816

Biological evolution has solved many challenging molecular problems with breathtaking effectiveness. Researchers have begun to harness the remarkable power of evolution to address problems of their own choosing, rather than of nature’s choosing. In this lecture, Liu will describe the development and first applications of phage­assisted continuous evolution (PACE), a method that enables proteins to evolve continuously in the laboratory for the first time, accelerating the speed of laboratory evolution ~100­fold. The Liu group has used PACE to rapidly evolve a wide variety of proteins with the potential to serve as novel therapeutic agents, as well as to study the reproducibility and path dependence of evolution over thousands of generations in a practical time frame. Liu will also describe a recent effort to use PACE to address a major problem facing worldwide agricultural productivity: the rise of insects resistant to a widely used protein insecticide.
Who it’s for: life-long Learners, curiosity seekers, science lovers
Vibe: informative, forward-thinking, collaborative
Host:  Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
Speaker:  David Liu, PhD, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and Associate Faculty member, Wyss Institute at Harvard University

———————————— 

Boston Green Drinks - September Happy Hour
Tuesday, September 27
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Scholars, 25 School Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-green-drinks-september-happy-hour-tickets-27173083424

We're talking off in August (Happy Labor Day weekend!) and will continue the conversation in September!
Join the conversation with sustainability professionals and hobbyists.  Enjoy a drink and build your connection with our green community!
Boston Green Drinks  builds a community of sustainably-minded Bostonians, provides a forum for exchange of sustainability career resources, and serves as a central point of information about emerging green issues.  We support the exchange of ideas and resources about sustainable energy, environment, food, health, education.

———————————— 

Breakthroughs in Nanotechnology
Tuesday, Sept 27
6:30 PM 
Belmont Media Center, 9 Lexington Street, Belmont 

Sameer Sonkusale, Ph.D., Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University; Principal Investigator, Nanoscale Integrated Sensors and Circuits Laboratory (NanoLab). the Sonkusale NanoLab. The Sonkusale Nanolab is currently engaged in cutting-edge research in several interdisciplinary areas, including nano-devices that benefit medicine and the life sciences. A major interest is the development of flexible, embedded sensors for diagnostics. Dr. Sonkusale and his team also work on zero-cost "do-it-yourself" diagnostics for the developing world. In this discussion (w/footage from his lab), Dr. Sonkusale explains how nanotechnology works and how it is revolutionizing medicine as well as other fields.

————————————

2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Medical Technology Producing Hamburgers
Tuesday, September 27
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Mark Post, (@MarkPost6), Professor of Physiology at Maastricht University, co-inventor of cell cultured beef
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.
 
Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

————————— 

Armin Nassehi: The State We Are In
Tuesday, September 27
7:00 PM to 10:00 PM (EDT) 
Goethe-Institut Boston, 170 Beacon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/armin-nassehi-the-state-we-are-in-tickets-26802345537

As we watch developments in the EU and US unfold, the unsettling feeling that our societies are unraveling is unavoidable. Social Theorist Armin Nassehi is professor at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich and editor of Kursbuch, one of Germany’s leading intellectual magazines. An outspoken intellectual in the German media and cited as “among the most thoughtful intellectual voices in Germany today” (New York Review of Books), Nassehi analyzes the current populist tendencies. Whether it’s elite bashing or xenophobic voices, he tries to make sense of the underlying causes while suggesting an urgent need to develop new narratives as a basis for building stronger democratic systems.

In addition, Armin Nassehi will speak at Brandeis University on Tuesday, September 27, 12-2 pm. Respondent ist Prof. Chandler Rosenberger (Dept. of Sociology, Brandeis University).

Armin Nassehi has been editor of the magazine Kursbuch since 2012. Since 2014 he has been serving as director of the Institute of sociology at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, where he has chaired the Department of Sociology since 1998. Among his most recent works are Die letzte Stunde der Wahrheit (i.e. truth’s final hour, 2015) and Gesellschaft der Gegenwarten: Studien zur Theorie der modernen Gesellschaft II (i.e. a society of presents: studies on the theory of contemporary society II, 2011).

This lecture is part of the global discussion/debate series "Kritikmaschine," organized by the Goethe-Institut and Kursbuch, one of Germany's leading intellectual magazines.

——————————— 

The Biopolis: Creative New Ideas for a Smarter City
Tuesday, September 27
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-biopolis-creative-new-ideas-for-a-smarter-city-tickets-27486259141

In an increasingly inter-connected and technological world, we need models for urban living that take full advantage of technology while increasing the participation of residents in developing new opportunities for a better life. A Smarter City responds to this challenge in ways that enhance not just the physical infrastructure of a city, but also the intellectual and social capital of its residents. It fosters the collective intelligence of citizens in a manner that is inclusive and oriented towards innovative problem solving. 
The Biopolis program is a transnational effort that links Boston/Cambridge with Paris, using the principles of biology to innovate new models for engaging citizens and meeting the urban challenges of their living city. Since 2015, teams of university students from Harvard, SciencesPo and the Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity have spent summers using Paris as a laboratory to develop new ideas for improving urban living. Proposals are co-developed with citizens and local government and represent collective expressions of new ways to create a Smarter City and address key goals for sustainable development. Biopolis teams will share their proposals with accompanying short films as the basis for a collective brainstorm with participants on potential implementations in Boston and Paris.
Who it's for: students, tech professionals, urban planning professionals, families
Vibe: educational, thought-provoking, forward-thinking

************
----------------
Opportunity
----------------
************

Dear Friends of Harvard Square & of the historic Harvard Square 'Out-of-Town-News' Kiosk:
Please add your John or Jane Hancock to this online petition and forward it to 
friends and neighbors, and share it on facebook and the like. Thanks!   cheers* James

Online Landmark Designation Petition:
https://www.change.org/p/cambridge-historical-commission-support-landmark-designation-for-the-harvard-square-kiosk

Boston Globe Article (Front Page, Business Section), 8/26/16:
http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/08/25/out-town-news-could-pushed-out-iconic-harvard-square-location/fu0JPz8OfNH2f0fpgkxgzN/story.html

——————————— 

Effective Altruism MIT Sloan Meetup Group
http://www.meetup.com/effective-altruism-mit-sloan/

Want to make the world the best place it can be? 
Effective Altruism is a worldwide movement that uses rational thinking and science to have the best possible impact. Effective Altruism MIT Sloan is bringing together people from all over the area to share experiences and be more effective by working together. 
To learn more about effective altruism, read the introduction on the international EA website (https://www.effectivealtruism.org) or watch Peter Singer's TED talk.

————————— 

Last fall, Solve (solve.mit.edu/) convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents like you from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. 

The Solve program is organized around four “pillars”: Fuel, Learn, Cure, and Make. This year’s program poses three “challenges” within those pillars. Of particular note to the sustainability community are the Fuel challenges: 
Fuel:
Carbon price
How can new technologies (including digital currencies like Bitcoin) be used to put a price on emissions of carbon and other greenhouse gases?
Negative carbon emissions
How do we remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in a way that is scalable, economical, and ethical?

What can you do right now?

The program is actively seeking proposals for these Fuel challenges. We encourage you to log in to the Solve CoLab platform (http://solvecolab.mit.edu) to propose solutions.  A distinguished panel of judges will select semifinalists, who will present their solutions at the Solve at HUBweek event, September 27 and 28, 2016. Registration for the Solve at HUBweek events is now open at www.hubweek.org.

Thank you for your continued support of the Solve program. Together, we can bring about real and lasting solutions to the world’s most challenging problems.

Editorial Comment:  I’ve alerted my contacts in the Geotherapy movement for enhanced soil carbon sequestration about this opportunity.  May they pick up on it.

—————————— 

Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

-----------------------

Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

---------------------

Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

———————————

Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

———————————

Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian at cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
http://www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit
@cambenergy 
http://facebook.com/cambridgeenergyalliance

——————————

Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

*********
------------
Resource
------------
*********

Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

---------------------------------

Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

----------------------

The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

---------------------

Boston Maker Spaces - 27 and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

****************************************
------------------------------------------------------

Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 12 PM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


More information about the Act-MA mailing list