[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - September 18, 2016

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Sep 18 12:06:48 PDT 2016


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Index
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Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.

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Monday, September 19
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12pm  Coastal Water Quality, Climate Change & Ocean Acidification along the U. S. Northeast
12pm  Ocean mixing driven by tides: breaking lee waves, hydraulic jumps and the influence of subinertial internal tides
12:15pm  The Competing Imaginaries of Solar Geoengineering
4pm Data, Decisions, and Public Policy Lecture:  Measurement for Action
4pm  The Materials of Imperialism: Engineering Arid Landscapes in Washington’s Columbia Basin and Afghanistan’s Helmand Valley
5pm  Fragments of A Life in Film
5:30pm  Divestment and Reinvesting in Massachusetts Companies
6pm  Challenges for the Next President
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series:  The Science of Sugar
7pm  A Truck Full of Money:  One Man’s Quest to Recover from Great Success
7pm  Water — and Climate — Solutions in Plain Sight

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Tuesday, September 20
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8:15am  Mechanotherapeutics:  From Drugs to Wearables, Wyss Institute's 7th Annual Symposium
8:30am  NECEC Energy Storage Forum 2016
12pm  New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  The Role of Sustainable Seafood
12pm  Brown Bag: Issues in Curating the Open Web at Scale - with Gary Price
12pm  Thinking Fast Makes Changing Slow: Human Thought Processes Interfere with Achieving Diversity
12pm  The Strategic Consequences of Torture Seminar
3pm  Control of Phase Transformations in Rechargeable Batteries
4pm  The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
4:15pm  Modern Environmental Politics: big data, behavioral science, and getting environmentalists to vote
4:15pm  "Brexit Means Brexit": But What Does Brexit Mean for the UK and the EU?
4:30pm  Immigration, Democracy, and Discrimination in Small Town America
4:30pm  Engineering biomolecular motors
5pm  The Power of Network: A Lecture by Dr. Chang-Gyu Hwang
5:30pm  The Impact of the U.S. Lead Regulation on Infant Health in Mexico
6pm  Putting the 2016 Election Into Perspective: A Conversation with Bob Schieffer, Ann Compton and Nicco Mele
6pm  Morphogenesis of Flux Structure: The New Field of Structural Design
6pm  Dig into foods of the past
7pm  CaféSci Boston presents "The Learning Caféteria," a 4-part series of science cafés inspired by NOVA's School of the Future

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Wednesday, September 21
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7:30am  September Boston Sustainability Breakfast
9am  Social Innovation in Africa: A Practical Guide for Scaling Impact
12pm  Soul City: The Lost Dream of an American Utopia
12pm Strategies of Insurgent Diplomacy: Evidence from the Iraqi Kurdish Liberation Movement
12:15pm  Vladimir Bulovic: Future will be Measured in Nanometers
4pm  The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
4pm  Aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions and climate change  
4pm  Countdown to #Campaign2016
4:15pm  Capital versus Output Subsidies: Implications of Alternative Incentives for Wind Energy
5pm  Fleet-wide monitoring of offshore wind farms for failure prognosis
7pm  The Citizens' Choice: Legalizing Recreational Marijuana

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Thursday, September 22
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11am  BU Sustainability Festival 
11:45am  Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
12pm  Modern Environmental Politics:  Big data, behavioral science, and getting environmentalists to vote
4pm  The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
5pm  Green Think: How Profit Can Save the Planet
5pm  An Evening with Ray Stata
5:30pm  Askwith Forums - Education as a Human Right: An Evening with Hanan Al Hroub, Winner of the 2016 Global Teacher Prize
5:30pm  Mapping Home: Global Crisis of Place -- Exhibition and Presentation
6pm  The 26th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony

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Friday, September 23
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10am  MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar - Karin van der Wiel (GFDL)
12pm  Drones, Photogrammetry and 3d modeling in Archaeology
12:30pm  IACS Seminar: Machine Learning for Materials Discovery: Low-LTC Compounds, Grain Boundaries and Superlattices
2:30pm  Free Will:  Delusional or Real? 
3pm  The Market as God
4pm  Free Event Brass Band Flash Mob School of HONK! Parade Cambridge!
5pm  Berkman Klein Center Fall 2016 Open House
6pm  Berkshires 10th Anniversary Party
7pm  The World in Flames:  A Black Boyhood in a White Supremacist Doomsday Cult

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Saturday, September 24
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8am  Boston Harbor Islands 2016 Centennial Bioblitz Festival
9am  Sustainable Model for Bangladesh Garment Industry
9am - 5pm  Beantown Jazz Festival
What the Fluff? Festival
1pm  The Ig Informal Lectures
2pm  The Wobblies in Their Heyday
2pm  Saving Eden from the Sixth Extinction: Film Screening and Discussion

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Sunday, September 25 - Saturday, October 1
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HUBweek see http://www.hubweek.org

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Sunday, September 25
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3pm  Innovation on the move: General Electric and Boston’s World of Ideas

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Monday, September 26
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10am - 5pm  OUR CONVENTION
11am  FAIR USE TOWN HALL: Copyright and Fair Use for the Visual Arts
12pm  Studying the Greenland Ice Sheet: Implications for climate past and present
12pm  Two talks: Unraveling the history of the Milky Way (speaker: Yuan-Sen Ting, Harvard); High-Redshift Astrophysics Using Every Photon (speaker: Patrick Breysse, Johns Hopkins) 
12:10pm  A physiological approach to the ecology and evolution of flowers
12pm  New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  Synthesis & Next Steps
12pm  Get the Structure Right - Lessons from the Israeli Energy Market 
4pm  Roxbury Showcase
5pm  A proposed energy conversion process for making solar energy a major player in global power generation
5:30pm  Alchemical Ecology: Rudolf Steiner and the Environmental Movement
6pm  Should we engineer the mosquito?
6pm  ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Imaginary Property with Florian Schneider
7pm  The World According to Star Wars
7pm  Skillshare: What's All the Buzz About? (Honeybees, beekeeping, and our envi…

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Tuesday, September 27
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8am  The Science of Addiction: How opioids, from prescription painkillers to her…
10am  HUB Presents: Expanding Opportunity in the Digital Age
11:45am  Phototactic Guidance of a Tissue-Engineered Soft-Robotic Ray
12pm  Responsive Communities Initiative
12pm  Implications of thaw-induced boreal tree cover loss for carbon, water and energy fluxes in the southern Taiga Plains, Northwest Territories
12pm  Speaker Series: Patrick Ruffini
12pm  Strategies for Rapid Climate Mitigation with Laurence Delina
2pm  FDA AND THE DRUG APPROVAL PROCESS: IS IT REALLY BROKEN?
2pm  Solve | MAKE
3pm  Collaborating at the Intersection of Art and Science
3pm  Earth System Dynamics and Mass Extinctions
4pm  Changing Sea Ice Conditions and Arctic Marine Ecosystems
4:30pm  How to Talk With Children About Gun Violence and Trauma
4:30pm  The New Arab Wars
5pm  How to Scale Your Big Idea in a Complex World
5:30pm  Askwith Debates: More Charter Schools? The Massachusetts Vote and the National Debate
5:30pm  What Works: Designing Inclusive Organizations
5:30pm  Palestinian and Israeli Bereaved Parents for Peace
6pm  Harnessing Evolution to Solve Problems in Biotech and Therapeutics
6pm  Boston Green Drinks - September Happy Hour
6:30pm  Breakthroughs in Nanotechnology
6:30pm  Careers in Sustainability
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Medical Technology Producing Hamburgers
7pm  Armin Nassehi: The State We Are In
7pm  The Biopolis: Creative New Ideas for a Smarter City

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

The Making of Donald Trump:  David Cay Johnston Is Having Too Much Fun on CSPAN
http://www.dailykos.com/stories/2016/9/12/1569494/-The-Making-of-Donald-Trump-David-Cay-Johnston-Is-Having-Too-Much-Fun-on-CSPAN

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Monday, September 19
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Coastal Water Quality, Climate Change & Ocean Acidification along the U. S. Northeast
Monday, September 19
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Scott Doney, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)

EPS Colloquium Series 
http://eps.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/event-type/department-colloquium

Note: The colloquium talks are now at noon. Please plan to come to Haller Hall at 11:45AM to help yourself to lunch. 

Contact Name:   Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Ocean mixing driven by tides: breaking lee waves, hydraulic jumps and the influence of subinertial internal tides
Monday, September 19 
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Buidling 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker:  Ruth Musgrave, MIT
The dissipation of tidal energy in the abyssal ocean leads to diapycnal mixing, raising the deep cold waters that form at high latitudes, and providing an important link in the energetics of the overturning circulation. Observations of deep ocean mixing show that it is both intermittent and highly inhomogeneous, with hotspots over regions of rough topography. Determining when, where and how much the ocean mixes is of critical importance for understanding the large scale circulation, with implications for biogeochemistry, heat transport and ocean modeling in a changing climate.

In this talk, I will focus on specific processes associated with tidally driven turbulence, combining field observations and numerical modeling of flows through a small channel that transects the crest of the Mendocino Ridge in the eastern Pacific, a site of mixed (diurnal and semidiurnal) tides. At this latitude the diurnal tide is subinertial and evanescent away from the topography, in contrast to the semidiurnal tide which is superinertial and radiating. We construct two numerical simulations to interpret our observations. First, we use a two-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, high resolution simulation to examine flow through the channel, and show that the observed turbulence arises from both hydraulic jumps and breaking internal lee waves. To place the processes in a regional context, we use a second simulation of tidally driven flow in a three-dimensional domain using realistic bathymetry, demonstrating the presence of diurnal bottom-trapped waves. These energetic internal waves generate strong currents close to the topography, and their interplay with the superinertial tidal constituent is of leading order importance in determining the timing and magnitude of the observed turbulence at the ridge.

Our observations and models illustrate some of the mechanisms by which energy is transferred from the tides to the large scale circulation, and highlight the role of subinertial trapped waves at this location. We posit that these waves may be important contributors to ocean mixing, especially at climatically sensitive high latitudes.

About the Speaker
Ruth uses observations, numerical models and theory to try to understand physical processes in the ocean. Her PhD was on internal tide generation and turbulence at topography, in particular where the tidal frequency is subinertial. Currently, her research is focused on the influence of topography on large scale currents, like the NEC.

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. 2016/2017 co-ordinator: Christine Chen (ccy at mit.edu)

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The Competing Imaginaries of Solar Geoengineering
Monday, September 19
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Jeremy Baskin, University of Melbourne

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

sts at hks.harvard.edu

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Data, Decisions, and Public Policy Lecture:  Measurement for Action
Monday, September 19
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building 10-250, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Rukmini Banerji
Dr. Rukmini Banerji is CEO of Pratham, one of India's largest NGOs working in education, and has emerged as a leading international voice on primary and secondary education. Pratham began in 1994 and has reached millions of children and youth through their education and vocational programs. Dr. Banerji's leadership on the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) has garnered international recognition for its innovative model to measure child learning outcomes which has transformed education policy in India and around the world. She also serves as a member of India's Central Advisory Board of Education. Dr. Banerji was a Rhodes Scholar and completed her PhD at the University of Chicago.

D2P2: Data, Decisions & Public Policy 
The D2P2 Lectures feature leading academics and other experts who share knowledge derived from modern applied economics research to demonstrate how it can inform better public policy decision-making. Speakers will discuss their groundbreaking research and practice, and how it can be applied to improve people???s lives.

Web site: https://www.povertyactionlab.org/d2p2
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE
Sponsor(s): Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, Economics Department
For more information, contact:  Taylor Sweazey
tsweazey at mit.edu 

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The Materials of Imperialism: Engineering Arid Landscapes in Washington’s Columbia Basin and Afghanistan’s Helmand Valley
Monday, September 19
4:00PM TO 5:30PM

http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/envihist/upcoming-events
with Linda Nash, University of Washington 

Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room (440), MCZ, 26 Oxford Street, 4th Floor, Cambridge
Environmental History Working Group

Contact Name:   Laura Martin
lauramartin at fas.harvard.edu

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Fragments of A Life in Film
September 19
5:00 - 6:00pm 
BU, COM 101, 640 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Graham Townsley, Documentary Producer/Director, Shining Red Productions

Bio:  Graham Townsley is an Emmy-nominated TV documentary filmmaker who has made films for PBS, National Geographic, and the Discovery Channel. His work has also been aired internationally on BBC, Channel 4, ARTE. and ZDF. His most recent documentaries are 'E.O. Wilson: Of Ants and Men;' and 'Dawn of Humanity;' both of which aired in 2015. 

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

More information at http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/09/fragments-of-life-in-film-bus-seminar.html

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Divestment and Reinvesting in Massachusetts Companies
Monday, September 19
5:30 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT)
Old West Church, 131 Cambridge Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/divestment-and-reinvesting-in-massachusetts-companies-tickets-27197251712

Over the past five years, Massachusetts has become the national incubator for social ventures, clean technologies, and innovative business solutions to climate change. The Climate Action Business Association has developed a new series of reports, Local Emerging Market Reports (LEMR) to offer a spotlight on further opportunities for leadership in the transition to a carbon free economy. The goal is to support local entrepreneurs, early adopters, investors, and others looking for market solutions to fuel the transition to a carbon free economy.

Join CABA and BASIC as we look at these reports from the perspective of sustainable and clean tech investors.  Matt Patsky, CEO of Trillium Asset Management and David Miller, Executive Director of Clean Energy Venture Group will provide their perspective on the report and the future of sustainable investments in Massachusetts' local economy.  

Report authors Michael Green and Kate Galbo from CABA will moderate the conversation and discuss how the reports can be used to fuel local investments.

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Challenges for the Next President
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 19, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JKF Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	JFK Jr. Forum
Harvard Institute of Politics
Co-sponsored by the Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
SPEAKER(S)  John Beyrle
Ambassador of the United States, Russian Federation (2008-2012)
Maxim Boycko
Visiting Lecturer in Economics, Harvard University
Jill Dougherty
Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Former CNN Moscow Bureau Chief
Nicholas Burns (Moderator)
Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations, Harvard Kennedy School
Faculty Director, Future of Diplomacy Project
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum Office
617-495-1380
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/challenges-next-president-crisis-russia

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series:  The Science of Sugar
Monday, September 19
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Joanne Chang ’91, (@jbchang), Flour Bakery, author of “Flour” and “Flour Too”
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Sept. 19
“The Science of Sugar”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Joanne Chang ’91, (@jbchang), Flour Bakery, author of “Flour” and “Flour Too”
Tuesday, Sept. 27
“Medical Technology Producing Hamburgers”
Science Center Lecture Hall B, 7 p.m.
Mark Post, (@MarkPost6), Professor of Physiology at Maastricht University, co-inventor of cell cultured beef
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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A Truck Full of Money:  One Man’s Quest to Recover from Great Success 
Monday, September 19
7:00 PM (Doors at 6:30)
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/tracy_kidder/
Cost:  $5 - $28.75 (book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes Pulitzer Prize winner TRACY KIDDER, author of The Soul of a New Machine and Mountains Beyond Mountains, and entrepreneur PAUL ENGLISH for a discussion of Kidder's latest book, A Truck Full of Money: One Man’s Quest to Recover from Great Success, the inspiring story of Kayak.com and Lola founder Paul English.
About A Truck Full of Money

Tracy Kidder, the “master of the nonfiction narrative” (The Baltimore Sun) and author of the bestselling classic The Soul of a New Machine, now tells the story of Paul English, a kinetic and unconventional inventor and entrepreneur, who as a boy rebelled against authority. Growing up in working-class Boston, English discovers a medium for his talents the first time he sees a computer. As a young man, despite suffering from what would eventually be diagnosed as bipolar disorder, he begins his pilgrim’s journey through the ups and downs in the brave new world of computers. Relating to the Internet as if it’s an extension of his own mind, he discovers that he has a talent for conceiving innovative enterprises and building teams that can develop them, becoming “a Pied Piper” of geeks. His innovative management style, success, and innate sense of fair play inspire intense loyalty. Early on, one colleague observes: “Someday this boy’s going to get hit by a truck full of money, and I’m going to be standing beside him.” Yet when English does indeed make a fortune, when the travel website Kayak is sold for almost two billion dollars—the first thing he thinks about is how to give the money away: “What else would you do with it?” The second thing he thinks is, What’s next?

With the power of a consummate storyteller, Tracy Kidder casts a fresh, critical, and often humorous eye on the way new ideas and new money are reshaping our culture and the world. A Truck Full of Money is a mesmerizing portrait of an irresistibly endearing man who is indefatigable, original, and as unpredictable as America itself.

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Water — and Climate — Solutions in Plain Sight
Monday, September 19
7:00–8:30pm
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain
RSVP at http://my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.
Cost:  $0 - $5 nonmember

Judith D. Schwartz, MA, MSJ, Journalist and Author
Judith Schwartz, who has looked deeply into the challenges and solutions around Earth’s soil in her 2013 book, Cows Save the Planet, has since turned her sights towards water. In this talk and discussion, she will focus on reframing our global environmental challenges in a way that illuminates potential solutions. For once we broaden our perspective to include how water moves across the landscape and through the atmosphere, we'll find many opportunities to restore ecological cycles, even entire ecosystems. Judith will offer examples from around the world that she's encountered in her reporting for her newest book, Water in Plain Sight: Hope for a Thirsty World.

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Tuesday, September 20
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Mechanotherapeutics:  From Drugs to Wearables, Wyss Institute's 7th Annual Symposium
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 20, 2016, 8:15 a.m. – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University
SPEAKER(S)	
Georg Duda, Ph.D., Julius Wolff Institut, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin
Philip Gottlieb, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo
Simon Hoerstrup, Ph.D., Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Zurich
Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., Wyss Institute, Harvard University
Helene Langevin, M.D., Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital
David J. Mooney, Ph.D., Wyss Institute, Harvard University
Dennis Orgill, M.D., Ph.D., Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital
David Paydarfar, M.D., Wyss Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Clinton T. Rubin, Ph.D., Stony Brook University
Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, Ph.D., Columbia University
Conor Walsh, Ph.D., Wyss Institute, Harvard University
Valerie M. Weaver, Ph.D., Center for Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration, University of California, San Francisco
COST	This event is free, however registration is required.
CONTACT INFO	info at wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-7038
DETAILS	
The Wyss Institute's 7th annual international symposium will focus on advances in the field of Mechanobiology that have resulted in the development of new types of pharmaceuticals, drug delivery systems, engineered tissues, and wearable therapeutic devices that leverage physical forces or target mechanical signaling pathways as a core part of their mechanism of action. Organized by Wyss Institute Core Faculty members Dave Mooney and Don Ingber, the day will include a number of distinguished speakers who will provide examples of how mechanics is being harnessed in ways that can transform the future of medicine.
LINK  http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewevent/551

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NECEC Energy Storage Forum 2016
Tuesday, September 20
8:30 AM to 10:30 AM
Foley Hoag LLP, 155 Seaport Boulevard Seaport West, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/necec-energy-storage-forum-tickets-25490831764

Join NECEC and Foley Hoag’s Energy and Cleantech practice for a not-to-be-missed discussion with energy storage experts in policy, deployment and investment who have their finger on the pulse of the energy storage market.

The Energy Storage Forum will take place in Boston and New York with a live video stream connecting panelists and guests from both locations. Register here

Event Contact
necec at necec.org

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New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  The Role of Sustainable Seafood
Thursday, September 20
12pm – 1pm
Webinar
RSVP at https://nertnetwork.org/2016/07/28/collective-inquiry-local-and-regional-food/

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Brown Bag: Issues in Curating the Open Web at Scale - with Gary Price
Tuesday, September 20
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building  E25-401, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Gary Price
Much of the web remains invisible: resources are undescribed, unindexed or simply buried -- as many people rarely look past the first page of Google searches or are unavailable from traditional library resources. 

At the same time many traditional library databases pay little attention to quality content from credible sources accessible on the open web. 

How do we build collections of quality open-web resources (i.e. documents, specialty databases, and multimedia) and make them accessible to individuals and user groups when and where they need it? 

This talk reflects on the emerging tools for systematic programmatic curation; the legal challenges to open-web curation; long term access issues, and the historical challenges to building sustainable communities of curation.

Web site: http://informatics.mit.edu/event/brown-bag-discussion-gary-price?type=month&month=2016-08
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries
For more information, contact:  Kelly Hopkins
6172533044
khopkins at mit.edu 

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Thinking Fast Makes Changing Slow: Human Thought Processes Interfere with Achieving Diversity
Tuesday, September 20
Noon–1:00 p.m.
BU, Instructional Building, Hiebert Lounge, 72 East Concord Street, Boston

Speaker
Lydia Villa-Komaroff
Board Member, Cytonome/ST, LLC; Board Member, American Type Culture Collection (ATCC); Board Member, Massachusetts Life Sciences Center (MLSC)

Please Register at http://www.bu.edu/sph/news-events/signature-events/diversity-inclusion-seminar-series/2016-series-schedule/thinking-fast-makes-changing-slow-human-thought-processes-interfere-with-achieving-diversity/

Live-Streaming Available During Event at http://www.bu.edu/sph/news-events/signature-events/sph-live/

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The Strategic Consequences of Torture Seminar
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 20, 2016, 12 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Taubman 401, Taubman Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Ethics, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Research study, Social Sciences, Special Events, Support/Social, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Carr Center for Human Rights Policy
SPEAKER(S)  Douglas A. Johnson, Alberto Mora, and Averell Schmidt (Faculty Director, Senior Fellow, and Fellow, respectively, at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy)
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	Nimesha Perera, nimesha_perera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Please join the Carr Center for a seminar with Douglas A. Johnson, Alberto Mora, and Averell Schmidt (Faculty Director, Senior Fellow, and Fellow, respectively, at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy) who will present findings on their research into the policy consequences stemming from the U.S. use of torture in the years after the attacks of 9/11.
The presentation will focus on how the US use of torture impacted the country's diplomatic relations and national security as well as the policy's impact on global norm prohibiting torture.
For more background, please see their recent publication in Foreign Affairs Magazine.
This event is open & free to the public. Admittance is on a first-come, first-serve basis.
Lunch will be served.
RSVP HERE: https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9LTvWHr1lJEMynX
LINK	http://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/event/briefing-strategic-consequences-torture?delta=0&type=month&month=2016-09&admin_panel=1

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Control of Phase Transformations in Rechargeable Batteries
Tuesday, September 20
3:00PM TO 4:00PM
Harvard, 209 Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Martin Z. Bazant, MIT
The rapid, stable cycling of rechargeable batteries requires well-controlled phase transformations of the redox active materials in each electrode, between the charged and discharged states. Three examples will be discussed: 1) In Li-ion batteries, common intercalation materials, such as iron phosphate and graphite, undergo phase separation (into Li-rich and Li-poor phases), which limits the power density and leads to degradation.  A general mathematical theory, supported by recent x-ray imaging experiments, will be presented that shows how phase separation can be suppressed by concentration-dependent reaction resistance. 2) In Li-air batteries, the same theory, applied to electrodeposition of Li2O2, reveals a fundamental rate limitation, unfortunately far below the needs of electric vehicles.  3) Finally, in Li-metal batteries, theoretical and experimental results will be presented regarding the control of morphological instabilities in lithium electrodeposition, which must be achieved to ensure safety and long cycle life.

Speaker Bio: Martin Z. Bazant is the E. G. Roos (1944) Professor of Chemical Engineering and Mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  After a PhD in Physics at Harvard University (1997), he joined the MIT faculty in Mathematics (1998) and then Chemical Engineering (2008), where he currently serves as Executive Officer.   His research combines theory, computation and experiments in diverse fields, with emphasis on electrochemistry and electrokinetics.  His contributions have been recognized by the Alexander Kuznetsov Prize in Theoretical Electrochemistry (ISE), Global Climate and Energy Project Chair (Stanford), Paris Sciences Chair (ESPCI), Brilliant Ten (Popular Science), Lighthill Lecture in Applied Mathematics (IMA), Winchell Lecture in Materials Science (Purdue), and Corrsin Lecture in Fluid Dynamics (Johns Hopkins).   He serves on the editorial board of SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics and Scientific Reports and is the Chief Scientific Advisor for Saint Gobain Ceramics and Plastics, Northboro R&D Center.

Widely Applied Mathematics Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/92326

Contact Name:  Alpha Lee
alphalee at g.harvard.edu

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The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 20, 2016, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Stephen L. Carter, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Yale University
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS	
A Lecture in 3 parts. A Q&A and reception will follow each talk.
9/20 – “Thinking Property” 
9/21 – The Invisible Race 
9/22 – The Visible Future 
LINK	http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-20-2016-400pm/stephen-l-carter-w-e-b-du-bois-lecture-series-1-3

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Modern Environmental Politics: big data, behavioral science, and getting environmentalists to vote
Tuesday, September 20
4:15p–6:00p
MIT, Building 4-270, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Nathaniel Stinnett
Big data has completely revolutionized how modern political campaigns target and communicate with voters. Simultaneously, a new generation of behavioral scientists has completely changed our understanding of why and how people decide to vote. These changes present a large number of counter-intuitive and exciting discoveries and they also suggest both good and bad news for the environmental movement. Join Nathaniel Stinnett for a discussion of how modern political campaigns work and how that impacts environmental policy at the local, state, and federal level.

Nathaniel Stinnett is the Founder & CEO of the Environmental Voter Project, a non-partisan nonprofit that uses big data analytics and behavioral science to identify non-voting environmentalists and then get them to vote. Recently dubbed “The Voting Guru” by Grist, Stinnett was named one of the 50 environmental visionaries that you’ll be talking about in 2016. He has over a decade of experience as a senior advisor, campaign manager, and trainer for US Senate, Congressional, and mayoral campaigns as well as issue-advocacy nonprofits. Formerly an attorney at the international law firm of DLA Piper, Stinnett holds a B.A. from Yale University and a J.D. from Boston College Law School. He lives in Boston, MA with his wife and daughter.

The Environmental Voter Project: http://www.environmentalvoter.org

ESI Lecture Series in Environment and Sustainability

Web site: https://environmentalsolutions.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Sponsor(s): Environmental Solutions Initiative
For more information, contact:  Hannah Loomis
617-715-4048
esi at mit.edu 

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"Brexit Means Brexit": But What Does Brexit Mean for the UK and the EU?
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 20, 2016, 4:15 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Hoffman Room, Busch Hall, 27 Kirkland Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	EU Law and Government
SPEAKER(S)  Jeff Kenner
DETAILS	  The United Kingdom's vote for Brexit on June 23, 2016 was an unprecedented rejection of the European integration process by an EU Member State. But what exactly does Brexit mean? Professor Kenner will examine the process of Britain's withdrawal from the perspective of the UK and the EU 27. The talk will explore various options for a negotiated settlement open to both the UK and the EU. Is it possible for the UK to have access to the EU's Single Market with some control over people's freedom of movement? If so, can this objective be achieved without Brexit and would that be desirable? If not, what alternative models for future relations are most suitable for the UK and the EU 27?
LINK  https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2016/09/brexit-means-brexit-but-what-does-brexit-mean-for-the-uk-and-the-eu

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Immigration, Democracy, and Discrimination in Small Town America
Tuesday, September 20
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Justin Steil, Assistant Professor of Law and Urban Planning, MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, Inter-University Committee on International Migration
For more information, contact:  Phiona Lovett
253-3848
phiona at mit.edu 

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Engineering biomolecular motors
Tuesday, September 20
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building 6-120, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Prof. Zev Bryant, Stanford University

Physical Chemistry Seminar Series

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The Power of Network: A Lecture by Dr. Chang-Gyu Hwang
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 20, 2016, 5 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Haarvard, Sanders Theare, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Conferences, Information Technology, Lecture, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Korea Society
SPEAKER(S)  Dr. Chang-Gyu Hwang
DETAILS  Dr. Hwang is a renowned entrepreneur and engineer, and currently he is the President of KT Corporation which is the largest telephone company in South Korea.  He is also well-known for Hwang’s Law, which refuted Moore’s Law by re-predicting the rate of advance in semiconductor in early 2000s. He already gave several invited lectures at different schools in Harvard; in particular, when he had a speech at Burden Auditorium in Harvard Business School in 2005 as the President of the Semiconductor Division at Samsung Electronics, more than 800 students were attended and the speech was featured in the Harvard Crimson (www.thecrimson.com…).
In the lecture, Dr. Hwang will be speaking regarding his experiences as an entrepreneur and his views on the future developments in the telecommunications industry. We believe his speech will be inspiring and helpful not only for students in business and engineering but also for the entire Harvard society.

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The Impact of the U.S. Lead Regulation on Infant Health in Mexico
Tuesday, September 20
5:30 - 6:30 PM
MIT, Building  E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge (I assume as the notice did not include a specific place and this is where these events are usually held)
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdwI0aUNFDavtYrWAqvD8WhOmkfBW5yZiTyC-X73fmHuxpZ6Q/viewform?c=0&w=1&usp=send_form

Dr. Shinsuke Tanaka 
Lead is a metal known to affect almost every organ and system in the human body. However, lead still exists in ambient air in the U.S. and continues to endanger public health and welfare. In response, the EPA substantially strengthened the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for lead in 2008. The revised standard is 10 times tighter than the previous one set over 30 years ago. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the new NAAQS for lead on (i) environmental quality in the U.S., (ii) trade patterns between the U.S. and Mexico and (iii) infant health in Mexico. We find that the new lead regulation substantially improved the ambient air quality in the U.S. Our evidence suggests that such improvements in domestic environmental quality are driven by increased exports of lead contents to Mexico for recycle and production. We also find that exports from lead-emitting Mexican firms to the U.S. have also increased. Consequently, we find that the birth outcomes in Mexico deteriorated in proximity to battery recycling plants as compared with areas slightly away from them. Our findings are consistent with the pollution haven hypothesis suggesting that the stringent environmental policy in a developed country can induce offshoring pollution and health risks to a country with lax environmental standards. 

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Putting the 2016 Election Into Perspective: A Conversation with Bob Schieffer, Ann Compton and Nicco Mele
Tuesday, September 20
6:00 p.m. 
Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, Littauer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

A conversation on the state of the 2016 presidential campaign and its coverage in the media, with Bob Schieffer, Ann Compton and Nicco Mele (moderator). Co-Sponsored by the Institute of Politics.

Bob Schieffer is the current Walter Shorenstein Media and Democracy Fellow. He has been a reporter for more than half a century and was a part of CBS News for 46 years. He is one of the few reporters in Washington to have covered all four of the major beats: the Pentagon, the White House, Congress and the State Department. Schieffer anchored the Saturday edition of the “CBS Evening News” for 23 years, became the network’s chief Washington correspondent in 1982 and was named the anchor and moderator of “Face the Nation” in 1991. Within these roles he has interviewed every president since Richard Nixon and moderated three presidential debates. Throughout his career Schieffer has written four books, won numerous awards and covered every presidential race and nominating convention since 1972.
Ann Compton is a visiting fellow at the Institute of Politics for the Fall 2016 semester. She was the first woman assigned by a television network to cover the White House and her longevity and impact have been considered unmatched over the span of her 41 years on the air for ABC News. After retiring from daily coverage in 2014, Ann was brought back to cover the 2016 political conventions for ABC. Ann’s career at ABC News spanned 7 presidents and 10 presidential campaigns for the network. She was assigned to the White House in 1974, as the Watergate scandal came to an end. She reported for all ABC News broadcasts and online from the lawn of the White House, from Capitol Hill, from the campaign trail, and from around the globe traveling with Presidents, Vice Presidents, and First Ladies. Her retirement was announced by President Barack Obama who called on her at a West Wing news conference saying, “Ann Compton, everybody here knows, is not only the consummate professional but is also just a pleasure to get to know.”
Nicco Mele (moderator) is the Director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy. He took over leadership of the Center in 2016 after serving as Senior Vice President and Deputy Publisher of the Los Angeles Times and as the Wallis Annenberg Chair in Journalism at the University of Southern California. He is the author of The End of Big: How The Internet Makes David the New Goliath and co-founder of EchoDitto (now Echo & Co.), a leading internet strategy and consulting firm. Mele also is a board member of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard and a Senior Fellow at the USC Annenberg Center on Communication Leadership & Policy.

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Morphogenesis of Flux Structure: The New Field of Structural Design
Tuesday, September 20
6:00p–7:30p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Mutsuro Sasaki: The Edward and Mary Allen Lecture in Structural Design

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, Building Technology Program
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

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Dig into foods of the past
Tuesday, September 20
 6 – 8 pm
Harvard, Schlesinger Library, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

Ever wonder what the Aztec’s chocolate drink actually tasted like? Or what went into a Bronze Age stew in Greece? Or how sweet the sponge cake nineteenth century prostitutes ate for dessert in Boston tasted? 

Join us on September 20 at the opening meeting of the Culinary Historians of Boston at the Schlesinger Library in Cambridge and find out.

Our speaker, Ilaria Patania, is a Ph.D. student in archaeology at B.U. who explores the foods of the past. Along with a team of students from the archaeology, gastronomy, and cooking departments, she has created meals based on the evidence found at digs in various parts of the world. At this, the first meeting of the season, she’ll explain how the evidence was unearthed, how the foods were recreated, and how they tasted. 

Come satisfy your curiosity with us!

Visit the website or Facebook page to learn about other upcoming meetings and events.
http://www.culinaryhistoriansboston.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/CulinaryHistorians-of- Boston/168569909055

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CaféSci Boston presents "The Learning Caféteria," a 4-part series of science cafés inspired by NOVA's School of the Future
Tuesday, September 20
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT) -
Le Laboratorie Cambridge, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-learning-cafeteria-series-tickets-27097159333

Airing September 14th during PBS “Spotlight Education” week, School of the Future is a 2-hour documentary that will introduce viewers to the science of learning—a complex and interdisciplinary new field that encompasses neuroscience, physiology, and the psychology of children.
The show examines how, in a new age of information, rapid innovation, and globalization, can we prepare our children to compete. Once the envy of the world, American schools are now in trouble. Test scores show our kids lag far behind their peers from other industrialized countries, and as the divide between rich and poor grows wider, the goal of getting all kids ready for college and the workforce gets harder by the day. How can the latest research help us fix education in America? Can the science of learning —  including new insights from neuroscientists, psychologists, and educators — reveal how kids’ brains work and tell us which techniques are most likely to engage and inspire growing minds?  What role should technology play in the classroom? Teachers, students, parents, and scientists take center stage as NOVA explores a new vision for the School of the Future.

Meet the Speakers
Dr. Nancy Hill, Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education
September 20, 2016
Professor Hill is a developmental psychologist and her research identifies the unique and interactive ways in which race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status influence parenting beliefs, practices and child outcomes, especially among African American, Latino, and Euro-American children. Her research has identified the ways in which similar parenting practices may have different meanings for and impacts on children’'s mental health and development based on cultural, community, and economic contexts.
Dr. Charles Nelson, Professor of Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital
October 18, 2016
Charles A. Nelson III, PhD, is Professor of Pediatrics and Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and holds the Richard David Scott Chair in Pediatric Developmental Medicine Research at Boston Children’s Hospital.  His research interests center on a variety of problems in developmental cognitive neuroscience, including:  typical and atypical memory development; the development of social perception; developmental trajectories to autism; and the effects of early adversity on brain and behavioral development.
Dr. Gigi Luk, Associate Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education
November 15, 2016
Gigi Luk's research on the cognitive consequences of bilingualism extends across the lifespan. These cognitive consequences include literacy acquisition in children and executive functions in young and older adults. The main research finding is that bilingualism, as a language experience, results in some cognitive advantages and linguistic limitations at different developmental stages. She investigates bilingual consequences using both behavioral and neuroimaging techniques. In addition to investigating the science of bilingualism, Dr. Luk has examined how to harness scientific findings on bilingualism to improve educational experience for children from diverse language backgrounds.
Dr. Luba Falk Feigenberg, Research Director, Making Caring Common
December 20, 2016
Luba Falk Feigenberg, EdD, is the Research Director for Making Caring Common. Luba has nearly two decades of experience working in a variety of non-profit and educational settings, including schools, early childhood education, after school programs, the juvenile justice system, and community mental health. At the core of her work is a focus on children’s social-emotional development, school-community partnerships, and effective schools and services for children. She regularly consults with schools, school districts, and mental health organizations about how to build a culture of continuous quality improvement, sustainable systems for student support services, and strategies to best promote children’s social-emotional development.
Directions to Le Laboratoire Cambridge, 650 East Kendall Street
Public Transit: Red line to Kendall Square, walk straight down 3rd Street, turn right onto Athenaeum Street, and left onto East Kendall
Parking: There is a parking deck - the 650 East Kendall Street Garage - accessible by Linskey Way. If you purchase food or drink from Le Lab, your parking ticket can be validated for discounted rates.
Le Laboratoire, is a unique art and design center that invites visitors to explore the experiments and wonders of innovators of all kinds discovering at frontiers of science. 

"School of the Future" is part of American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen, a public media initiative made possible by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for "School of the Future" is also provided by Carnegie Corporation of New York. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of the author.

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Wednesday, September 21
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September Boston Sustainability Breakfast
Wednesday, September 21
7:30 AM to 8:30 AM (EDT) 
Pret A Manger, 101 Arch Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/september-boston-sustainability-breakfast-tickets-27424507440

Happy Fall!!
Join us for the September Sustainability Breakfast - Net Impact Boston's informal breakfast meetup of sustainability professionals together for networking, discussion and moral support. It's important to remind ourselves that we are not the only ones out there in the business world trying to do good! Feel free to drop by any time between 7:30 and 830 am.

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Social Innovation in Africa: A Practical Guide for Scaling Impact
WHEN  Wed., Sep. 21, 2016, 9 – 10 a.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at the Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Ndidi Nwuneli, Director, African Philanthropy Forum and Founder, LEAP Africa
CONTACT INFO	Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  This seminar, will be given by former M-RCBG senior fellow Ndidi Nwuneli, who has recently published the book "Social Innovation in Africa: A Practical Guide for Scaling Impact." She is the director of the African Philanthropy Forum and founder of LEAP Africa.
Breakfast will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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Soul City: The Lost Dream of an American Utopia
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 21, 2016, 12 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center
SPEAKER(S)  Thomas Healy, Professor of Law, Seton Hall Law School
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS	
A Q&A will follow the talk
LINK	http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-21-2016-1200pm/fall-colloquium-thomas-healy

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Strategies of Insurgent Diplomacy: Evidence from the Iraqi Kurdish Liberation Movement
Wednesday, September 21, 2016
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cabmridge

Speaker: Morgan L. Kaplan (Harvard)

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu 

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Vladimir Bulovic: Future will be Measured in Nanometers
Wednesday, September 21
12:15 PM to 1:15 PM
Refreshments: 11:45 AM
MIT, Building 32-G882, Hewlett, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Vladimir Bulovic, Associate Dean for Innovation, School of Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) 
Biography: Vladimir Bulovi is the Associate Dean for Innovation in MIT’s School of Engineering. He is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT, holding the Fariborz Maseeh Chair in Emerging Technology, leading the Organic and Nanostructured Electronics laboratory, co-leading the MIT Innovation Initiative and co-directing the MIT-ENI Solar Frontiers Center. He is an author of over 180 research articles (cited over 30,000 times) and an inventor of over 90 U.S. patents in areas of light emitting diodes, lasers, photovoltaics, photodetectors, chemical sensors, programmable memories, and micro-electro machines, majority of which have been licensed and utilized by both start-up and multinational companies. He is a co-founder of several start-up companies that together employ over 200 people, including QD Vision, Inc., producing quantum dot optoelectronic components; Kateeva, Inc., focused on development of printed organic electronics; and Ubiquitous Energy, Inc., developing nanostructured solar technologies. Bulovi? received his Ph.D. from Princeton University, where his academic work and patents contributed to the launch of the Universal Display Corporation and the Global Photonics Energy Corporation.

Abstract: The Nano Age is upon us … With nano-scale advancements we are reimagining Health and Life Sciences, Energy, Computing, Information Technology, Manufacturing, Quantum Science, … That is because nano is not a specific technology. It does not belong to a particular industry or discipline. It is, rather, a revolutionary way of understanding and working with matter, and it is the key to launching the next Innovation Age, the Nano Age. 

MIT.nano rising at the heart of the campus is MIT’s newest cradle for Nano Age advancements.

Contact: Deborah Goodwin, 617.324.7303, dlehto at csail.mit.edu
seminars at csail.mit.edu, cis-seminars at csail.mit.edu 

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The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 21, 2016, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Stephen L. Carter, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Yale University
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS  A Lecture in 3 parts. A Q&A and reception will follow each talk.
9/20 – “Thinking Property” 
9/21 – The Invisible Race 
9/22 – The Visible Future 
LINK  http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-20-2016-400pm/stephen-l-carter-w-e-b-du-bois-lecture-series-1-3

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Aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions and climate change
Wednesday, September 21
4:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker:  Chris Bretherton, Univ of Washington
Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key uncertainty in interpreting the historical record of climate change and for model projection of future climate change. Boundary layer clouds cover much of the world oceans. Their interactions with aerosols, the focus of this talk, have fascinating dynamical as well as microphysical aspects that climate models are just starting to grapple with.

Aerosols are essential to the formation and radiative properties of low clouds. In turn clouds and precipitation are important for removing aerosol from the boundary layer, and also interact with atmospheric turbulence and convection. The cloud response to aerosols drives global scale circulation and rainfall changes. These internal feedbacks make aerosol-cloud interaction important and challenging to model. We use observations and aerosol-coupled large-eddy simulations to frame low clouds and aerosols as a coupled system that can support preferred regimes. Long-lived pockets of open cells in marine stratocumulus are one naturally occurring manifestation of stable multiple coexisting stable regimes. Other possible examples and implications for simulation of aerosol-cloud-climate interaction will also be noted.

EAPS Department Lecture Series
About the Series
EAPS interdisciplinary Department Lecture Series (DLS) brings both national and international speakers into the department to share their work. In addition EAPS sponsors a number of annual flagship named lectures, among them the Brace Lecture, the Kendall Lecture, and the Carlson Lecture. All such lectures and seminars are free and open to the public. To be added to EAPS event listserve contact Brandon Milardo, bmilardo at mit.edu.

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Countdown to #Campaign2016
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 21, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, L-166, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  Ann Compton
COST  Free and Open to the Public
CONTACT INFO	deisy_carrera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Come take a front row seat to history in the final 8 weeks of #Campaign2016.  For ABC News,  Ann Compton covered ten presidential elections and seven presidents. She asked questions at two formal general election debates. Each week her study group and national guests will track the polls, dissect the rhetoric, and put a special focus on how the age of digital media makes for the most unconventional candidates and news coverage in modern times.
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/fellows-study-groups

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Capital versus Output Subsidies: Implications of Alternative Incentives for Wind Energy
WHEN  Wed., Sep. 21, 2016, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Room Littauer-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy, Harvard Environmental Economics Program
SPEAKER(S)  Todd Gerarden, Harvard University
LINK  https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

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Fleet-wide monitoring of offshore wind farms for failure prognosis
September 21
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm 
MIT, Building 35-225, Sloan Laborator,  
RSVP at http://energy.mit.edu/event/helsen/#speaker-1
Space is limited; reservation required.

JAN HELSEN , Professor, Vrije Universiteit Brussel 
Offshore wind energy is rapidly becoming a key player in the European renewables market and recently expanded to U.S. waters. However, a drastic reduction in the cost of offshore wind energy is necessary in order to achieve long-term viability.

Two aspects with high potential are operation and maintenance (O&M) optimization and field-data enabled design improvements. Both heavily rely on decision support tools to link turbine operation modes to failure mechanisms.

An owner-operator of a wind farm looks for controllability and seeks knowledge about future failure events. Prognosis techniques not only detect failure, but also and more importantly predict failure evolution. This enables reduced power operation modes to allow turbines to remain online while spare parts are on their way.

A designer is interested in the link between occurring failure and the design assumptions. Prognosis enables feedback from the failure mechanisms of the whole fleet of turbines in the field, creating an interactive learning process about the current design. Due to a lack of data, prognosis has been held back a long time, but the current trend towards sensorization of Industrial machines, the so-called Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), is starting to overcome this hurdle.

Professor Helsen’s research aims to leverage physics-based signal processing techniques with machine learning approaches to build multi-level models that predict system under-performance and failure. Helsen also investigates the potential to learn at the fleet level, and the potential to embed expert knowledge in decision-support schemes and dashboards.

Jan Helsen joined the department of Mechanical Engineering at Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) in 2014. He holds a PhD in Engineering Science from KU Leuven in the field of flexible multibody modeling of wind turbines. His research focuses on physics based big data analytics for monitoring of fleets of rotating machinery, with main application areas in wind energy and industrial machinery. In the wind energy domain he coordinates the big data analytics-related projects at the Belgian offshore wind laboratory OWI-lab. He has a close collaboration with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Wind Team in the field of turbine reliability. His research team is involved in both fundamental and industry oriented research projects with leading wind energy players. He worked with MHIVOW, Vestas, ZF Wind Power and Siemens, among others.

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The Citizens' Choice: Legalizing Recreational Marijuana
Wednesday, September 21
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Edward M. Kennedy Institute, 210 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-citizens-choice-legalizing-recreational-marijuana-tickets-27154241066

Admission is free and open to the public, but registration is required. 
WGBH and the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate are proud to present The Citizens' Choice: Legalizing Recreational Marijuana. Join us as we explore both sides of this issue – and attempt to answer the question, would legalizing recreational marijuana affect Massachusetts for better or for worse? Hear a variety of experts discuss this initiative, and prepare yourself to make an informed decision when you head into the voting booth this fall. Jim Braude, host of WGBH's Greater Boston will moderate. 

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Thursday, September 22
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BU Sustainability Festival 
Thursday, September 22
11:00am – 2:30pm
BU Medical Campus, Talbot Green, 72 E. Concord Street, Boston 

Join the Challenge to reduce your environmental footprint; buzz your actions and you could win a your choice of a FitBit or solar charger! Swap your light bulbs for an LED or get a travel coffee mug for free. Learn about biking in Boston and get involved in student and staff community organizations!

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Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 22, 2016, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Littauer Building, Fainsod Room (3rd Floor Littauer), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Law, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar Rahmani Center for Business & Government, HKS
SPEAKER(S)  Prof. Malcolm Sparrow, HKS
CONTACT INFO	Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS	  This seminar will be given by Malcolm Sparrow, Professor of the Practice of Public Management at Harvard Kennedy School on his recently published book "Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform."
Lunch will be served. 

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Modern Environmental Politics:  Big data, behavioral science, and getting environmentalists to vote
Tuesday, September 22
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Nathaniel Stinnett
Big data has completely revolutionized how modern political campaigns target and communicate with voters. Simultaneously, a new generation of behavioral scientists has completely changed our understanding of why and how people decide to vote. These changes present a large number of counter-intuitive and exciting discoveries and they also suggest both good and bad news for the environmental movement. Join Nathaniel Stinnett for a discussion of how modern political campaigns work and how that impacts environmental policy at the local, state, and federal level.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures: Blackness and the Legal Imagination
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 22, 2016, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Stephen L. Carter, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Yale University
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS  A Lecture in 3 parts. A Q&A and reception will follow each talk.
9/20 – “Thinking Property” 
9/21 – The Invisible Race 
9/22 – The Visible Future 
LINK	http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-20-2016-400pm/stephen-l-carter-w-e-b-du-bois-lecture-series-1-3

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Green Think: How Profit Can Save the Planet
Thursday, September 22
5:00 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT) 
Harvard Club of Boston, 374 Commonwealth Avenue Massachusetts Room, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/green-think-how-profit-can-save-the-planet-tickets-26724098498

The environments in which we live are changing fast. To keep people healthy and alive, we must prevent diseases caused by turbulent weather, pollution, and increasingly crowded cities.

Hear from Rick Fedrizzi, Founder and CEO of US Green Building Council, and learn about our new Master of Public Health in Sustainability and the Global Environment.

This speaker series will celebrate the Center for Health and the Global Environment's 20th year, and introduce you to pressing issues students will explore in the Sustainability, Health, and the Global Environment program at the Harvard School of Public Health. In this program students will learn the latest research techniques, and have opportunities to connect with leading edge thinkers in global businesses and governments who are focused on the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings. We are accepting applications beginning Fall 2016. 

Join us to learn from leading global health experts, and talk with faculty members actively working to solve some of the greatest public health challenges facing us today. To learn about other topics in the series visit http://www.chgeharvard.org/events. 

Reception following lecture. 

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An Evening with Ray Stata
Thursday, September 22
5:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 32-123, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Ray Stata, founder of Analog Devices
Celebrating Boston's dedication to innovation and to building thriving global companies. We will honor the region's entrepreneurial spirit with an in-depth interview with Ray Stata '57 (founder of Analog Devices), led by Antonio Rodriguez (Matrix Partners), followed by a Q&A session and a reception.

Web site: https://innovation.mit.edu/event/evening-ray-stata/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Tickets: https://innovation.mit.edu/event/evening-ray-stata/ 
Sponsor(s): Innovation Initiative, Translational Fellows Program, RLE
For more information, contact:  Terri Park
617-715-2330
innovation at mit.edu 

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Askwith Forums - Education as a Human Right: An Evening with Hanan Al Hroub, Winner of the 2016 Global Teacher Prize
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 22, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  Speaker: Hanan Al Hroub, recipient, 2016 Global Teacher Prize; teacher, Samiha Khalil Secondary School, Palestine
Discussant: Fernando Reimers, Ed.M.’84, Ed.D.’88, Ford Foundation Professor of Practice in International Education and director, International Education Policy Program and the Global Education Innovation Initiative, HGSE
Introduction: James E. Ryan, dean and Charles William Eliot Professor, HGSE
In this Askwith Forum, Hanan Al Hroub, winner of the 2016 Global Teacher Prize, will speak about her experiences as a Palestinian educator and her unique approach to instruction.

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Mapping Home: Global Crisis of Place -- Exhibition and Presentation
Thursday, September 22
5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
Washburn Lounge, Brattle Campus, Lesley University, 10 Phillips Place, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/mapping-home-global-crisis-of-place-exhibition-and-presentation-tickets-27606720444

We are bearing witness to the highest level of mass migration in human history. The office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates that conflict, generalized violence, and human rights violations coupled with drought, disease, and a lack of work, shelter, food, and clean water has forcibly displaced over 65 million people. This number is much higher when displacement is understood in relation to colonization, systemic discrimination and present day examples of extractive economics, terrorism, and social exclusion.

We are experiencing a crisis of place.

Through Dr. Sajnani’s work with the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma, she asked first responders, policy makers, healthcare providers, and resettlement specialists who work with refugees around the world to take a photograph of what sustains them amidst this ongoing crisis and to create a digital video of how they contribute to creating a healing environment through their policies, programs, or practice. An analysis of 507 photos and 540 videos from participants in Syria, Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, Nigeria, Germany, Australia, and the U.S amongst other countries, reveals an undeniable relationship between ecological and human health.

As co-curator of this archive, Oscar Palacio’s interest is focused on the way Dr. Sajnani’s participants across the globe use the medium of photography to map out their new environments. Through the lens of displacement, this selection of landscape photographs emphasizes the human need to define alien territories, while pointing out moments of hope and play.

Panelists
Co-Curator - Nisha Sajnani is Associate Professor, Director of Global Interdisciplinary Studies; Coordinator of the Clinical Mental Health: Drama Therapy MA program; Advisor, Expressive Therapies PhD program; and Fellow of the Lesley University Institute for Arts and Health. She is also on faculty with the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma where she lectures on the role of beauty in the context of displacement. Nisha is a Canadian-born multimedia artist who works with oral histories, digital photography, video, improvisation, and performance to explore identity, memory, ethics, and place. Most recently, she directed Under Pressure (2014), a performance collage featuring community responses to the Boston Marathon bombing, and Lives That Matter (2015), an ethnodrama examining racism, identity politics, and hashtag activism.
Co-Curator - Oscar Palacio is Associate Professor of Photography at Lesley University College of Art and Design. He is a Colombian-born, Boston-based photographer whose work explores the role of photographic representation in relationship to history, memory, identity, and place. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Addison Gallery of American Art among others. Recent books include American Places, published by The Arts at California Institute of Integral Studies. For more information visit http://oscarpalacio.net
Discussant- Marjorie Agosín is a poet and activist who teaches Latin American studies at Wellesley College. She is the poet laureate of the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma. She has won numerous honors in recognition of her work as a human rights activist, including the United Nations Leadership Award for Human Rights, the Jeanette Rankin Award in Human Rights, and years after she left her homeland the Chilean government honored her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal for Lifetime Achievement.
Discussant- Nicole Weber, PhD, is the director of the online Science in Education program at Lesley University. She describes herself as an artful scientist interested in finding ways to reconnect  local communities to the natural environment. By connecting science to a local community, both socially and naturally, she feels that we will begin to better understand the interrelation of the community and the environment. This has grown from creating personal ownership and advocacy for learning, creating authentic experiences where we are empowered to question, constructing knowledge from one’s social network, and moving beyond a local focus to see the network of influence through systems thinking.  Dr. Weber looks to find interesting ways to get us outside and create an intersection of community and conservation whenever possible.
Discussant- Richard F. Mollica, MD, MAR is the Director of the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT) of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.  Over the past three decades HPRT and IPC have pioneered the mental health care of survivors of mass violence and torture. HPRT/IPC’s clinical model has been replicated throughout the world. Under Dr. Mollica’s direction, HPRT conducts training, policy and research activities for traumatized populations around the world. HPRT’s screening instruments are considered a gold standard in the field and have been widely translated into over thirty languages. HPRT’s scientific work has helped place mental health issues at the center of the recovery of post-conflict societies. Dr. Mollica has published over 160 scientific articles. He and his team over the past 30 years have cared for over 10,000 survivors of extreme violence worldwide. Through his research, clinical work and trainings he is recognized as a leader in the treatment and rehabilitation of traumatized people and their communities.

Please RSVP, but walk-ins are welcome!
Any questions, please contact Beth Chambers Tallett at etallett at lesley.edu

Exhibition Dates: June 16 - September 30, 2016

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The 26th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony
Thursday, September 22
6:00 pm*
Harvard, Sanders Theater, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
TICKETS are available exclusively by the Harvard Box Office at https://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu/Online/default.asp

*Pre-ceremony concert —and the webcast —begin at 5:40 pm (US Eastern Time)
The ceremony proper begins at 6:00 pm

The 26th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony will introduce ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners - Each has done something that makes people laugh then think.
Winners travel to the ceremony, at their own expense, from around the world to receive their prize from a group of genuine, genuinely bemused Nobel Laureates, in Harvard's historic and largest theater. Additional info will appear in the Improbable Research blog. 

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Friday, September 23
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MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar - Karin van der Wiel (GFDL)
Friday, September 23, 2016
10:00a–11:00a
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Karin van der Wiel, GFDL
The MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar (MASS) is an informal student-run weekly seminar series within PAOC. Seminar topics include all research concerning the atmosphere and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars usually take place on Fridays from 12-1pm. The presentations are either given by an invited speaker or by a member of PAOC and can focus on new research or discussion of a paper of particular interest. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Martin Wolf
mjwolf at mit.edu 

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Drones, Photogrammetry and 3d modeling in Archaeology
Wednesday, September 23
12:00pm
Harvard, Tozzer Anthropology Building 203, 21 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Luis Jaime Castillo Butters, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú 

Archaeology Program Seminar Series
More information at http://anthropology.fas.harvard.edu/event/archaeology-program-seminar-series-1

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IACS Seminar: Machine Learning for Materials Discovery: Low-LTC Compounds, Grain Boundaries and Superlattices
Friday, September 23
12:30pm to 2:00pm
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge
Lunch 12:30pm; Talk 1pm

Koji Tsuda, Professor, The University of Tokyo
Material discovery driven by machine learning is a reality. I report successful case studies in discovery of low LTC compounds from database, grain boundary optimization and automated design of Si-Ge superlattices.

Speaker Bio:  Koji Tsuda is a professor in the Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences Graduate School of Frontier Sciences at The University of Tokyo.  Machine learning, bioinformatics and materials Informatics. Group leader of a national materials informatics project at NIMS (National Institute for Materials Science).
Host: Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS)

Contact: Natasha Baker
Phone: 617-496-2623
Email: nrbaker at seas.harvard.edu

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Free Will:  Delusional or Real? 
Friday, September 23 
2:30 PM - 4 PM
43 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Free Will is conceived as one of the central tenets of human agency. Despite its central importance for moral responsibility and law, its existence as a real or a delusionary concept still under heated debate. The panel will tackle questions like: What is free will? Does it exist? If so, how is it generated? Do animals have free will? How can one make moral decisions without free will? The panel will bring neuroscientists, physicists and philosophers to address these questions from an interdisciplinary perspective.  

The panelists are:
1.Haim Sompolinsky: Professor of Physics and Neuroscience at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at Harvard University 
2.Tamar Schapiro: Professor of Philosophy at MIT 
3.Robert Doyle: Philosopher and Staff scientist at the Astronomy department of Harvard University.
4.Jonathan Phillips: Cognitive scientist and Postdoctoral researcher at the Moral Psychology laboratory at Harvard University. 

The panel moderators are Ahmed El Hady (Princeton University) and Emily Mackevicius (MIT)
The event is hosted and sponsored by the Brain and Cognitive Science department (MIT). It will take place on Friday 23rd of September from 2:30 to 4:00 PM at room 46-3189 (MIT Brain and Cognitive sciences department, map: https://goo.gl/maps/Rb2cmKqYe1C2 ) . Everyone is invited. The lecture is open to the public. Please share the event with your friends and colleagues. We are looking forward to see you all.

MIT Brain and Cognitive Sciences

More information at https://www.facebook.com/events/775624079206673/

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The Market as God
Friday, September 23
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Hollis Research Professor of Divinity at Harvard University HARVEY COX for a discussion of his book The Market as God.

About The Market as God
The Market has deified itself, according to Harvey Cox’s brilliant exegesis. And all of the world’s problems—widening inequality, a rapidly warming planet, the injustices of global poverty—are consequently harder to solve. Only by tracing how the Market reached its “divine” status can we hope to restore it to its proper place as servant of humanity.
The Market as God captures how our world has fallen in thrall to the business theology of supply and demand. According to its acolytes, the Market is omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent. It knows the value of everything, and determines the outcome of every transaction; it can raise nations and ruin households, and nothing escapes its reductionist commodification. The Market comes complete with its own doctrines, prophets, and evangelical zeal to convert the world to its way of life. Cox brings that theology out of the shadows, demonstrating that the way the world economy operates is neither natural nor inevitable but shaped by a global system of values and symbols that can be best understood as a religion.

Drawing on biblical sources, economists and financial experts, prehistoric religions, Greek mythology, historical patterns, and the work of natural and social scientists, Cox points to many parallels between the development of Christianity and the Market economy. At various times in history, both have garnered enormous wealth and displayed pompous behavior. Both have experienced the corruption of power. However, what the religious have learned over the millennia, sometimes at great cost, still eludes the Market faithful: humility.

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Free Event Brass Band Flash Mob School of HONK! Parade Cambridge!
Friday, September 23
4:00 PM
School of HONK, 119 Winthrop Street, Cambridge 
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/SocialFun/events/233995810/

RAIN OR SHINE if it rains bring your umbrellas and do the twirling umbrella dance  

This is a great danceable event for those who are lucky enough to join in on this Meetup, we'll be following a large number of jolly brass band musicians on their spontaneous local route! Everybody in the neighborhood will be gawking at the marvelous performance and some joining in. Those automobilers honking their horns will be vastly outnumbered.

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Berkman Klein Center Fall 2016 Open House
Friday September 23
5:00 pm followed by Reception
Harvard Law, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West, Second Floor, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/node/99552#RSVP

Come to the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society’s Fall 2016 Open House to meet our faculty, fellows, and staff, and to learn about the many ways you can get involved in our dynamic, exciting environment.

5:00-6:30 pm - Project Showcase Session: Select Berkman Klein projects will be present with information about their current activities. Staff working with each of these projects are eager to share information about the big research questions they are considering, meet potential future collaborators, and solicit ideas. In addition to the project tabling, there will be space and opportunity to connect with new Berkman Klein community members and Berkman Klein Center Staff and Faculty. You may come for any portion of time during this session.

6:30 pm - Reception: Keep the conversations going with the help of light snacks and drinks!
As a University-wide research center at Harvard, our interdisciplinary efforts in the exploration of cyberspace address a diverse range of backgrounds and experiences. If you're interested in the Internet’s impact on society and are looking to engage a community of world-class fellows and faculty through events, conversations, research, and more please join us to hear more about our upcoming academic year.

People from all disciplines, universities, organizations, and backgrounds are encouraged to attend the Open House. We look forward to seeing you there!

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Berkshires 10th Anniversary Party
Friday, September 23
6 – 11 pm 
Prairie Whale, 178 Main Street, Great Barrington
Suggested donation at the door: 5 - 20 BerkShares or Dollars

House-made bar snacks by Prairie Whale
Wandering Star Craft beer on tap
Dance party with DJ BFG!

Sponsored by BerkShares, Inc., Prairie Whale, & Wandering Star Craft Brewery
Before the party...become a member!  BerkShares, Inc., is a non-profit, membership organization. Membership is open to any resident of the Berkshires and costs 25 BerkShares or $25 per year. We will hold our Annual Meeting for members on Thursday, October 20thth at 5:30 pm.

Members elect the Board of Trustees, participate on committees, help set policy, and are advocates for a more diverse and sustainable local economy. Membership dues help to support the organization financially.

If you would like to run for a position on the Board of Trustees please submit an inquiry (including name, address, and one or two paragraphs of biographical information) along with your membership dues. The by-laws of the corporation and more information about membership may be found online.

To become a member, send 25 BerkShares or $25 to BerkShares, Inc. P.O. Box 125, Great Barrington, MA, 01230 by September 23rd. Or bring your membership dues to the party!

Editorial Comment:  A little out of our usual geographic area but local currencies are an important tool and BerkShares are a good example of what they can do.

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The World in Flames:  A Black Boyhood in a White Supremacist Doomsday Cult
Friday, September 23
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
This event is free; no tickets are required.

Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome award-winning author and an associate professor of creative writing at Emerson College JERALD WALKER for a discussion of his latest book, The World in Flames: A Black Boyhood in a White Supremacist Doomsday Cult—a memoir of growing up with blind, African-American parents in a segregated cult preaching the imminent end of the world.
About The World in Flames

When The World in Flames begins, in 1970, Jerald Walker is six years old. His consciousness revolves around being a member of a church whose teachings he finds confusing and terrifying. Composed of a hodgepodge of religious beliefs, the underlying tenet of Herbert W. Armstrong’s Worldwide Church of God was that members were God’s chosen race and all others would perish in just a few years’ time. The next life, according to Armstrong, would arrive in 1975, three years after the Great Tribulation. Walker would be eleven years old.

Walker’s parents were particularly vulnerable to the promise of relief from this world’s hardships. They were living in a two-room apartment in a dangerous Chicago housing project with their four children. Both were blind, having lost their sight to childhood accidents, and took comfort in the belief that they had been chosen for a better afterlife.

When the initial prophecy of the 1972 Great Tribulation does not materialize, Walker is considerably less disappointed than relieved. When the End-Time 1975 prophecy also fails, he finally begins to question his faith and to see a potential future for himself.

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Saturday, September 24
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Boston Harbor Islands 2016 Centennial Bioblitz Festival
Saturday, September 24
8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Boston Harbor Islands
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-harbor-islands-2016-centennial-bioblitz-festival-tickets-27684251341
$0 – $17

Grab your backpack and camera and explore the wilds of the Boston Harbor Islands like never before during our National Parks Centennial Bioblitz and Biodiversity Festival on Saturday, September 24, 2016.
Organized by the National Geographic Society, National Park Service and Boston Harbor Islands Partnership, this event is part of the larger National Parks BioBlitz, with more than one hundred national parks across the country celebrating biodiversity in parks to commemorate the 100th Birthday of the National Park Service.
During BioBlitz, teams of scientists, students, teachers and YOUwill join forces in a RACE to discover and document the flora and fauna of the Boston Harbor Islands National and State Park. From nature walks led by expert scientists to biodiversity games for the whole family, there will be something for everyone. 
Part scientific endeavor, part festival, and part outdoor classroom, BioBlitz provides a unique opportunity to work alongside experts to discover, count and document living creatures in the parks; to contribute to the park’s official species lists; to explore interconnectedness of plants, animals, the environment, culture and our daily lives; and to help protect the extraordinary biodiversity in our parks. For our BioBlitz, participants will snap photos of the living things they see and identifications will pour in through iNaturalist, a social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists that maps and shares observations of biodiversity across the globe. 
Whether you have a couple of hours or a full day, there are activities to engage the whole family. Expolrers of all ages are needed, however, inventory teams are best suited for ages 8 and up. Make sure to download the iNaturalist App before your visit.
Events include:
Thompson Island Coastal and Migratory Bird Discovery: Guided Walk - at 8:00 am to 12:00 pm
(reservations are required use "Tickets" link above)
Little Brewster Intertidal Biodiversity: Guided Exploration 
(Hurry, tickets sell out fast - and are available at bostonharborislands.org)
Biodiversity Discovery at World’s End: Guided Walks - at 10:00 am and 1:00 pm
(spaces are limited, use "Tickets" link above to save your place) 
Exploring the Microwilderness of Georges Island: Guided Walks - at 11:15 am and 1:15 pm
(spaces are limited, use "Tickets" link above to save your place) 
Exploring Intertidal Biodiversity with the New England Aquarium: Guided Marine Sampling - Georges Island
(drop in, no reservations required)
Discovering the Birds and Bugs of Spectacle Island:Guided Walks - at 11:15 am and 1:45 pm
(spaces are limited, use "Tickets" link above to save your place) 
Exploring the Kingdoms of Life on Peddocks Island: Guided Walks in Wildlife Biology, Fungi Identification, and Wild Edible Plants - boat departs at 11:45 am from Georges Island.
(reservations are required use "Get Tickets" link above)

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Sustainable Model for Bangladesh Garment Industry
Saturday, September 24
9:00 AM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sustainable-model-for-bangladesh-garment-industry-tickets-27641951822

The 3rd Annual International Conference on “Sustainable Models for the Bangladesh Apparel Industry”, to be held on Saturday, September 24, 2016 at Harvard University. The day-long event is being organized by the International Sustainable Development Institute (ISDI).

The conference provides a forum for an active discussion on the state of the Bangladesh garment sector. At this year’s conference, we will focus on exploring ways to build a sustainable model for the Apparel Industry that is competitive while benefiting workers and stakeholders. The apparel manufacturing industry and distribution channels have seen dramatic changes in recent years. Exploring new market trends and consumer preferences, the conference participants will discuss strategic approaches for major transformations of the industry. In order for Bangladesh to compete in the global market, it is necessary to be cost-efficient while achieving compliance with heightened standards for worker health and safety.

The discussions will focus on the following topics: 1) international trade policies including the TPP and GSP; 2) progress on workers’ conditions, workplace safety, and fair price models that provide resources for upgrades; and 3) stakeholders’ collaboration for environmental sustainability and workplace standards in the context of Bangladesh’s garment and apparel industry. Expert recommendations will be made to help take collaboration among the stakeholders to the next level. There will be efforts at devising strategic action that can overcome the existing challenges and realize Bangladesh’s potential for economic development.

We invite you to attend the conference and to participate in the discussion.

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Beantown Jazz Festival
The Berklee Beantown Jazz Festival
The 2016 Berklee Beantown Jazz Festival will be held on Saturday, September 24, 2016. The theme of this year’s festival is “Jazz: A Peace Supreme.”

The Berklee Beantown Jazz Festival is Boston’s biggest block party—a free, annual, outdoor public concert that has delighted hundreds of thousands of music lovers over the years with its host of jazz, Latin, blues, funk, and groove performances, along with KidsJam, an instrument petting zoo, and an array of food vendors. Each year, the festival is the place to be in Boston on the last Saturday of September as the community comes together in a bond forged in the joy of great live music.

The festival offers world-class music on three stages, phenomenal food and drink, arts, crafts, and unique gifts. We look forward to seeing you for Boston's best free outdoor concert.

https://www.berklee.edu/beantownjazz

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What the Fluff? Festival
Saturday,September 24 (Rain date September 25)
Union Square, Somerville
http://www.flufffestival.com

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The Ig Informal Lectures
Saturday, Sep 24
1:00 pm
MIT, Building 26-100, 60 Vassar Street, Cambridge

A half-afternoon of improbably funny, informative, informal, brief public lectures and demonstrations:
The new Ig Nobel Prize winners will attempt to explain what they did, and why they did it
Special appearance by several past Ig Nobel Prize winners — including a special performance by Dr. Nakamats.
The Ig Nobel Prize winners will be available for you to talk with, both before and after the lectures
The Ig informal Lectures are a free event, organized in cooperation with the MIT Press Bookstore. Seating is limited, so we suggest you arrive a bit early.

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The Wobblies in Their Heyday
Saturday, September 24
2:00 p.m.
Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Avenue, Somerville

Author and former Somerville resident Eric Chester will discuss his recent work, /The Wobblies in Their Heyday: The Rise and Destruction of the Industrial Workers of the World during the World War I Era./

Based on extensive archival research, The Wobblies in Their Heyday, looks at the union during the World War I era when it was able to organize militant strikes that drastically curtailed production in key industries, copper mining and lumber. It also looks at the debates within the union on how to build a broadly based movement to oppose the war. The book also details the coordinated campaign of repression 
launched by the administration of President Woodrow Wilson with the intention of crushing the Wobblies.

This event is free and open to the public.
Sponsored by the Fountain Avenue Labor Support Committee (617) 625-9070

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Saving Eden from the Sixth Extinction: Film Screening and Discussion
Saturday, September 24
2:00pm to  4:00pm
Harvard Museum of Natural History, Haller Hall, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

The upcoming film, "Saving Eden from the Sixth Extinction," tells the story of how animals such as northern white rhinos, polar bears, African elephants, and bonobos have been pushed to the brink of extinction and it highlights the critical work that scientists and activists are doing to save these species. 

A discussion with film producer Mitchell Block will follow the screening.

Regular museum admission rates apply

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Sunday, September 25 - Saturday, October 1
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HUBweek
WHEN  Sun., Sep. 25, 9 a.m. – Sat., Oct. 1, 2016, 9 a.m.
WHERE  Across the Greater Boston Area
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Founded by The Boston Globe, Harvard University, Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
SPEAKER(S)  TBD
COST  FREE, $10-50
CONTACT INFO	kkoslick at hubweek.org
DETAILS  HUBweek is a festival for the future happening now. From September 25 to October 1, 2016, HUBweek will showcase, celebrate, and convene Greater Boston’s most creative and innovative minds in art, science, and technology.
Founded by The Boston Globe, Harvard University, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the inaugural festival in October 2015 convened 46,000 attendees and 600 speakers and artists at 106 events over 8 days. Registration for HUBweek 2016 will open on July 20, with events and speakers to be released throughout the summer.
Sign up at HUBweek.org now through July 15 to secure exclusive 48-hour advance registration.
Curious? Learn more at HUBweek.org
LINK	http://www.hubweek.org

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Sunday, September 25
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Innovation on the move: General Electric and Boston’s World of Ideas
Sunday, September 25
3:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Aloft Boston Seaport, 401-403 D Street, Boston

Ann Klee, Vice President of Environment, Health & Safety at General Electric Company, joins Harvard Business Review Editor-in-Chief Adi Ignatius to discuss GE’s move to Boston, and the opportunities and benefits of an urban corporate campus embedded in a city’s vibrant technology and knowledge ecosystem. Discussants will review the ways in which Boston's institutions, corporations, startups, and other organizations can collaborate to strengthen the impact of the region’s network and its contributions to world changing innovations.
This event is taking place as part of HUBweek, a week-long ideas festival celebrating innovation at the intersection of art, science, and technology across Greater Boston.

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Monday, September 26
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OUR CONVENTION
Monday, September 26
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, 210 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston

How do you mobilize and empower a generation?

“Today, Boston is home to the largest proportion of young adults of any major US city.” – Catherine Cloutier, The Boston Globe

Young adults comprise about 45 percent of eligible voters and nearly half the Boston’s workforce. They are an economic engine, adding $1 billion annually in goods and services to the city. However, young adults – people between ages of 21 and 39 years old – are often ignored and overlooked when discussing the future of Greater Boston. During HUBweek 2016, City Awake will select up 500 Delegates – nominated representatives from a diverse coalition of up to 200 organizations – to participate in Our Convention. Featuring a series of programs focused on building community and exploring various issues facing Greater Boston, Our Convention Delegates will work together to formalize shared priorities as a generation.

Who it’s for: 500 young thought leaders who want to make an impact
Vibe: meaningful, hands-on, informative
More information at https://hubweek.org/events/our-convention/

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FAIR USE TOWN HALL: Copyright and Fair Use for the Visual Arts
Monday, September 26
11:00 AM to 1:30 PM (EDT)
Harvard University, The Thompson Room at Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fair-use-town-hall-copyright-and-fair-use-for-the-visual-arts-tickets-27466802947

Please join use for this informative townhall. Lunch will be served! 
Are you a professor, artists, museum professional, editor, librarian or archivist who works with copyrighted materials?  The College Art Association (CAA) and the Office of Scholarly Communications (OSC) at Harvard University are pleased to announce that Peter Jaszi, Professor of Law at Washington College of Law, American University and lead principal investigator of CAA's Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts, will be speaking about the Code, and answering questions on Monday, September 26 at Harvard University. The town hall style event will be moderated by Kyle Courtney, Program Manager and Copyright Advisor at OSC. 
Copies of CAA’s Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts will be disseminated. The Code provides visual-arts professionals with a set of principles addressing best practices in the fair use of copyrighted materials. It describes how fair use can be invoked and implemented when using copyrighted materials in scholarship, teaching, museums, archives, and in the creation of art. This event will address questions about fair use of interest to professors, artists, museum professionals, editors, librarians, and archivists. 
Admission to this event is free, but it would be helpful for us to know how many can attend. Please register to this event by Wednesday September 21, 2016. 

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Studying the Greenland Ice Sheet: Implications for climate past and present
Monday, September 26
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geological Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Dorthe Dahl-Jensen (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen).

Note: The colloquium talks are now at noon. Please plan on arriving at 11:45AM to help yourself to lunch. 

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/event-type/department-colloquium

Contact Name:  Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Two talks: Unraveling the history of the Milky Way (speaker: Yuan-Sen Ting, Harvard); High-Redshift Astrophysics Using Every Photon (speaker: Patrick Breysse, Johns Hopkins) 
Monday, September 26
12:00pm 
MIT, Building 33-116, 125 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker 1:  Yuan-Sen Ting, Harvard
Unraveling the history of the Milky Way
Abstract:  Understanding physical processes responsible for the formation and evolution of galaxies like the Milky Way is a fundamental problem in astrophysics. However, a key challenge is that the properties and orbits of the stars can only be observed at present: in order to understand what happened in the Milky Way at earlier epochs, one must explore “archeological” techniques. One idea, "chemical tagging”, aims to probe the history of the Milky Way via the unique imprint in chemical abundance space of long-disrupted star clusters. I will discuss the opportunities and challenges associated with chemical tagging, including a first constraint on the disrupted cluster mass function in the Milky Way. I will also describe a new set of tools for efficient fitting large quantities of stellar spectra and opportunities for extracting many stellar parameters from low-resolution data.
 
Speaker 2:  Patrick Breysse, Johns Hopkins
High-Redshift Astrophysics Using Every Photon
Abstract:  Large galaxy surveys have dramatically improved our understanding of the complex processes which govern gas dynamics and star formation in the nearby universe.  However, we know far less about the most distant galaxies, as existing high-redshift observations can only detect the very brightest sources.  Intensity mapping surveys provide a promising tool to access this poorly-studied population.  By observing emission lines with low angular resolution, these surveys can make use of every photon in a target line to study faint emitters which are inaccessible using traditional techniques.  With upcoming carbon monoxide experiments in mind, I will demonstrate how an intensity map can be used to measure the luminosity function of a galaxy population, and in turn how these measurements will allow us to place robust constraints on the cosmic star formation history.  I will then show how cross-correlating CO isotopologue lines will make it possible to study gas dynamics within the earliest galaxies in unprecedented detail.

More information at http://space.mit.edu/two-talks-unraveling-history-milky-way-speaker-yuan-sen-ting-harvard-high-redshift-astrophysics
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A physiological approach to the ecology and evolution of flowers
Monday, September 26
12:10 pm
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill, 1300 Centre Street, Boston
 
Adam Roddy, Post-doctoral researcher, Yale University
Arnold Arboretum Jewett Prize Recipient

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New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  Synthesis & Next Steps
Thursday, September 26
12pm – 1pm
Webinar
RSVP at https://nertnetwork.org/2016/07/28/collective-inquiry-local-and-regional-food/

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Get the Structure Right - Lessons from the Israeli Energy Market 
Monday, September 26
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Bldg, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Orit Farkash HaCohen, Chairperson, Israel Electric Authority, 2011-2016

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html
This series is presented by the Energy Technology Innovation Policy/Consortium for Energy Policy Research at HKS. Lunch will be provided.

Contact Name:   Louisa Lund
Louisa_Lund at hks.harvard.edu

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Roxbury Showcase
Monday, September 26
4:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Roxbury Innovation Center, 2300 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/roxbury-showcase-tickets-26578137926

The impact of innovation in Greater Boston spans from art and food to technology and community. At the HUBweek Roxbury Showcase, now’s your chance to taste innovation in Roxbury. Hear from leaders making an impact by promoting inclusive innovation in our city. Meet tomorrow's innovators who are shaping the future of business, technology, design and fashion. Learn, mingle and share experiences to help each other take new ideas and ventures to the next level.
Who it’s for: The curious, those seeking relaxing and de-stress techniques
Vibe: Entrepreneurs, foodies, techies, artists, students
Host: 
HUBweek
Partner Hosts:
Roxbury Innovation Center
The Tech Connection
The Timothy Smith Network
Epicenter Community
Smarter in the City
Microsoft

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A proposed energy conversion process for making solar energy a major player in global power generation
Monday, September 26
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building 32-155, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jacob Karni
We are challenged to develop an energy conversion method, which could gradually replace fossil fuel combustion on a worldwide scale, eventually leading to a renewable-dominant global energy supply. Whereas other renewable energy resources can have important supporting roles, the only energy sources available on earth in large enough quantities to replace fossil fuels are nuclear and solar. 

Professor Karni will first clarify the fundamental requirements of a major energy conversion and power generation system. He will then discuss a solar energy conversion process based on several complementing novel technologies, and aimed to enable large-scale utilization of solar energy for year-round, 24/7 power generation and clean fuel production at high efficiency and affordable costs. 

The proposed process combines developments accomplished by a group of collaborators working together and separately over 25 years. It includes innovations in large-scale solar optics, solar receiver, thermal storage, heat engine, and fuel production from CO2 and water. The main system components have been tested and proven on a small scale, but must still be scaled up, integrated and operated together.

Web site: http://energy.mit.edu/event/karni/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/926-seminar-a-proposed-energy-conversion-process-for-making-solar-energy-a-major-player-in-global-tickets-27760973820 
Sponsor(s): MIT Energy Initiative

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Alchemical Ecology: Rudolf Steiner and the Environmental Movement
Monday, September 26
5:30pm
Harvard, Barker Center, Room 133, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge

Daniel McKanan, Harvard Divinity School

Synopsis
For nearly a century, students of Rudolf Steiner’s “spiritual science” have made significant contributions to environmental activism. They created the first certification system for organic agriculture, initiated the lawsuit that inspired Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, invented community-supported agriculture, and founded the world’s largest “green banks.” All of this activity is inspired by a spiritual worldview that might surprise other environmentalists: Steiner drew on alchemy and astrology as well as experimental science, and he taught his students “how to know higher worlds” as well as how to care for this one. In this presentation drawing on his forthcoming book, Harvard Divinity School professor Dan McKanan will offer an overview of Steiner’s contributions to environmentalism, and suggest some of the ways Steiner-inspired initiatives challenge all environmentalists to embrace a broader sense of ecological connection.

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Should we engineer the mosquito?
Monday, September 26
6:00 PM
LabCentral, 700 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/BosLab/events/233152367/

BosLab is hosting a public forum to discuss the implications of genetically engineering mosquitoes towards eradicating diseases like Malaria or dengue. Guest speaker Professor Esvelt will discuss the use of gene drive technology for tackling vector-borne diseases, including Lyme disease. Participants will learn how the technology works, weigh in on the potential benefits and risks of this approach, and discuss its ethical and societal implications. Both scientists and members of the public are invited to participate in this engaging public forum! Refreshments and dinner will be served. The event is free and advanced registration begins September 12.

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Imaginary Property with Florian Schneider
Monday, September 26
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E15-001, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Department of Architecture, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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The World According to Star Wars
WHEN  Mon., Sep. 26, 2016, 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Coop
SPEAKER(S)  Cass Sunstein
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS	  There’s Santa Claus, Shakespeare, Mickey Mouse, the Bible, and then there’s Star Wars. Nothing quite compares to sitting down with a young child and hearing the sound of John William’s score as those beloved golden letters fill the screen. In this fun, erudite, and often moving book, Cass R. Sunstein explores the lessons of Star Wars as they relate to childhood, fathers, the Dark Side, rebellion, and redemption. As it turns out, Star Wars also has a lot to teach us about constitutional law, economics, and political uprisings.

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Skillshare: What's All the Buzz About? (Honeybees, beekeeping, and our envi…
Monday, September 26
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Avenue, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/skillshare-whats-all-the-buzz-about-honeybees-beekeeping-and-our-environment-tickets-27264402562

About Skillshare: Somerville Skillshare is a free monthly learning event that features classes around any innovative topic and we encourage locals to teach it. It’s a way to learn new skills, jump-start new hobbies, and meet other people with similar interests, all in a fun and informal setting.
Class Description: This will be a one hour talk on what is happening with honeybees and other pollinators in our agricultural system, and how we and our world are affected by these changes and what we can do to help. The talk will include the basics of the hive and beekeeping as well as a short bit on the products of the hive.
This will be a one-time talk on Monday September 26, from 7pm to 8pm. 
About the facilitator: Tony Lulek is a Beekeeper and is the owner of Little Beehive Farm. His products are 100% natural with no preservatives. He developed most of the recipes himself. He was also the president of the Northfolk County Beekeepers Association for 6 years and was teaching bee school throughout that time.

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Tuesday, September 27
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The Science of Addiction: How opioids, from prescription painkillers to her…
Tuesday, September 27
8:00 AM to 9:15 AM (EDT)
Ragon Institute, 400 Technology Square, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-science-of-addiction-how-opioids-from-prescription-painkillers-to-heroin-work-in-the-brain-tickets-27110704848

This panel will examine the mechanisms of opioid addiction and the various and sometimes controversial methods of treatment – from abstinence to medication to a potential vaccine.
Who it’s for: community members, health care professionals, students, medical patients
Vibe: Thought-provoking, educational, pertinent
Hosted by STAT in Partnership with CVS Health
Sponsor: 
CVS Health
Panelists:
Monica Bharel, MD, MPH
Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
Sarah Wakeman, MD, FASAM
Medical Director, Substance Use Disorder Initiative at
Massachusetts General Hospital
Scott E. Lukas, Ph.D.
Director, Behavioral Psychopharmacology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital
Seth Mnookin
Co-Director of MIT’s Graduate Program in Science Writing

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HUB Presents: Expanding Opportunity in the Digital Age
Tuesday, September 27
10:00a–12:00p
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://hubweek.org/events/solve/expanding-opportunity-in-the-digital-age
Cost:  $25

Speaker: ANDREW MCAFEE Co-director, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy; JAMES MANYIKA Senior partner, McKinsey & Company; Director, McKinsey Global Institute (MGI); MICHELLE MOORE Head of Digital Banking, Bank of America

The acceleration of technology growth has led to major benefits for businesses, the economy, and society, but what about workers? 

Expanding Opportunity in the Digital Age will focus on the various challenges and strategies for broadening economic opportunity in a time of rapid technological advancement. This event will feature a mix of short personal stories from policy, industry, institutional and community leaders who are dealing with these issues in various and diverse settings. Followed by a keynote address on inclusive innovation, the event will conclude with an interactive and engaging discussion on the topic amongst experts. 

Who it's for: Business and civic leaders, researchers, entrepreneurs, students, workers 
Vibe: Informative, thought-provoking, action-oriented
Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/solve/expanding-opportunity-in-the-digital-age/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $25
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, MIT Solve, HUBweek
For more information, contact:  HUBweek
hello at hubweek.org 

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Phototactic Guidance of a Tissue-Engineered Soft-Robotic Ray
Tuesday, September 27 
11:45am to 1:00pm
Harvard, Geo Museum, Haller Hall, Room 102, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Inspired by the relatively simple morphological blueprint provided by batoid fish such as stingrays and skates, we created a biohybrid system that enables an artificial animal, a tissue-engineered ray - to swim and phototactically follow a light cue. By patterning dissociated rat cardiomyocytes on an elastomeric body enclosing a microfabricated gold skeleton, we replicated fish morphology at 1/10 scale and captured basic fin deflection patterns of batoid fish. Optogenetics allows for phototactic guidance, steering, and turning maneuvers. Optical stimulation induced sequential muscle activation via serpentine-patterned muscle circuits, leading to coordinated undulatory swimming. The speed and direction of the ray was controlled by modulating light frequency and by independently eliciting right and left fins, allowing the biohybrid machine to maneuver through an obstacle course.

Contact: Luo Gu
Email: luogu at seas.harvard.edu

Editorial Comment:  You might have seen this in the news, the “soft robot” skate or stingray.  It's a biorobotic hybrid, rat cells in an elastomeric body with a gold skeleton that is one tenth scale the living creature.  Get in on the ground floor.  Harvard is also working on robot bees.

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Responsive Communities Initiative
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Information Technology, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society
SPEAKER(S)  Susan Crawford
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/responsive-communities-initiative-tickets-26573146998
DETAILS  The Responsive Communities Initiative led by Susan Crawford at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University addresses some of the most important issues of economic development, social justice, and civil liberties of our time – those prompted by Internet access. The program has three areas of research involving the internet, data, and government: Internet Access Infrastructure, Data Governance, and Responsive Communities Leaders. Come learn about the current state of the programs research, what they hope to achieve, and how Internet access could be regulated as a utility and open government data can improve our communities.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/responsive-communities-initiative/

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Implications of thaw-induced boreal tree cover loss for carbon, water and energy fluxes in the southern Taiga Plains, Northwest Territories
Tuesday, September 27 
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, Herbaria Seminar Room (125), 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

with Oliver Sonnentag, Université de Montréal

Herbaria Seminar Series 
http://huh.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/news/herbaria

Free and open to the public. 

Contact Name:  Barbara Hanrahan
bhanrahan at oeb.harvard.edu
(617) 495-2365

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Speaker Series: Patrick Ruffini
Tuesday, September 27
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Patrick Ruffini is a strategist, thinker, and organizer focused on data and technology’s disruptive impact on politics and business. He is CEO of Echelon Insights, a research, analytics, and digital intelligence firm. He was among the first digital strategists in American politics, working for President Bush’s 2004 campaign, directing the Republican National Committee’s digital strategy in 2006, and founding Engage, a leading digital agency in politics and issue advocacy. Ruffini has led technology efforts in three successive Presidential cycles and advised clients around the world.

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Strategies for Rapid Climate Mitigation with Laurence Delina
Tuesday, September 27
12:00pm – 1:30pm
BU, Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, 67 Bay State Road, Boston

Laurence Delina, a post-doctoral associate at the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, will discuss his recent book, Strategies for Rapid Climate Mitigation, at a seminar on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 from 12:00 to 1:30 pm at the Pardee Center, 67 Bay State Road. The book, published in June by Routledge Press, explores whether the rapid mobilization among countries in preparation for World War II is an appropriate analogy for the scale and speed required for an effective response to the transnational threat of climate change in the 21st century.

Delina, a citizen of the Philippines, holds a PhD from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He is leading a project at the Pardee Center on sustainable energy transitions in developing countries.

http://www.bu.edu/pardee/2016/09/12/upcoming-seminar-strategies-for-rapid-climate-mitigation/

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FDA AND THE DRUG APPROVAL PROCESS: IS IT REALLY BROKEN?
Tuesday, September 27
2:00 – 3:15 PM
Ragon Institute, 400 Technology Square, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fda-and-the-drug-approval-process-is-it-really-broken-tickets-27110490206

Join veteran pharmaceutical industry columnist, Ed Silverman, as he leads a lively discussion with a panel of thought leaders on the FDA and the drug approval process.

The agency may be approving more drugs, but Congress wants to speed the process in ways that some say would lower stands, and patient groups complain it takes too long to green light desperately needed rare treatments. Is an overhaul warranted or just a few tweaks? What happens if standards really are changed? And what can the FDA do on its own?

Explore the possibilities for improving the drug approval process with our panel of experts. Q&A to follow.

Who it’s for: health care professionals, business leaders, students, medical patients, researchers, policy makers
Vibe: thought-provoking, conversation-starting, informative

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Solve | MAKE
Tuesday, September 27
2:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

With the world's population poised to grow exponentially by midcentury, Solve's Make pillar addresses issues relating to basic infrastructure, manufacturing, economic opportunity, and how best to accommodate growth. Join our community of technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents to help create solutions to Make pillar challenges. Go here for more information: http://solvecolab.mit.edu. 

Be at Solve at HUBweek on Tuesday, September 27, as Solve | Make finalists selected by a distinguished panel of judges present their proposed solutions to the Inclusive Innovation challenge, answering the question: How do we create a more inclusive, productive, and sustainable economic future for all? 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

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Collaborating at the Intersection of Art and Science
Tuesday, September 27
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM (EDT)
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Auditorium, 415 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/collaborating-at-the-intersection-of-art-and-science-tickets-26589059593

Artists and scientists influence each other in surprising ways. Join us for a fascinating conversation between Broad Institute researchers and artist-in-residence Naoe Suzuki, as they explore ideation as a collaborative effort, with results that potentially enhance both the art and research produced. The artist-in-residence program at Broad Institute provides an environment where revolutionary scientists and forward thinking artists can work, communicate, and learn together to benefit both science and art, and leverage the connection between the two disciplines to collaboratively provoke the creative thinking that drives innovation. 
Who it’s for: Artists, scientists, all creative thinkers
Vibe: Synergy, dialogue, thought-provoking
Host:  Catalyst Conversations
Partner Host:  Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Speakers:   Naoe Suzuki
Before beginning her appointment at Broad Institute, current artist-in- residence Naoe Suzuki has been the recipient of many grants and awards including the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, the Artist Grant in Drawing/Printmaking/Artist’s Book, and Artist Grant in Sculpture/Installation from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation, the Artists’ Fellowship, Inc., Puffin Foundation, and the Blanche E. Colman Award from Mellon Trust of New England. Her residency fellowships include Studios at MASS MoCA (2016), Blue Mountain Center (2015, 2013, 2011, 2008 and 2005), Millay Colony for the Arts (2008 and 2002), Jentel (2006), Centrum (1999), and MacDowell Colony (1998-99). Naoe was born in Tokyo, Japan, and based in Waltham, MA. She holds M.F.A. in Studio for Interrelated Media from Massachusetts College of Art and Design. You can see more of her work on her website at www.naoesuzuki.com.

Todd Golub, M.D.
Founding Core Member, Chief Scientific Officer, and Director of the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School; Charles A. Dana Investigator in Human Cancer Genetics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Investigator at Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Todd Golub is a founding core member of the Broad Institute and serves as the institute’s chief scientific officer and director of its Cancer Program. Golub is a world leader in understanding the basis of cancer, by creating and applying tools of genomics. He has made fundamental discoveries in the molecular basis of childhood leukemia, and laid the foundation for the diagnosis and classification of human cancers using gene expression analysis. He also pioneered the development of chemical screening approaches based on gene expression. He joined the faculty of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in 1997. At the same time he served as the leader of cancer genomics at the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome research, which evolved into the Cancer Program at the Broad. Golub has directed that program since 2004, and is also currently the Charles A. Dana Investigator in Human Cancer Genetics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. He is the recipient of multiple awards, including the Erasmus Hematology Award; the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award and the Outstanding Achievement Award from the American Association for Cancer Research; the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research; the E. Mead Johnson Award from the Society for Pediatric Research; and the Judson Daland Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Clinical Investigation from the American Philosophical Society. In 2014, he was elected as a member to the Institute of Medicine. Golub serves on the scientific advisory boards of the Wistar Institute and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He also serves as chair of the board of scientific advisors of the National Cancer Institute. Golub received his B.A. from Carleton College and his M.D. from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He completed his internship, residency, and fellowship.

Deborah Davidson, moderator 
Deborah Davidson is an artist, curator, and educator. She received her M.F.A. from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University and her B.A. from Binghamton University.  Her current project Catalyst Conversations is an organization devoted to the idea of art and science in dialogue, launched in October 2012. She is also the director of the Suffolk University Gallery and maintains a studio practice as well, exhibiting widely in the greater Boston area.

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Earth System Dynamics and Mass Extinctions
Tuesday, September 27
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Harvard, Pierce 209

Daniel H. Rothman, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, MIT
The five great mass extinctions of the geologic past are each associated with significant perturbations of Earth's carbon cycle. But many past environmental events are not associated with mass extinction. What makes them different?  By transforming geochemical signals to physical variables, we find that mass extinctions are associated with rates of environmental change that exceed a limit
imposed by mass conservation in a normal carbon cycle.  We suggest that external perturbations of the carbon cycle, such as extensive volcanism, can excite responses that breach this threshold.  We conclude with brief remarks on the relevance of these findings to modern environmental change and a potential sixth extinction.

Widely Applied Mathematics Seminar

Contact: Alpha Lee
Email: alphalee at g.harvard.edu

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Changing Sea Ice Conditions and Arctic Marine Ecosystems
September 27
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Jim McCarthy, Biological Oceanography, Harvard University
The shrinking area of Arctic sea ice in summer is one of the most often cited examples of anthropogenic climate change. The areal extent of sea ice at the time of the September minimum has declined by about 1%/yr since satellite observations began 35 yr ago.  Sea ice is very different from lake ice.  A brine is created as ice crystalizes, a portion which remains in channels within the ice and provides habitat for microscopic plankton.  These organisms include photosynthetic algae and microscopic animals that feed on the algae, and they then become food for shrimp and fish under and at the edges of the ice.  This production is the base of the food web that supports marine mammals and birds that flourish in the Arctic during spring and summer.  Climate models project that with additional warming from greenhouse gases summer sea ice could vanish in the Arctic by mid century, with profound implications for many iconic species.

Bio:  Professor of Biological Oceanography at Harvard and was President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science from Feb 2008-Feb 2009.[1][2]  McCarthy is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Biological Oceanography and former Master of Pforzheimer House. He is also Acting Curator of the Malacology Department in the Museum of Comparative Zoology.  His studies address factors that regulate the processes of primary production and nutrient supply in upper ocean, approached using controlled laboratory studies and field investigations. Study sites range from near shore to the open ocean. Recent and current field research sites include the North Atlantic, equatorial Pacific, and Arabian Sea.

More information at http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/jim-mccarthy.html#more

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How to Talk With Children About Gun Violence and Trauma
Tuesday, September 27
4:30 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Marran Theater, Doble Campus, Lesley University, 34 Mellen Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-to-talk-with-children-about-gun-violence-and-trauma-tickets-27611920999

In the wake of violence around the country and the world, the public is invited to join Lesley University faculty experts for a panel discussion to explore how teachers, parents, and other service providers can talk about gun violence and the related trauma.

Hear from Assistant Professor of Art Therapy Kelvin Ramirez; Associate Professor and social worker Joshua Baldwin; Professor of Photography Andre Ruesch; and Visiting Professor Debbie LeeKeenan, who for 20 years directed the Eliot-Pearson laboratory school for the Department of Child Study and Human Development at Tufts University.

The panel will moderated by Professor Lisa Fiore, an expert in early childhood development and educational psychology.

"Shots Fired"
The panel is presented in conjunction with an exhibit by professional photographer and artist Mark Teiwes (MFA '16), who used a camera-less process to shoot photosensitive material and literally document the effects of a gunshot.  The exhibit is on view in Marran Gallery through October 17th.
Marran Gallery and Theater
34 Mellen St
Cambridge, MA 02138
For more information about this event or the exhibit, contact Beth Tallett at etallett at lesley.edu.
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

Please RSVP, but walk-ins are welcome!

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The New Arab Wars
Tuesday, September 27
4:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building E51-315, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Prof. Marc Lynch
The hopes of the Arab uprisings of 2011 have faded into a nightmarish array of resurgent autocrats, failed states, and civil wars. What went wrong? "The New Arab Wars" highlights the role of regional and global powers, from Saudi Arabia and Iran to the United States. It shows how the interventions by external powers derailed the democratic transition in Egypt and blocked change in other countries. It then explains how those interventions turned Libya, Yemen and Syria into full-scale wars with little prospect in sight for resolution. Finally, it looks at the Obama administration's approach to the uprisings and how the next President will likely adapt America's role in the Middle East. 

Marc Lynch is professor of Political Science at The George Washington University.

Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar 
The Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar is organized under the auspices of the MIT Center for International Studies, which conducts research on contemporary international issues and provides an opportunity for faculty and students to share perspectives and exchange views. Each year the Bustani Seminar invites scholars, journalists, consultants, and other experts from the Middle East, Europe, and the United States to MIT to present recent research findings on contemporary politics, society and culture, and economic and technological development in the Middle East.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cis/bustani/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, Radius/T&C
For more information, contact:  Dain Goding
617-252-1888

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How to Scale Your Big Idea in a Complex World
Tuesday, September 27
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building E51, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Co-sponsored by HUBweek and MIT System Design & Management, this panel of innovators and entrepreneurs will discuss how they are applying systems thinking to groundbreaking work in a wide range of domains. Your questions and ideas are welcome and will be an important part of this event!

Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/reinventing-innovation-with-systems-thinking-how-to-scale-your-big-idea-in-a-complex-world/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: Pre-registration recommended. See url above
Sponsor(s): MIT System Design & Management
For more information, contact:  Lois Slavin
lslavin at mit.edu 

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Askwith Debates: More Charter Schools? The Massachusetts Vote and the National Debate
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE	617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS	
Participants:
Tito Jackson, District 7 city councilor and chairman, Committee on Education, Boston City Council
Marc Kenen, executive director, Massachusetts Charter Public School Association
Additional participants TBA.
Moderator: Paul Reville, Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration, HGSE

Voters will face a decision this November regarding charter school caps – whether or not to authorize up to 12 new charter schools or expand enrollment in existing Massachusetts charter schools beginning as early as January 2017. Will a “yes” vote harm mainstream schools and undermine their funding? What other opportunities are there for parents stuck on charter school waiting lists? Will this decision influence the future of charter schools nationwide? This referendum has attracted national attention in the heated controversy about the future of charter schools in the U.S. public school education system. How do taxpayers/voters determine what’s best to keep mainstream school systems healthy while looking out for what’s best for individual children? Join us as proponents and opponents square off on the merits of charter school expansion in this inaugural of the Askwith Forum Debates.

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What Works: Designing Inclusive Organizations
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Women and Public Policy Program, Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government
SPEAKER(S)  Iris Bohnet and Meghna Chakrabarti
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-works-designing-inclusive-organizations-tickets-27084615815
DETAILS  Diversity is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back, and debiasing people’s minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Behavioral design offers a new solution.

Professor Iris Bohnet will discuss what organizations can do to create more inclusive environments, level the playing field, and help diverse teams succeed. There is so much more that can be done – often at a shockingly low cost and surprisingly high speed. Join the Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) during HUBweek for a conversation with Iris Bohnet, Professor of Public Policy, author of What Works: Gender Equality by Design, and Director of the Women and Public Policy Program.

For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit 
http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/what-works-designing-inclusive-organizations/

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Palestinian and Israeli Bereaved Parents for Peace
Tuesday, September 27
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

The Parents Circle Families Forum (PCFF) is a joint Israeli-Palestinian organization made up of more than 600 bereaved families--all of whom have lost a loved one to the violent conflict. 

Join us to hear the stories of bereaved Israeli and Palestinian families as they share their extraordinary journey on the path of reconciliation. 

Also learn about opportunities to teach CS and entrepreneurship to Israeli and Palestinian youth through MISTI MIT-MEET (Middle Eastern Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow.) 

Light fare provided.

Open to: the general public

Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MIT Sloan Executive Education, MISTI MIT-MEET

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Harnessing Evolution to Solve Problems in Biotech and Therapeutics
Tuesday, September 27
6:00 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT) 
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 415 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/harnessing-evolution-to-solve-problems-in-biotech-and-therapeutics-tickets-26576763816

Biological evolution has solved many challenging molecular problems with breathtaking effectiveness. Researchers have begun to harness the remarkable power of evolution to address problems of their own choosing, rather than of nature’s choosing. In this lecture, Liu will describe the development and first applications of phage­assisted continuous evolution (PACE), a method that enables proteins to evolve continuously in the laboratory for the first time, accelerating the speed of laboratory evolution ~100­fold. The Liu group has used PACE to rapidly evolve a wide variety of proteins with the potential to serve as novel therapeutic agents, as well as to study the reproducibility and path dependence of evolution over thousands of generations in a practical time frame. Liu will also describe a recent effort to use PACE to address a major problem facing worldwide agricultural productivity: the rise of insects resistant to a widely used protein insecticide.
Who it’s for: life-long Learners, curiosity seekers, science lovers
Vibe: informative, forward-thinking, collaborative
Host:  Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
Speaker:  David Liu, PhD, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and Associate Faculty member, Wyss Institute at Harvard University

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Boston Green Drinks - September Happy Hour
Tuesday, September 27
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Scholars, 25 School Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-green-drinks-september-happy-hour-tickets-27173083424

We're talking off in August (Happy Labor Day weekend!) and will continue the conversation in September!
Join the conversation with sustainability professionals and hobbyists.  Enjoy a drink and build your connection with our green community!
Boston Green Drinks  builds a community of sustainably-minded Bostonians, provides a forum for exchange of sustainability career resources, and serves as a central point of information about emerging green issues.  We support the exchange of ideas and resources about sustainable energy, environment, food, health, education.

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Breakthroughs in Nanotechnology
Tuesday, Sept 27
6:30 PM 
Belmont Media Center, 9 Lexington Street, Belmont 

Sameer Sonkusale, Ph.D., Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University; Principal Investigator, Nanoscale Integrated Sensors and Circuits Laboratory (NanoLab). the Sonkusale NanoLab. The Sonkusale Nanolab is currently engaged in cutting-edge research in several interdisciplinary areas, including nano-devices that benefit medicine and the life sciences. A major interest is the development of flexible, embedded sensors for diagnostics. Dr. Sonkusale and his team also work on zero-cost "do-it-yourself" diagnostics for the developing world. In this discussion (w/footage from his lab), Dr. Sonkusale explains how nanotechnology works and how it is revolutionizing medicine as well as other fields.

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Careers in Sustainability
Tuesday, September 27
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Northeastern University, Robinson Hall - Room 107, 336 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/careers-in-sustainability-tickets-27632204668

Interested in a career related to sustainability? Let us help!
On Sept 27th the Northeastern Graduate student association in collaboration with the USGBC Massachusetts Chapter will be hosting a panel discussion featuring a diverse group of sustainability professionals . Panelists will share their stories, lessons they learned along the way and answer questions from the audience .

SPEAKER BIO
Paul Lyons
Lyons is a Registered Mechanical Engineer and Construction Supervisor in Massachusetts, and a certified PV installer from the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP).  He holds a B.S. in engineering from Cornell University, an M.B.A. from the University of New Haven, and an M.A. in Geography from Boston University
Originally from a place with more snow than sun, Paul Lyons has come a long way in the solar industry. Working on solar projects for over twenty years in local New England and overseas in Haiti and Mexico, Lyons has extensive experience in solar design, consulting, management, and installation. He founded Zapotec Energy Inc. in 1997 and has led all of Zapotec’s previous and current projects, and continues to play a key role in bringing together communities, developers, and contractors to create a solar future in Massachusetts. He remains well connected in the solar professional network as an active member in the Solar Energy Business Association of New England (SEBANE), the American Solar Energy Society, and the Solar Electric Power Association. 

Jenna Dancewicz
I am currently an Assistant Project Manager at Suffolk Construction. For the past three years I have worked on the historic renovation of the Filene’s Burnham Building and the iconic new construction of Millennium Tower. I have worked on multiple facets of the Millennium Tower project, from concrete submittal reviews to building out the intricate amenity space to a renovation to an existing MBTA station. Along with my work out in the field, I am a leading member of Suffolk’s Green Team, which promotes environmental awareness within the company.
Prior to working at Suffolk, I attended Brown University and graduated in 2011 with a degree in Civil Engineering. Along with studying engineering, I played on the Varsity Women’s Ice Hockey team and also tap danced in a group called “What’s on Tap?”. When I started at Brown, I knew I wanted to be an engineer and pursued the bio-medical track. However, I didn’t fall in love with that type of engineering, so I went to my advisor for advice. He suggested I take a class in sustainability and green buildings. That class made me fall in love with green buildings and steered me towards majoring in civil engineering. Building with sustainability in mind just made sense to me because a green building is efficient, creates a healthier indoor environment and ultimately helps reduce our impact on the exterior environment! The engineer in me is always geared for efficiency and the athlete in me is always game for being healthy. It was a win-win. To this day I am always trying to find out new information about how people are building green and how I can be more sustainable.
When I am not working, I enjoy participating in the USGBC-MA Emerging Professionals Committee. I also enjoy playing ice hockey, kayaking and biking.  I love to travel and take photos with my DSLR camera. 
 
Alana Spencer
Alana Spencer, LEED AP BD+C is a Sustainability Product Manager at Vanderweil Engineers focusing on building certifications, sustainable design, and energy efficiency in the C+D and built environments. After graduating from St. Xavier University in Chicago, IL with a BS in Business Administration, Alana began her career in software, focusing on sustainability performance management for global corporations and seamlessly transitioned into project / product management.
Alana’s project experience includes a wide array of building and LEED certification types, for new and existing built environments including detailed analysis and development of sustainable design opportunities throughout the integrative lifecycle of projects; corporate sustainability disclosure reporting (GRI, CDP, UN Global Compact); and marketing/public relation campaigns.
In her spare time, Alana volunteers in the Boston area including USGBC-MA, is involved with the South End Neighborhood Association, continues to expand her knowledge base (WELL, Resiliency,...) and travels as often as she can.

Celis Brisbin
Celis Brisbin works at the US Green Building Council's Massachusetts Chapter as a Programs Manager. His variety of responsibilities support the non-profit's mission to drive sustainable and regenerative design, construction, and operation of buildings and communities in Massachusetts. Prior to working at the Chapter, he spent a few years in the solar industry as a Purchasing Manager and was a Volunteer for the Peace Corps prior to that. When he is not in the office, you can find him furthering the efficiency of his hybrid or biking around the city.  
Brisbin is a LEED Green Associate, Living Futures Ambassador and WELL Accredited Professional.  He holds a B.S. in Urban Planning from the University of New Hampshire
 
Rohit Saxena
Rohit brings more than 30 years of rich experience throughout the United States and India to our team. His career focus on technical and complex building  types helps clients meet the growing demand for energy efficiency in highly technical built environments, including biomedical research facilities, biotechnology and pharmaceutical buildings, and medical research laboratories.
As Senior Project Director for Science & Technology, Rohit focuses on leading EYP’s diverse team of design professionals in Boston and nationwide on high-performance design projects, specifically in highly technical building types. He oversees fast tracked and phased construction projects to ensure timely delivery and a high level of client satisfaction. An internationally respected thought leader, Rohit regularly speaks at industry trade conferences, on a wide range of topics from science, sustainability and technology

Sean Tully
As a Program Manager with The Weidt Group, Sean is primarily responsible for providing consulting services for high performance buildings, assisting design professionals and building owners in selecting optimal energy-saving strategies for their project goals and budgets through utility incentive programs. is also proficient in energy auditing, developing scopes, specifications, drawings, and costing to implement energy conservation measures and preparing written reports of energy conservation opportunities based on savings analysis. He reviews and calculates energy savings from implementation of energy conservation projects such as energy management control systems, HVAC equipment upgrades, heating system conversion, variable frequency drives and energy efficient motors.

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Medical Technology Producing Hamburgers
Tuesday, September 27
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Mark Post, (@MarkPost6), Professor of Physiology at Maastricht University, co-inventor of cell cultured beef
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Armin Nassehi: The State We Are In
Tuesday, September 27
7:00 PM to 10:00 PM (EDT) 
Goethe-Institut Boston, 170 Beacon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/armin-nassehi-the-state-we-are-in-tickets-26802345537

As we watch developments in the EU and US unfold, the unsettling feeling that our societies are unraveling is unavoidable. Social Theorist Armin Nassehi is professor at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich and editor of Kursbuch, one of Germany’s leading intellectual magazines. An outspoken intellectual in the German media and cited as “among the most thoughtful intellectual voices in Germany today” (New York Review of Books), Nassehi analyzes the current populist tendencies. Whether it’s elite bashing or xenophobic voices, he tries to make sense of the underlying causes while suggesting an urgent need to develop new narratives as a basis for building stronger democratic systems.

In addition, Armin Nassehi will speak at Brandeis University on Tuesday, September 27, 12-2 pm. Respondent ist Prof. Chandler Rosenberger (Dept. of Sociology, Brandeis University).

Armin Nassehi has been editor of the magazine Kursbuch since 2012. Since 2014 he has been serving as director of the Institute of sociology at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, where he has chaired the Department of Sociology since 1998. Among his most recent works are Die letzte Stunde der Wahrheit (i.e. truth’s final hour, 2015) and Gesellschaft der Gegenwarten: Studien zur Theorie der modernen Gesellschaft II (i.e. a society of presents: studies on the theory of contemporary society II, 2011).

This lecture is part of the global discussion/debate series "Kritikmaschine," organized by the Goethe-Institut and Kursbuch, one of Germany's leading intellectual magazines.

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The Biopolis: Creative New Ideas for a Smarter City
Tuesday, September 27
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-biopolis-creative-new-ideas-for-a-smarter-city-tickets-27486259141

In an increasingly inter-connected and technological world, we need models for urban living that take full advantage of technology while increasing the participation of residents in developing new opportunities for a better life. A Smarter City responds to this challenge in ways that enhance not just the physical infrastructure of a city, but also the intellectual and social capital of its residents. It fosters the collective intelligence of citizens in a manner that is inclusive and oriented towards innovative problem solving. 
The Biopolis program is a transnational effort that links Boston/Cambridge with Paris, using the principles of biology to innovate new models for engaging citizens and meeting the urban challenges of their living city. Since 2015, teams of university students from Harvard, SciencesPo and the Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity have spent summers using Paris as a laboratory to develop new ideas for improving urban living. Proposals are co-developed with citizens and local government and represent collective expressions of new ways to create a Smarter City and address key goals for sustainable development. Biopolis teams will share their proposals with accompanying short films as the basis for a collective brainstorm with participants on potential implementations in Boston and Paris.
Who it's for: students, tech professionals, urban planning professionals, families
Vibe: educational, thought-provoking, forward-thinking

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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, September 28 and Thursday, September 29
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MIT Climate CoLab’s Crowds & Climate Conference
September 28 & 29
MIT Samberg Conference Center, Chang Building floor 6 & 7, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/crowds-climate-tickets-26606652213
Cost: $ 0 - $75

What:  MIT’s Climate CoLab, an online community of over 70,000 people working to tackle climate change, recently opened registration for  Crowds & Climate, Climate CoLab’s signature conference. Join us September 28 & 29 at MIT for a chance to connect with leaders from businesses, non-profit organizations, governments and communities around the world, and engage with innovative climate solutions to advance a new, collective way of tackling climate change. This year, Crowds & Climate is aligned with MIT's Solve, whose mission is to discover, evaluate, and advance solutions to big, global problems; and part of HUBweek, Boston's week-long city-wide celebration of innovation. Register for the conference before 9/5 for the special early bird rate of $50! A limited number of student scholarships are also available.

http://climatecolab.org

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Wednesday, September 28
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Synaptic gap: 21st Century Brain Science Meets Mental Health Policy
Wednesday, September 28
7:30 AM to 4:30 PM (EDT)
Starr Center, 185 Cambridge Street, 2nd floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/synaptic-gap-21st-century-brain-science-meets-mental-health-policy-tickets-26505936971

Some of the most exciting and world-changing advances in medicine are happening in neuroscience. Unfortunately, mental health treatment and policy are not keeping pace. Massachusetts General Hospital convenes a provocative one-day forum to look beyond the present day access and payment obstacles. The forum will challenge the health care community to shape a future that is grounded in the latest brain science -- and connected to mental health treatment and policy. The spirit of HUBweek, its focus on solving tough problems -- and the timing on the eve of a Presidential election provides a tremendous opportunity to re-energize the health care community to use the extraordinary advances in neuroscience to shape the future of mental health care in our nation. Join clinicians, researchers, policy makers, advocates, business leaders and elected officials as we work together to: translate advances in brain science to individual patient care and treatment policy; find new ways to meet demand through non-traditional approaches to care in an environment of cost accountability; take a critical look at the economics of mental health; and promote resilience and hope.
Who It's For: Health care policy makers, Clinicians, Researchers, Advocates, Elected officials 
Vibe: Thought provoking, Challenging, Energizing

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Cleantech Scandinavia Boston Showcase 
Wednesday, September 28 
8:30 AM to 5:30 PM
Pierce Atwood LLP, 100 Summer Street, Boston 
RSVP at madeleine at cleantechscandinavia.com

For the second consecutive year, Cleantech Scandinavia is bringing together promising Nordic and North American cleantech startups to meet with investors at its Cleantech Showcase in Boston. The showcase will take place at Pierce Atwood LLP on September 28th from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm. As a compliment to the showcase there will be a cleantech tour of Boston on September 29th.

The goal is to meet investors and industry actors from both regions, effectively creating a platform for all to form partnerships for potential co-investments and other business opportunities.

Learn more.

Cleantech Scandinavia is the leading Nordic cleantech investor network. Their platform of Nordic cleantech companies offer unique opportunities for their established international network of investors, industrials, real estate companies, cities, service providers and the public sector. Today there are approximately 70 members including venture funds, industrial ventures from multinational companies, real estate companies, cities, service providers and government organizations. Members are from Scandinavia, Continental Europe, China, North America and other locations.

Editorial Comment:  I went last year and found quite a few useful technological developments mentioned.  One way to expand your imagination.

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Solve | LEARN
Wednesday, September 28
10:00a–11:30a
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

Given that access to a quality education is the foundation of economic and social progress for all of us, Solve's Learn pillar addresses challenges in education. 

You are invited to join our community of technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents to help create solutions to Solve: Learn pillar challenges. Go here to read about and submit your solution to the challenge of how to improve education for children living in refugee camps: http://solvecolab.mit.edu. 

Be sure to attend Solve at HUBweek on Wednesday, September 28, when Solve: Learn finalists selected by a distinguished panel of judges will present their proposed solutions to the refugee education challenge. 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

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Nelson Mandela: Romantic Hero, Tragic Hero
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 12 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center
SPEAKER(S)  Xolela Mangcu, Professor of Sociology, University of Cape Town
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS	 A Q&A will follow the talk
LINK  http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-28-2016-1200pm/fall-colloquium-xolela-mangcu

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Probability Assessment and National Security Decision Making: Experimental Evidence from National Security Professionals
Wednesday, September 28
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jeffrey Friedman (Dartmouth)

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu 

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Explore the Emerging Worlds of Augmented and Virtual Reality
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 1 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Innovation Lab, 125 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Information Technology, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Innovation Lab
DETAILS	  It’s clear that Virtual and Augmented Reality will become ubiquitous technologies that change how we perceive, interact, create, teach, and play. VR/AR cuts across a wide range of industries from retail, healthcare, the arts, entertainment, and education.
Join the Harvard Innovation Lab for an afternoon of exploration and education about the VR/AR ecosystem and how organizations are tapping into these new frontier technologies to change the way the world works. This dynamic program will include keynotes from luminaries in the space, concurrent sessions on the exploding range of VR-AR applications across industries, demonstration stations, a manufacturers’ showcase, and more.
You’ll never look at the world the same way again.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/explore-the-emerging-worlds-of-virtual-and-augmented-reality/

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Improved Learning and Retention by Augmenting STEM Curriculum with Computational Thinking, Self-Assessment and Student-Created Visualizations
Wednesday, September 28
1:30p–3:00p
MIT, Building 33-116

Speaker: Prof Craig Carter, Dr Kyle Keane
DUE Education Talk series (DUET): 
The DUET speakers present current research on learning, cognitive psychology, educational technology, and educational assessment. Our goal is to provide access to educational research in support of individual and institutional efforts at enhancing residential student learning.

From the Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Prof Craig Carter and Dr Kyle Keane will discuss teaching materials science and mathematics to sophomores through problem-based learning in the context of students' current and future coursework. They are required to create, code, and visualize concepts from their discipline. 

This is part of a larger project called CodeSeal (http://codeseal.org) . CodeSeal provides a framework of curated content, authoring tools, LMS, and data collection and analysis. CodeSeal's goals are to crowd-source computational STEM curriculum and research its effectiveness in different contexts. 

Web site: https://mpc-www.mit.edu/component/k2/item/537
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Teaching and Learning Laboratory, Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Education
For more information, contact:  Leann Dobranski
617-253-3371
leann at mit.edu 

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Solve | FUEL
Wednesday, September 28
2:00p–3:30p
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

Solve's Fuel pillar addresses challenges in energy, food, water, and sustainability, including the need to reduce greenhouse gases and how to leverage technology to set a price on carbon emissions. 

You have an exciting opportunity to join our community of technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents to help create solutions to Fuel pillar challenges. We are now actively seeking solutions to the two Fuel challenges, which are co-hosted by MIT's notable Climate CoLab. Go here to learn more: http://solvecolab.mit.edu. 

Be sure to attend Solve at HUBweek on Wednesday, September 28, when Solve: Fuel finalists selected by a distinguished panel of judges will present their proposed solutions to the Fuel challenges relating to climate change. 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

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Bio-Inspired Metal-Coordination Dynamics: An Easier Way to Engineer Supramolecular Mechanics?

3:30p–4:45p
SEMINAR 3:30 PM REFRESHMENTS 3:00 PM
MIT, Building 56-114, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Prof. Niels Holten-Andersen (MIT DMSE)

Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM) Seminar Series 
PPSM sponsors a series of seminars covering a broad range of topics of general interest to the polymer community, featuring speakers from both on and off campus.

Web site: http://polymerscience.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM)
For more information, contact:  Gregory Sands
(617) 253-0949

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TumbleBit: An Untrusted Bitcoin-Compatible Anonymous Payment Hub 
Wednesday, September 28
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
MIT, Building 32-G882, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Ethan Heilman , Boston University
Abstract:: This paper presents TumbleBit, a new unidirectional unlinkable payment hub that is fully compatible with today's Bitcoin protocol. TumbleBit allows parties to make fast, anonymous, off-blockchain payments through an untrusted intermediary called the Tumbler. TumbleBit's anonymity properties are similar to classic Chaumian eCash: no one, not even the Tumbler, can link a payment from its payer to its payee. Every payment made via TumbleBit is backed by bitcoins, and comes with a guarantee that Tumbler can neither violate anonymity, nor steal bitcoins, nor "print money" by issuing payments to itself. We prove the security of TumbleBit using the real/ideal world paradigm and the random oracle model. Security follows from the standard RSA assumption and ECDSA unforgeability. We implement TumbleBit, mix payments from 800 users and show that TumbleBit's off-blockchain payments can complete in seconds.

Bio:  Ethan is a PhD student in the Boston University Security Group (BUSEC) of the Computer Science Dept. His research interests are: cryptocurrencies, network security, and cryptanalysis. His most recent projects have been related to internet routing and Bitcoin.

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Countdown to #Campaign2016
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, L-166, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  Ann Compton
COST  Free and Open to the Public
CONTACT INFO  deisy_carrera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Come take a front row seat to history in the final 8 weeks of #Campaign2016.  For ABC News,  Ann Compton covered ten presidential elections and seven presidents. She asked questions at two formal general election debates. Each week her study group and national guests will track the polls, dissect the rhetoric, and put a special focus on how the age of digital media makes for the most unconventional candidates and news coverage in modern times.
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/fellows-study-groups

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Solve | FUEL Closing Keynote & Reception
Wednesday, September 28
Time: 4:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building E14-6th floor, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

The finale of the exciting Crowds & Climate conference's first day will be a session and reception hosted by Solve and Climate CoLab at the MIT Media Lab on the evening of Wednesday, September 28. 

This session will kick off with a keynote address from a nationally known climate change innovator. The keynote will be the culmination of a day of events focused specifically on innovation and the potential for new, crowd-based technologies - such as crowdsourcing, virtual collaboration, and online communities - to help the world more effectively tackle climate change. 

You won't want to miss this closing session and reception, which is sure to be a thought-provoking and inspiring conclusion to the Crowds & Climate Wednesday sessions. 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Climate CoLab, Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

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#Tech4Democracy: Meet the Changemakers
WHEN  Wed., Sep. 28, 2016, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Second North Floor
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Information Technology, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government
SPEAKER(S)  Archon Fung
Tiana Epps Johnson
Rey Faustino
Seth Flaxman
Denise Linn
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tech4democracy-meet-the-change-makers-tickets-27084204585
DETAILS  Please join us for a panel with Harvard Kennedy School alumni and affiliates who are working to leverage digital technology to make governance and society more inclusive. The panel, moderated by HKS Academic Dean Archon Fung, will explore the potential and pitfalls of digital technology in realizing democratic values such as participation, transparency, accountability, responsiveness, and equal representation.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit www.harvard.edu…
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/tech4democracy-meet-the-change-makers/

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Heat Exposure and Human Capital Accumulation: Evidence from NYC Public Schools
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Room Littauer-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
Harvard Environmental Economics Program
SPEAKER(S)  Jisung Park, Harvard University
LINK  https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

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"A Small Good Thing" Film Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker Pamela Tanner Boll
Wednesday, September 28
4:30 PM to 6:30 PM (EDT)
Marran Theater, Doble Campus, Lesley University, 34 Mellen Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-small-good-thing-film-screening-and-discussion-with-filmmaker-pamela-tanner-boll-tickets-23851329970

A Small Good Thing explores what it takes to live a good life at the beginning of this new century.  This film follows six people who, despite economic concerns and high levels of stress, have found more meaning in their lives, a closer bond with their families and communities, and a deeper connection to themselves and the natural world.  The surprising discovery at the heart of A Small Good Thing is that hard--but not impossible--is a crucial part of a good life.  The stories inspire us to make small, good changes in our daily lives.
About the Filmmaker
Pamela Tanner Boll is an artist, filmmaker, writer and activist. She is the Co-Executive Producer of the Academy Award-winning documentary, Born into Brothels. Pamela has executive produced the following film projects: Living in Emergency: True Stories of Doctors Without Borders; In a Dream; Connected; Our Summer in Tehran; Strange Powers; Close to the Fire; She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry; Teen Press; E-Team; and Obit.  Pamela directed and produced Who Does She Think She Is?, a feature-length documentary film that follows five women who are mothers and artists. Pamela’s current project is A Small Good Thing, a film that asks the question how can we live in a better way. The feature-length film, which recently won Best Documentary at the Boston International Film Festival, tells the stories of people moving away from the philosophy that “more is better.” It centers on a more holistic concept of well-being − one based on a close connection to themselves, the natural world, and to the greater good.Pamela grew up in Parkersburg, WV. She received a BA in English from Middlebury College and a Masters in Interdisciplinary Studies from Lesley University.   Pamela lives in Winchester, Massachusetts, where she raised three sons, and Boulder, Colorado.
 
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Trash is for Tossers: How to Live Zero Waste with Lauren Singer at Follain
Wednesday, September 28
5:00 PM to 7:00 PM (EDT)
Follain, Beacon Hill, 65 Charles Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/trash-is-for-tossers-how-to-live-zero-waste-with-lauren-singer-at-follain-tickets-27610341274

Meet zero waste expert Lauren Singer of Trash is for Tossers and learn easy steps to reduce waste in everyday life. Lauren will be teaching us how to make our own zero-waste toothpaste and also introducing her bulk laundry detergent line, The Simply Co. Join us on Wednesday, September 28th from 5-7pm at Follain Beacon Hill for an inspiring evening with this 25-year-old trailblazer.

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Crisis and Sovereignty: Posthegemony, Affect, Illiteracy
Wednesday, September 28
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building 14E-304, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Abraham Acosta
Abraham Acosta will explore the critical stakes of political theory and theories of resistance in a contemporary moment marked by the increasing discordance between contemporary theories of power and the intensified historical contradictions brought about by the neoliberal restructuration of the nation-state. Cultural studies, including the notion of Hegemony, mark increasingly ineffectual attempts to draw meaning from cultural practices and political forms in such a radically transformed environment. In effect, we are seeing older theoretical models pushed to their limits and may no longer provide the secure analytic footing they offered in previous years. Given these conditions, Dr. Acosta will reflect upon several, recently developed, theoretical accounts of power that aim to think beyond the critical and material assumptions of power and hegemony--including the notions of Posthegemony, Affect, and "illiteracy"--as a means to chart a new path and theoretical framework for critical inquiry. 

Abraham Acosta is Associate Professor of Latin American Cultural Studies at the University of Arizona. He specializes in literary and cultural analysis, focusing on questions of subalternity, postcoloniality, and biopolitics in the Americas. His research traverses the critical realities of contemporary multilingual contexts, where assumptions of power, knowledge, and capital crosshatch with historical translations of cultural difference.

Web site: http://mitgsl.mit.edu/news-events/crisis-and-sovereignty-posthegemony-affect-illiteracy
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676
lhickler at mit.edu 

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Next Generation of Ideas, Featuring the Beantown Throwdown
Wednesday, September 28
5:30 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)
Hatch Fenway, 401 Park Drive, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/next-generation-of-ideas-featuring-the-beantown-throwdown-tickets-26575124914
Cost:  $0 – $25

Home to over 60 colleges and universities, Boston has launched some of the most creative and inventive student-founded startups in the world. This night is all about celebrating and showcasing them.
At Next Generation of Ideas, student teams representing more than 10 different local colleges and universities will pitch to the audience for in-kind benefits and bragging rights as the winner of the fourth annual Beantown Throwdown. This year’s teams are presenting a wide variety of innovative ideas– from using virtual reality to help aging populations to connecting vets to the resources they need. Current competitors include:
Dropzone for Veterans, Babson College: connecting vets to the resources they need
Echo, Boston College: turning every smart device into a personal DJ booth
Aday, Harvard University: using machine learning to take the pain out of hourly work scheduling
Rendever Health, MIT: helping aging populations by way of virtual reality
Cookin, Northeastern University: offering “buy-it-yourself” alternatives to expensive meal plan services
Huambo Group, Tufts University: bringing connectivity to millions across the globe
CircularBlu, UMass Boston: decreasing hospital waste by 20%
bistara, Berklee College of Music: empowering students to be their own bosses
...with even more to come from Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston University, and UMass Lowell!
In a fun, collaborative environment, this program will also include unbridled insights from successful startup founders and CEOs, audience voting, and an awards ceremony for the winning student team.
Who it’s for: students, startups, anyone curious about new ideas
Vibe: fun, interactive, celebratory
Speakers
Elsa Sze: Founder and CEO, Agora
Frederick Townes: Co-Founder and COO, Placester
Rebecca Liebman: Co-Founder, LearnLux
Scott Kirsner: Columnist, The Boston Globe; Co-Founder, Innovation Leader
Jim Melvin: Chief Marketing Officer, SevOne
Host
MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge
Sponsor
SevOne, Inc.
Refunds: Refunds will be issued for any event that is canceled or moved to a different location, date or time. 

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Co-Creating the Future of Our Cities: Economic Mobility
Wednesday, September 28
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Impact Hub Boston, 50 Milk Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/co-creating-the-future-of-our-cities-economic-mobility-tickets-27421649893

Impact Hub Boston invites you to join us for deep discussion around the issue of economic mobility and the role it plays in the future of Boston. You'll hear from a panel of experts about their diverse experiences with the topic, and each will share a pointed question related to their work. All participants are then invited to engage in small group conversations with these experts in an effort to move their work forward. This is a chance to bring your unique perspective to collaborate with changemakers to improve economic mobility for the people of Boston. 
We are convening a varied group of social entrepreneurs, local government, community leaders, nonprofit professionals, business leaders, philanthropists, academics, and engaged citizens for productive conversation drawn from a wide a range of lived experience and professional experience in different fields, neighborhoods, and sectors. 
Join us if you are interested in learning more about, and contributing to, strategic work around economic mobility being done by Boston's public, private, and nonprofit leaders.
This event is part of an international event series, Co-Creating the Future of Our Cities. During the week of September 26-30, Impact Hub Boston joins with fourteen other Impact Hubs across North America to host programming to promote dialog and creative problem solving to address major urban issues. 
Presented in partnership with City Awake, and representatives from the following organizations: 
The Family Independence Initiative invests in families struggling with poverty as well as the solutions they discover on their own. We do away with the traditional top-down approach to fighting poverty by letting families themselves be the change agents. 
Check back for more partnership updates in coming weeks.

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Environmental Film Festival On Tour, presented by Bank of America
Wednesday, September 28
6:00 PM
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/environmental-film-festival-on-tour-presented-by-bank-of-america-tickets-26944764516
Cost:  $5 - 14.00

The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital (DCEFF), America’s largest and longest-running festival of its kind is coming to Boston for a special two-day event, presented by Bank of America.
Four exceptional environmental films – all Boston premieres – will be screened at Kendall Square Cinema, each followed by a discussion with filmmakers, scientists and experts. The films cover a range of topics, from the evolution of climate change, to water scarcity, and the dark side of technology.

 General Admission is $8 per film. You also have the option to purchase a One Day Pass for two screenings featured on the same night ($14) or a Full Event Pass  ($27) for all four screenings. 
Discounted tickets of $5 are available to students, military and seniors. In order to claim these discounts, please bring a valid ID when you present your ticket. 
Do you have a promo code? Please select General Admission tickets and enter your promo code to access your FREE TICKET. Up to 2 free tickets are available per customer. Please bring your valid ID to selected screening event to verify free admission upon entry.
Films:  WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2016

WOMEN IN WATER, 6:00 PM
(Spain, 2014, 58 min.)
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Cost: $8
An evocative examination of the role of women in Indian society as seen through the prism of water. Women and Water examines who has access to this most elemental of resources and why it is denied to those who need it most. Directed and produced by Nocem Collado. This film will be preceded by The Nature of People, a short documentary produced by The Nature Conservancy on people adapting in changing coastal communities. (11 min.)
Special Guests: Filmmaker Nocem Collado; Mark Smith, The Nature Conservancy
ICE AND THE SKY, 8:15 PM
(France, 2015, 89 min.)
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Cost: $8
Claude Lorius discovered the effects of climate change, while drilling down into the Antarctic ice fields in the 1950s. At 82, he returns there one last time to reflect on six decades of research and adventure. Directed by Luc Jacquet and produced by Richard Grandpierre and Frédéric Doniguian.

More screening and event details are available at dceff.org/boston

Refunds:  Refunds will be issued for any event that is canceled or moved to a different location, date or time. 

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Film Screening of NAIJA BETA
Wednesday, September 28
6:30p–9:00p
MIT, Building 10-105, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Arthur Musah '04, M.Eng '05
The Division of Student Life and the MIT Club of Boston are teaming up to cosponsor a screening of NAIJA BETA in the Bush Room (10-105). This is a film about the experiences of African MIT students by MIT alum Arthur Musah (S.B. '04, M.Eng. '05). After the screening, there will be a panel discussion examining the film's themes of youth entrepreneurship, innovation, and homecoming in Nigeria in age of globalization. A light dinner will be provided. DSL Staff/Guests: $15; Non-Members/Guests: $20; Current Students: free (dinner not included). Register at http://tinyurl.com/jossh5z.

Web site: http://tinyurl.com/jossh5z
Open to: the general public
Cost: See registration 
Tickets: http://tinyurl.com/jossh5z 
Sponsor(s): Division of Student Life
For more information, contact:  Bob Ferrara 
617-253-7495
rferrara at mit.edu 

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What the Presidential Campaign Says About America
Wednesday, September 28
7:00pm
Harvard, Barker Center, Room 133, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge

Roundtable Discussion

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Can We Save Coral Reefs and If So How?
Wednesday, September 28
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
New England Aquarium, Simons IMAX Theatre, 1 Central Wharf, Boston

Jeremy Jackson, Professor of Oceanography Emeritus at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Senior Scientist Emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution
Reef corals are declining worldwide. Climate change dominates the headlines, especially in relation to the recent mass bleaching and death of corals along the northern Great Barrier Reef and throughout the Pacific. But climate change is only half of the story. Up to now, the destructive impacts of climate change on reefs have been much less than the localized effects of overfishing, land-based pollution, and loss of habitats due to coastal development. A recent study of changes on Caribbean reefs over the past 50 years demonstrates that reefs with effective local protections and governance have double the amount of living coral, more fish, and clearer waters than reefs without protections. These new findings show that there are things we can do right now to help reefs recover. We need to stop all forms of overfishing, establish very large marine protected areas, and impose strict regulations on coastal development and pollution while at the same time working to reduce the use of fossil fuels. It’s not either/or, but all of the above

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The Good Life:  Results from The Harvard Study of Adult Development
Wednesday, September 28 
7:00 – 8:30 pm
Museum of Science1 Science Park, Boston
RSVP at http://www.mos.org/public-events/the-good-life

Do fame and fortune actually make the good life? Since 1938, researchers have been tracking the lives of more than 700 men to study the keys for having a happy and healthy life. The Harvard Study of Adult Development is the longest study of human development ever undertaken and now includes the subjects’ wives and children.

Program Speaker
Robert J. Waldinger, MD, psychiatrist, clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development, director of the Center for Psychodynamic Therapy & Research at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Zen priest, whose recent TEDx Beacon Street talk has been viewed over ten million times, and learn the secrets of how to live the truly good life.

Funding provided by the Lee and Nile Albright Annual Symposium Fund. This program is free thanks to the generosity of the Lowell Institute.

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Thursday, September 29
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The Right Corporate Approach to Public Policy
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government (M-RCBG) at the Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Ben Heineman, senior fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
CONTACT INFO  Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS	 Lunch will be served. 

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After 1492: Globalization as a biological process
Thursday, September 29
12pm  - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford
       
Charles C. Mann       
The two dates that mark the beginning of globalization are 1492 (when, famously, Columbus voyaged to the Americas) and 1571 (when, much less famously, Legazpi bloodily founded the Spanish colony of Manila). From these beginnings came today's globe-spanning network of exchange. Increasingly, this exchange--and is impacts--is understood in terms as much ecological as economic, in terms of vessels from distant lands causing previously separate ecosystems to collide. The "Columbian Exchange," as this ongoing worldwide ecological convulsion is known, was the biggest event in the history of life since the death of the dinosaurs, and a vital part of the human story as well.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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HUB Presents: The Hype and Promise of Blockchain
Thursday, September 29
2:00p–6:00p
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, 600 Atlantic Avenue #100, Boston
RSVP at https://hubweek.org/events/the-hype-and-promise-of-blockchain/
Cost:  $25

Blockchain technology is arguably the most promising, and most hyped, emerging technology that has the potential to fundamentally disrupt a significant number of industries and change the way that society works. 

Should you believe all the hype? What effects might blockchain have on you and your neighbors? This event will feature demos, discussions and roundtables seeking to demystify a seemingly esoteric, complex concept and make it real and tangible to an engaged audience. In addition, technical deep-dive sessions will be offered as part of the programming for interested attendees. More speakers will be announced throughout the summer. 

Who it's for: fintech, anyone who's curious about the potential impacts of blockchain technology 
Vibe: provocative, informative, approachable
Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/the-hype-and-promise-of-blockchain/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $25
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, HUBweek, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
For more information, contact:  HUBweek
hello at hubweek.org 

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Gender Diversity in Technology | Film Screening and Panel
Thursday, September 29
2:30 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Continuum Innovation, 1 Drydock Avenue 410 W, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gender-diversity-in-technology-film-screening-and-panel-tickets-27415046141

Manulife/John Hancock’s Lab of Forward Thinking (LOFT) and Global Women’s Alliance, in partnership with Continuum Boston, invite you to join us for a screening of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap, to be followed by a panel discussion focusing on gender diversity in technology.
CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap, is a documentary that investigates the persistent gender and minority gap in the technology industry. We encourage you to view a trailer of the film here. At the conclusion of the screening, we will be joined by an esteemed panel of women in technology, including Rachel Murray (She Geeks Out), Suelin Chen (Cake), Heddy Stern (Pivotal), Heather Reavey (Continuum), and Sandeep Tatla (John Hancock).
This special event is part of HUBWeek, a week-long ideas festival, that unites over 70 innovative organizations and celebrates the intersection of art, science and technology across Greater Boston.
All attendees are invited to attend a catered reception following the conclusion of our program.
Share your experience and start a discussion on a social media during the event, by using #LOFTWelcomes.
When: September 29th. 2:30 – 6:00 PM
Where: Continuum Innovation, 21 Drydock Avenue 410 W, Boston 02210
Agenda:
2:30 PM – Screening of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap
4:00 PM – Panel Discussion
5:00 PM – Reception & Networking

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TEDxBoston:  Artificial Intelligence And Machine Learning: How Far We’ve Come, How Far We Have To Go
Thursday, September 29
3pm - 5pm
245 Summer Street, Boston
RSVP at https://tedxboston.org
Lifestream at https://tedxboston.org

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Stories of Grassroots Change
Thursday, September 29
4:00 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Mezzanine, 290 Congress Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/stories-of-grassroots-change-tickets-26890778041

Throughout American history, some of our country’s most powerful movements for freedom and justice have originated right here in Boston, as regular community members have gathered in Boston’s streets and neighborhoods to call out injustice and take collective action. Boston’s remarkable legacy of grassroots activism continues today, as communities across the city are driving historic local – and nationwide – progress in education, healthcare, environmental conservation, and equality.
At this inspiring storytelling event, hear from local activists and aspiring young leaders who are involved in contemporary grassroots change campaigns in Boston, and learn from their struggles, successes, and insights. Attendees with their own stories of grassroots change can also sign up to share by selecting “Storyteller” on the registration page. The event is organized by Generation Citizen, an action civics education nonprofit that empowers local middle and high school students to lead grassroots change efforts in their communities, and will also include the voices and stories of these Generation Citizen youth activists.
Who It's For: The civically engaged, students, aspiring young leaders
Vibe: Meaningful, provocative, engaging
Host:  Generation Citizen & Boston Debate League
Featuring:  Shea Rose, local artist and activist Malia Lazu, Future Boston Alliance

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"Trafficked" Film Screening & Panel Discussion
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 29, 2016, 4 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Education, Ethics, Film, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events, Support/Social
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CARR CENTER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS POLICY
Co-sponsor - South Asia Institute
SPEAKER(S)  Panelists:
Siddharth Kara, Adjunct Lecturer of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School, Author of “Sex Trafficking”, Screenwriter & Producer of “Trafficked”
Swanee Hunt, Eleanor Roosevelt Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Anne Archer, Academy Award-nominated actress, lead in “Trafficked”, activist
Moderator: Sushma Raman, Executive Director, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy
DIRECTED BY  Will Wallace
WRITTEN BY  Siddharth Kara
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_73NRoSfTYYuafnn
CONTACT INFO  nimesha_perera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Millions of vulnerable girls worldwide are being ensnared by human traffickers into the insidious world of sex slavery and exploited relentlessly to generate profits of one hundred billion dollars a year. That is more than the annual profits of Google, Microsoft, Nike and Starbucks combined.
Inspired by real characters from the award winning book 'Sex Trafficking' by Siddharth Kara, this is the story of three such girls from America, Nigeria and India who become ensnared in an elaborate global network of illicit human, organ, and drug trafficking.
Please join the Carr Center for a screening of the new movie “Trafficked.” The screening will be followed by a panel discussion, with time for questions from the audience. Admittance is on a first-come, first-serve basis. Refreshments will be served.
RSVP HERE: https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_73NRoSfTYYuafnn
LINK  http://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/event/film-screening-panel-discussion-trafficked?delta=0

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A Nation of ‘Bystanders’? A Topography of Complicity and Capitulation in Nazi Germany and Beyond
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 4:15 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Goldman Room, Busch Hall
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Contemporary Europe Study Group
SPEAKER(S)  Mary Fulbrook
DETAILS	  Using a wide range of ego-documents and other sources, this paper explores the significance of personal and social relationships for the development of persecution in the Third Reich, as well as reverberations in postwar societies. Exploring a range of topics that are usually held to be the preserve of "the history of everyday life" — including intimacy, family relationships, friendships, privacy, and social life — the paper develops a theory of the "social self" and the role of personal relationships in the genesis of genocide. It concludes by exploring the long-term and wider significance of willing or unwilling capitulation to new norms, and questions around complicity, collusion, and the diffuse burden of guilt across generations.
LINK  https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2016/09/a-nation-of-bystanders-a-topography-of-complicity-and-capitulation-in-nazi-germany-and-beyond

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Party Polarization in Legislatures with Office-Mandated Candidates
Thursday, September 29
4:30p–6:00p
Harvard, CGIS Knafel Building, Room K354, third floor, 1737 Cambridge Street,Cambridge, 

Speaker: Jim Snyder (Harvard University)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Positive Political Economy
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Starr Forum: The Warming Arctic: Site of a New "Cold War"?
Thursday, September 29
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 4-270, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Marlene Laruelle, Lawrence Susskind, Kenneth Yalowitz
This will explore the geopolitical implications of the thawing Arctic. The speakers will discuss what is at stake as trade routes and mineral deposits open up due to Climate Change. The changing landscape in the Arctic opens up tremendous potential, but also the possibility of geopolitical conflict among the littoral states. We will ask our speakers to address the following topics, among others: What should be the new international regime governing Arctic exploration and passage? What are US and Russian objectives in the Arctic? Can the states surrounding the Arctic agree about governance? How great is the potential for conflict over Arctic resources and re-militarization? 

About the speakers: 
Marlene Laruelle, George Washington University; author, Russia's Arctic Strategy and the Future of the Far North (2013) 
Lawrence Susskind, Ford Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Director, MIT Science Impact Collaborative 
Kenneth Yalowitz, former Ambassador to Belarus and Georgia; director, Conflict Resolution Center, Georgetown University; senior fellow, Arctic Studies at Dartmouth 
[Carol Saivetz and Elizabeth Wood, co-chairs] 

Part of the Focus On Russia lecture series and the Architecture at the End of the Earth exhibition series 

CIS Starr Forum 
A public events series on pressing issues in international affairs, sponsored by the MIT Center for International Studies.

Please contact us at starrforum at mit.edu if you need accessibility accommodations

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cis/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MISTI MIT-Russia Program, Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:
617-253-8306
starrforum at mit.edu 

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Next Stage Planning for the Digital Humanities at MIT
Thursday, September 29
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

As a Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at MIT, Douglas O'Reagan will study how the digital humanities can best aid the specific strengths, mission, and broader community around MIT. In this talk, O'Reagan will update the audience on his efforts and invite suggestions and ideas concerning the future of digital humanities at MIT. 

O'Reagan completed his Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Berkeley in May 2014. His dissertation was a comparative history of the Allied powers' attempts to study and copy German science and technology during and after the Second World War. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Fung Institute of Engineering Leadership in UC Berkeley's College of Engineering from 2014-2015, where he worked with an interdisciplinary team on applying data science, econometric analysis, and historical research in studying the origins and impacts of specific breakthrough technologies. In 2015 he became a visiting assistant professor at Washington State University's Tri-Cities campus, where he taught history and served as Lead Archivist and Director of the Oral History Program for the Hanford History Project, which manages the US Department of Energy's collections related to the Hanford site of the Manhattan Project.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/next-stage-planning-digital-humanities-mit/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

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Horizons in Regenerative Medicine: Honey, I Shrunk the Patient!
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard University, 5 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Stem Cell Institute
SPEAKER(S)  Adam E. Cohen, PhD
Kevin C. Eggan, PhD
Dr. Steven Hyman
Geraldine Hamilton
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET INFO  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine-honey-i-shrunk-the-patient-tickets-26574511078#tickets
DETAILS	 Organs-on-Chips. Diseases in dishes. Bioengineering creates the opportunity to mold our human cells into living machines. The ability to study and test human cells of interest in a dish and outside the body promises to accelerate the pace of therapeutic discovery, while lowering its risks. Hear from this panel of visionary scientists who are replicating human systems in the lab dish by making functioning human organs in miniature for study. Panelists will review the state of the art in “disease-in-a-dish” models, which use patients’ stem cells to create populations of cells and mini-organs to understand how the body works and how it is affected by disease. Learn about the potential impacts of these studies and how this may affect the future of drug discovery and accelerate “time to patient.”
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit 
http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine/honey-i-shrunk-the-patient/

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Jeanne S. Chall Lecture and Reception: Reading in New Ways for New Times
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 5:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Askwith Hall in Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Lecture, Reception
TOPIC  Literacy
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  events at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture
DETAILS  Please RSVP to assist us in planning for attendance numbers.
Reading in New Ways for New Times: Issues for Theory, Research, and Practice
Speaker: Donald J. Leu, John and Maria Neag Endowed Chair in Literacy and Technology, professor of education, and director, The New Literacies Research Lab, Neag School of Education, University of Connecticut

Introduction: James S. Kim, Ed.M.’98, Ed.D.’02, associate professor of education and Jeanne S. Chall Advisory Board, HGSE

The emergence of the Internet as an essential channel of information and communication makes it imperative that we begin to reassess the nature of reading. Join Donald J. Leu as he explores how today’s educator must envision new ways of reading online. He suggests we position online reading – at a young age – as a key piece of curriculum so that equity and opportunity are more fully realized. Leu will address how the digital age presents challenges – but also new opportunities -- to reading theory, research, and practice as we know it.

Following Dr. Leu's lecture will be an awards presentation of the Jeanne S. Chall Doctoral Student Research Award to Emily Phillips Galloway, Ed.D.’16, and the Jeanne S. Chall Research Grant to Laura Tortorelli, College of Education, Michigan State University

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EnergyBar!
Thursday, September 29
5:30 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Greentown Labs, 28 Dane Street, Somerville
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/energybar-tickets-21458385609

EnergyBar is Greentown Labs' monthly networking event devoted to helping people in clean technology meet and discuss innovations in energy technology. Entrepreneurs, investors, students, and ‘friends of cleantech,’ are invited to attend, meet colleagues, and expand our growing regional clean technology community. 
Our attendees typically span a variety of disciplines within energy, efficiency, and renewables. In general, if you're looking for a job in cleantech or energy, trying to expand your network, or perhaps thinking about starting your own energy-related company this is the event for you. Expect to have conversations about issues facing advanced and renewable energy technologies and ways to solve our most pressing energy problems.
 
Light appetizers and drinks will be served starting at 5:30 pm. Suggested dress is shop floor casual. Parking is incredibly limited at Greentown Labs and we encourage attendees to consider taking advantage of public transportation. 
Hope to see you there! 

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Environmental Film Festival On Tour, presented by Bank of America
Thursday, September 29
6pm
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/environmental-film-festival-on-tour-presented-by-bank-of-america-tickets-26944764516
Cost:  $5 - 14.00

The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital (DCEFF), America’s largest and longest-running festival of its kind is coming to Boston for a special two-day event, presented by Bank of America.
Four exceptional environmental films – all Boston premieres – will be screened at Kendall Square Cinema, each followed by a discussion with filmmakers, scientists and experts. The films cover a range of topics, from the evolution of climate change, to water scarcity, and the dark side of technology.

 General Admission is $8 per film. You also have the option to purchase a One Day Pass for two screenings featured on the same night ($14) or a Full Event Pass  ($27) for all four screenings. 
Discounted tickets of $5 are available to students, military and seniors. In order to claim these discounts, please bring a valid ID when you present your ticket. 
Do you have a promo code? Please select General Admission tickets and enter your promo code to access your FREE TICKET. Up to 2 free tickets are available per customer. Please bring your valid ID to selected screening event to verify free admission upon entry.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2016
DEATH BY DESIGN, 6:00 PM
(US, 2016, 74 min.)
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Cost: $8
Consumers love – and live on – their electronic devices. But what is the cost of our digital dependency? Directed by Sue Williams. Produced by Sue Williams and Hilary Klotz Steinman.
*Co-Presented with GlobeDocs Documentary Film Festival.
Special Guests: Filmmaker Sue Williams; Film Subjects, Ted Smith and Amanda Hawes
THE AGE OF CONSEQUENCES, 8:15 PM
(US, 2016, 80 min.)
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Cost: $8
An investigation on climate change, resource scarcity, migration, and conflict through the lens of US national security and global stability. Written, directed and produced by Jared P. Scott. Executive produced by Sophie Robinson.
Special Guests: Filmmaker Jared P. Scott; Peter Fox-Penner, Institute for Sustainable Energy, Boston University
Host:  Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital
Partner Host:  Bank of America

More screening and event details are available at dceff.org/boston

Refunds:  Refunds will be issued for any event that is canceled or moved to a different location, date or time. 

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Focused: Women in Investigative Journalism
Thursday, September 29
6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Suffolk University, Modern Theatre, 525 Washington Street, Boston
 
At the turn of the 20th century, investigative journalism into the activities and lives of civil servants, at times called “muckraking”, was conducted, in part, by several brave and progressive women. Today, investigative journalism continues to be a catalyst for change. Our panelists will explore how investigative journalism today leads to civil service and other political reform, and bring the discussion full circle to the early female muckraking journalists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. What role does investigative journalism play in speaking truth to power? How has this investigative journalism changed over the last century? What is the experience of women working in this field?

In this panel, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, former Boston Globe columnist, and professor of journalism at Brandeis University, Eileen McNamara, discusses these and other questions with: Jenn Ableson, Boston Globe Spotlight Reporter; Beth Daley, Senior Investigative Reporter and Senior Trainer at The Eye and the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, and Joan Vennochi, Boston Globe Op-Ed Columnist.
 
This event is supported in part by a generous award from Mass Humanities, as part of the Nichols House Museum’s Women in Politics: Then and Now programming series. 

More information at http://www.fordhallforum.org/programs/focused

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Chuck Hoberman 10° Opening Reception
Thursday, September 29
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)
Le Laboratoire Cambridge, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/chuck-hoberman-10-opening-reception-tickets-27574415820

Please Join Us for the Opening Reception Celebrating Chuck Hoberman's 10°.

Editorial Comment:  Chuck Hoberman is best known for his expanding/contracting Hoberman Sphere.  He does fascinating work.

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Election 2016 in the Media
Thursday, September 29
6:00pm to 9:00pm
Cambridge Community Television (CCTV), 438 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 

Instructor: Frank Morris
What impact has the media played on Election 2016? How have U.S. presidential candidates benefitted and been hurt by biases in news coverage? How does the press cover the campaigns of a former First Lady, a self-proclaimed democratic socialist, two Latino senators, an African-American neurosurgeon, and a billionaire businessman? Learn how to really analyze the news in this exciting, free class centered on current events.

CCTV MONTHLY FREE LECTURE SERIES
Beginning in February 2016, CCTV is launched a monthly series of high-caliber seminar classes that are completely free and open to the general public (this includes non-members and non-residents). These classes are taught by highly educated practitioners in their field, and are a rare opportunity to sample the kind of resources available at CCTV.

Advance registration is required and is accepted on a first-come basis. Early registration is advised since courses may fill up or be canceled due to low enrollment. Call 617-661-6900 or email allison at cctvcambridge.org for details. Schedules are subject to change.

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Gold Rush or Realities? The Future of Drone Systems
Thursday, September 29
6:00 pm to 9:00 pm
swissnex Boston 420 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gold-rush-or-realities-the-future-of-drone-systems-tickets-27549760074

Register to Attend this Event
What does the future hold for unmanned aircraft systems?
Drones, also known as unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are capturing the imagination of many people with their widespread application. For others, they are a serious threat to airspace management and privacy. While it is clear that this technology is here to stay, important questions are waiting to be answered.

Come join us for a presentation by Michel Guillaume, Professor and Director of the Centre for Aviation (ZAV) at Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), where he and his team are working on answering some of these important questions.

The unique Bachelor Degree Program in Aviation associated with ZAV, now celebrating its 10th anniversary, is an interdisciplinary program addressing complex and wide-ranging issues in the aviation sector under one roof. It links a broad variety of technologies, methods, and research fields with the goal of overcoming the challenges of future global mobility and researching ways to shape it more efficiently and securely.
Michel Guillaume will discuss the development of fixed wing UMARS drones, Remote Pilote Stations for drones and the project of a “Technology Study for Drones” in Switzerland, where in 2015 Swiss Post, Swiss WorldCargo and Matternet started jointly testing the commercial use of logistics drones.

Following Michel Guillaume’s presentation, a panel of experts moderated by Olivier de Weck from MIT’s AeroAstro department will discuss the future of autonomous aerospace science, ideas for unmanned aircraft integration in existing aerospace organization, and trends for payloads of unmanned aircraft systems for different applications (search and rescue, logistics, real estate agriculture, high altitude platforms to augment satellites, etc.).

More information at http://www.swissnexboston.org/event/gold-rush-or-realities-the-future-of-drone-systems/#sthash.ozINVH94.dpuf

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TEDxCambridge
Thursday, September 29
6pm - 9pm
Boston Opera House, 539 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at 
Cost:  $45 - $150

TEDxCambridge is a premier evening event experience hosted at the Boston Opera House that celebrates the remarkable innovation, creativity, and inspiration found within New England and beyond. We curate one of the largest TEDx conferences in the world featuring 2,600 guests and six speakers. TEDxCambridge showcases the greatest insights in science, design, technology, business, education, and the arts. Our speakers tackle humanity’s toughest questions, answering with innovation, enterprise, and enduring optimism. We seek to highlight ideas that inspire people to change their lives and communities.

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Playing for Their Lives: The Global El Sistema Movement for Social Change Through Music
Thursday, September 29
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Recital Room N-1, Rey-Waldstein Building - Longy School of Music of Bard College 33 Garden Street, Cambridge 
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/playing-for-their-lives-book-release-event-tickets-27261872996
Cost:  $0 – $20

At this reception celebrating the launch of their book, authors Tricia Tunstall and Eric Booth will introduce us to the remarkable story of the international El Sistema movement. This program, which started over four decades ago with a handful of music students in a parking garage in Caracas, has evolved into one of classical music’s most vibrant new expressions and one of the world’s most promising social initiatives.

At the event, Tricia and Eric will be making a formal presentation, and will be available to sign copies of their book. We will also have copies of the book available for purchase at the event. Light refreshments will be served. 
Please consider making a donation to support Longy's free programming and innovative educational initiatives.

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Rigs to Reefs: A Blue Solution to Repurpose the World’s Offshore Oil and Gas Platforms
Thursday, September 29
7pm
NE Aquarium, Simons IMAX Theatre, 1 Central Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=106707&view=Detail

Emily Callahan and Amber Jackson
Co-Founders of Blue Latitudes
There comes a time when the useful life of an oil platform comes to an end, at least when it comes to drilling for oil, and that’s when Emily Callahan and Amber Jackson, co-founders of Blue Latitudes, dive in. They are marine scientists on a mission to re-purpose offshore oil and gas platforms as artificial reefs around the world. The oil platforms found in their home state of California, like most offshore oil platforms around the world, are home to some of the most productive ecosystems on the planet. As the world’s natural reefs are overfished, over-trawled and polluted, Amber and Emily believe that re-purposing these structures, some the size of the empire state building, as artificial reefs, may be the best decision for the future of our oceans. It’s time to think creatively about the resources we have, and proceed forward boldly with radical new tactics for ocean management. Join Callahan and Jackson to hear how Rig2Reef Exploration has successfully conducted research expeditions in the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico and California, investigating the ecological, economic and cultural benefits of re-purposing these offshore platforms in a variety of ways, from eco-tourism hot spots, to national marine sanctuaries.

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His Final Battle:  The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt
Thursday, September 29
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes former executive editor for The New York Times JOSEPH LELYVELD for a discussion of his latest book, His Final Battle: The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt.

About His Final Battle
“By far the most enigmatic leading figure” of World War II. That’s how the British military historian John Keegan described Franklin D. Roosevelt, who frequently left his contemporaries guessing, never more so than at the end of his life. Here, in a hugely insightful account, a prizewinning author and journalist untangles the narrative threads of Roosevelt’s final months, showing how he juggled the strategic, political, and personal choices he faced as the war, his presidency, and his life raced in tandem to their climax.

The story has been told piecemeal but never like this, with a close focus on Roosevelt himself and his hopes for a stable international order after the war, and how these led him into a prolonged courtship of Joseph Stalin, the Soviet dictator, involving secret, arduous journeys to Tehran and the Crimea. In between, as the war entered its final phase, came the thunderbolt of a dire medical diagnosis, raising urgent questions about the ability of the longest-serving president to stand for a fourth term at a time when he had little choice. Neither his family nor top figures in his administration were informed of his diagnosis, let alone the public or his closest ally, Winston Churchill. With D-Day looming, Roosevelt took a month off on a plantation in the south where he was examined daily by a navy cardiologist, then waited two more months before finally announcing, on the eve of his party’s convention, that he’d be a candidate. A political grand master still, he manipulated the selection of a new running mate, with an eye to a possible succession, displaying some of his old vigor and wit in a winning campaign.

With precision and compassion, Joseph Lelyveld examines the choices Roosevelt faced, shining new light on his state of mind, preoccupations, and motives, both as leader of the wartime alliance and in his personal life. Confronting his own mortality, Roosevelt operated in the belief that he had a duty to see the war through to the end, telling himself he could always resign if he found he couldn’t carry on.

Lelyveld delivers an incisive portrait of this deliberately inscrutable man, a consummate leader to the very last. 

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The World’s Emergency Room
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 7 p.m.
WHERE	Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
SPEAKER(S)  Michael VanRooyen
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS	  Twenty years ago, the most common cause of death for medical humanitarians and other aid workers was traffic accidents; today, it is violent attacks. And the death of each doctor, nurse, paramedic, midwife, and vaccinator is multiplied untold times in the vulnerable populations deprived of their care.

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A Conversation on Racial and Ethnic Disparities with the Family of Henriett...
Thursday, September 29
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Faneuil Hall, 1 Faneuil Hall Square, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-conversation-on-racial-and-ethnic-disparities-with-the-family-of-henrietta-lacks-tickets-26289291980

Deepening racial and ethnic divisions in the United States have created an urgent need for the healthcare community to re-focus attention on ending racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care.
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, brought world-wide public attention to the use of HeLa cells in medical research and ethical issues of race, class and consent. The story of Henrietta Lacks and her immortal HeLa cell line continues to be critically important as genetic research and big data processing have the potential to transform treatment of disease and save lives.
At its core, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is the story of a woman, her family, their invaluable gift to medical science, and their incredible journey through the politics of race and medicine. We invite you to this special program in Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall, which will feature David Lacks, Jr. and Victoria Baptiste, RN, in a conversation about their grandmother, her extraordinary contribution to medical science, and their family’s role in her legacy and the future of research.
The program will call attention to the Disparities Solutions Center’s efforts to create a national network of trained health care providers and policy makers committed to providing the highest quality care for all and ending disparities in health and health care.
Who it's for: Clinicians, researchers, policy makers, community members, students, patients and family members
Vibe: Thought-provoking, uplifting, motivating
Panelists:
Joseph Betancourt, MD, MPH
Victoria Baptiste, RN
David Lacks Jr.

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On Your Own But Not Alone: Enhancing Health and Well Being in Later Life
Thursday, September 29 
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
First Church JP, 6 Eliot Street, Jamaica Plain
RSVP aat https://www.facebook.com/events/154578494988454/

Co-Sponsored by JP at Home

As we enter later life, being single has its own unique challenges and opportunities. Meeting these challenges requires single people to tap our remarkable human capacity to adapt to a life circumstance that may not have turned out as we expected. At the Forum, JP resident Nancy Goldner (Ph.D, LICSW) will draw on insights and practical suggestions gained both from her clinical experience and from being a single person for many years. She will identify the signature strengths and resources that sustain physical health and emotional wellbeing for those of us who live on our own. We will hear a brief presentation from Nancy and there will be plenty of time for discussion.

Dr. Goldner is an active member of JP at Home, an organization that works to keep JP women and men in their homes as long as possible through social networks, information and services. In her presentation, she will note the role that a “village” like JP at Home plays in promoting emotional and physical health.

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Friday, September 30
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Engineering & Entrepreneurship: The Internet of Things
Friday, September 30
8:30 AM to 2:30 PM
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/engineering-entrepreneurship-the-internet-of-things-tickets-27084487431

The “Internet of Things,” in which everyday objects possess network connectivity that allows them to send and receive data, is poised to radically transform the way we live and work. As part of their collaborative series on engineering and entrepreneurship, the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Harvard Business School will host a symposium on the Internet of Things, exploring the thrilling opportunities it provides for technological innovation and social organization. The event will feature lightning talks by four Harvard SEAS faculty members, as well as a keynote talk by Chicago Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) Commissioner and CIO Brenna Berman, called “Transforming the Future City.” Berman says, “Adopting IoT technologies in the urban environment offers cities a host of opportunities but also presents just as many challenges. Learn about one city's experience - its successes and lessons learned - as it uses connected technologies to course its future.”
Following the keynote, this symposium will feature a quintessential HBS experience – a case study discussion. The “case method” was introduced by HBS faculty in 1925, and has since become a powerful tool for interactive business education. It gives participants the unique opportunity to reason through a real-world management challenge. HBS remains the world’s leading case-writing institution, and symposium attendees will have the opportunity to experience a case study firsthand.
The symposium will culminate in transportation to the Hynes Convention Center for Demo Day, where local start-up companies, innovation labs, and change-making organizations will share the exciting new work that makes Boston a hub of visionary research.
Speaker:  Brenna Berman, Chicago Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) Commissioner and CIO
Chicago Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) Commissioner and CIO, Brenna Berman joined the Emanuel administration in 2011. In that time, she has focused on transforming the team at DoIT to provide the skills and expertise to implement the Mayor’s commitment to leveraging data and technology to create a more efficient, effective and innovative City government. This has meant adding new skills to the team to increase the focus on software engineering and analytics, improving the department’s commercial partnerships to drive savings for the City and identifying ground-breaking civic partnerships.
Over the past several years, Commissioner Berman and the team at DoIT has delivered on the Mayor’s commitment to a robust open data program, integrated advanced analytics and real-time data-driven decision making across the city, driven IoT innovation for the City through unique partnerships at UILabs and, in partnership with the University of Chicago, realized the vision of urba scale sensing with the Array of Things.
Prior to joining the Emanuel Administration, Comm. Berman built a career promoting government innovation over 10 years at IBM, where she worked closely with government agencies in cities and countries across the world to leverage technology and analytics to improve the services they provide to their residents. She advised governments on a variety of issues, from targeting personalized services through analytics to normalizing program offerings to simplify the delivery process and make them understandable to residents. Throughout her time at IBM, Ms. Berman tailored cutting-edge business and data models, from processes to analytic algorithms for large government organizations in order to accelerate their own modernization efforts, providing an incredibly valuable skill set for the work she continues at DoIT.
Brenna earned her bachelor’s degree and Masters in Public Policy from the University of Chicago.
Who It's For: students, faculty, community members, policy makers, current and future leaders
Vibe: inspiring, enlightening, cutting-edge, educational

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New England Electricity Restructuring Roundtable:  Connecting the Dots: Major New England Energy Initiatives & Reforming Retail Rates to Better Integrate DERs
Friday, September 30
9 am to 12:30 pm 
Foley Hoag, 155 Seaport Boulevard, 13th Floor, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/connecting-the-dots-major-new-england-energy-initiatives-and-reforming-retail-rates-to-better-tickets-20908406607?utm_campaign=Register+Now+for+9%2F30+NE+RT&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Register+Now+for+9%2F30+NE+Roundtable
Cost:  $0 - $65

Connecting the Dots: Major New England Energy Initiatives 
Our first panel, Connecting the Dots: Major New England Energy Initiatives, will provide timely updates on the myriad major energy-related initiatives in progress in New England, and then explore how these initiatives could and should be connected for maximum impact on clean energy goals, greenhouse gas reductions, and economic development. Massachusetts' recently passed comprehensive energy legislation (requiring 1,600 MW of off-shore wind and 1,200 MW of clean energy generation) and NEPOOL's launch of its "Integrating Markets and Public Policy" process (along with extensive and related modeling efforts by ISO New England and NESCOE), must be layered on top of - and ultimately integrated with - existing programs and initiatives. These include the three-state renewables RFP; RGGI's 2016 Program Review Process (and likely cap changes); meeting state GHG, RPS, and EE requirements; and even state gas RFPs and regional gas infrastructure decisions.

The stellar panel below will provide insightful updates on all of these initiatives and help New England regulators and energy stakeholders better connect the dots.
 
Undersecretary Ned Bartlett, MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Deputy Commissioner Katie Dykes, CT DEEP 
Joel Gordon, (PSEG), Chair, NEPOOL
Robert Ethier, VP, Market Operations, ISO New England
Janet Besser, Executive VP, NECEC

Reforming Retail Rates to Better Integrate DERs
Our second panel, Reforming Retail Rates to Better Integrate DERs,
explores various options for changing retail rate designs in ways that more accurately capture the full range of benefits that distributed energy resources can provide (in time and location), while also allowing utilities to recoup the full costs of modernizing and maintaining a state-of-the-art electric grid.  As the New England states grapple with incentivizing DERs while protecting ratepayers, the search for more sustainable retail rate designs has become a high priority. 
 
Paul Centolella, former utility regulator and current President of Paul Centolella and Associates, will discuss the innovative rate design approach he recently co-authored for the NY PSC and NYSERDA for the REV process. Ryan Katofsky, Senior Director of Industry Analysis, Advanced Energy Economy, will then discuss the rate designs that AEE has been proposing in New York and other states to better integrate DERs. Finally, Jane Park, Vice President, Regulatory Policy & Strategy at Commonwealth Edison Company (Exelon), will offer a utility perspective and present a case study on Commonwealth Edison's effort to integrate DERs into retail rates.

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Mothers Against Violence National Conference
Friday, September 30, 9:00 AM - Saturday, October 1, 6:00 PM (EDT)
Wheelock College, Brookline Campus , 43 Hawes Street, Brookline
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mothers-against-violence-national-conference-tickets-26928582114
Cost:  $0 – $125

On September 29 – October 1, 2016 Mothers for Justice and Equality (MJE) will host its second annual Mothers Against Violence National Conference in Boston. The conference is the only national convening of mothers who have lost children to street violence, social justice change makers, corporate partners and civic leaders and is expected to welcome over 200 attendees from dozens of cities including Oakland, Chicago, New Haven, Ferguson and Baltimore.
During the three-day conference mothers from around the country share their successes, gain technical assistance from experts, and build an alliance to lead the change that is needed to end senseless street violence. Mothers for Justice and Equality strives to ensure that our audience is provided with  the most current information so that they are able to bring it back to their own communities.
SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

Thursday, September 29
5:00 – 7:00 pm  
Opening Reception and Fireside Chat
Friday, September 30
8:30 - 9:30 am  
Continental Breakfast
9:30 - 10:00 am 
Opening Remarks: Monalisa Smith and Randall Davis
10:00 - 10:30 am  
Keynote Address: Mayor Marty Walsh
10:45 am - 12:00 pm 
Morning Breakout Sessions
12:00 - 1:30 pm  
Lunch and Keynote Speaker: 
Rev. Dr. Timothy Tyler, Shorter Community AME Church, Denver, CO
2:00 - 3:15 pm  
Afternoon Breakout Sessions
3:30 - 5:00 pm  
General Session, Race and Justice: The Youth Perspective
Opening Remarks: Robert Lewis, The BASE
Faciliator: Renee Omolade, Lewis Family Foundation and Black Girls Rock!
Saturday, October 1
8:30 - 9:30 am  
Continental Breakfast
10:15 - 11:30 am 
Morning Breakout Sessions
12:00 - 2:00 pm  
Lunch and Closing Plenary, Race and Justice: A Discussion with "Mothers of the Movement"
Opening Remarks and Facilitator: Rev. Dr. Janie Dowdy-Dandridge, AME Church, Nashville, TN
Special Performance by Oneida Easly

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HUB Presents: Demo Day
Friday, September 30
11:00a–6:00p
Hynes Convention Center, 900 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02115

Imagine yourself in a room with some the most impactful people and companies in this region. 

Join us in celebrating and recognizing companies in Boston making the greatest impact in this city. At Demo Day, visionary companies from the leading local startup incubators, accelerators, corporate innovation labs, who are fueling the change here in Boston will pitch, share and demo their work for recognition of their impact. 

Demo Day is an opportunity to: 
Explore the latest in health care & digital health, social entrepreneurship, technology, consumer & retail, hardware, biotech, clean tech, food and more 

Make meaningful connections with local change makers and connect with potential mentors and peers 

Gain valuable advice in areas such as career development, finding a fulfilling job and how to get the first meeting 

Additionally, we welcome the Babson Breakaway Challenge to our main stage for the first and only competition to promote gender parity in the VC industry and award $250,000 to a high-potential, women-led business. Be there as the final round of women pitch their businesses to an expert panel for the chance to win the largest prize ever for a competition of this kind. 

The full program will be announced soon - stay tuned. 

Who it's for: Startups, midsize-large companies, recruiters, investors, the curious 
Vibe: High-energy, cutting-edge, educational
Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/demo-day/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, HUBweek, Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce
For more information, contact:  HUBweek
hello at hubweek.org 

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Innovations in Synthetic Biology
Friday, September 30, 2016
12–1:30 pm
Join us via WebEx 
Meeting password: LabLunch
Contact  innovation at mit.edu

Speaker Abstracts
Christian Rückert
Title: Using synthetic biology and metabolic engineering to produce natural pharmaceuticals such as alpha-carotene in Corynebacterium.
Abstract: Interest in vitamins such as carotenoids has increased in recent years, due to the high value these compounds possess in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industry. These compounds not only act as important precursors for essential amino acids in feedstocks, but also have antioxidant and coloring properties as well. In 2010, the carotenoid market was estimated at nearly $1.2 billion and this number is expected to increase to $1.4 billion by 2018 with a compound annual growth rate of 2.3. Despite its high value, current extraction of carotenoids is rather difficult. Extraction from vegetables is highly dependent on seasonal and geographic variability that cannot be controlled and chemical synthesis of these compounds generates hazardous waste that affects the environment. In order to overcome these limitations, we propose to establish Corynebacterium glutamicum as a microbial platform for the production of high-value carotenoids. The establishment of a microbial production platform can lower production costs by using low-costs substrates and reducing toxic byproducts. C. glutamicum, in particular, is a strong candidate as a potential host for several reasons. To implement a fermentation-based production of pigments and high value lipids with a microorganism, the Gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is chosen as a potential host for several reasons. Foremost, C. glutamicum is well established for the fermentative production of a variety of compounds at an industrial scale. Currently, C. glutamicum strains are used for the industrial production of lysine, glutamate and tryptophan. It is a Generally Regarded As Safe (GRAS) model organism that is genetically tractable and whose genome has been sequenced and is publicly available. In addition, the regulatory capabilities of this organism are well described. In recent years, first synthetic biology approaches towards a platform strain with a reduced genome and increased genomic stability have been under­taken. We are establishing C. glutamicum as a production platform for lipophilic vitamins and related compounds with health benefits and high value, specifically carotenes. C. glutamicum is a natural producer of carotenoids, synthesizing the C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin and its and mono- and diglucoside. This ability indicates that this bacterium is capable to be engineered, in principle, to become a production host for carotenes. Based on the wild-type, there are 5 major targets that have the potential apparent to achieve maximize carotene production in C. glutamicum: A) removal of the genes for decaprenoxanthin (glucoside) synthesis, B) increase of IPP precursor production, C) increase of lycopene precursor production, D) introduction of carotene cyclases for carotene production, and E) engineering of the capability to store carotenes.

Philipp Pfingstag
Title: Lightening the Burden of Knowledge: How tools help DNA engineers push the frontiers of science
Abstract: In this paper we investigate the influence of research tools on technological progress. The frontier of knowledge moves continually outward as new scientific discoveries are made and creates an increasing burden of knowledge for successive generations of innovators. This barrier can be overcome by an increased educational phase, greater specialization, and larger teams. There is little theory on how research tools affect scientific advancement. Synthetic biology provides a promising setting to study these effects. In contrast to traditional, time-consuming, and error-prone genetic engineering tools, the rapidly falling costs of DNA synthesis allows scientists to work on a broader set of problems for a reasonable price. We analyze how new tools help scientists to push the frontier of knowledge forward and how these tools shape the direction of research. We use a difference in differences approach to analyze the innovative step of new synthetic genetic parts compared to traditional DNA chunks and to examine the importance of those parts for the scientific community.

Hosted by the MIT Innovation Initiative Lab for Innovation Science and Policy
The Lab Lunch is a monthly lunchtime speaker series. This month, join us as we welcome Christian Rückert (Research Scientist, MIT Department of Biology) and Philipp Pfingstag (PhD student, Technical University of Munich School of Management) who will be presenting on innovation in synthetic biology.

More at: https://innovation.mit.edu/event/lab-lunch-innovation-synthetic-biology/#sthash.2cQDMW22.dpuf

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The Portable Frederick Douglass
Friday, September 30
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR., and JOHN STAUFFER, editors of the new Penguin Classics edition of The Portable Frederick Douglass, for a discussion of the seminal writings and speeches of a legendary writer, orator, and civil rights leader.
About The Portable Frederick Douglass

This compact volume offers a full course on the remarkable, diverse career of Frederick Douglass, letting us hear once more a necessary historical figure whose guiding voice is needed now as urgently as ever. Edited by renowned scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Pulitzer Prize–nominated historian John Stauffer, The Portable Frederick Douglass includes the full range of Douglass’s works: the complete Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, as well as extracts from My Bondage and My Freedom and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass; The Heroic Slave, one of the first works of African American fiction; the brilliant speeches that launched his political career and that constitute the greatest oratory of the Civil War era; and his journalism, which ranges from cultural and political critique (including his early support for women’s equality) to law, history, philosophy, literature, art, and international affairs, including a never-before-published essay on Haitian revolutionary Toussaint L’Ouverture.
 
The Portable Frederick Douglass is the latest addition in a series of African American classics curated by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. First published in 2008, the series reflects a selection of great works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry by African and African American authors introduced and annotated by leading scholars and acclaimed writers in new or updated editions for Penguin Classics. In his series essay, “What Is an African American Classic?” Gates provides a broader view of the canon of classics of African American literature available from Penguin Classics and beyond. Gates writes, “These texts reveal the human universal through the African American particular: all true art, all classics do this; this is what ‘art’ is, a revelation of that which makes each of us sublimely human, rendered in the minute details of the actions and thoughts and feelings of a compelling character embedded in a time and place.”
 
For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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Horizons in Regenerative Medicine: Ageless Aging
WHEN  Fri., Sep. 30, 2016, 3:30 – 5 p.m.
WHERE	Harvard, 5 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Stem Cell Institute
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK	  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine-ageless-aging-tickets-26574396736#tickets
DETAILS  Have you ever wished you could turn back the clock a few years? That age old idiom is now becoming a reality. Thanks to aging research, there are new prospects for managing “healthspan” – slowing down, and even reversing, some of the effects of aging. Join us for a lively panel discussion around the latest in aging research, including work by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute on therapeutics that may restore youthful function. You’ll also learn some tips from a study conducted by a leading geriatrician on centenarians and how to live a healthier, longer life.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine/ageless-aging/

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Horizons in Regenerative Medicine: Ageless Aging
Friday, September 30
5:30 PM to 7:00 PM (EDT)
Geological Museum, 24 Oxford Street Lecture Hall 100, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine-ageless-aging-tickets-26574396736

Have you ever wished you could turn back the clock a few years? That age old idiom is now becoming a reality. Thanks to aging research, there are new prospects for managing “healthspan” – slowing down, and even reversing, some of the effects of aging. Join us for a lively panel discussion around the latest in aging research, including work by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute on factors that show potential to restore some youthful function and interventions that may one day mitigate the effects of diseases such as Alzheimer’s. You’ll also hear about factors that accelerate the aging process and what they can tell us about lowering the risk of age-related diseases. Current studies of centenarians shed light on how and why they live healthier, longer lives.
Who it’s For: students, postdocs, scientists, investigators, bioengineers, the curious, patients, disease advocates, investors, current and future leaders
Vibe: inspiring, enlightening, informative, cutting-edge, breakthrough
Speakers: 
Amy Wagers, PhD
Forst Family Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University
Executive Committee Member, Harvard Stem Cell Institute
Richard T. Lee, MD
Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University
Head, Cardiovascular Program, Harvard Stem Cell Institute
Tracy Young-Pearse, PhD
Assistant Professor of Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School
Principal Investigator, Harvard Stem Cell Institute
William Mair, PhD
Assistant Professor of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Paola Sebastiani, PhD
Professor, Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health

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Is the Human Brain Just a Fallible Machine?: A discussion on Humans, Machines, and God with Professors of Artifical Intelligence and Neurology
Friday, Sept. 30
6:00-8:00 pm
TMEC Amphitheater (260 Longwood Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/veritas-forum-at-harvard-medical-school-tickets-27617862771
RSVP for dinner discussion groups after the event here:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf44moyX_8txl64d9hgT2yq65RzyjuXxrHXlipX-n7-sgSKTw/viewform

Speakers: 
Rosalind Picard, Professor of Artificial Intelligence at MIT
Shahram Khoshbin, Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School
Moderator: Patrick Smith, Lecturer in Bioethics at Harvard Medical School

Philosophers and theologians have long discussed and debated the nature of human cognition, consciousness, and free will. Sophisticated philosophical terms for different stances with regards to human mental events have been argued for many years, ranging from the materialistic functional physicalist view, the more ethereal epiphenomenalist view, the mind-body duality view, as well as many others.  This debate has accelerated in recent years with the substantial advances in the fields of machine learning/artificial intelligence and an increased scientific understanding of neurobiology.

Does free will exist? What is the relationship of the brain to the human mind? What is consciousness?  Is there a spiritual component to the mind or is it purely the firing of neurons? What are the implications of this for medical care and "guilt" in legal proceedings? How do advances in modern artificial intelligence inform these discussions?

The Christian Medical and Dental Association (CMDA), Catholic Students Organization (CSO), and others invite you to a discussion on these questions and others between a Christian artificial intelligence professor at MIT and a professor of neurology at HMS.

Food:  Refreshments provided

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Saturday, October 1
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Protest, Public Religion, and Social Change Conference
Saturday, October 1
8:00 AM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Boston University School of Theology, 745 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/protest-public-religion-and-social-change-conference-tickets-273055375982 
Cost:  $10

Boston University is pleased to announce its second annual Graduate Conference on Religious Studies, on the theme of “Protest, Public Religion, and Social Change.” In this contentious election year, we are frequently reminded of how religious commitments inform all sides of our public debates over what it means to be a just society. This conference draws on B.U.’s rich history of religious activism in pursuit of social justice as a starting point for a broader conversation about how a wide variety of religious traditions engage with changing societies. We invited papers that reflect on how religion manifests publicly in moments of social crisis, and how religious groups use texts, material culture, ritual, theologies, and philosophical traditions to effect or to resist social change. 

Keynote address by
Pamela Lightsey
Boston University 

Faculty Roundtable Discussion on Social Justice and Religion
Featuring:
Dr. Anthony Petro
and
Dr. Diana Swancutt

We are no longer accepting paper proposals. But we encourage you to register soon to join the conference events. Online registration ends September 16th, 12:30 PM. Although same-day registration is available, lunch cannot be guaranteed. We look forward to meeting you all on October 1st!

Full schedule coming soon!

Check us out on Facebook at:
https://www.facebook.com/events/329299647412001/

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Fashion Technology with Open Style Lab		
Saturday, October 1 
Presentation: 11:30 am and 12:30 pm; Showcase: 11:00 am – 1:30 pm
Museum of Science, 1 Science Park, Boston
Free with museum admission

Fashion Technology with Open Style Lab
Join us for a sneak peek at prototype designs for assistive clothing. Celebrate the collaborative work between engineers, occupational therapists, and designers who participated in an innovative summer program at MIT called Open Style Lab.

After ten weeks of working closely with each other and a client with disabilities, teams will share their experiences, processes, and designs. Check out creations that are both fashionable and functional!

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Let's Talk About Food Festival 
Saturday, October 1
9am - 5pm
Copley Square, Boston

This festival lets participants dive into the most important food conversations and debates happening in society today. Through hands-on cooking demonstrations, edible gardens, and more, participants can also explore how to take advantage of the food around them by cooking better and eating healthier. Check back often for more details.

More information at http://www.boston.com/sponsored/extra/letstalkaboutfood/festival

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Somerville AgriCultural Festival
Saturday, October 1
3pm to 7pm
ArtFarm site, 10 Poplar Street, corner of Poplar and Linwood Streets, Somerville

First-ever celebration of “everything we grow from the earth, and the people who grow it, here in Somerville.”  A chance for growers to display iproduce and the rest of us urban ag types to share what we know.  Plus talks, hands-on demos, participatory art.

http://somervilleartscouncil.org/artfarm 

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HUBWEEK CLOSING PARTY, FEATURING BREW THE CHARLES
Saturday, October 1
5:00 – 10:00 PM
Power Station, 540 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118
RSVP at https://hubweek.org/events/brew-the-charles/
Cost:  $0-$25

Don’t miss the final celebration of HUBweek 2016.

On Saturday, October 1st at the SOWA Power Station, join us for the HUBweek Closing Party. Featuring multiple signature HUBweek experiences, including music, projections, and art installations; the much-anticipated Brew the Charles (see details below); and tasty bites from local food innovators, this will be a whole new take on space, art, science, and food. This event is open to the public and welcomes all ages–registration is required.

HUB Presents: Brew the Charles
Swimming in the Charles River is one thing. How about drinking it? Six local breweries have accepted the challenge. Working with Newton-based water technology company Desalitech, six local Massachusetts breweries are taking Charles River water and turning it into beer. This August, Desalitech ran thousands of gallons of Charles River water through its industry-leading treatment and purifi cation system. From there, the Boston Beer Company, Cape Ann Brewing Company, Castle Island Brewing Co., Harpoon Brewery, Idle Hands Craft Ales, and Ipswich Ale Brewery are creating custom, craft brews that turn science into beer. Which brewery will create the best beer? That’s for you and a group of local food and beverage experts to decide. Come to the Brew the Charles competition to taste for yourself and award a prize to the best Charles River HUBweek brew. Even the brewers will pick their favorite! Included in the registration fee is a sampling of up to 12 beers. 20% of all proceeds will be donated to the Charles River Conservancy’s Swim the Charles Program. Tickets for the “Brew the Charles” tasting are 21+.

Vibe: fun, creative, social, adventurous
Who it’s for: anyone over 21, beer lovers, science geeks

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Monday, October 3
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PAOC Colloquium - Kim Cobb (GaTech)
Monday, October 3
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Kim Cobb, GaTech
About the Speaker
Kim Cobb’s research uses corals and cave stalagmites to reconstruct tropical Pacific temperature and rainfall patterns over the last decades to millennia. She received her B.A. from Yale University in 1996, and her Ph.D. in Oceanography from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in 2002. She spent two years at Caltech in the Department of Geological and Planetary Sciences before joining the faculty at Georgia Tech in 2004. Kim has sailed on six oceanographic cruises and led five caving expeditions to the rainforests of Borneo in support of her research. Her papers regularly appear in high-profile journals, including 5 papers in Nature or Science. Kim has received numerous awards for her research, most notably a NSF CAREER Award in 2007, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2008, and a Sigma Chi Best Paper Award in 2013. She sits on the AAAS Climate Science Panel, the international CLIVAR Pacific Panel, and the international PAGES-CLIVAR Intersection Panel.

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Bayesian Inversion for Large Scale Antarctic Ice Sheet Flow
Monday, October 3
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Omar Ghattas, University of Texas, Austin

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/event/department-colloquium-series-12

Note: The colloquium talks now begin at noon. Please plan on arriving at 11:45AM to help yourself to lunch. 

Contact Name:   Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Governments as Partners: The Role of Collaboration in US Cleantech Startup Innovation
Monday, October 3
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Claudia Doblinger, University of Regensburg, Germany

This series is presented by the Energy Technology Innovation Policy/Consortium for Energy Policy Research at HKS. Lunch will be provided.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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One butterfly species tumbles off an adaptive peak and enters a lethal trap in the course of six host shifts observed across half a century
Monday, October 3
12:10 pm
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Michael Singer, Professor, University of Plymouth

More information at http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Computations Rule Everything Around Me with
Monday, October 3
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E15-001, The ACT Cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Etienne Turpin

ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents:  Computations Rule Everything Around Me with Etienne Turpin

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking
Monday, October 3
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.
 
Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Weapons of Math Destruction:  How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy
Monday, October 3
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This event is free; no tickets are required.

Harvard Book Store welcomes data scientist CATHY O'NEIL for a discussion of Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, her book on the mathematical models that pervade modern life and threaten to rip apart our social fabric.
About Weapons of Math Destruction

We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives—where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance—are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: Everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated.
But as Cathy O’Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they’re wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination: If a poor student can’t get a loan because a lending model deems him too risky (by virtue of his zip code), he’s then cut off from the kind of education that could pull him out of poverty, and a vicious spiral ensues. Models are propping up the lucky and punishing the downtrodden, creating a “toxic cocktail for democracy.” Welcome to the dark side of Big Data.
Tracing the arc of a person’s life, O’Neil exposes the black box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society. These “weapons of math destruction” score teachers and students, sort résumés, grant (or deny) loans, evaluate workers, target voters, set parole, and monitor our health.
O’Neil calls on modelers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use. But in the end, it’s up to us to become more savvy about the models that govern our lives. This important book empowers us to ask the tough questions, uncover the truth, and demand change.

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SCIENCE ON SCREEN®:  A Face in the Crowd 
Monday, October 3
7:00pm
Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Street, Brookline,
Cost:  $9 - $12

POWER! He loved it! He took it raw in big gulpfuls...he liked the taste, the way it mixed with the bourbon and the sin in his blood!

Andy Griffith sizzles in his first onscreen role as drunken drifter Lonesome Rhodes who becomes an overnight media sensation, rising from itinerant Ozark guitar picker to local media rabble-rouser to TV superstar and political king-maker. From director Elia Kazan and On the Waterfront writer Budd Schulberg, A Face in the Crowd was hailed by Francois Truffaut as "passionate, exalted, fierce...a pleasure for the mind."

Before the film, join Dr. Steven Schlozman, associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS), as he discusses our attraction to politically charismatic speakers, our tendency to create "us" versus "them" dichotomies, and how our brains work (and don’t work) during an election year. 

About the Speaker
Dr. Steven Schlozman is associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS). He also serves as course director of the psychopathology class for the MIT-HMS Program in Health, Sciences and Technology. Dr. Schlozman practices child and adult psychiatry at MGH, where he also serves as the primary consultant to the pediatric transplant service. He received BA's in English and biology from Stanford University, and his MD from the Dartmouth-Brown Program in Medicine.

Dr. Schlozman has done international research focusing on stigma and mental illness, and has written and presented extensively on the topic. He also writes short fiction, and has published one novel, The Zombie Autopsies. This novel has been optioned for film adaptation by George Romero, creator of Night of the Living Dead, and Dr. Schlozman is currently working on a sequel. Because of this work, he teaches a freshman seminar at Harvard University that focuses on horror and thrillers in literature and film.

More information at http://www.coolidge.org/films/face-crowd

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Tuesday, October 4
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Speaker Series: Zeynep Tufekci
Tuesday, October 4,
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275.15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Zeynep Tufekci, a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, writes about the social impacts of technology. She is an assistant professor in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, a faculty associate at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard, and a former fellow at the Center for Internet Technology Policy at Princeton. Her research revolves around politics, civics, movements, privacy and surveillance, as well as data and algorithms.

Originally from Turkey, Ms. Tufekci was a computer programmer by profession and academic training before turning her focus to the impact of technology on society and social change. She switched to social science, and started calling herself a “technosociologist.” She has been published widely on the interaction of new technologies with society, politics and culture. Her forthcoming book from Yale University Press is tentatively titled “Beautiful Tear Gas: The Ecstatic, Fragile Politics of Networked Protest in the 21st Century.”

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Methane Emission from Living Trees and Deadwood
Tuesday, October 4
12:00pm to 1:00pm
HUH Seminar Room, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Kristofer Covey, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Yale University

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Exxon: The Road Not Taken with Lisa Song
Tuesday, October 4
4:00pm
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Lisa Song, Climate Reporter, Inside Climate News
Lisa Song, a reporter at InsideClimate News, will discuss the story behind "Exxon: the Road Not Taken," an investigative series that revealed Exxon's early engagement with climate science before the company turned to climate denial, manufacturing doubt about the scientific consensus its own scientists had confirmed. Lisa was part of the team that reported the series, which was named a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. Lisa will also talk about climate reporting in general, and the challenges and opportunities of doing watchdog environmental reporting.

Bio:  Lisa Song joined InsideClimate News in January 2011, where she reports on climate change, environmental health and natural gas drilling. She is co-author of the "The Dilbit Disaster" series, which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, and worked on the Exxon: The Road Not Taken stories. Song has degrees in environmental science and science writing from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

BURECS Seminar Series on Climate Change

This program is supported in part by a grant to Earth & Environment Professor Dave Marchant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Science Education Program.

http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/lisa-song.html

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MATERIALITY
Tuesday, October 4
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 1 Broadway 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/materiality-tickets-27529052136
Cost:  $8 – $12

Touted as the key to determining the best sustainability strategy, materiality assessments intimidate mere mortals trying to move their organization’s sustainability initiatives forward. Yet, those who have done them and live to tell the tale, say they are critical to gaining organizational alignment. We’ve asked BASG veterans of Materiality Assessments Asheen Phansey and Johanna Jobin to lead our discussion. If you have similar experience and an interest to join the panel, please contact us. 

A materiality assessment is a process of engaging stakeholders to identify what environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues are most important to an organization. These findings can help an organization prioritize both where their sustainability initiatives should focus and what’s most important for them to report.
Leading our discussion are:
 
Asheen Phansey has served in various roles as a corporate sustainability leader at Dassault Systèmes since 2010. Dassault Systèmes is a $3B software company that provides businesses and people with 3D modeling apps and experiences to harmonize product, nature, and life.
Asheen lectures and advises students at Babson College and Harvard University, serves on the Net Impact Advisory Council, and ranks as one of the most influential social media thought leaders in corporate sustainability (twitter: @asheen). Asheen has experience in the biotech and aerospace industries, and holds a BS in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University and an MBA in Technology Entrepreneurship from Babson College.
Asheen enjoys learning new languages, speaking at Toastmasters, philosophizing over espresso or whiskey, and running (sometimes after his young kids). Among his greatest achievements in life are speaking at BASG for now his third time, and counting Carol and Johanna as friends.
Asheen plans to speak about Dassault Systèmes Handprinting/Net-Positive as a way of addressing materiality challenges, and about conducting a scope 3 GHG materiality study for the aerospace sector on behalf of the International Aerospace Environmental Group.

and Johanna Jobin, Director, Global EHS & Sustainability at Biogen, has done many materiality assessments. Earlier this year we heard about Biogen’s journey to carbon neutrality. Before Biogen, Johanna was Head of Corporate Responsibility & Community Affairs of MilliporeSigma. She received her Master of Environmental Management degree, with a certificate in Energy and Environment, from Duke and is an ISO 14001 trained auditor. Johanna is also active with NAEM, USGBC, AIM, WPI, MSEP, the City of Cambridge Climate Protection Action Committee, and “e” inc.

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Presenting the 2016 Norman B. Leventhal Excellence in City Building AWARDS
Tuesday, October 4
6:00 – 9:00 pm
Boston Harbor Hotel Boston

HONORING
Thomas Glynn, CEO, Massport Cambridge Innovation Center
Tim Rowe, Founder & CEO and Brian Dacey, President
University of Massachusetts Boston, School for the Environment Ellen Douglas, PhD, Associate Professor of Hydrology and
Paul Kirshen, PhD, Professor of Climate Adaptation
  
A Better City
33 Broad Street Boston, MA 02109
        Norman B. Leventhal Excellence in City Building
AWARDS
Join us in celebrating remarkable leaders who have made significant contributions that have enhanced Boston and the region’s economic competitiveness, mobility, sustainability and quality of life.
A formal invitation will follow.

For more information about A Better City, please contact Sarah Shields.
T. 617-502-6250 | E. sshields at abettercity.org
www.abettercity.org

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Streams of Expression and Love: Joe Lovano Celebrates Gunther Schuller at MIT
Tuesday, October 4
8:00p–9:30p
MIT, Building 14W-111, Killian Hall

Speaker: Joe Lovano
In addition to performing music from Rush Hour as a quartet (with vocal-jazz great Judi Silvano, Boston-bassist and MIT Affiliated Artist Keala Kaumeheiwa and MIT Director of Wind and Jazz Ensembles, Fred Harris, drums) Lovano will also perform MIT composer and Professor of Music Peter Child's Moonsculptures, an attractive Third Stream influenced composition for tenor saxophone, violin, and piano. Violinist and Schuller devotee Young-Nam Kim (Artistic Director of the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota), and pianist and Senior Lecturer in Music at MIT David Deveau (Rockport Chamber Music Festival Artistic Director) join Lovano. Other chamber works by Child and Harris round out the program performed by Kim and his son Daniel Kim, new violist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

One of Schuller's closest friends and perhaps greatest advocate, the legendary Third Stream pianist and educator Ran Blake (New England Conservatory) will make a very special solo guest appearance on the program.

MIT Sounding 
The 2016-17 season of innovative annual performance series MIT Sounding continues to blur the boundaries between contemporary and world music. Curated by Evan Ziporyn, Faculty Director of the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology, this season of Sounding integrates the avant-garde sounds of ancient instruments and traditional practices with cutting-edge composition and technology to present various visions of a new, evolving music that defies genre.

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/joe-lovano/#public-events
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free: donations will be accepted for efforts to preserve the legacy of Gunther Schuller 
Tickets: Registration available soon 
Sponsor(s): Music and Theater Arts, CAST
For more information, contact:  Leah Talatinian
617.253.5351
leaht at mit.edu 

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Opportunity
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Dear Friends of Harvard Square & of the historic Harvard Square 'Out-of-Town-News' Kiosk:
Please add your John or Jane Hancock to this online petition and forward it to 
friends and neighbors, and share it on facebook and the like. Thanks!   cheers* James

Online Landmark Designation Petition:
https://www.change.org/p/cambridge-historical-commission-support-landmark-designation-for-the-harvard-square-kiosk

Boston Globe Article (Front Page, Business Section), 8/26/16:
http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/08/25/out-town-news-could-pushed-out-iconic-harvard-square-location/fu0JPz8OfNH2f0fpgkxgzN/story.html

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Effective Altruism MIT Sloan Meetup Group
http://www.meetup.com/effective-altruism-mit-sloan/

Want to make the world the best place it can be? 
Effective Altruism is a worldwide movement that uses rational thinking and science to have the best possible impact. Effective Altruism MIT Sloan is bringing together people from all over the area to share experiences and be more effective by working together. 
To learn more about effective altruism, read the introduction on the international EA website (https://www.effectivealtruism.org) or watch Peter Singer's TED talk.

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Last fall, Solve (solve.mit.edu/) convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents like you from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. 

The Solve program is organized around four “pillars”: Fuel, Learn, Cure, and Make. This year’s program poses three “challenges” within those pillars. Of particular note to the sustainability community are the Fuel challenges: 
Fuel:
Carbon price
How can new technologies (including digital currencies like Bitcoin) be used to put a price on emissions of carbon and other greenhouse gases?
Negative carbon emissions
How do we remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in a way that is scalable, economical, and ethical?

What can you do right now?

The program is actively seeking proposals for these Fuel challenges. We encourage you to log in to the Solve CoLab platform (http://solvecolab.mit.edu) to propose solutions.  A distinguished panel of judges will select semifinalists, who will present their solutions at the Solve at HUBweek event, September 27 and 28, 2016. Registration for the Solve at HUBweek events is now open at www.hubweek.org.

Thank you for your continued support of the Solve program. Together, we can bring about real and lasting solutions to the world’s most challenging problems.

Editorial Comment:  I’ve alerted my contacts in the Geotherapy movement for enhanced soil carbon sequestration about this opportunity.  May they pick up on it.

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Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian at cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
http://www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit
@cambenergy 
http://facebook.com/cambridgeenergyalliance

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Resource
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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 27 and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 12 PM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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