[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - September 25, 2016

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Sep 25 11:11:56 PDT 2016


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Index
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Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.  Keep scrolling, please.

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Monday, September 26
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10am - 5pm  OUR CONVENTION
11am  FAIR USE TOWN HALL: Copyright and Fair Use for the Visual Arts
12pm  Studying the Greenland Ice Sheet: Implications for climate past and present
12pm  PAOC Colloquium:  TWENTY-YEARS OF THE GLOBAL OCEAN CIRCULATION: MEANS AND CHANGES
12pm  Two talks: Unraveling the history of the Milky Way (speaker: Yuan-Sen Ting, Harvard); High-Redshift Astrophysics Using Every Photon (speaker: Patrick Breysse, Johns Hopkins) 
12pm  MIT Water Club - Lunch and Learn
12:10pm  A physiological approach to the ecology and evolution of flowers
12pm  New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  Synthesis & Next Steps
12pm  Get the Structure Right - Lessons from the Israeli Energy Market 
1:15pm  The Madhouse Effect: Lecture & Lunch with Dr. Michael Mann
4pm  Redesigning professional work: Findings from the Work, Family & Health Network Study
4pm  Roxbury Showcase
4:15pm  A Vision for Asian Collective Energy Security
4:30pm  Finding Humanity Amid Conflict
5pm  A proposed energy conversion process for making solar energy a major player in global power generation
5:30pm  Alchemical Ecology: Rudolf Steiner and the Environmental Movement
6pm  Should we engineer the mosquito?
6pm  ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Imaginary Property with Florian Schneider
7pm  The World According to Star Wars
7pm  Skillshare: What's All the Buzz About? (Honeybees, beekeeping, and our envi…

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Tuesday, September 27
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8am  The Science of Addiction: How opioids, from prescription painkillers to her…
10am  HUB Presents: Expanding Opportunity in the Digital Age
11:45am  Phototactic Guidance of a Tissue-Engineered Soft-Robotic Ray
12pm  Responsive Communities Initiative
12pm  Implications of thaw-induced boreal tree cover loss for carbon, water and energy fluxes in the southern Taiga Plains, Northwest Territories
12pm  Speaker Series: Patrick Ruffini
12pm  Strategies for Rapid Climate Mitigation with Laurence Delina
2pm  FDA AND THE DRUG APPROVAL PROCESS: IS IT REALLY BROKEN?
2pm  Solve | MAKE
3pm  Collaborating at the Intersection of Art and Science
3pm  Earth System Dynamics and Mass Extinctions
4pm  Changing Sea Ice Conditions and Arctic Marine Ecosystems
4:15pm  Is This All the Media's Fault? Running a Presidential Campaign in the age of Kardashian
4:15pm  The Role of the U.S. Military in National Security Policy Formulation and Execution
4:30pm  How to Talk With Children About Gun Violence and Trauma
4:30pm  The New Arab Wars
5pm  How to Scale Your Big Idea in a Complex World
5:30pm  Askwith Debates: More Charter Schools? The Massachusetts Vote and the National Debate
5:30pm  What Works: Designing Inclusive Organizations
5:30pm  Tradeoffs between hydropower and hydrological alterations in the Amazon
5:30pm  Palestinian and Israeli Bereaved Parents for Peace
6pm  Harnessing Evolution to Solve Problems in Biotech and Therapeutics
6pm  Food Fight to Benefit No Kid Hungry
6pm  Boston Green Drinks - September Happy Hour
6:30pm  Breakthroughs in Nanotechnology
6:30pm  Careers in Sustainability
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Medical Technology Producing Hamburgers
7pm  Armin Nassehi: The State We Are In
7pm  The Biopolis: Creative New Ideas for a Smarter City

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Wednesday, September 28 and Thursday, September 29
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MIT Climate CoLab’s Crowds & Climate Conference

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Wednesday, September 28
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7:30am  Synaptic gap: 21st Century Brain Science Meets Mental Health Policy
8:30am  Cleantech Scandinavia Boston Showcase 
10am  Solve | LEARN
12pm  Nelson Mandela: Romantic Hero, Tragic Hero
12pm  Probability Assessment and National Security Decision Making: Experimental Evidence from National Security Professionals
12:15pm  Planetary health and nutrition: Tracking the human nutritional consequences of accelerating global environmental change
12:30pm  CHINA’S ECONOMY: DOES GROWTH HAVE A FUTURE?
12:30pm  Transnational Governance Experiments: From Climate Change to Mining and the Minerals Life Cycle
1pm  Explore the Emerging Worlds of Augmented and Virtual Reality
1:30pm  .Improved Learning and Retention by Augmenting STEM Curriculum with Computational Thinking, Self-Assessment and Student-Created Visualizations
2pm  Solve | FUEL
3:30pm  Bio-Inspired Metal-Coordination Dynamics: An Easier Way to Engineer Supramolecular Mechanics?
4pm  TumbleBit: An Untrusted Bitcoin-Compatible Anonymous Payment Hub 
4pm  When Activism Works, with AIDS as an Example
.4pm  Countdown to #Campaign2016
4pm  Solve | FUEL Closing Keynote & Reception
4:10pm  #Tech4Democracy: Meet the Changemakers
4:15pm  Heat Exposure and Human Capital Accumulation: Evidence from NYC Public Schools
4:30pm  "A Small Good Thing" Film Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker Pamela Tanner Boll
5pm  Trash is for Tossers: How to Live Zero Waste with Lauren Singer at Follain
5:30pm  Crisis and Sovereignty: Posthegemony, Affect, Illiteracy
5:30pm  Next Generation of Ideas, Featuring the Beantown Throwdown
6pm  Apple Harvest Night with Champlain Orchards & Red Apple Farm
6pm  Co-Creating the Future of Our Cities: Economic Mobility
6pm  Environmental Film Festival On Tour, presented by Bank of America
6:30pm  Film Screening of NAIJA BETA
7pm  What the Presidential Campaign Says About America
7pm  Can We Save Coral Reefs and If So How?
7pm  The Good Life:  Results from The Harvard Study of Adult Development

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Thursday, September 29
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11:45am  The Right Corporate Approach to Public Policy
12pm  After 1492: Globalization as a biological process
2pm  HUB Presents: The Hype and Promise of Blockchain
2:30pm  Gender Diversity in Technology | Film Screening and Panel
3pm  TEDxBoston:  Artificial Intelligence And Machine Learning: How Far We’ve Come, How Far We Have To Go
4pm  Campaign 2016: Breaking All the Rules
4pm  The Untold Story of the Obama Era: The Necessity of Race and Gender in Politics
4pm  Stories of Grassroots Change
4pm  "Trafficked" Film Screening & Panel Discussion
4:15pm  A Nation of ‘Bystanders’? A Topography of Complicity and Capitulation in Nazi Germany and Beyond
4:30pm  Party Polarization in Legislatures with Office-Mandated Candidates
4:30pm  Starr Forum: The Warming Arctic: Site of a New "Cold War”?
5pm  Next Stage Planning for the Digital Humanities at MIT
5:30pm  Horizons in Regenerative Medicine: Honey, I Shrunk the Patient!
5:30pm  Jeanne S. Chall Lecture and Reception: Reading in New Ways for New Times
5:30pm  EnergyBar!
6pm  Environmental Film Festival On Tour, presented by Bank of America
6pm  Focused: Women in Investigative Journalism
6pm  Chuck Hoberman 10° Opening Reception
6pm  Election 2016 in the Media
6pm  Gold Rush or Realities? The Future of Drone Systems
6pm  TEDxCambridge
6:30pm  Playing for Their Lives: The Global El Sistema Movement for Social Change Through Music
7pm  Rigs to Reefs: A Blue Solution to Repurpose the World’s Offshore Oil and Gas Platforms
7pm  His Final Battle:  The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt
7pm  The World’s Emergency Room
7pm  A Conversation on Racial and Ethnic Disparities with the Family of Henrietta Lacks
7pm  On Your Own But Not Alone: Enhancing Health and Well Being in Later Life

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Friday, September 30
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8:30am  HILT [Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching] Conference:  Interactivity
8:30am  Engineering & Entrepreneurship: The Internet of Things
9am  FOIA in the Digital Age
9am  New England Electricity Restructuring Roundtable:  Connecting the Dots: Major New England Energy Initiatives & Reforming Retail Rates to Better Integrate DERs
9am  Mothers Against Violence National Conference
10:30am  Food & Agriculture - Millennium Goal #2 Zero Hunger 
11am  HUB Presents: Demo Day
12pm  Innovations in Synthetic Biology
3pm  The Portable Frederick Douglass
3:30pm  Horizons in Regenerative Medicine: Ageless Aging
6pm  s the Human Brain Just a Fallible Machine?: A discussion on Humans, Machines, and God with Professors of Artifical Intelligence and Neurology
7pm  Harvard Extension Environmental Club presents guest speaker Rachael Miller Co-founder of Rozalia Project

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Saturday, October 1
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8am  Protest, Public Religion, and Social Change Conference
9am  Let's Talk About Food Festival 
11:30am  Fashion Technology with Open Style Lab
3pm  Somerville AgriCultural Festival
5pm  HUBWEEK CLOSING PARTY, FEATURING BREW THE CHARLES

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Monday, October 3
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12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Kim Cobb (GaTech)
12pm  Bayesian Inversion for Large Scale Antarctic Ice Sheet Flow
12pm  Governments as Partners: The Role of Collaboration in US Cleantech Startup Innovation
12:!0pm  One butterfly species tumbles off an adaptive peak and enters a lethal trap in the course of six host shifts observed across half a century
6pm  ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Computations Rule Everything Around Me
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking
7pm  Weapons of Math Destruction:  How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy
7pm  SCIENCE ON SCREEN®:  A Face in the Crowd 

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Tuesday, October 4
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12pm  Speaker Series: Zeynep Tufekci
12pm  Methane Emission from Living Trees and Deadwood
2:30pm  Debate on MA Ballot Question 4: would legalize the recreational use of marijuana
4pm  Exxon: The Road Not Taken with Lisa Song
6pm  MATERIALITY
6pm  Presenting the 2016 Norman B. Leventhal Excellence in City Building AWARDS
6:30pm  Rem Koolhaas
8pm  Streams of Expression and Love: Joe Lovano Celebrates Gunther Schuller at MIT

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com


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Monday, September 26
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OUR CONVENTION
Monday, September 26
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, 210 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston

How do you mobilize and empower a generation?

“Today, Boston is home to the largest proportion of young adults of any major US city.” – Catherine Cloutier, The Boston Globe

Young adults comprise about 45 percent of eligible voters and nearly half the Boston’s workforce. They are an economic engine, adding $1 billion annually in goods and services to the city. However, young adults – people between ages of 21 and 39 years old – are often ignored and overlooked when discussing the future of Greater Boston. During HUBweek 2016, City Awake will select up 500 Delegates – nominated representatives from a diverse coalition of up to 200 organizations – to participate in Our Convention. Featuring a series of programs focused on building community and exploring various issues facing Greater Boston, Our Convention Delegates will work together to formalize shared priorities as a generation.

Who it’s for: 500 young thought leaders who want to make an impact
Vibe: meaningful, hands-on, informative
More information at https://hubweek.org/events/our-convention/

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FAIR USE TOWN HALL: Copyright and Fair Use for the Visual Arts
Monday, September 26
11:00 AM to 1:30 PM (EDT)
Harvard University, The Thompson Room at Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fair-use-town-hall-copyright-and-fair-use-for-the-visual-arts-tickets-27466802947

Please join use for this informative townhall. Lunch will be served! 
Are you a professor, artists, museum professional, editor, librarian or archivist who works with copyrighted materials?  The College Art Association (CAA) and the Office of Scholarly Communications (OSC) at Harvard University are pleased to announce that Peter Jaszi, Professor of Law at Washington College of Law, American University and lead principal investigator of CAA's Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts, will be speaking about the Code, and answering questions on Monday, September 26 at Harvard University. The town hall style event will be moderated by Kyle Courtney, Program Manager and Copyright Advisor at OSC. 
Copies of CAA’s Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts will be disseminated. The Code provides visual-arts professionals with a set of principles addressing best practices in the fair use of copyrighted materials. It describes how fair use can be invoked and implemented when using copyrighted materials in scholarship, teaching, museums, archives, and in the creation of art. This event will address questions about fair use of interest to professors, artists, museum professionals, editors, librarians, and archivists. 
Admission to this event is free, but it would be helpful for us to know how many can attend. Please register to this event by Wednesday September 21, 2016. 

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Studying the Greenland Ice Sheet: Implications for climate past and present
Monday, September 26
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geological Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Dorthe Dahl-Jensen (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen).

Note: The colloquium talks are now at noon. Please plan on arriving at 11:45AM to help yourself to lunch. 

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/event-type/department-colloquium

Contact Name:  Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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PAOC Colloquium:  TWENTY-YEARS OF THE GLOBAL OCEAN CIRCULATION: MEANS AND CHANGES
Monday, September 26
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker:  Carl Wunsch (MIT)
An over-arching goal of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) was to describe and understand the full threedimensional time- evolving global ocean circulation from days to about a decade. The intention was to quantify and understand its changing climate impacts. To that end, the Estimating the Ocean Circulation and Climate (ECCO) consortium was formed to exploit the global data sets that emerged from WOCE and its successor programs (Argo, altimetry, hydrography, meteorology, etc.) combined with a general circulation model.

Now there exists a dynamically consistent time-evolving ocean state estimate also (almost) consistent with all of the data over 24 years. The state estimate makes possible discussion of basic budgets and their changes (heat and freshwater content, kinetic and potential energy), raises interesting questions of its meaning, accuracy and full depiction. I will emphasize the global ocean properties and their changes over 20 years with some representative regional examples. This talk constitutes an invitation to the wider community to extend the available analyses.

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged.

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Two talks: Unraveling the history of the Milky Way (speaker: Yuan-Sen Ting, Harvard); High-Redshift Astrophysics Using Every Photon (speaker: Patrick Breysse, Johns Hopkins) 
Monday, September 26
12:00pm 
MIT, Building 33-116, 125 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker 1:  Yuan-Sen Ting, Harvard
Unraveling the history of the Milky Way
Abstract:  Understanding physical processes responsible for the formation and evolution of galaxies like the Milky Way is a fundamental problem in astrophysics. However, a key challenge is that the properties and orbits of the stars can only be observed at present: in order to understand what happened in the Milky Way at earlier epochs, one must explore “archeological” techniques. One idea, "chemical tagging”, aims to probe the history of the Milky Way via the unique imprint in chemical abundance space of long-disrupted star clusters. I will discuss the opportunities and challenges associated with chemical tagging, including a first constraint on the disrupted cluster mass function in the Milky Way. I will also describe a new set of tools for efficient fitting large quantities of stellar spectra and opportunities for extracting many stellar parameters from low-resolution data.

Speaker 2:  Patrick Breysse, Johns Hopkins
High-Redshift Astrophysics Using Every Photon
Abstract:  Large galaxy surveys have dramatically improved our understanding of the complex processes which govern gas dynamics and star formation in the nearby universe.  However, we know far less about the most distant galaxies, as existing high-redshift observations can only detect the very brightest sources.  Intensity mapping surveys provide a promising tool to access this poorly-studied population.  By observing emission lines with low angular resolution, these surveys can make use of every photon in a target line to study faint emitters which are inaccessible using traditional techniques.  With upcoming carbon monoxide experiments in mind, I will demonstrate how an intensity map can be used to measure the luminosity function of a galaxy population, and in turn how these measurements will allow us to place robust constraints on the cosmic star formation history.  I will then show how cross-correlating CO isotopologue lines will make it possible to study gas dynamics within the earliest galaxies in unprecedented detail.

More information at http://space.mit.edu/two-talks-unraveling-history-milky-way-speaker-yuan-sen-ting-harvard-high-redshift-astrophysics

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MIT Water Club - Lunch and Learn
Monday, September 26
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, 1-134, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This month's lunch and learn will feature Samantha McBride, who will be talking about how endocrine-disrupting compounds pose a risk to aqueous species. Lunch will be served!

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): GSC Funding Board, MIT Water Club
For more information, contact:  waterclub
waterclub-officers at mit.edu 

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A physiological approach to the ecology and evolution of flowers
Monday, September 26
12:10 pm
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Adam Roddy, Post-doctoral researcher, Yale University
Arnold Arboretum Jewett Prize Recipient

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New England Resilience & Transition Network Collective Inquiry on Local and Regional Food Systems:  Synthesis & Next Steps
Thursday, September 26
12pm – 1pm
Webinar
RSVP at https://nertnetwork.org/2016/07/28/collective-inquiry-local-and-regional-food/

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Get the Structure Right - Lessons from the Israeli Energy Market 
Monday, September 26
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Bldg, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Orit Farkash HaCohen, Chairperson, Israel Electric Authority, 2011-2016

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html
This series is presented by the Energy Technology Innovation Policy/Consortium for Energy Policy Research at HKS. Lunch will be provided.

Contact Name:   Louisa Lund
Louisa_Lund at hks.harvard.edu

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The Madhouse Effect: Lecture & Lunch with Dr. Michael Mann
Monday, September 26
1:15 PM
MIT, Building 4-270, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Join us for a lunch lecture and book signing with world-renowned climate scientist, Dr. Michael Mann. Mann will introduce his new illustrated book, "The Madhouse Effect", which chronicles his first-hand experiences as a target of climate change denialism, and the fight against it.

Event is free and open to the public. There will be a book signing, with books on-sale at a reduced price of $20 (cash only, so PLEASE REMEMBER CASH!). All proceeds will go to the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund, a non-profit that defends climate scientists dragged into litigation. It was initially created to defend Dr. Mann against legal harassment by politically-motivated groups. 

As a prestigious and outspoken climate scientist, Dr. Michael Mann has not only witnessed the climate science disinformation campaigns of business and political interests - he has been one of their key targets. In his new book "The Madhouse Effect", he partners with the Washington Post's political cartoonist Tom Toles to explain how the practice of climate change denial has managed to confuse the public despite the overwhelming scientific consensus.

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Redesigning professional work: Findings from the Work, Family & Health Network Study
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 26, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, 9 Bow Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Research study, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	HCPDS
SPEAKER(S)  Erin L. Kelly, Ph.D., professor of work and organization studies, Institute for Work and Employment Research, MIT Sloan School of Management
CONTACT INFO	Nicole Goguen
ngoguen at hsph.harvard.edu
DETAILS  This presentation describes the WFHN's group-randomized experiment among information technology employees in a U.S. Fortune 500 firm. Professional, managerial, and technical employees often face expectations that they will put in long hours in the office and be almost constantly available for work, prioritizing their paid work over family and personal responsibilities. Our experiment evaluates a unique approach (called STAR) to supporting employees’ personal and family lives and health that involves training supervisors and participatory workshops where employees and managers together consider how can both “get the job done” and meet personal obligations.
LINK	https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/population-development/events/pop-center-seminars/

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Roxbury Showcase
Monday, September 26
4:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Roxbury Innovation Center, 2300 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/roxbury-showcase-tickets-26578137926

The impact of innovation in Greater Boston spans from art and food to technology and community. At the HUBweek Roxbury Showcase, now’s your chance to taste innovation in Roxbury. Hear from leaders making an impact by promoting inclusive innovation in our city. Meet tomorrow's innovators who are shaping the future of business, technology, design and fashion. Learn, mingle and share experiences to help each other take new ideas and ventures to the next level.
Who it’s for: The curious, those seeking relaxing and de-stress techniques
Vibe: Entrepreneurs, foodies, techies, artists, students
Host: 
HUBweek
Partner Hosts:
Roxbury Innovation Center
The Tech Connection
The Timothy Smith Network
Epicenter Community
Smarter in the City
Microsoft

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A Vision for Asian Collective Energy Security
Monday, September 26
4:15-5:30 PM
Harvard, Starr Auditorium, 2nd floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Nobuo Tanaka, President, Sasakawa Peace Foundation;  Executive Director (2007-11), International Energy Agency (IEA) and Professor, Graduate School of Public Policy (GRASPP), University of Tokyo
Nobuo Tanaka has extensive national government and international experience in the fields of energy, trade and innovation. Executive Director of the International Energy Agency (IEA) from 2007 to 2011, Mr. Tanaka oversaw a seminal period in the Agency’s work and direction. Under his leadership, the IEA initiated a collective release of oil stocks in June 2011, the third such collective action in the Agency’s history, opening new scope and a new era for IEA emergency action. While IEA Executive Director, Mr. Tanaka was responsible for pioneering the concept of ‘comprehensive energy security’ while also expanding the Agency’s focus on climate change, renewable energy and the transition to a low-carbon energy economy (with the 450 ppm scenario of the IEA’s World Energy Outlook becoming the benchmark goal for global climate change mitigation). Mr. Tanaka led IEA work on fossil fuel subsidy reform, energy efficiency policy recommendations (adopted by the G8), low-carbon energy technology roadmaps, gas and electricity security, energy poverty and carbon capture and storage, among others. Notably, Mr. Tanaka also played a crucial and personal role in the strengthening of ties with major IEA non-Member energy players, including China, India, Russia, Brazil, Chile, Indonesia, Mexico and South Africa, and in IEA relations with business, including through the creation of the IEA Energy Business Council. Responsible for a great expansion of IEA engagement with other international fora, throughout his time as IEA Executive Director, Mr. Tanaka made numerous keynote speeches on global energy affairs and policy to summits of Heads of State and Ministers. 
 
Mr. Tanaka began his career in 1973 in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in Tokyo, and has served in a number of high-ranking positions in METI, including Director-General of the Multilateral Trade System Department. He was responsible for Japan’s involvement with the IEA and the G7 Energy Ministers’ Meeting during the second oil crisis of the late 1970s and early 1980s. He participated in establishing the comprehensive energy policy of Japan in the late 1980s, and oversaw the implementation of Japan’s international nuclear energy policy and led negotiations of bilateral nuclear agreements.
 
Open to the public. 
 
For more information: 
http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/7129/vision_for_asian_collective_energy_security.html

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Finding Humanity Amid Conflict
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 26, 2016, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S-020, Belfer Case Study Room, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Herbert C. Kelman Seminar on International Conflict
SPEAKER(S)  Christa Case Bryant, Political Editor, Christian Science Monitor
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	Donna Hicks, Chair dhicks at wcfia.harvard.edu

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A proposed energy conversion process for making solar energy a major player in global power generation
Monday, September 26
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building 32-155, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jacob Karni
We are challenged to develop an energy conversion method, which could gradually replace fossil fuel combustion on a worldwide scale, eventually leading to a renewable-dominant global energy supply. Whereas other renewable energy resources can have important supporting roles, the only energy sources available on earth in large enough quantities to replace fossil fuels are nuclear and solar. 

Professor Karni will first clarify the fundamental requirements of a major energy conversion and power generation system. He will then discuss a solar energy conversion process based on several complementing novel technologies, and aimed to enable large-scale utilization of solar energy for year-round, 24/7 power generation and clean fuel production at high efficiency and affordable costs. 

The proposed process combines developments accomplished by a group of collaborators working together and separately over 25 years. It includes innovations in large-scale solar optics, solar receiver, thermal storage, heat engine, and fuel production from CO2 and water. The main system components have been tested and proven on a small scale, but must still be scaled up, integrated and operated together.

Web site: http://energy.mit.edu/event/karni/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/926-seminar-a-proposed-energy-conversion-process-for-making-solar-energy-a-major-player-in-global-tickets-27760973820 
Sponsor(s): MIT Energy Initiative

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Alchemical Ecology: Rudolf Steiner and the Environmental Movement
Monday, September 26
5:30pm
Harvard, Barker Center, Room 133, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge

Daniel McKanan, Harvard Divinity School

Synopsis
For nearly a century, students of Rudolf Steiner’s “spiritual science” have made significant contributions to environmental activism. They created the first certification system for organic agriculture, initiated the lawsuit that inspired Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, invented community-supported agriculture, and founded the world’s largest “green banks.” All of this activity is inspired by a spiritual worldview that might surprise other environmentalists: Steiner drew on alchemy and astrology as well as experimental science, and he taught his students “how to know higher worlds” as well as how to care for this one. In this presentation drawing on his forthcoming book, Harvard Divinity School professor Dan McKanan will offer an overview of Steiner’s contributions to environmentalism, and suggest some of the ways Steiner-inspired initiatives challenge all environmentalists to embrace a broader sense of ecological connection.

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Should we engineer the mosquito?
Monday, September 26
6:00 PM
LabCentral, 700 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/BosLab/events/233152367/

BosLab is hosting a public forum to discuss the implications of genetically engineering mosquitoes towards eradicating diseases like Malaria or dengue. Guest speaker Professor Esvelt will discuss the use of gene drive technology for tackling vector-borne diseases, including Lyme disease. Participants will learn how the technology works, weigh in on the potential benefits and risks of this approach, and discuss its ethical and societal implications. Both scientists and members of the public are invited to participate in this engaging public forum! Refreshments and dinner will be served. The event is free and advanced registration begins September 12.

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Imaginary Property with Florian Schneider
Monday, September 26
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E15-001, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Department of Architecture, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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The World According to Star Wars
WHEN  Mon., Sep. 26, 2016, 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Coop
SPEAKER(S)  Cass Sunstein
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS	  There’s Santa Claus, Shakespeare, Mickey Mouse, the Bible, and then there’s Star Wars. Nothing quite compares to sitting down with a young child and hearing the sound of John William’s score as those beloved golden letters fill the screen. In this fun, erudite, and often moving book, Cass R. Sunstein explores the lessons of Star Wars as they relate to childhood, fathers, the Dark Side, rebellion, and redemption. As it turns out, Star Wars also has a lot to teach us about constitutional law, economics, and political uprisings.

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Skillshare: What's All the Buzz About? (Honeybees, beekeeping, and our envi…
Monday, September 26
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
The Center for Arts at the Armory, 191 Highland Avenue, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/skillshare-whats-all-the-buzz-about-honeybees-beekeeping-and-our-environment-tickets-27264402562

About Skillshare: Somerville Skillshare is a free monthly learning event that features classes around any innovative topic and we encourage locals to teach it. It’s a way to learn new skills, jump-start new hobbies, and meet other people with similar interests, all in a fun and informal setting.
Class Description: This will be a one hour talk on what is happening with honeybees and other pollinators in our agricultural system, and how we and our world are affected by these changes and what we can do to help. The talk will include the basics of the hive and beekeeping as well as a short bit on the products of the hive.
This will be a one-time talk on Monday September 26, from 7pm to 8pm. 
About the facilitator: Tony Lulek is a Beekeeper and is the owner of Little Beehive Farm. His products are 100% natural with no preservatives. He developed most of the recipes himself. He was also the president of the Northfolk County Beekeepers Association for 6 years and was teaching bee school throughout that time.

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Tuesday, September 27
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The Science of Addiction: How opioids, from prescription painkillers to her…
Tuesday, September 27
8:00 AM to 9:15 AM (EDT)
Ragon Institute, 400 Technology Square, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-science-of-addiction-how-opioids-from-prescription-painkillers-to-heroin-work-in-the-brain-tickets-27110704848

This panel will examine the mechanisms of opioid addiction and the various and sometimes controversial methods of treatment – from abstinence to medication to a potential vaccine.
Who it’s for: community members, health care professionals, students, medical patients
Vibe: Thought-provoking, educational, pertinent
Hosted by STAT in Partnership with CVS Health
Sponsor: 
CVS Health
Panelists:
Monica Bharel, MD, MPH
Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
Sarah Wakeman, MD, FASAM
Medical Director, Substance Use Disorder Initiative at
Massachusetts General Hospital
Scott E. Lukas, Ph.D.
Director, Behavioral Psychopharmacology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital
Seth Mnookin
Co-Director of MIT’s Graduate Program in Science Writing

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HUB Presents: Expanding Opportunity in the Digital Age
Tuesday, September 27
10:00a–12:00p
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://hubweek.org/events/solve/expanding-opportunity-in-the-digital-age
Cost:  $25

Speaker: ANDREW MCAFEE Co-director, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy; JAMES MANYIKA Senior partner, McKinsey & Company; Director, McKinsey Global Institute (MGI); MICHELLE MOORE Head of Digital Banking, Bank of America

The acceleration of technology growth has led to major benefits for businesses, the economy, and society, but what about workers? 

Expanding Opportunity in the Digital Age will focus on the various challenges and strategies for broadening economic opportunity in a time of rapid technological advancement. This event will feature a mix of short personal stories from policy, industry, institutional and community leaders who are dealing with these issues in various and diverse settings. Followed by a keynote address on inclusive innovation, the event will conclude with an interactive and engaging discussion on the topic amongst experts. 

Who it's for: Business and civic leaders, researchers, entrepreneurs, students, workers 
Vibe: Informative, thought-provoking, action-oriented
Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/solve/expanding-opportunity-in-the-digital-age/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $25
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, MIT Solve, HUBweek
For more information, contact:  HUBweek
hello at hubweek.org 

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Phototactic Guidance of a Tissue-Engineered Soft-Robotic Ray
Tuesday, September 27 
11:45am to 1:00pm
Harvard, Geo Museum, Haller Hall, Room 102, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Inspired by the relatively simple morphological blueprint provided by batoid fish such as stingrays and skates, we created a biohybrid system that enables an artificial animal, a tissue-engineered ray - to swim and phototactically follow a light cue. By patterning dissociated rat cardiomyocytes on an elastomeric body enclosing a microfabricated gold skeleton, we replicated fish morphology at 1/10 scale and captured basic fin deflection patterns of batoid fish. Optogenetics allows for phototactic guidance, steering, and turning maneuvers. Optical stimulation induced sequential muscle activation via serpentine-patterned muscle circuits, leading to coordinated undulatory swimming. The speed and direction of the ray was controlled by modulating light frequency and by independently eliciting right and left fins, allowing the biohybrid machine to maneuver through an obstacle course.

Contact: Luo Gu
Email: luogu at seas.harvard.edu

Editorial Comment:  You might have seen this in the news, the “soft robot” skate or stingray.  It's a biorobotic hybrid, rat cells in an elastomeric body with a gold skeleton that is one tenth scale the living creature.  Get in on the ground floor.  Harvard is also working on robot bees.

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Responsive Communities Initiative
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Information Technology, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society
SPEAKER(S)  Susan Crawford
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/responsive-communities-initiative-tickets-26573146998
DETAILS  The Responsive Communities Initiative led by Susan Crawford at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University addresses some of the most important issues of economic development, social justice, and civil liberties of our time – those prompted by Internet access. The program has three areas of research involving the internet, data, and government: Internet Access Infrastructure, Data Governance, and Responsive Communities Leaders. Come learn about the current state of the programs research, what they hope to achieve, and how Internet access could be regulated as a utility and open government data can improve our communities.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/responsive-communities-initiative/

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Implications of thaw-induced boreal tree cover loss for carbon, water and energy fluxes in the southern Taiga Plains, Northwest Territories
Tuesday, September 27 
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, Herbaria Seminar Room (125), 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

with Oliver Sonnentag, Université de Montréal

Herbaria Seminar Series 
http://huh.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/news/herbaria

Free and open to the public. 

Contact Name:  Barbara Hanrahan
bhanrahan at oeb.harvard.edu
(617) 495-2365

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Speaker Series: Patrick Ruffini
Tuesday, September 27
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Patrick Ruffini is a strategist, thinker, and organizer focused on data and technology’s disruptive impact on politics and business. He is CEO of Echelon Insights, a research, analytics, and digital intelligence firm. He was among the first digital strategists in American politics, working for President Bush’s 2004 campaign, directing the Republican National Committee’s digital strategy in 2006, and founding Engage, a leading digital agency in politics and issue advocacy. Ruffini has led technology efforts in three successive Presidential cycles and advised clients around the world.

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Strategies for Rapid Climate Mitigation with Laurence Delina
Tuesday, September 27
12:00pm – 1:30pm
BU, Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, 67 Bay State Road, Boston

Laurence Delina, a post-doctoral associate at the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, will discuss his recent book, Strategies for Rapid Climate Mitigation, at a seminar on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 from 12:00 to 1:30 pm at the Pardee Center, 67 Bay State Road. The book, published in June by Routledge Press, explores whether the rapid mobilization among countries in preparation for World War II is an appropriate analogy for the scale and speed required for an effective response to the transnational threat of climate change in the 21st century.

Delina, a citizen of the Philippines, holds a PhD from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He is leading a project at the Pardee Center on sustainable energy transitions in developing countries.

http://www.bu.edu/pardee/2016/09/12/upcoming-seminar-strategies-for-rapid-climate-mitigation/

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FDA AND THE DRUG APPROVAL PROCESS: IS IT REALLY BROKEN?
Tuesday, September 27
2:00 – 3:15 PM
Ragon Institute, 400 Technology Square, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fda-and-the-drug-approval-process-is-it-really-broken-tickets-27110490206

Join veteran pharmaceutical industry columnist, Ed Silverman, as he leads a lively discussion with a panel of thought leaders on the FDA and the drug approval process.

The agency may be approving more drugs, but Congress wants to speed the process in ways that some say would lower stands, and patient groups complain it takes too long to green light desperately needed rare treatments. Is an overhaul warranted or just a few tweaks? What happens if standards really are changed? And what can the FDA do on its own?

Explore the possibilities for improving the drug approval process with our panel of experts. Q&A to follow.

Who it’s for: health care professionals, business leaders, students, medical patients, researchers, policy makers
Vibe: thought-provoking, conversation-starting, informative

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Solve | MAKE
Tuesday, September 27
2:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

With the world's population poised to grow exponentially by midcentury, Solve's Make pillar addresses issues relating to basic infrastructure, manufacturing, economic opportunity, and how best to accommodate growth. Join our community of technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents to help create solutions to Make pillar challenges. Go here for more information: http://solvecolab.mit.edu. 

Be at Solve at HUBweek on Tuesday, September 27, as Solve | Make finalists selected by a distinguished panel of judges present their proposed solutions to the Inclusive Innovation challenge, answering the question: How do we create a more inclusive, productive, and sustainable economic future for all? 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

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Collaborating at the Intersection of Art and Science
Tuesday, September 27
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM (EDT)
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Auditorium, 415 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/collaborating-at-the-intersection-of-art-and-science-tickets-26589059593

Artists and scientists influence each other in surprising ways. Join us for a fascinating conversation between Broad Institute researchers and artist-in-residence Naoe Suzuki, as they explore ideation as a collaborative effort, with results that potentially enhance both the art and research produced. The artist-in-residence program at Broad Institute provides an environment where revolutionary scientists and forward thinking artists can work, communicate, and learn together to benefit both science and art, and leverage the connection between the two disciplines to collaboratively provoke the creative thinking that drives innovation. 
Who it’s for: Artists, scientists, all creative thinkers
Vibe: Synergy, dialogue, thought-provoking
Host:  Catalyst Conversations
Partner Host:  Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Speakers:   Naoe Suzuki
Before beginning her appointment at Broad Institute, current artist-in- residence Naoe Suzuki has been the recipient of many grants and awards including the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, the Artist Grant in Drawing/Printmaking/Artist’s Book, and Artist Grant in Sculpture/Installation from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation, the Artists’ Fellowship, Inc., Puffin Foundation, and the Blanche E. Colman Award from Mellon Trust of New England. Her residency fellowships include Studios at MASS MoCA (2016), Blue Mountain Center (2015, 2013, 2011, 2008 and 2005), Millay Colony for the Arts (2008 and 2002), Jentel (2006), Centrum (1999), and MacDowell Colony (1998-99). Naoe was born in Tokyo, Japan, and based in Waltham, MA. She holds M.F.A. in Studio for Interrelated Media from Massachusetts College of Art and Design. You can see more of her work on her website at www.naoesuzuki.com.

Todd Golub, M.D.
Founding Core Member, Chief Scientific Officer, and Director of the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School; Charles A. Dana Investigator in Human Cancer Genetics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Investigator at Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Todd Golub is a founding core member of the Broad Institute and serves as the institute’s chief scientific officer and director of its Cancer Program. Golub is a world leader in understanding the basis of cancer, by creating and applying tools of genomics. He has made fundamental discoveries in the molecular basis of childhood leukemia, and laid the foundation for the diagnosis and classification of human cancers using gene expression analysis. He also pioneered the development of chemical screening approaches based on gene expression. He joined the faculty of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in 1997. At the same time he served as the leader of cancer genomics at the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome research, which evolved into the Cancer Program at the Broad. Golub has directed that program since 2004, and is also currently the Charles A. Dana Investigator in Human Cancer Genetics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. He is the recipient of multiple awards, including the Erasmus Hematology Award; the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award and the Outstanding Achievement Award from the American Association for Cancer Research; the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research; the E. Mead Johnson Award from the Society for Pediatric Research; and the Judson Daland Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Clinical Investigation from the American Philosophical Society. In 2014, he was elected as a member to the Institute of Medicine. Golub serves on the scientific advisory boards of the Wistar Institute and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He also serves as chair of the board of scientific advisors of the National Cancer Institute. Golub received his B.A. from Carleton College and his M.D. from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He completed his internship, residency, and fellowship.

Deborah Davidson, moderator 
Deborah Davidson is an artist, curator, and educator. She received her M.F.A. from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University and her B.A. from Binghamton University.  Her current project Catalyst Conversations is an organization devoted to the idea of art and science in dialogue, launched in October 2012. She is also the director of the Suffolk University Gallery and maintains a studio practice as well, exhibiting widely in the greater Boston area.

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Earth System Dynamics and Mass Extinctions
Tuesday, September 27
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Harvard, Pierce 209

Daniel H. Rothman, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, MIT
The five great mass extinctions of the geologic past are each associated with significant perturbations of Earth's carbon cycle. But many past environmental events are not associated with mass extinction. What makes them different?  By transforming geochemical signals to physical variables, we find that mass extinctions are associated with rates of environmental change that exceed a limit
imposed by mass conservation in a normal carbon cycle.  We suggest that external perturbations of the carbon cycle, such as extensive volcanism, can excite responses that breach this threshold.  We conclude with brief remarks on the relevance of these findings to modern environmental change and a potential sixth extinction.

Widely Applied Mathematics Seminar

Contact: Alpha Lee
Email: alphalee at g.harvard.edu

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Changing Sea Ice Conditions and Arctic Marine Ecosystems
September 27
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Jim McCarthy, Biological Oceanography, Harvard University
The shrinking area of Arctic sea ice in summer is one of the most often cited examples of anthropogenic climate change. The areal extent of sea ice at the time of the September minimum has declined by about 1%/yr since satellite observations began 35 yr ago.  Sea ice is very different from lake ice.  A brine is created as ice crystalizes, a portion which remains in channels within the ice and provides habitat for microscopic plankton.  These organisms include photosynthetic algae and microscopic animals that feed on the algae, and they then become food for shrimp and fish under and at the edges of the ice.  This production is the base of the food web that supports marine mammals and birds that flourish in the Arctic during spring and summer.  Climate models project that with additional warming from greenhouse gases summer sea ice could vanish in the Arctic by mid century, with profound implications for many iconic species.

Bio:  Professor of Biological Oceanography at Harvard and was President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science from Feb 2008-Feb 2009.[1][2]  McCarthy is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Biological Oceanography and former Master of Pforzheimer House. He is also Acting Curator of the Malacology Department in the Museum of Comparative Zoology.  His studies address factors that regulate the processes of primary production and nutrient supply in upper ocean, approached using controlled laboratory studies and field investigations. Study sites range from near shore to the open ocean. Recent and current field research sites include the North Atlantic, equatorial Pacific, and Arabian Sea.

More information at http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/jim-mccarthy.html#more

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Is This All the Media's Fault? Running a Presidential Campaign in the age of Kardashian
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 27, 2016, 4:15 – 5:45 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Littauer Building,  Faculty Dining Room, 79 JFK Street,Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
SPEAKER(S)  Sarah Isgur Flores
COST  Free and Open to the Public
CONTACT INFO	Deisy_Carrera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  This study group will discuss how presidential campaigns use the media to reach voters and look at the effectiveness of each candidate’s strategies. What is the role of a presidential communications team and how do they build a strategy? Which campaign's theory of the media's role in politics is right--Trump's more is more or Hillary's adversarial approach? What did we learn from the primaries and how will it affect 2020?
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/fellows/study-groups/sarah-isgur-flores

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The Role of the U.S. Military in National Security Policy Formulation and Execution
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 27, 2016, 4:15 – 5:45 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, LIttauer Building, L166, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  General Tom Hill
COST  Free and Open to the Public
CONTACT INFO	Deisy_Carrera at hks.harvard.edu
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/fellows/study-groups/tom-hill

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How to Talk With Children About Gun Violence and Trauma
Tuesday, September 27
4:30 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Marran Theater, Doble Campus, Lesley University, 34 Mellen Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-to-talk-with-children-about-gun-violence-and-trauma-tickets-27611920999

In the wake of violence around the country and the world, the public is invited to join Lesley University faculty experts for a panel discussion to explore how teachers, parents, and other service providers can talk about gun violence and the related trauma.

Hear from Assistant Professor of Art Therapy Kelvin Ramirez; Associate Professor and social worker Joshua Baldwin; Professor of Photography Andre Ruesch; and Visiting Professor Debbie LeeKeenan, who for 20 years directed the Eliot-Pearson laboratory school for the Department of Child Study and Human Development at Tufts University.

The panel will moderated by Professor Lisa Fiore, an expert in early childhood development and educational psychology.

"Shots Fired"
The panel is presented in conjunction with an exhibit by professional photographer and artist Mark Teiwes (MFA '16), who used a camera-less process to shoot photosensitive material and literally document the effects of a gunshot.  The exhibit is on view in Marran Gallery through October 17th.
Marran Gallery and Theater
34 Mellen St
Cambridge, MA 02138
For more information about this event or the exhibit, contact Beth Tallett at etallett at lesley.edu.
Cost: Free and Open to the Public

Please RSVP, but walk-ins are welcome!

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The New Arab Wars
Tuesday, September 27
4:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building E51-315, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Prof. Marc Lynch
The hopes of the Arab uprisings of 2011 have faded into a nightmarish array of resurgent autocrats, failed states, and civil wars. What went wrong? "The New Arab Wars" highlights the role of regional and global powers, from Saudi Arabia and Iran to the United States. It shows how the interventions by external powers derailed the democratic transition in Egypt and blocked change in other countries. It then explains how those interventions turned Libya, Yemen and Syria into full-scale wars with little prospect in sight for resolution. Finally, it looks at the Obama administration's approach to the uprisings and how the next President will likely adapt America's role in the Middle East. 

Marc Lynch is professor of Political Science at The George Washington University.

Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar 
The Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar is organized under the auspices of the MIT Center for International Studies, which conducts research on contemporary international issues and provides an opportunity for faculty and students to share perspectives and exchange views. Each year the Bustani Seminar invites scholars, journalists, consultants, and other experts from the Middle East, Europe, and the United States to MIT to present recent research findings on contemporary politics, society and culture, and economic and technological development in the Middle East.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cis/bustani/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, Radius/T&C
For more information, contact:  Dain Goding
617-252-1888

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How to Scale Your Big Idea in a Complex World
Tuesday, September 27
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building E51, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Co-sponsored by HUBweek and MIT System Design & Management, this panel of innovators and entrepreneurs will discuss how they are applying systems thinking to groundbreaking work in a wide range of domains. Your questions and ideas are welcome and will be an important part of this event!

Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/reinventing-innovation-with-systems-thinking-how-to-scale-your-big-idea-in-a-complex-world/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: Pre-registration recommended. See url above
Sponsor(s): MIT System Design & Management
For more information, contact:  Lois Slavin
lslavin at mit.edu 

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Askwith Debates: More Charter Schools? The Massachusetts Vote and the National Debate
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE	617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS	
Participants:
Tito Jackson, District 7 city councilor and chairman, Committee on Education, Boston City Council
Marc Kenen, executive director, Massachusetts Charter Public School Association
Additional participants TBA.
Moderator: Paul Reville, Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration, HGSE

Voters will face a decision this November regarding charter school caps – whether or not to authorize up to 12 new charter schools or expand enrollment in existing Massachusetts charter schools beginning as early as January 2017. Will a “yes” vote harm mainstream schools and undermine their funding? What other opportunities are there for parents stuck on charter school waiting lists? Will this decision influence the future of charter schools nationwide? This referendum has attracted national attention in the heated controversy about the future of charter schools in the U.S. public school education system. How do taxpayers/voters determine what’s best to keep mainstream school systems healthy while looking out for what’s best for individual children? Join us as proponents and opponents square off on the merits of charter school expansion in this inaugural of the Askwith Forum Debates.

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What Works: Designing Inclusive Organizations
WHEN  Tue., Sep. 27, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Women and Public Policy Program, Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government
SPEAKER(S)  Iris Bohnet and Meghna Chakrabarti
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-works-designing-inclusive-organizations-tickets-27084615815
DETAILS  Diversity is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back, and debiasing people’s minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Behavioral design offers a new solution.

Professor Iris Bohnet will discuss what organizations can do to create more inclusive environments, level the playing field, and help diverse teams succeed. There is so much more that can be done – often at a shockingly low cost and surprisingly high speed. Join the Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) during HUBweek for a conversation with Iris Bohnet, Professor of Public Policy, author of What Works: Gender Equality by Design, and Director of the Women and Public Policy Program.

For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit 
http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/what-works-designing-inclusive-organizations/

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Tradeoffs between hydropower and hydrological alterations in the Amazon
Tuesday, September 27
5:30 - 6:30 PM 
MIT, Building E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScavKvmA2a7mAq0yHWu5b3G7tTYdJL2QaEF1d4LN5An80rqOw/viewform?c=0&w=1

Dr. Mauricio Arias, assistant professor with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Florida, as well as an associate at the Harvard Kennedy School's Sustainability Science Program. An abstract of the talk is below. Please RSVP for this exciting talk so that we can order an accurate amount of dinner for all attendees.

This project asks what the future fate for hydropower generation in the Amazon is under the changing climate and deforestation and what can be done to maintain the basin’s wellbeing. Hydropower will continue to play a major contribution to Brazil’s energy agenda. With near 50% of the country’s potential hydropower development, the Tapajós Basin in Southeast Amazonia will have an increasingly important role in the national electricity market. Given the environmental and hydrological shifts this basin has faced and will likely continue to experience in the future, the main questions that this project asks are: what is the fate for hydropower generation in the Tapajós under the changing climate and forest conversion in the Amazon? What can be done to maintain the basin’s wellbeing? These questions are being addressed with long-term environmental datasets, a series of computation tools, and stakeholder consultation and engagement. Thus far, a number of computer models have been developed, which are able to estimate daily scale, decadal patterns of the regional climate, the basin’s biosphere, river flows, and hydropower generation. Simulations of historical and future conditions highlight that the combined effects of climate change and deforestation have altered the seasonality of river flows in recent decades, and such alterations are likely to increase over the next century.,

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Palestinian and Israeli Bereaved Parents for Peace
Tuesday, September 27
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

The Parents Circle Families Forum (PCFF) is a joint Israeli-Palestinian organization made up of more than 600 bereaved families--all of whom have lost a loved one to the violent conflict. 

Join us to hear the stories of bereaved Israeli and Palestinian families as they share their extraordinary journey on the path of reconciliation. 

Also learn about opportunities to teach CS and entrepreneurship to Israeli and Palestinian youth through MISTI MIT-MEET (Middle Eastern Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow.) 

Light fare provided.

Open to: the general public

Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MIT Sloan Executive Education, MISTI MIT-MEET

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Harnessing Evolution to Solve Problems in Biotech and Therapeutics
Tuesday, September 27
6:00 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT) 
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 415 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/harnessing-evolution-to-solve-problems-in-biotech-and-therapeutics-tickets-26576763816

Biological evolution has solved many challenging molecular problems with breathtaking effectiveness. Researchers have begun to harness the remarkable power of evolution to address problems of their own choosing, rather than of nature’s choosing. In this lecture, Liu will describe the development and first applications of phage­assisted continuous evolution (PACE), a method that enables proteins to evolve continuously in the laboratory for the first time, accelerating the speed of laboratory evolution ~100­fold. The Liu group has used PACE to rapidly evolve a wide variety of proteins with the potential to serve as novel therapeutic agents, as well as to study the reproducibility and path dependence of evolution over thousands of generations in a practical time frame. Liu will also describe a recent effort to use PACE to address a major problem facing worldwide agricultural productivity: the rise of insects resistant to a widely used protein insecticide.
Who it’s for: life-long Learners, curiosity seekers, science lovers
Vibe: informative, forward-thinking, collaborative
Host:  Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
Speaker:  David Liu, PhD, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and Associate Faculty member, Wyss Institute at Harvard University

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Food Fight to Benefit No Kid Hungry
Tuesday, September 27
6:00 - 8:00pm
Lincoln Tavern 425 West Broadway South Boston
RSVP at https://www.universe.com/events/boston-food-fights-4-round-1-tickets-83RMJ2?ref=CE%20Webpage
Cost:  $30

Join us for Boston's Food Fight Series, where we bring together leading chefs from the local communities for an evening of friendly competition, food, fun, and fundraising!

Next Tuesday, September 27th witness Food Fight veteran Tico face off against new Kendall Square hot spot Mamaleh's for the Battle for Breakfast!  Tickets are an incredible deal at $30 each and include all you can eat food and two free sponsored drink tickets from our beverage sponsor - Mionetto Prosecco!

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Boston Green Drinks - September Happy Hour
Tuesday, September 27
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Scholars, 25 School Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-green-drinks-september-happy-hour-tickets-27173083424

We're talking off in August (Happy Labor Day weekend!) and will continue the conversation in September!
Join the conversation with sustainability professionals and hobbyists.  Enjoy a drink and build your connection with our green community!
Boston Green Drinks  builds a community of sustainably-minded Bostonians, provides a forum for exchange of sustainability career resources, and serves as a central point of information about emerging green issues.  We support the exchange of ideas and resources about sustainable energy, environment, food, health, education.

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Breakthroughs in Nanotechnology
Tuesday, Sept 27
6:30 PM 
Belmont Media Center, 9 Lexington Street, Belmont 

Sameer Sonkusale, Ph.D., Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University; Principal Investigator, Nanoscale Integrated Sensors and Circuits Laboratory (NanoLab). the Sonkusale NanoLab. The Sonkusale Nanolab is currently engaged in cutting-edge research in several interdisciplinary areas, including nano-devices that benefit medicine and the life sciences. A major interest is the development of flexible, embedded sensors for diagnostics. Dr. Sonkusale and his team also work on zero-cost "do-it-yourself" diagnostics for the developing world. In this discussion (w/footage from his lab), Dr. Sonkusale explains how nanotechnology works and how it is revolutionizing medicine as well as other fields.

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Careers in Sustainability
Tuesday, September 27
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Northeastern University, Robinson Hall - Room 107, 336 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/careers-in-sustainability-tickets-27632204668

Interested in a career related to sustainability? Let us help!
On Sept 27th the Northeastern Graduate student association in collaboration with the USGBC Massachusetts Chapter will be hosting a panel discussion featuring a diverse group of sustainability professionals . Panelists will share their stories, lessons they learned along the way and answer questions from the audience .

SPEAKER BIO
Paul Lyons
Lyons is a Registered Mechanical Engineer and Construction Supervisor in Massachusetts, and a certified PV installer from the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP).  He holds a B.S. in engineering from Cornell University, an M.B.A. from the University of New Haven, and an M.A. in Geography from Boston University
Originally from a place with more snow than sun, Paul Lyons has come a long way in the solar industry. Working on solar projects for over twenty years in local New England and overseas in Haiti and Mexico, Lyons has extensive experience in solar design, consulting, management, and installation. He founded Zapotec Energy Inc. in 1997 and has led all of Zapotec’s previous and current projects, and continues to play a key role in bringing together communities, developers, and contractors to create a solar future in Massachusetts. He remains well connected in the solar professional network as an active member in the Solar Energy Business Association of New England (SEBANE), the American Solar Energy Society, and the Solar Electric Power Association. 

Jenna Dancewicz
I am currently an Assistant Project Manager at Suffolk Construction. For the past three years I have worked on the historic renovation of the Filene’s Burnham Building and the iconic new construction of Millennium Tower. I have worked on multiple facets of the Millennium Tower project, from concrete submittal reviews to building out the intricate amenity space to a renovation to an existing MBTA station. Along with my work out in the field, I am a leading member of Suffolk’s Green Team, which promotes environmental awareness within the company.
Prior to working at Suffolk, I attended Brown University and graduated in 2011 with a degree in Civil Engineering. Along with studying engineering, I played on the Varsity Women’s Ice Hockey team and also tap danced in a group called “What’s on Tap?”. When I started at Brown, I knew I wanted to be an engineer and pursued the bio-medical track. However, I didn’t fall in love with that type of engineering, so I went to my advisor for advice. He suggested I take a class in sustainability and green buildings. That class made me fall in love with green buildings and steered me towards majoring in civil engineering. Building with sustainability in mind just made sense to me because a green building is efficient, creates a healthier indoor environment and ultimately helps reduce our impact on the exterior environment! The engineer in me is always geared for efficiency and the athlete in me is always game for being healthy. It was a win-win. To this day I am always trying to find out new information about how people are building green and how I can be more sustainable.
When I am not working, I enjoy participating in the USGBC-MA Emerging Professionals Committee. I also enjoy playing ice hockey, kayaking and biking.  I love to travel and take photos with my DSLR camera. 

Alana Spencer
Alana Spencer, LEED AP BD+C is a Sustainability Product Manager at Vanderweil Engineers focusing on building certifications, sustainable design, and energy efficiency in the C+D and built environments. After graduating from St. Xavier University in Chicago, IL with a BS in Business Administration, Alana began her career in software, focusing on sustainability performance management for global corporations and seamlessly transitioned into project / product management.
Alana’s project experience includes a wide array of building and LEED certification types, for new and existing built environments including detailed analysis and development of sustainable design opportunities throughout the integrative lifecycle of projects; corporate sustainability disclosure reporting (GRI, CDP, UN Global Compact); and marketing/public relation campaigns.
In her spare time, Alana volunteers in the Boston area including USGBC-MA, is involved with the South End Neighborhood Association, continues to expand her knowledge base (WELL, Resiliency,...) and travels as often as she can.

Celis Brisbin
Celis Brisbin works at the US Green Building Council's Massachusetts Chapter as a Programs Manager. His variety of responsibilities support the non-profit's mission to drive sustainable and regenerative design, construction, and operation of buildings and communities in Massachusetts. Prior to working at the Chapter, he spent a few years in the solar industry as a Purchasing Manager and was a Volunteer for the Peace Corps prior to that. When he is not in the office, you can find him furthering the efficiency of his hybrid or biking around the city.  
Brisbin is a LEED Green Associate, Living Futures Ambassador and WELL Accredited Professional.  He holds a B.S. in Urban Planning from the University of New Hampshire

Rohit Saxena
Rohit brings more than 30 years of rich experience throughout the United States and India to our team. His career focus on technical and complex building  types helps clients meet the growing demand for energy efficiency in highly technical built environments, including biomedical research facilities, biotechnology and pharmaceutical buildings, and medical research laboratories.
As Senior Project Director for Science & Technology, Rohit focuses on leading EYP’s diverse team of design professionals in Boston and nationwide on high-performance design projects, specifically in highly technical building types. He oversees fast tracked and phased construction projects to ensure timely delivery and a high level of client satisfaction. An internationally respected thought leader, Rohit regularly speaks at industry trade conferences, on a wide range of topics from science, sustainability and technology

Sean Tully
As a Program Manager with The Weidt Group, Sean is primarily responsible for providing consulting services for high performance buildings, assisting design professionals and building owners in selecting optimal energy-saving strategies for their project goals and budgets through utility incentive programs. is also proficient in energy auditing, developing scopes, specifications, drawings, and costing to implement energy conservation measures and preparing written reports of energy conservation opportunities based on savings analysis. He reviews and calculates energy savings from implementation of energy conservation projects such as energy management control systems, HVAC equipment upgrades, heating system conversion, variable frequency drives and energy efficient motors.

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Medical Technology Producing Hamburgers
Tuesday, September 27
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Mark Post, (@MarkPost6), Professor of Physiology at Maastricht University, co-inventor of cell cultured beef
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Armin Nassehi: The State We Are In
Tuesday, September 27
7:00 PM to 10:00 PM (EDT) 
Goethe-Institut Boston, 170 Beacon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/armin-nassehi-the-state-we-are-in-tickets-26802345537

As we watch developments in the EU and US unfold, the unsettling feeling that our societies are unraveling is unavoidable. Social Theorist Armin Nassehi is professor at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich and editor of Kursbuch, one of Germany’s leading intellectual magazines. An outspoken intellectual in the German media and cited as “among the most thoughtful intellectual voices in Germany today” (New York Review of Books), Nassehi analyzes the current populist tendencies. Whether it’s elite bashing or xenophobic voices, he tries to make sense of the underlying causes while suggesting an urgent need to develop new narratives as a basis for building stronger democratic systems.

In addition, Armin Nassehi will speak at Brandeis University on Tuesday, September 27, 12-2 pm. Respondent ist Prof. Chandler Rosenberger (Dept. of Sociology, Brandeis University).

Armin Nassehi has been editor of the magazine Kursbuch since 2012. Since 2014 he has been serving as director of the Institute of sociology at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, where he has chaired the Department of Sociology since 1998. Among his most recent works are Die letzte Stunde der Wahrheit (i.e. truth’s final hour, 2015) and Gesellschaft der Gegenwarten: Studien zur Theorie der modernen Gesellschaft II (i.e. a society of presents: studies on the theory of contemporary society II, 2011).

This lecture is part of the global discussion/debate series "Kritikmaschine," organized by the Goethe-Institut and Kursbuch, one of Germany's leading intellectual magazines.

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The Biopolis: Creative New Ideas for a Smarter City
Tuesday, September 27
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-biopolis-creative-new-ideas-for-a-smarter-city-tickets-27486259141

In an increasingly inter-connected and technological world, we need models for urban living that take full advantage of technology while increasing the participation of residents in developing new opportunities for a better life. A Smarter City responds to this challenge in ways that enhance not just the physical infrastructure of a city, but also the intellectual and social capital of its residents. It fosters the collective intelligence of citizens in a manner that is inclusive and oriented towards innovative problem solving. 
The Biopolis program is a transnational effort that links Boston/Cambridge with Paris, using the principles of biology to innovate new models for engaging citizens and meeting the urban challenges of their living city. Since 2015, teams of university students from Harvard, SciencesPo and the Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity have spent summers using Paris as a laboratory to develop new ideas for improving urban living. Proposals are co-developed with citizens and local government and represent collective expressions of new ways to create a Smarter City and address key goals for sustainable development. Biopolis teams will share their proposals with accompanying short films as the basis for a collective brainstorm with participants on potential implementations in Boston and Paris.
Who it's for: students, tech professionals, urban planning professionals, families
Vibe: educational, thought-provoking, forward-thinking

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Wednesday, September 28 and Thursday, September 29
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MIT Climate CoLab’s Crowds & Climate Conference
September 28 & 29
MIT Samberg Conference Center, Chang Building floor 6 & 7, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/crowds-climate-tickets-26606652213
Cost: $ 0 - $75

What:  MIT’s Climate CoLab, an online community of over 70,000 people working to tackle climate change, recently opened registration for  Crowds & Climate, Climate CoLab’s signature conference. Join us September 28 & 29 at MIT for a chance to connect with leaders from businesses, non-profit organizations, governments and communities around the world, and engage with innovative climate solutions to advance a new, collective way of tackling climate change. This year, Crowds & Climate is aligned with MIT's Solve, whose mission is to discover, evaluate, and advance solutions to big, global problems; and part of HUBweek, Boston's week-long city-wide celebration of innovation. Register for the conference before 9/5 for the special early bird rate of $50! A limited number of student scholarships are also available.

http://climatecolab.org

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Wednesday, September 28
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Synaptic gap: 21st Century Brain Science Meets Mental Health Policy
Wednesday, September 28
7:30 AM to 4:30 PM (EDT)
Starr Center, 185 Cambridge Street, 2nd floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/synaptic-gap-21st-century-brain-science-meets-mental-health-policy-tickets-26505936971

Some of the most exciting and world-changing advances in medicine are happening in neuroscience. Unfortunately, mental health treatment and policy are not keeping pace. Massachusetts General Hospital convenes a provocative one-day forum to look beyond the present day access and payment obstacles. The forum will challenge the health care community to shape a future that is grounded in the latest brain science -- and connected to mental health treatment and policy. The spirit of HUBweek, its focus on solving tough problems -- and the timing on the eve of a Presidential election provides a tremendous opportunity to re-energize the health care community to use the extraordinary advances in neuroscience to shape the future of mental health care in our nation. Join clinicians, researchers, policy makers, advocates, business leaders and elected officials as we work together to: translate advances in brain science to individual patient care and treatment policy; find new ways to meet demand through non-traditional approaches to care in an environment of cost accountability; take a critical look at the economics of mental health; and promote resilience and hope.
Who It's For: Health care policy makers, Clinicians, Researchers, Advocates, Elected officials 
Vibe: Thought provoking, Challenging, Energizing

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Cleantech Scandinavia Boston Showcase 
Wednesday, September 28 
8:30 AM to 5:30 PM
Pierce Atwood LLP, 100 Summer Street, Boston 
RSVP at madeleine at cleantechscandinavia.com

For the second consecutive year, Cleantech Scandinavia is bringing together promising Nordic and North American cleantech startups to meet with investors at its Cleantech Showcase in Boston. The showcase will take place at Pierce Atwood LLP on September 28th from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm. As a compliment to the showcase there will be a cleantech tour of Boston on September 29th.

The goal is to meet investors and industry actors from both regions, effectively creating a platform for all to form partnerships for potential co-investments and other business opportunities.

Cleantech Scandinavia is the leading Nordic cleantech investor network. Their platform of Nordic cleantech companies offer unique opportunities for their established international network of investors, industrials, real estate companies, cities, service providers and the public sector. Today there are approximately 70 members including venture funds, industrial ventures from multinational companies, real estate companies, cities, service providers and government organizations. Members are from Scandinavia, Continental Europe, China, North America and other locations.

Editorial Comment:  I went last year and found quite a few useful technological developments mentioned.  One way to expand your imagination.

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Solve | LEARN
Wednesday, September 28
10:00a–11:30a
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

Given that access to a quality education is the foundation of economic and social progress for all of us, Solve's Learn pillar addresses challenges in education. 

You are invited to join our community of technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents to help create solutions to Solve: Learn pillar challenges. Go here to read about and submit your solution to the challenge of how to improve education for children living in refugee camps: http://solvecolab.mit.edu. 

Be sure to attend Solve at HUBweek on Wednesday, September 28, when Solve: Learn finalists selected by a distinguished panel of judges will present their proposed solutions to the refugee education challenge. 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

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Nelson Mandela: Romantic Hero, Tragic Hero
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 12 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center
SPEAKER(S)  Xolela Mangcu, Professor of Sociology, University of Cape Town
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS	 A Q&A will follow the talk
LINK  http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/september-28-2016-1200pm/fall-colloquium-xolela-mangcu

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Probability Assessment and National Security Decision Making: Experimental Evidence from National Security Professionals
Wednesday, September 28
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jeffrey Friedman (Dartmouth)

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu 

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Planetary health and nutrition: Tracking the human nutritional consequences of accelerating global environmental change
Wednesday, September 28
12:15–1:15 pm
Tufts, Behrakis Auditorium, Jaharis Building, 150 Harrison Avenue, Boston
This event will be live streamed: http://www.nutrition.tufts.edu/livestream/seminar

This Friedman Seminar features Sam Myers, Senior Research Scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, presenting “Planetary health and nutrition: Tracking the human nutritional consequences of accelerating global environmental change.”

Samuel Myers, MD, MPH works at the intersection of human health and global environmental change. He is a Senior Research Scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is also Director of the Planetary Health Alliance. Sam’s current work spans several areas of planetary health including 1) the global nutritional impacts of rising concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere; 2) the health impacts of land management decisions in SE Asia associated with biomass burning and particulate air pollution; 3) the nutritional impacts of reduced access to wildlife (bushmeat) in the diet in Madagascar; 4) the local (in Madagascar) and global consequences of fisheries decline for human nutrition and health; and 5) the impact of animal pollinator declines on human nutrition at a global scale.  As the Director of the Planetary Health Alliance, Sam oversees a multi-institutional effort to support research, education and policy efforts around the world focused on understanding and quantifying the human health impacts of global environmental change and translating that understanding into resource management decisions globally. Dr. Myers serves as a Commissioner on the Lancet-Rockefeller Foundation Commission on Planetary Health and was recently awarded the Prince Albert II of Monaco—Institut Pasteur Award 2015 for research at the interface of global environmental change and human health.

More information at http://www.nutrition.tufts.edu/event/2016-09-28/friedman-seminar-sam-myers

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CHINA’S ECONOMY: DOES GROWTH HAVE A FUTURE?
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, S020, Belfer Case Study Room, Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Critical Issues Confronting China Seminar Series; co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Harvard University Asia Center
SPEAKER(S)  Arthur R. Kroeber, Head of research, Gavekal; Founder, Gavekal Dragonomics; Editor, China Economic Quarterly
LINK	http://asiaevents.harvard.edu/event/china’s-economy-does-growth-have-future

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Transnational Governance Experiments: From Climate Change to Mining and the Minerals Life Cycle
Wednesday, September 28
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Tufts, Crowe Room, Goddard Building 310, 419 Boston Avenue, Medford

Stacy VanDeveer, Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of New Hampshire

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Explore the Emerging Worlds of Augmented and Virtual Reality
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 1 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Innovation Lab, 125 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Information Technology, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Innovation Lab
DETAILS	  It’s clear that Virtual and Augmented Reality will become ubiquitous technologies that change how we perceive, interact, create, teach, and play. VR/AR cuts across a wide range of industries from retail, healthcare, the arts, entertainment, and education.
Join the Harvard Innovation Lab for an afternoon of exploration and education about the VR/AR ecosystem and how organizations are tapping into these new frontier technologies to change the way the world works. This dynamic program will include keynotes from luminaries in the space, concurrent sessions on the exploding range of VR-AR applications across industries, demonstration stations, a manufacturers’ showcase, and more.
You’ll never look at the world the same way again.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/explore-the-emerging-worlds-of-virtual-and-augmented-reality/

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.Improved Learning and Retention by Augmenting STEM Curriculum with Computational Thinking, Self-Assessment and Student-Created Visualizations
Wednesday, September 28
1:30p–3:00p
MIT, Building 33-116

Speaker: Prof Craig Carter, Dr Kyle Keane
DUE Education Talk series (DUET): 
The DUET speakers present current research on learning, cognitive psychology, educational technology, and educational assessment. Our goal is to provide access to educational research in support of individual and institutional efforts at enhancing residential student learning.

From the Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Prof Craig Carter and Dr Kyle Keane will discuss teaching materials science and mathematics to sophomores through problem-based learning in the context of students' current and future coursework. They are required to create, code, and visualize concepts from their discipline. 

This is part of a larger project called CodeSeal (http://codeseal.org) . CodeSeal provides a framework of curated content, authoring tools, LMS, and data collection and analysis. CodeSeal's goals are to crowd-source computational STEM curriculum and research its effectiveness in different contexts. 

Web site: https://mpc-www.mit.edu/component/k2/item/537
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Teaching and Learning Laboratory, Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Education
For more information, contact:  Leann Dobranski
617-253-3371
leann at mit.edu 

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Solve | FUEL
Wednesday, September 28
2:00p–3:30p
MIT, Building E14-674, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

Solve's Fuel pillar addresses challenges in energy, food, water, and sustainability, including the need to reduce greenhouse gases and how to leverage technology to set a price on carbon emissions. 

You have an exciting opportunity to join our community of technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents to help create solutions to Fuel pillar challenges. We are now actively seeking solutions to the two Fuel challenges, which are co-hosted by MIT's notable Climate CoLab. Go here to learn more: http://solvecolab.mit.edu. 

Be sure to attend Solve at HUBweek on Wednesday, September 28, when Solve: Fuel finalists selected by a distinguished panel of judges will present their proposed solutions to the Fuel challenges relating to climate change. 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

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Bio-Inspired Metal-Coordination Dynamics: An Easier Way to Engineer Supramolecular Mechanics?
Wednesday, September 28
3:30p–4:45p
SEMINAR 3:30 PM REFRESHMENTS 3:00 PM
MIT, Building 56-114, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Prof. Niels Holten-Andersen (MIT DMSE)

Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM) Seminar Series 
PPSM sponsors a series of seminars covering a broad range of topics of general interest to the polymer community, featuring speakers from both on and off campus.

Web site: http://polymerscience.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM)
For more information, contact:  Gregory Sands
(617) 253-0949

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TumbleBit: An Untrusted Bitcoin-Compatible Anonymous Payment Hub 
Wednesday, September 28
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
MIT, Building 32-G882, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Ethan Heilman , Boston University
Abstract:: This paper presents TumbleBit, a new unidirectional unlinkable payment hub that is fully compatible with today's Bitcoin protocol. TumbleBit allows parties to make fast, anonymous, off-blockchain payments through an untrusted intermediary called the Tumbler. TumbleBit's anonymity properties are similar to classic Chaumian eCash: no one, not even the Tumbler, can link a payment from its payer to its payee. Every payment made via TumbleBit is backed by bitcoins, and comes with a guarantee that Tumbler can neither violate anonymity, nor steal bitcoins, nor "print money" by issuing payments to itself. We prove the security of TumbleBit using the real/ideal world paradigm and the random oracle model. Security follows from the standard RSA assumption and ECDSA unforgeability. We implement TumbleBit, mix payments from 800 users and show that TumbleBit's off-blockchain payments can complete in seconds.

Bio:  Ethan is a PhD student in the Boston University Security Group (BUSEC) of the Computer Science Dept. His research interests are: cryptocurrencies, network security, and cryptanalysis. His most recent projects have been related to internet routing and Bitcoin.

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When Activism Works, with AIDS as an Example
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, LIttauer Building, Faculty Dining Room, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  Peter Staley
COST  Free and Open to the Public
CONTACT INFO	deisy_carrera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Fed by hatred of homosexuals, a slow response to the mounting number of AIDS deaths by government, media, and the American public led individuals affected by HIV and AIDS in the mid-1980s to create a powerful movement that changed hearts and minds, and revolutionized the institutional response to illness. AIDS activism, and most prominently ACT UP, is an inspiring example of the effective social justice movements that have changed America for the better.
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/fellows-study-groups

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Countdown to #Campaign2016
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, L-166, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  Ann Compton
COST  Free and Open to the Public
CONTACT INFO  deisy_carrera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Come take a front row seat to history in the final 8 weeks of #Campaign2016.  For ABC News,  Ann Compton covered ten presidential elections and seven presidents. She asked questions at two formal general election debates. Each week her study group and national guests will track the polls, dissect the rhetoric, and put a special focus on how the age of digital media makes for the most unconventional candidates and news coverage in modern times.
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/fellows-study-groups

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Solve | FUEL Closing Keynote & Reception
Wednesday, September 28
Time: 4:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building E14-6th floor, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Solve 
Solve is a live meeting series whose mission is to cultivate a community to discover, evaluate, and advance technological solutions to global problems. At its first major event during HUBweek 2015, Solve convened technologists, philanthropists, business leaders, policymakers, and change agents from around the world to examine and address problems where technology, business innovation, and smart policy can be leveraged to bring about real and lasting change. Since then, teams have taken steps on a number of issues, such as funding an inclusive innovation competition, easing the barriers to building a safe, economical new nuclear reactor design, and other projects around the world. 

The finale of the exciting Crowds & Climate conference's first day will be a session and reception hosted by Solve and Climate CoLab at the MIT Media Lab on the evening of Wednesday, September 28. 

This session will kick off with a keynote address from a nationally known climate change innovator. The keynote will be the culmination of a day of events focused specifically on innovation and the potential for new, crowd-based technologies - such as crowdsourcing, virtual collaboration, and online communities - to help the world more effectively tackle climate change. 

You won't want to miss this closing session and reception, which is sure to be a thought-provoking and inspiring conclusion to the Crowds & Climate Wednesday sessions. 

Who it's for: change makers, those curious about how we can solve major global issues 
Vibe: action-oriented, serious, meaningful
Web site: http://solve.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Climate CoLab, Technology Review, MIT Solve
For more information, contact:  Solve
solve at mit.edu 

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#Tech4Democracy: Meet the Changemakers
WHEN  Wed., Sep. 28, 2016, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Second North Floor
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Information Technology, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government
SPEAKER(S)  Archon Fung
Tiana Epps Johnson
Rey Faustino
Seth Flaxman
Denise Linn
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tech4democracy-meet-the-change-makers-tickets-27084204585
DETAILS  Please join us for a panel with Harvard Kennedy School alumni and affiliates who are working to leverage digital technology to make governance and society more inclusive. The panel, moderated by HKS Academic Dean Archon Fung, will explore the potential and pitfalls of digital technology in realizing democratic values such as participation, transparency, accountability, responsiveness, and equal representation.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit www.harvard.edu…
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/tech4democracy-meet-the-change-makers/

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Heat Exposure and Human Capital Accumulation: Evidence from NYC Public Schools
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2016, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Room Littauer-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
Harvard Environmental Economics Program
SPEAKER(S)  Jisung Park, Harvard University
LINK  https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

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"A Small Good Thing" Film Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker Pamela Tanner Boll
Wednesday, September 28
4:30 PM to 6:30 PM (EDT)
Marran Theater, Doble Campus, Lesley University, 34 Mellen Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-small-good-thing-film-screening-and-discussion-with-filmmaker-pamela-tanner-boll-tickets-23851329970

A Small Good Thing explores what it takes to live a good life at the beginning of this new century.  This film follows six people who, despite economic concerns and high levels of stress, have found more meaning in their lives, a closer bond with their families and communities, and a deeper connection to themselves and the natural world.  The surprising discovery at the heart of A Small Good Thing is that hard--but not impossible--is a crucial part of a good life.  The stories inspire us to make small, good changes in our daily lives.
About the Filmmaker
Pamela Tanner Boll is an artist, filmmaker, writer and activist. She is the Co-Executive Producer of the Academy Award-winning documentary, Born into Brothels. Pamela has executive produced the following film projects: Living in Emergency: True Stories of Doctors Without Borders; In a Dream; Connected; Our Summer in Tehran; Strange Powers; Close to the Fire; She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry; Teen Press; E-Team; and Obit.  Pamela directed and produced Who Does She Think She Is?, a feature-length documentary film that follows five women who are mothers and artists. Pamela’s current project is A Small Good Thing, a film that asks the question how can we live in a better way. The feature-length film, which recently won Best Documentary at the Boston International Film Festival, tells the stories of people moving away from the philosophy that “more is better.” It centers on a more holistic concept of well-being − one based on a close connection to themselves, the natural world, and to the greater good.Pamela grew up in Parkersburg, WV. She received a BA in English from Middlebury College and a Masters in Interdisciplinary Studies from Lesley University.   Pamela lives in Winchester, Massachusetts, where she raised three sons, and Boulder, Colorado.

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Trash is for Tossers: How to Live Zero Waste with Lauren Singer at Follain
Wednesday, September 28
5:00 PM to 7:00 PM (EDT)
Follain, Beacon Hill, 65 Charles Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/trash-is-for-tossers-how-to-live-zero-waste-with-lauren-singer-at-follain-tickets-27610341274

Meet zero waste expert Lauren Singer of Trash is for Tossers and learn easy steps to reduce waste in everyday life. Lauren will be teaching us how to make our own zero-waste toothpaste and also introducing her bulk laundry detergent line, The Simply Co. Join us on Wednesday, September 28th from 5-7pm at Follain Beacon Hill for an inspiring evening with this 25-year-old trailblazer.

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Crisis and Sovereignty: Posthegemony, Affect, Illiteracy
Wednesday, September 28
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building 14E-304, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Abraham Acosta
Abraham Acosta will explore the critical stakes of political theory and theories of resistance in a contemporary moment marked by the increasing discordance between contemporary theories of power and the intensified historical contradictions brought about by the neoliberal restructuration of the nation-state. Cultural studies, including the notion of Hegemony, mark increasingly ineffectual attempts to draw meaning from cultural practices and political forms in such a radically transformed environment. In effect, we are seeing older theoretical models pushed to their limits and may no longer provide the secure analytic footing they offered in previous years. Given these conditions, Dr. Acosta will reflect upon several, recently developed, theoretical accounts of power that aim to think beyond the critical and material assumptions of power and hegemony--including the notions of Posthegemony, Affect, and "illiteracy"--as a means to chart a new path and theoretical framework for critical inquiry. 

Abraham Acosta is Associate Professor of Latin American Cultural Studies at the University of Arizona. He specializes in literary and cultural analysis, focusing on questions of subalternity, postcoloniality, and biopolitics in the Americas. His research traverses the critical realities of contemporary multilingual contexts, where assumptions of power, knowledge, and capital crosshatch with historical translations of cultural difference.

Web site: http://mitgsl.mit.edu/news-events/crisis-and-sovereignty-posthegemony-affect-illiteracy
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676
lhickler at mit.edu 

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Next Generation of Ideas, Featuring the Beantown Throwdown
Wednesday, September 28
5:30 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)
Hatch Fenway, 401 Park Drive, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/next-generation-of-ideas-featuring-the-beantown-throwdown-tickets-26575124914
Cost:  $0 – $25

Home to over 60 colleges and universities, Boston has launched some of the most creative and inventive student-founded startups in the world. This night is all about celebrating and showcasing them.
At Next Generation of Ideas, student teams representing more than 10 different local colleges and universities will pitch to the audience for in-kind benefits and bragging rights as the winner of the fourth annual Beantown Throwdown. This year’s teams are presenting a wide variety of innovative ideas– from using virtual reality to help aging populations to connecting vets to the resources they need. Current competitors include:
Dropzone for Veterans, Babson College: connecting vets to the resources they need
Echo, Boston College: turning every smart device into a personal DJ booth
Aday, Harvard University: using machine learning to take the pain out of hourly work scheduling
Rendever Health, MIT: helping aging populations by way of virtual reality
Cookin, Northeastern University: offering “buy-it-yourself” alternatives to expensive meal plan services
Huambo Group, Tufts University: bringing connectivity to millions across the globe
CircularBlu, UMass Boston: decreasing hospital waste by 20%
bistara, Berklee College of Music: empowering students to be their own bosses
...with even more to come from Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston University, and UMass Lowell!
In a fun, collaborative environment, this program will also include unbridled insights from successful startup founders and CEOs, audience voting, and an awards ceremony for the winning student team.
Who it’s for: students, startups, anyone curious about new ideas
Vibe: fun, interactive, celebratory
Speakers
Elsa Sze: Founder and CEO, Agora
Frederick Townes: Co-Founder and COO, Placester
Rebecca Liebman: Co-Founder, LearnLux
Scott Kirsner: Columnist, The Boston Globe; Co-Founder, Innovation Leader
Jim Melvin: Chief Marketing Officer, SevOne
Host
MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge
Sponsor
SevOne, Inc.
Refunds: Refunds will be issued for any event that is canceled or moved to a different location, date or time. 

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Apple Harvest Night with Champlain Orchards & Red Apple Farm
Wednesday, September 28
6:00-7:30 pm
The KITCHEN at Boston Public Market, 100 Hanover Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/apple-harvest-night-tickets-27780564416
 
Do you love cider? Are you curious about the behind-the-scenes in the making of your favorite beverage? Apple season is finally here and we're celebrating our favorite fall fruit with a whole evening of activities and tastings. Bring the whole family to taste fall treats and to learn how apples are transformed into cider. Kids welcome!
 
Cider Tasting & Activities 
Champlain Orchards will teach us how they craft each of their ciders straight from the branch to the bottle. They will also have fresh apples from this year's harvest for snacking. 

Red Apple Farms will also sample their cider varieties paired with samples of their apple cider donuts. Farmer Rose will talk about how apple cider is extracted fresh from tree and about the different varieties of apples, along with the history behind how cider came to be.

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Co-Creating the Future of Our Cities: Economic Mobility
Wednesday, September 28
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Impact Hub Boston, 50 Milk Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/co-creating-the-future-of-our-cities-economic-mobility-tickets-27421649893

Impact Hub Boston invites you to join us for deep discussion around the issue of economic mobility and the role it plays in the future of Boston. You'll hear from a panel of experts about their diverse experiences with the topic, and each will share a pointed question related to their work. All participants are then invited to engage in small group conversations with these experts in an effort to move their work forward. This is a chance to bring your unique perspective to collaborate with changemakers to improve economic mobility for the people of Boston. 
We are convening a varied group of social entrepreneurs, local government, community leaders, nonprofit professionals, business leaders, philanthropists, academics, and engaged citizens for productive conversation drawn from a wide a range of lived experience and professional experience in different fields, neighborhoods, and sectors. 
Join us if you are interested in learning more about, and contributing to, strategic work around economic mobility being done by Boston's public, private, and nonprofit leaders.
This event is part of an international event series, Co-Creating the Future of Our Cities. During the week of September 26-30, Impact Hub Boston joins with fourteen other Impact Hubs across North America to host programming to promote dialog and creative problem solving to address major urban issues. 
Presented in partnership with City Awake, and representatives from the following organizations: 
The Family Independence Initiative invests in families struggling with poverty as well as the solutions they discover on their own. We do away with the traditional top-down approach to fighting poverty by letting families themselves be the change agents. 
Check back for more partnership updates in coming weeks.

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Environmental Film Festival On Tour, presented by Bank of America
Wednesday, September 28
6:00 PM
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/environmental-film-festival-on-tour-presented-by-bank-of-america-tickets-26944764516
Cost:  $5 - 14.00

The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital (DCEFF), America’s largest and longest-running festival of its kind is coming to Boston for a special two-day event, presented by Bank of America.
Four exceptional environmental films – all Boston premieres – will be screened at Kendall Square Cinema, each followed by a discussion with filmmakers, scientists and experts. The films cover a range of topics, from the evolution of climate change, to water scarcity, and the dark side of technology.

General Admission is $8 per film. You also have the option to purchase a One Day Pass for two screenings featured on the same night ($14) or a Full Event Pass  ($27) for all four screenings. 
Discounted tickets of $5 are available to students, military and seniors. In order to claim these discounts, please bring a valid ID when you present your ticket. 
Do you have a promo code? Please select General Admission tickets and enter your promo code to access your FREE TICKET. Up to 2 free tickets are available per customer. Please bring your valid ID to selected screening event to verify free admission upon entry.
Films:  WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2016

WOMEN IN WATER, 6:00 PM
(Spain, 2014, 58 min.)
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Cost: $8
An evocative examination of the role of women in Indian society as seen through the prism of water. Women and Water examines who has access to this most elemental of resources and why it is denied to those who need it most. Directed and produced by Nocem Collado. This film will be preceded by The Nature of People, a short documentary produced by The Nature Conservancy on people adapting in changing coastal communities. (11 min.)
Special Guests: Filmmaker Nocem Collado; Mark Smith, The Nature Conservancy
ICE AND THE SKY, 8:15 PM
(France, 2015, 89 min.)
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Cost: $8
Claude Lorius discovered the effects of climate change, while drilling down into the Antarctic ice fields in the 1950s. At 82, he returns there one last time to reflect on six decades of research and adventure. Directed by Luc Jacquet and produced by Richard Grandpierre and Frédéric Doniguian.

More screening and event details are available at dceff.org/boston

Refunds:  Refunds will be issued for any event that is canceled or moved to a different location, date or time. 

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Film Screening of NAIJA BETA
Wednesday, September 28
6:30p–9:00p
MIT, Building 10-105, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Arthur Musah '04, M.Eng '05
The Division of Student Life and the MIT Club of Boston are teaming up to cosponsor a screening of NAIJA BETA in the Bush Room (10-105). This is a film about the experiences of African MIT students by MIT alum Arthur Musah (S.B. '04, M.Eng. '05). After the screening, there will be a panel discussion examining the film's themes of youth entrepreneurship, innovation, and homecoming in Nigeria in age of globalization. A light dinner will be provided. DSL Staff/Guests: $15; Non-Members/Guests: $20; Current Students: free (dinner not included). Register at http://tinyurl.com/jossh5z.

Web site: http://tinyurl.com/jossh5z
Open to: the general public
Cost: See registration 
Tickets: http://tinyurl.com/jossh5z 
Sponsor(s): Division of Student Life
For more information, contact:  Bob Ferrara 
617-253-7495
rferrara at mit.edu 

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What the Presidential Campaign Says About America
Wednesday, September 28
7:00pm
Harvard, Barker Center, Room 133, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge

Roundtable Discussion

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Can We Save Coral Reefs and If So How?
Wednesday, September 28
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
New England Aquarium, Simons IMAX Theatre, 1 Central Wharf, Boston

Jeremy Jackson, Professor of Oceanography Emeritus at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Senior Scientist Emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution
Reef corals are declining worldwide. Climate change dominates the headlines, especially in relation to the recent mass bleaching and death of corals along the northern Great Barrier Reef and throughout the Pacific. But climate change is only half of the story. Up to now, the destructive impacts of climate change on reefs have been much less than the localized effects of overfishing, land-based pollution, and loss of habitats due to coastal development. A recent study of changes on Caribbean reefs over the past 50 years demonstrates that reefs with effective local protections and governance have double the amount of living coral, more fish, and clearer waters than reefs without protections. These new findings show that there are things we can do right now to help reefs recover. We need to stop all forms of overfishing, establish very large marine protected areas, and impose strict regulations on coastal development and pollution while at the same time working to reduce the use of fossil fuels. It’s not either/or, but all of the above

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The Good Life:  Results from The Harvard Study of Adult Development
Wednesday, September 28 
7:00 – 8:30 pm
Museum of Science1 Science Park, Boston
RSVP at http://www.mos.org/public-events/the-good-life

Do fame and fortune actually make the good life? Since 1938, researchers have been tracking the lives of more than 700 men to study the keys for having a happy and healthy life. The Harvard Study of Adult Development is the longest study of human development ever undertaken and now includes the subjects’ wives and children.

Program Speaker
Robert J. Waldinger, MD, psychiatrist, clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development, director of the Center for Psychodynamic Therapy & Research at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Zen priest, whose recent TEDx Beacon Street talk has been viewed over ten million times, and learn the secrets of how to live the truly good life.

Funding provided by the Lee and Nile Albright Annual Symposium Fund. This program is free thanks to the generosity of the Lowell Institute.

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Thursday, September 29
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The Right Corporate Approach to Public Policy
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government (M-RCBG) at the Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Ben Heineman, senior fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
CONTACT INFO  Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS	 Lunch will be served. 

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After 1492: Globalization as a biological process
Thursday, September 29
12pm  - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Charles C. Mann       
The two dates that mark the beginning of globalization are 1492 (when, famously, Columbus voyaged to the Americas) and 1571 (when, much less famously, Legazpi bloodily founded the Spanish colony of Manila). From these beginnings came today's globe-spanning network of exchange. Increasingly, this exchange--and is impacts--is understood in terms as much ecological as economic, in terms of vessels from distant lands causing previously separate ecosystems to collide. The "Columbian Exchange," as this ongoing worldwide ecological convulsion is known, was the biggest event in the history of life since the death of the dinosaurs, and a vital part of the human story as well.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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HUB Presents: The Hype and Promise of Blockchain
Thursday, September 29
2:00p–6:00p
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, 600 Atlantic Avenue #100, Boston
RSVP at https://hubweek.org/events/the-hype-and-promise-of-blockchain/
Cost:  $25

Blockchain technology is arguably the most promising, and most hyped, emerging technology that has the potential to fundamentally disrupt a significant number of industries and change the way that society works. 

Should you believe all the hype? What effects might blockchain have on you and your neighbors? This event will feature demos, discussions and roundtables seeking to demystify a seemingly esoteric, complex concept and make it real and tangible to an engaged audience. In addition, technical deep-dive sessions will be offered as part of the programming for interested attendees. More speakers will be announced throughout the summer. 

Who it's for: fintech, anyone who's curious about the potential impacts of blockchain technology 
Vibe: provocative, informative, approachable
Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/the-hype-and-promise-of-blockchain/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $25
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, HUBweek, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
For more information, contact:  HUBweek
hello at hubweek.org 

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Gender Diversity in Technology | Film Screening and Panel
Thursday, September 29
2:30 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Continuum Innovation, 1 Drydock Avenue 410 W, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gender-diversity-in-technology-film-screening-and-panel-tickets-27415046141

Manulife/John Hancock’s Lab of Forward Thinking (LOFT) and Global Women’s Alliance, in partnership with Continuum Boston, invite you to join us for a screening of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap, to be followed by a panel discussion focusing on gender diversity in technology.
CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap, is a documentary that investigates the persistent gender and minority gap in the technology industry. We encourage you to view a trailer of the film here. At the conclusion of the screening, we will be joined by an esteemed panel of women in technology, including Rachel Murray (She Geeks Out), Suelin Chen (Cake), Heddy Stern (Pivotal), Heather Reavey (Continuum), and Sandeep Tatla (John Hancock).
This special event is part of HUBWeek, a week-long ideas festival, that unites over 70 innovative organizations and celebrates the intersection of art, science and technology across Greater Boston.
All attendees are invited to attend a catered reception following the conclusion of our program.
Share your experience and start a discussion on a social media during the event, by using #LOFTWelcomes.
When: September 29th. 2:30 – 6:00 PM
Where: Continuum Innovation, 21 Drydock Avenue 410 W, Boston 02210
Agenda:
2:30 PM – Screening of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap
4:00 PM – Panel Discussion
5:00 PM – Reception & Networking

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TEDxBoston:  Artificial Intelligence And Machine Learning: How Far We’ve Come, How Far We Have To Go
Thursday, September 29
3pm - 5pm
245 Summer Street, Boston
RSVP at https://tedxboston.org
Lifestream at https://tedxboston.org

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Campaign 2016: Breaking All the Rules
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 29, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Littauer Building L-166, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  David Kochel
COST  Free and Open to the Public
CONTACT INFO	Deisy_Carrera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Join veteran GOP operative David Kochel for a look at how the 2016 nominating process broke long-established political rules and previewed the epic battle ahead: Clinton v. Trump. Kochel has spent thirty years toiling in the fields of GOP primary politics and presidential general election politics — as an “Iowa guy”, founder of a successful communications firm, and ultimately as the senior strategist to the 2016 campaign of Jeb Bush. With Team Bush, Kochel had the unique experience sharing the spin room with Donald J. Trump, Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina and a host of others, fighting over table scraps in the media feast.
The curriculum will include insight and analysis of the fascinating GOP primary, and provide a real-time breakdown of the unfolding 2016 race. Topics will include campaign advertising, debate strategy, voter contact, volunteer mobilization and the ever-present media narrative and whether any of it matters in an historically unpredictable year.
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/fellows-study-groups

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The Untold Story of the Obama Era: The Necessity of Race and Gender in Politics
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 29, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Littauer Builidng, Faculty Dining Room, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)	Michael Blake
CONTACT INFO	deisy_carrera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  From the beginning of the 2008 Presidential campaign to the upcoming conclusion of the Obama administration, the emergence of people of color, millennials and women as “The Obama Coalition” has transformed elections and governing forever. Fortunately, it was a priority for President Obama to ensure this organizing occurred, but, the inner workings of how to achieve this success have not been widely shared to make the progress sustainable. Given the changing demographics and new policy platforms from these groups, creating and sustaining a strategy that focuses on race and gender in both of these arenas is not optional; it is a necessity for success. As we approach this historic 2016 Presidential election and prepare for the future legacy of President Barack Obama, what is the story to be told of the “Obama coalition”? How did we get here? How did it happen? Where we go from here in the era that this country has never seen before: The time after a Black President.
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/fellows-study-groups

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Stories of Grassroots Change
Thursday, September 29
4:00 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Mezzanine, 290 Congress Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/stories-of-grassroots-change-tickets-26890778041

Throughout American history, some of our country’s most powerful movements for freedom and justice have originated right here in Boston, as regular community members have gathered in Boston’s streets and neighborhoods to call out injustice and take collective action. Boston’s remarkable legacy of grassroots activism continues today, as communities across the city are driving historic local – and nationwide – progress in education, healthcare, environmental conservation, and equality.
At this inspiring storytelling event, hear from local activists and aspiring young leaders who are involved in contemporary grassroots change campaigns in Boston, and learn from their struggles, successes, and insights. Attendees with their own stories of grassroots change can also sign up to share by selecting “Storyteller” on the registration page. The event is organized by Generation Citizen, an action civics education nonprofit that empowers local middle and high school students to lead grassroots change efforts in their communities, and will also include the voices and stories of these Generation Citizen youth activists.
Who It's For: The civically engaged, students, aspiring young leaders
Vibe: Meaningful, provocative, engaging
Host:  Generation Citizen & Boston Debate League
Featuring:  Shea Rose, local artist and activist Malia Lazu, Future Boston Alliance

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"Trafficked" Film Screening & Panel Discussion
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 29, 2016, 4 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Education, Ethics, Film, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events, Support/Social
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CARR CENTER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS POLICY
Co-sponsor - South Asia Institute
SPEAKER(S)  Panelists:
Siddharth Kara, Adjunct Lecturer of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School, Author of “Sex Trafficking”, Screenwriter & Producer of “Trafficked”
Swanee Hunt, Eleanor Roosevelt Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Anne Archer, Academy Award-nominated actress, lead in “Trafficked”, activist
Moderator: Sushma Raman, Executive Director, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy
DIRECTED BY  Will Wallace
WRITTEN BY  Siddharth Kara
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_73NRoSfTYYuafnn
CONTACT INFO  nimesha_perera at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Millions of vulnerable girls worldwide are being ensnared by human traffickers into the insidious world of sex slavery and exploited relentlessly to generate profits of one hundred billion dollars a year. That is more than the annual profits of Google, Microsoft, Nike and Starbucks combined.
Inspired by real characters from the award winning book 'Sex Trafficking' by Siddharth Kara, this is the story of three such girls from America, Nigeria and India who become ensnared in an elaborate global network of illicit human, organ, and drug trafficking.
Please join the Carr Center for a screening of the new movie “Trafficked.” The screening will be followed by a panel discussion, with time for questions from the audience. Admittance is on a first-come, first-serve basis. Refreshments will be served.
RSVP HERE: https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_73NRoSfTYYuafnn
LINK  http://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/event/film-screening-panel-discussion-trafficked?delta=0

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A Nation of ‘Bystanders’? A Topography of Complicity and Capitulation in Nazi Germany and Beyond
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 4:15 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Goldman Room, Busch Hall
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Contemporary Europe Study Group
SPEAKER(S)  Mary Fulbrook
DETAILS	  Using a wide range of ego-documents and other sources, this paper explores the significance of personal and social relationships for the development of persecution in the Third Reich, as well as reverberations in postwar societies. Exploring a range of topics that are usually held to be the preserve of "the history of everyday life" — including intimacy, family relationships, friendships, privacy, and social life — the paper develops a theory of the "social self" and the role of personal relationships in the genesis of genocide. It concludes by exploring the long-term and wider significance of willing or unwilling capitulation to new norms, and questions around complicity, collusion, and the diffuse burden of guilt across generations.
LINK  https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2016/09/a-nation-of-bystanders-a-topography-of-complicity-and-capitulation-in-nazi-germany-and-beyond

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Party Polarization in Legislatures with Office-Mandated Candidates
Thursday, September 29
4:30p–6:00p
Harvard, CGIS Knafel Building, Room K354, third floor, 1737 Cambridge Street,Cambridge, 

Speaker: Jim Snyder (Harvard University)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Positive Political Economy
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Starr Forum: The Warming Arctic: Site of a New "Cold War"?
Thursday, September 29
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 4-270, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Marlene Laruelle, Lawrence Susskind, Kenneth Yalowitz
This will explore the geopolitical implications of the thawing Arctic. The speakers will discuss what is at stake as trade routes and mineral deposits open up due to Climate Change. The changing landscape in the Arctic opens up tremendous potential, but also the possibility of geopolitical conflict among the littoral states. We will ask our speakers to address the following topics, among others: What should be the new international regime governing Arctic exploration and passage? What are US and Russian objectives in the Arctic? Can the states surrounding the Arctic agree about governance? How great is the potential for conflict over Arctic resources and re-militarization? 

About the speakers: 
Marlene Laruelle, George Washington University; author, Russia's Arctic Strategy and the Future of the Far North (2013) 
Lawrence Susskind, Ford Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Director, MIT Science Impact Collaborative 
Kenneth Yalowitz, former Ambassador to Belarus and Georgia; director, Conflict Resolution Center, Georgetown University; senior fellow, Arctic Studies at Dartmouth 
[Carol Saivetz and Elizabeth Wood, co-chairs] 

Part of the Focus On Russia lecture series and the Architecture at the End of the Earth exhibition series 

CIS Starr Forum 
A public events series on pressing issues in international affairs, sponsored by the MIT Center for International Studies.

Please contact us at starrforum at mit.edu if you need accessibility accommodations

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cis/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MISTI MIT-Russia Program, Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:
617-253-8306
starrforum at mit.edu 

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Next Stage Planning for the Digital Humanities at MIT
Thursday, September 29
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

As a Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at MIT, Douglas O'Reagan will study how the digital humanities can best aid the specific strengths, mission, and broader community around MIT. In this talk, O'Reagan will update the audience on his efforts and invite suggestions and ideas concerning the future of digital humanities at MIT. 

O'Reagan completed his Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Berkeley in May 2014. His dissertation was a comparative history of the Allied powers' attempts to study and copy German science and technology during and after the Second World War. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Fung Institute of Engineering Leadership in UC Berkeley's College of Engineering from 2014-2015, where he worked with an interdisciplinary team on applying data science, econometric analysis, and historical research in studying the origins and impacts of specific breakthrough technologies. In 2015 he became a visiting assistant professor at Washington State University's Tri-Cities campus, where he taught history and served as Lead Archivist and Director of the Oral History Program for the Hanford History Project, which manages the US Department of Energy's collections related to the Hanford site of the Manhattan Project.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/next-stage-planning-digital-humanities-mit/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

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Horizons in Regenerative Medicine: Honey, I Shrunk the Patient!
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard University, 5 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Stem Cell Institute
SPEAKER(S)  Adam E. Cohen, PhD
Kevin C. Eggan, PhD
Dr. Steven Hyman
Geraldine Hamilton
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET INFO  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine-honey-i-shrunk-the-patient-tickets-26574511078#tickets
DETAILS	 Organs-on-Chips. Diseases in dishes. Bioengineering creates the opportunity to mold our human cells into living machines. The ability to study and test human cells of interest in a dish and outside the body promises to accelerate the pace of therapeutic discovery, while lowering its risks. Hear from this panel of visionary scientists who are replicating human systems in the lab dish by making functioning human organs in miniature for study. Panelists will review the state of the art in “disease-in-a-dish” models, which use patients’ stem cells to create populations of cells and mini-organs to understand how the body works and how it is affected by disease. Learn about the potential impacts of these studies and how this may affect the future of drug discovery and accelerate “time to patient.”
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit 
http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine/honey-i-shrunk-the-patient/

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Jeanne S. Chall Lecture and Reception: Reading in New Ways for New Times
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 5:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Askwith Hall in Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Lecture, Reception
TOPIC  Literacy
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  events at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture
DETAILS  Please RSVP to assist us in planning for attendance numbers.
Reading in New Ways for New Times: Issues for Theory, Research, and Practice
Speaker: Donald J. Leu, John and Maria Neag Endowed Chair in Literacy and Technology, professor of education, and director, The New Literacies Research Lab, Neag School of Education, University of Connecticut

Introduction: James S. Kim, Ed.M.’98, Ed.D.’02, associate professor of education and Jeanne S. Chall Advisory Board, HGSE

The emergence of the Internet as an essential channel of information and communication makes it imperative that we begin to reassess the nature of reading. Join Donald J. Leu as he explores how today’s educator must envision new ways of reading online. He suggests we position online reading – at a young age – as a key piece of curriculum so that equity and opportunity are more fully realized. Leu will address how the digital age presents challenges – but also new opportunities -- to reading theory, research, and practice as we know it.

Following Dr. Leu's lecture will be an awards presentation of the Jeanne S. Chall Doctoral Student Research Award to Emily Phillips Galloway, Ed.D.’16, and the Jeanne S. Chall Research Grant to Laura Tortorelli, College of Education, Michigan State University

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EnergyBar!
Thursday, September 29
5:30 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Greentown Labs, 28 Dane Street, Somerville
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/energybar-tickets-21458385609

EnergyBar is Greentown Labs' monthly networking event devoted to helping people in clean technology meet and discuss innovations in energy technology. Entrepreneurs, investors, students, and ‘friends of cleantech,’ are invited to attend, meet colleagues, and expand our growing regional clean technology community. 
Our attendees typically span a variety of disciplines within energy, efficiency, and renewables. In general, if you're looking for a job in cleantech or energy, trying to expand your network, or perhaps thinking about starting your own energy-related company this is the event for you. Expect to have conversations about issues facing advanced and renewable energy technologies and ways to solve our most pressing energy problems.

Light appetizers and drinks will be served starting at 5:30 pm. Suggested dress is shop floor casual. Parking is incredibly limited at Greentown Labs and we encourage attendees to consider taking advantage of public transportation. 
Hope to see you there! 

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Environmental Film Festival On Tour, presented by Bank of America
Thursday, September 29
6pm
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/environmental-film-festival-on-tour-presented-by-bank-of-america-tickets-26944764516
Cost:  $5 - 14.00

The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital (DCEFF), America’s largest and longest-running festival of its kind is coming to Boston for a special two-day event, presented by Bank of America.
Four exceptional environmental films – all Boston premieres – will be screened at Kendall Square Cinema, each followed by a discussion with filmmakers, scientists and experts. The films cover a range of topics, from the evolution of climate change, to water scarcity, and the dark side of technology.

General Admission is $8 per film. You also have the option to purchase a One Day Pass for two screenings featured on the same night ($14) or a Full Event Pass  ($27) for all four screenings. 
Discounted tickets of $5 are available to students, military and seniors. In order to claim these discounts, please bring a valid ID when you present your ticket. 
Do you have a promo code? Please select General Admission tickets and enter your promo code to access your FREE TICKET. Up to 2 free tickets are available per customer. Please bring your valid ID to selected screening event to verify free admission upon entry.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2016
DEATH BY DESIGN, 6:00 PM
(US, 2016, 74 min.)
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Cost: $8
Consumers love – and live on – their electronic devices. But what is the cost of our digital dependency? Directed by Sue Williams. Produced by Sue Williams and Hilary Klotz Steinman.
*Co-Presented with GlobeDocs Documentary Film Festival.
Special Guests: Filmmaker Sue Williams; Film Subjects, Ted Smith and Amanda Hawes
THE AGE OF CONSEQUENCES, 8:15 PM
(US, 2016, 80 min.)
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Cost: $8
An investigation on climate change, resource scarcity, migration, and conflict through the lens of US national security and global stability. Written, directed and produced by Jared P. Scott. Executive produced by Sophie Robinson.
Special Guests: Filmmaker Jared P. Scott; Peter Fox-Penner, Institute for Sustainable Energy, Boston University
Host:  Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital
Partner Host:  Bank of America

More screening and event details are available at dceff.org/boston

Refunds:  Refunds will be issued for any event that is canceled or moved to a different location, date or time. 

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Focused: Women in Investigative Journalism
Thursday, September 29
6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Suffolk University, Modern Theatre, 525 Washington Street, Boston

At the turn of the 20th century, investigative journalism into the activities and lives of civil servants, at times called “muckraking”, was conducted, in part, by several brave and progressive women. Today, investigative journalism continues to be a catalyst for change. Our panelists will explore how investigative journalism today leads to civil service and other political reform, and bring the discussion full circle to the early female muckraking journalists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. What role does investigative journalism play in speaking truth to power? How has this investigative journalism changed over the last century? What is the experience of women working in this field?

In this panel, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, former Boston Globe columnist, and professor of journalism at Brandeis University, Eileen McNamara, discusses these and other questions with: Jenn Ableson, Boston Globe Spotlight Reporter; Beth Daley, Senior Investigative Reporter and Senior Trainer at The Eye and the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, and Joan Vennochi, Boston Globe Op-Ed Columnist.

This event is supported in part by a generous award from Mass Humanities, as part of the Nichols House Museum’s Women in Politics: Then and Now programming series. 

More information at http://www.fordhallforum.org/programs/focused

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Chuck Hoberman 10° Opening Reception
Thursday, September 29
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)
Le Laboratoire Cambridge, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/chuck-hoberman-10-opening-reception-tickets-27574415820

Please Join Us for the Opening Reception Celebrating Chuck Hoberman's 10°.

Editorial Comment:  Chuck Hoberman is best known for his expanding/contracting Hoberman Sphere.  He does fascinating work.

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Election 2016 in the Media
Thursday, September 29
6:00pm to 9:00pm
Cambridge Community Television (CCTV), 438 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 

Instructor: Frank Morris
What impact has the media played on Election 2016? How have U.S. presidential candidates benefitted and been hurt by biases in news coverage? How does the press cover the campaigns of a former First Lady, a self-proclaimed democratic socialist, two Latino senators, an African-American neurosurgeon, and a billionaire businessman? Learn how to really analyze the news in this exciting, free class centered on current events.

CCTV MONTHLY FREE LECTURE SERIES
Beginning in February 2016, CCTV is launched a monthly series of high-caliber seminar classes that are completely free and open to the general public (this includes non-members and non-residents). These classes are taught by highly educated practitioners in their field, and are a rare opportunity to sample the kind of resources available at CCTV.

Advance registration is required and is accepted on a first-come basis. Early registration is advised since courses may fill up or be canceled due to low enrollment. Call 617-661-6900 or email allison at cctvcambridge.org for details. Schedules are subject to change.

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Gold Rush or Realities? The Future of Drone Systems
Thursday, September 29
6:00 pm to 9:00 pm
swissnex Boston 420 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gold-rush-or-realities-the-future-of-drone-systems-tickets-27549760074

Register to Attend this Event
What does the future hold for unmanned aircraft systems?
Drones, also known as unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are capturing the imagination of many people with their widespread application. For others, they are a serious threat to airspace management and privacy. While it is clear that this technology is here to stay, important questions are waiting to be answered.

Come join us for a presentation by Michel Guillaume, Professor and Director of the Centre for Aviation (ZAV) at Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), where he and his team are working on answering some of these important questions.

The unique Bachelor Degree Program in Aviation associated with ZAV, now celebrating its 10th anniversary, is an interdisciplinary program addressing complex and wide-ranging issues in the aviation sector under one roof. It links a broad variety of technologies, methods, and research fields with the goal of overcoming the challenges of future global mobility and researching ways to shape it more efficiently and securely.
Michel Guillaume will discuss the development of fixed wing UMARS drones, Remote Pilote Stations for drones and the project of a “Technology Study for Drones” in Switzerland, where in 2015 Swiss Post, Swiss WorldCargo and Matternet started jointly testing the commercial use of logistics drones.

Following Michel Guillaume’s presentation, a panel of experts moderated by Olivier de Weck from MIT’s AeroAstro department will discuss the future of autonomous aerospace science, ideas for unmanned aircraft integration in existing aerospace organization, and trends for payloads of unmanned aircraft systems for different applications (search and rescue, logistics, real estate agriculture, high altitude platforms to augment satellites, etc.).

More information at http://www.swissnexboston.org/event/gold-rush-or-realities-the-future-of-drone-systems/#sthash.ozINVH94.dpuf

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TEDxCambridge
Thursday, September 29
6pm - 9pm
Boston Opera House, 539 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at 
Cost:  $45 - $150

TEDxCambridge is a premier evening event experience hosted at the Boston Opera House that celebrates the remarkable innovation, creativity, and inspiration found within New England and beyond. We curate one of the largest TEDx conferences in the world featuring 2,600 guests and six speakers. TEDxCambridge showcases the greatest insights in science, design, technology, business, education, and the arts. Our speakers tackle humanity’s toughest questions, answering with innovation, enterprise, and enduring optimism. We seek to highlight ideas that inspire people to change their lives and communities.

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Playing for Their Lives: The Global El Sistema Movement for Social Change Through Music
Thursday, September 29
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Recital Room N-1, Rey-Waldstein Building - Longy School of Music of Bard College 33 Garden Street, Cambridge 
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/playing-for-their-lives-book-release-event-tickets-27261872996
Cost:  $0 – $20

At this reception celebrating the launch of their book, authors Tricia Tunstall and Eric Booth will introduce us to the remarkable story of the international El Sistema movement. This program, which started over four decades ago with a handful of music students in a parking garage in Caracas, has evolved into one of classical music’s most vibrant new expressions and one of the world’s most promising social initiatives.

At the event, Tricia and Eric will be making a formal presentation, and will be available to sign copies of their book. We will also have copies of the book available for purchase at the event. Light refreshments will be served. 
Please consider making a donation to support Longy's free programming and innovative educational initiatives.

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Rigs to Reefs: A Blue Solution to Repurpose the World’s Offshore Oil and Gas Platforms
Thursday, September 29
7pm
NE Aquarium, Simons IMAX Theatre, 1 Central Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=106707&view=Detail

Emily Callahan and Amber Jackson
Co-Founders of Blue Latitudes
There comes a time when the useful life of an oil platform comes to an end, at least when it comes to drilling for oil, and that’s when Emily Callahan and Amber Jackson, co-founders of Blue Latitudes, dive in. They are marine scientists on a mission to re-purpose offshore oil and gas platforms as artificial reefs around the world. The oil platforms found in their home state of California, like most offshore oil platforms around the world, are home to some of the most productive ecosystems on the planet. As the world’s natural reefs are overfished, over-trawled and polluted, Amber and Emily believe that re-purposing these structures, some the size of the empire state building, as artificial reefs, may be the best decision for the future of our oceans. It’s time to think creatively about the resources we have, and proceed forward boldly with radical new tactics for ocean management. Join Callahan and Jackson to hear how Rig2Reef Exploration has successfully conducted research expeditions in the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico and California, investigating the ecological, economic and cultural benefits of re-purposing these offshore platforms in a variety of ways, from eco-tourism hot spots, to national marine sanctuaries.

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His Final Battle:  The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt
Thursday, September 29
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes former executive editor for The New York Times JOSEPH LELYVELD for a discussion of his latest book, His Final Battle: The Last Months of Franklin Roosevelt.

About His Final Battle
“By far the most enigmatic leading figure” of World War II. That’s how the British military historian John Keegan described Franklin D. Roosevelt, who frequently left his contemporaries guessing, never more so than at the end of his life. Here, in a hugely insightful account, a prizewinning author and journalist untangles the narrative threads of Roosevelt’s final months, showing how he juggled the strategic, political, and personal choices he faced as the war, his presidency, and his life raced in tandem to their climax.

The story has been told piecemeal but never like this, with a close focus on Roosevelt himself and his hopes for a stable international order after the war, and how these led him into a prolonged courtship of Joseph Stalin, the Soviet dictator, involving secret, arduous journeys to Tehran and the Crimea. In between, as the war entered its final phase, came the thunderbolt of a dire medical diagnosis, raising urgent questions about the ability of the longest-serving president to stand for a fourth term at a time when he had little choice. Neither his family nor top figures in his administration were informed of his diagnosis, let alone the public or his closest ally, Winston Churchill. With D-Day looming, Roosevelt took a month off on a plantation in the south where he was examined daily by a navy cardiologist, then waited two more months before finally announcing, on the eve of his party’s convention, that he’d be a candidate. A political grand master still, he manipulated the selection of a new running mate, with an eye to a possible succession, displaying some of his old vigor and wit in a winning campaign.

With precision and compassion, Joseph Lelyveld examines the choices Roosevelt faced, shining new light on his state of mind, preoccupations, and motives, both as leader of the wartime alliance and in his personal life. Confronting his own mortality, Roosevelt operated in the belief that he had a duty to see the war through to the end, telling himself he could always resign if he found he couldn’t carry on.

Lelyveld delivers an incisive portrait of this deliberately inscrutable man, a consummate leader to the very last. 

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The World’s Emergency Room
WHEN  Thu., Sep. 29, 2016, 7 p.m.
WHERE	Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
SPEAKER(S)  Michael VanRooyen
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS	  Twenty years ago, the most common cause of death for medical humanitarians and other aid workers was traffic accidents; today, it is violent attacks. And the death of each doctor, nurse, paramedic, midwife, and vaccinator is multiplied untold times in the vulnerable populations deprived of their care.

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A Conversation on Racial and Ethnic Disparities with the Family of Henrietta Lacks
Thursday, September 29
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Faneuil Hall, 1 Faneuil Hall Square, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-conversation-on-racial-and-ethnic-disparities-with-the-family-of-henrietta-lacks-tickets-26289291980

Deepening racial and ethnic divisions in the United States have created an urgent need for the healthcare community to re-focus attention on ending racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care.
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, brought world-wide public attention to the use of HeLa cells in medical research and ethical issues of race, class and consent. The story of Henrietta Lacks and her immortal HeLa cell line continues to be critically important as genetic research and big data processing have the potential to transform treatment of disease and save lives.
At its core, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is the story of a woman, her family, their invaluable gift to medical science, and their incredible journey through the politics of race and medicine. We invite you to this special program in Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall, which will feature David Lacks, Jr. and Victoria Baptiste, RN, in a conversation about their grandmother, her extraordinary contribution to medical science, and their family’s role in her legacy and the future of research.
The program will call attention to the Disparities Solutions Center’s efforts to create a national network of trained health care providers and policy makers committed to providing the highest quality care for all and ending disparities in health and health care.
Who it's for: Clinicians, researchers, policy makers, community members, students, patients and family members
Vibe: Thought-provoking, uplifting, motivating
Panelists:
Joseph Betancourt, MD, MPH
Victoria Baptiste, RN
David Lacks Jr.

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On Your Own But Not Alone: Enhancing Health and Well Being in Later Life
Thursday, September 29 
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
First Church JP, 6 Eliot Street, Jamaica Plain
RSVP aat https://www.facebook.com/events/154578494988454/

Co-Sponsored by JP at Home

As we enter later life, being single has its own unique challenges and opportunities. Meeting these challenges requires single people to tap our remarkable human capacity to adapt to a life circumstance that may not have turned out as we expected. At the Forum, JP resident Nancy Goldner (Ph.D, LICSW) will draw on insights and practical suggestions gained both from her clinical experience and from being a single person for many years. She will identify the signature strengths and resources that sustain physical health and emotional wellbeing for those of us who live on our own. We will hear a brief presentation from Nancy and there will be plenty of time for discussion.

Dr. Goldner is an active member of JP at Home, an organization that works to keep JP women and men in their homes as long as possible through social networks, information and services. In her presentation, she will note the role that a “village” like JP at Home plays in promoting emotional and physical health.

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Friday, September 30
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HILT [Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching] Conference:  Interactivity
Friday, September 30
8:30am - 1:45pm
Harvard, Milstein Conference Room, Wasserstein Hall, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at xhttps://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe5/form/SV_6tyOi5qb7M2TaaV

The Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching annual conference is an event designed to engage Harvard faculty (and some students and academic professionals) in a university-level dialogue about teaching and learning innovation. 

HILT's fifth annual conference will showcase varied interactive instructional approaches and considerations for Harvard in an evolving education landscape. See the full conference program and breakout session descriptions at http://hilt.harvard.edu/breakouts

More information at http://hilt.harvard.edu

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Engineering & Entrepreneurship: The Internet of Things
Friday, September 30
8:30 AM to 2:30 PM
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/engineering-entrepreneurship-the-internet-of-things-tickets-27084487431

The “Internet of Things,” in which everyday objects possess network connectivity that allows them to send and receive data, is poised to radically transform the way we live and work. As part of their collaborative series on engineering and entrepreneurship, the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Harvard Business School will host a symposium on the Internet of Things, exploring the thrilling opportunities it provides for technological innovation and social organization. The event will feature lightning talks by four Harvard SEAS faculty members, as well as a keynote talk by Chicago Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) Commissioner and CIO Brenna Berman, called “Transforming the Future City.” Berman says, “Adopting IoT technologies in the urban environment offers cities a host of opportunities but also presents just as many challenges. Learn about one city's experience - its successes and lessons learned - as it uses connected technologies to course its future.”
Following the keynote, this symposium will feature a quintessential HBS experience – a case study discussion. The “case method” was introduced by HBS faculty in 1925, and has since become a powerful tool for interactive business education. It gives participants the unique opportunity to reason through a real-world management challenge. HBS remains the world’s leading case-writing institution, and symposium attendees will have the opportunity to experience a case study firsthand.
The symposium will culminate in transportation to the Hynes Convention Center for Demo Day, where local start-up companies, innovation labs, and change-making organizations will share the exciting new work that makes Boston a hub of visionary research.
Speaker:  Brenna Berman, Chicago Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) Commissioner and CIO
Chicago Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) Commissioner and CIO, Brenna Berman joined the Emanuel administration in 2011. In that time, she has focused on transforming the team at DoIT to provide the skills and expertise to implement the Mayor’s commitment to leveraging data and technology to create a more efficient, effective and innovative City government. This has meant adding new skills to the team to increase the focus on software engineering and analytics, improving the department’s commercial partnerships to drive savings for the City and identifying ground-breaking civic partnerships.
Over the past several years, Commissioner Berman and the team at DoIT has delivered on the Mayor’s commitment to a robust open data program, integrated advanced analytics and real-time data-driven decision making across the city, driven IoT innovation for the City through unique partnerships at UILabs and, in partnership with the University of Chicago, realized the vision of urba scale sensing with the Array of Things.
Prior to joining the Emanuel Administration, Comm. Berman built a career promoting government innovation over 10 years at IBM, where she worked closely with government agencies in cities and countries across the world to leverage technology and analytics to improve the services they provide to their residents. She advised governments on a variety of issues, from targeting personalized services through analytics to normalizing program offerings to simplify the delivery process and make them understandable to residents. Throughout her time at IBM, Ms. Berman tailored cutting-edge business and data models, from processes to analytic algorithms for large government organizations in order to accelerate their own modernization efforts, providing an incredibly valuable skill set for the work she continues at DoIT.
Brenna earned her bachelor’s degree and Masters in Public Policy from the University of Chicago.
Who It's For: students, faculty, community members, policy makers, current and future leaders
Vibe: inspiring, enlightening, cutting-edge, educational

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FOIA in the Digital Age
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 30, 2016, 9 – 11:30 a.m.
WHERE Harvard, Goodman Hall, Littauer 140, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Information Technology, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy
SPEAKER(S)	
Michael Morisy, Cofounder of MuckRock 
Tracy Weber, Senior Editor at ProPublica 
Miriam Nisbet, Former Director of Office of Government Information Services, National Archives 
Nick Sinai, Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Former U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer (moderator) 
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  Email and the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is in the national news—and has become part of the fabric of the 2016 presidential race. FOIA has helped journalists break many important national news stories over the past 50 years—but what are the implications for national media and presidential politics when FOIA meets a world of ubiquitous email, text, and Slack messages?
President Obama pledged to have the “most transparent administration in history,” and on his first full day in office, issued a memorandum directing that under FOIA agencies should adopt a presumption of openness. And more recently, in June 2016, President Obama signed a FOIA reform bill, which codified and expanded ongoing reforms. But critics charge that President Obama’s rhetoric doesn’t match his administration’s record on FOIA.
Has enough been done to bring FOIA into the digital age? What else can and should be done? How will the next administration implement FOIA after an election year where email and transparency has been a major campaign issue?
LINK	http://shorensteincenter.org/foia-digital-age/

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New England Electricity Restructuring Roundtable:  Connecting the Dots: Major New England Energy Initiatives & Reforming Retail Rates to Better Integrate DERs
Friday, September 30
9 am to 12:30 pm 
Foley Hoag, 155 Seaport Boulevard, 13th Floor, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/connecting-the-dots-major-new-england-energy-initiatives-and-reforming-retail-rates-to-better-tickets-20908406607?utm_campaign=Register+Now+for+9%2F30+NE+RT&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Register+Now+for+9%2F30+NE+Roundtable
Cost:  $0 - $65

Connecting the Dots: Major New England Energy Initiatives 
Our first panel, Connecting the Dots: Major New England Energy Initiatives, will provide timely updates on the myriad major energy-related initiatives in progress in New England, and then explore how these initiatives could and should be connected for maximum impact on clean energy goals, greenhouse gas reductions, and economic development. Massachusetts' recently passed comprehensive energy legislation (requiring 1,600 MW of off-shore wind and 1,200 MW of clean energy generation) and NEPOOL's launch of its "Integrating Markets and Public Policy" process (along with extensive and related modeling efforts by ISO New England and NESCOE), must be layered on top of - and ultimately integrated with - existing programs and initiatives. These include the three-state renewables RFP; RGGI's 2016 Program Review Process (and likely cap changes); meeting state GHG, RPS, and EE requirements; and even state gas RFPs and regional gas infrastructure decisions.

The stellar panel below will provide insightful updates on all of these initiatives and help New England regulators and energy stakeholders better connect the dots.

Undersecretary Ned Bartlett, MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Deputy Commissioner Katie Dykes, CT DEEP 
Joel Gordon, (PSEG), Chair, NEPOOL
Robert Ethier, VP, Market Operations, ISO New England
Janet Besser, Executive VP, NECEC

Reforming Retail Rates to Better Integrate DERs
Our second panel, Reforming Retail Rates to Better Integrate DERs,
explores various options for changing retail rate designs in ways that more accurately capture the full range of benefits that distributed energy resources can provide (in time and location), while also allowing utilities to recoup the full costs of modernizing and maintaining a state-of-the-art electric grid.  As the New England states grapple with incentivizing DERs while protecting ratepayers, the search for more sustainable retail rate designs has become a high priority. 

Paul Centolella, former utility regulator and current President of Paul Centolella and Associates, will discuss the innovative rate design approach he recently co-authored for the NY PSC and NYSERDA for the REV process. Ryan Katofsky, Senior Director of Industry Analysis, Advanced Energy Economy, will then discuss the rate designs that AEE has been proposing in New York and other states to better integrate DERs. Finally, Jane Park, Vice President, Regulatory Policy & Strategy at Commonwealth Edison Company (Exelon), will offer a utility perspective and present a case study on Commonwealth Edison's effort to integrate DERs into retail rates.

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Mothers Against Violence National Conference
Friday, September 30, 9:00 AM - Saturday, October 1, 6:00 PM (EDT)
Wheelock College, Brookline Campus , 43 Hawes Street, Brookline
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mothers-against-violence-national-conference-tickets-26928582114
Cost:  $0 – $125

On September 29 – October 1, 2016 Mothers for Justice and Equality (MJE) will host its second annual Mothers Against Violence National Conference in Boston. The conference is the only national convening of mothers who have lost children to street violence, social justice change makers, corporate partners and civic leaders and is expected to welcome over 200 attendees from dozens of cities including Oakland, Chicago, New Haven, Ferguson and Baltimore.
During the three-day conference mothers from around the country share their successes, gain technical assistance from experts, and build an alliance to lead the change that is needed to end senseless street violence. Mothers for Justice and Equality strives to ensure that our audience is provided with  the most current information so that they are able to bring it back to their own communities.
SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

Thursday, September 29
5:00 – 7:00 pm  
Opening Reception and Fireside Chat
Friday, September 30
8:30 - 9:30 am  
Continental Breakfast
9:30 - 10:00 am 
Opening Remarks: Monalisa Smith and Randall Davis
10:00 - 10:30 am  
Keynote Address: Mayor Marty Walsh
10:45 am - 12:00 pm 
Morning Breakout Sessions
12:00 - 1:30 pm  
Lunch and Keynote Speaker: 
Rev. Dr. Timothy Tyler, Shorter Community AME Church, Denver, CO
2:00 - 3:15 pm  
Afternoon Breakout Sessions
3:30 - 5:00 pm  
General Session, Race and Justice: The Youth Perspective
Opening Remarks: Robert Lewis, The BASE
Faciliator: Renee Omolade, Lewis Family Foundation and Black Girls Rock!
Saturday, October 1
8:30 - 9:30 am  
Continental Breakfast
10:15 - 11:30 am 
Morning Breakout Sessions
12:00 - 2:00 pm  
Lunch and Closing Plenary, Race and Justice: A Discussion with "Mothers of the Movement"
Opening Remarks and Facilitator: Rev. Dr. Janie Dowdy-Dandridge, AME Church, Nashville, TN
Special Performance by Oneida Easly

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Food & Agriculture - Millennium Goal #2 Zero Hunger 
Friday, September 30
10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Stratton Student Center, 84 Massachusetts Avenue, 4th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/entrepreneurship-sdg-2-zero-hunger-tickets-27437008832

moderated by Professor Tavneet Suri and featuring guest speaker Dr. Venkat  Maroju, Sloan '07, CEO of Source Trace Systems

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HUB Presents: Demo Day
Friday, September 30
11:00a–6:00p
Hynes Convention Center, 900 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02115

Imagine yourself in a room with some the most impactful people and companies in this region. 

Join us in celebrating and recognizing companies in Boston making the greatest impact in this city. At Demo Day, visionary companies from the leading local startup incubators, accelerators, corporate innovation labs, who are fueling the change here in Boston will pitch, share and demo their work for recognition of their impact. 

Demo Day is an opportunity to: 
Explore the latest in health care & digital health, social entrepreneurship, technology, consumer & retail, hardware, biotech, clean tech, food and more 

Make meaningful connections with local change makers and connect with potential mentors and peers 

Gain valuable advice in areas such as career development, finding a fulfilling job and how to get the first meeting 

Additionally, we welcome the Babson Breakaway Challenge to our main stage for the first and only competition to promote gender parity in the VC industry and award $250,000 to a high-potential, women-led business. Be there as the final round of women pitch their businesses to an expert panel for the chance to win the largest prize ever for a competition of this kind. 

The full program will be announced soon - stay tuned. 

Who it's for: Startups, midsize-large companies, recruiters, investors, the curious 
Vibe: High-energy, cutting-edge, educational
Web site: https://hubweek.org/events/demo-day/
Open to: the general public
Cost: $0
Sponsor(s): Technology Review, HUBweek, Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce
For more information, contact:  HUBweek
hello at hubweek.org 

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Innovations in Synthetic Biology
Friday, September 30, 2016
12–1:30 pm
Join us via WebEx 
Meeting password: LabLunch
Contact  innovation at mit.edu

Speaker Abstracts
Christian Rückert
Title: Using synthetic biology and metabolic engineering to produce natural pharmaceuticals such as alpha-carotene in Corynebacterium.
Abstract: Interest in vitamins such as carotenoids has increased in recent years, due to the high value these compounds possess in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industry. These compounds not only act as important precursors for essential amino acids in feedstocks, but also have antioxidant and coloring properties as well. In 2010, the carotenoid market was estimated at nearly $1.2 billion and this number is expected to increase to $1.4 billion by 2018 with a compound annual growth rate of 2.3. Despite its high value, current extraction of carotenoids is rather difficult. Extraction from vegetables is highly dependent on seasonal and geographic variability that cannot be controlled and chemical synthesis of these compounds generates hazardous waste that affects the environment. In order to overcome these limitations, we propose to establish Corynebacterium glutamicum as a microbial platform for the production of high-value carotenoids. The establishment of a microbial production platform can lower production costs by using low-costs substrates and reducing toxic byproducts. C. glutamicum, in particular, is a strong candidate as a potential host for several reasons. To implement a fermentation-based production of pigments and high value lipids with a microorganism, the Gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is chosen as a potential host for several reasons. Foremost, C. glutamicum is well established for the fermentative production of a variety of compounds at an industrial scale. Currently, C. glutamicum strains are used for the industrial production of lysine, glutamate and tryptophan. It is a Generally Regarded As Safe (GRAS) model organism that is genetically tractable and whose genome has been sequenced and is publicly available. In addition, the regulatory capabilities of this organism are well described. In recent years, first synthetic biology approaches towards a platform strain with a reduced genome and increased genomic stability have been under­taken. We are establishing C. glutamicum as a production platform for lipophilic vitamins and related compounds with health benefits and high value, specifically carotenes. C. glutamicum is a natural producer of carotenoids, synthesizing the C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin and its and mono- and diglucoside. This ability indicates that this bacterium is capable to be engineered, in principle, to become a production host for carotenes. Based on the wild-type, there are 5 major targets that have the potential apparent to achieve maximize carotene production in C. glutamicum: A) removal of the genes for decaprenoxanthin (glucoside) synthesis, B) increase of IPP precursor production, C) increase of lycopene precursor production, D) introduction of carotene cyclases for carotene production, and E) engineering of the capability to store carotenes.

Philipp Pfingstag
Title: Lightening the Burden of Knowledge: How tools help DNA engineers push the frontiers of science
Abstract: In this paper we investigate the influence of research tools on technological progress. The frontier of knowledge moves continually outward as new scientific discoveries are made and creates an increasing burden of knowledge for successive generations of innovators. This barrier can be overcome by an increased educational phase, greater specialization, and larger teams. There is little theory on how research tools affect scientific advancement. Synthetic biology provides a promising setting to study these effects. In contrast to traditional, time-consuming, and error-prone genetic engineering tools, the rapidly falling costs of DNA synthesis allows scientists to work on a broader set of problems for a reasonable price. We analyze how new tools help scientists to push the frontier of knowledge forward and how these tools shape the direction of research. We use a difference in differences approach to analyze the innovative step of new synthetic genetic parts compared to traditional DNA chunks and to examine the importance of those parts for the scientific community.

Hosted by the MIT Innovation Initiative Lab for Innovation Science and Policy
The Lab Lunch is a monthly lunchtime speaker series. This month, join us as we welcome Christian Rückert (Research Scientist, MIT Department of Biology) and Philipp Pfingstag (PhD student, Technical University of Munich School of Management) who will be presenting on innovation in synthetic biology.

More at: https://innovation.mit.edu/event/lab-lunch-innovation-synthetic-biology/#sthash.2cQDMW22.dpuf

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The Portable Frederick Douglass
Friday, September 30
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR., and JOHN STAUFFER, editors of the new Penguin Classics edition of The Portable Frederick Douglass, for a discussion of the seminal writings and speeches of a legendary writer, orator, and civil rights leader.
About The Portable Frederick Douglass

This compact volume offers a full course on the remarkable, diverse career of Frederick Douglass, letting us hear once more a necessary historical figure whose guiding voice is needed now as urgently as ever. Edited by renowned scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Pulitzer Prize–nominated historian John Stauffer, The Portable Frederick Douglass includes the full range of Douglass’s works: the complete Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, as well as extracts from My Bondage and My Freedom and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass; The Heroic Slave, one of the first works of African American fiction; the brilliant speeches that launched his political career and that constitute the greatest oratory of the Civil War era; and his journalism, which ranges from cultural and political critique (including his early support for women’s equality) to law, history, philosophy, literature, art, and international affairs, including a never-before-published essay on Haitian revolutionary Toussaint L’Ouverture.

The Portable Frederick Douglass is the latest addition in a series of African American classics curated by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. First published in 2008, the series reflects a selection of great works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry by African and African American authors introduced and annotated by leading scholars and acclaimed writers in new or updated editions for Penguin Classics. In his series essay, “What Is an African American Classic?” Gates provides a broader view of the canon of classics of African American literature available from Penguin Classics and beyond. Gates writes, “These texts reveal the human universal through the African American particular: all true art, all classics do this; this is what ‘art’ is, a revelation of that which makes each of us sublimely human, rendered in the minute details of the actions and thoughts and feelings of a compelling character embedded in a time and place.”

For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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Horizons in Regenerative Medicine: Ageless Aging
WHEN  Fri., Sep. 30, 2016, 3:30 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, 5 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Stem Cell Institute
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine-ageless-aging-tickets-26574396736#tickets
DETAILS  Have you ever wished you could turn back the clock a few years? That age old idiom is now becoming a reality. Thanks to aging research, there are new prospects for managing “healthspan” – slowing down, and even reversing, some of the effects of aging. Join us for a lively panel discussion around the latest in aging research, including work by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute on therapeutics that may restore youthful function. You’ll also learn some tips from a study conducted by a leading geriatrician on centenarians and how to live a healthier, longer life.
For more information on HUBweek events at Harvard, please visit http://www.harvard.edu/hubweek
LINK  https://hubweek.org/events/horizons-in-regenerative-medicine/ageless-aging/

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Is the Human Brain Just a Fallible Machine?: A discussion on Humans, Machines, and God with Professors of Artifical Intelligence and Neurology
Friday, Sept. 30
6:00-8:00 pm
TMEC Amphitheater (260 Longwood Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/veritas-forum-at-harvard-medical-school-tickets-27617862771
RSVP for dinner discussion groups after the event here:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf44moyX_8txl64d9hgT2yq65RzyjuXxrHXlipX-n7-sgSKTw/viewform

Speakers: 
Rosalind Picard, Professor of Artificial Intelligence at MIT
Shahram Khoshbin, Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School
Moderator: Patrick Smith, Lecturer in Bioethics at Harvard Medical School

Philosophers and theologians have long discussed and debated the nature of human cognition, consciousness, and free will. Sophisticated philosophical terms for different stances with regards to human mental events have been argued for many years, ranging from the materialistic functional physicalist view, the more ethereal epiphenomenalist view, the mind-body duality view, as well as many others.  This debate has accelerated in recent years with the substantial advances in the fields of machine learning/artificial intelligence and an increased scientific understanding of neurobiology.

Does free will exist? What is the relationship of the brain to the human mind? What is consciousness?  Is there a spiritual component to the mind or is it purely the firing of neurons? What are the implications of this for medical care and "guilt" in legal proceedings? How do advances in modern artificial intelligence inform these discussions?

The Christian Medical and Dental Association (CMDA), Catholic Students Organization (CSO), and others invite you to a discussion on these questions and others between a Christian artificial intelligence professor at MIT and a professor of neurology at HMS.

Food:  Refreshments provided

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Harvard Extension Environmental Club presents guest speaker Rachael Miller Co-founder of Rozalia Project
Friday, September 30
7–9 pm
Harvard University main Campus, Room- TBA, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rozalia-project-tickets-27575072785

Rozalia Project is an amazing organization which focuses on cleaning, protecting, and helping marine ecosystems thrive! Lately, Rozalia Project has done amazing marine pollution research, making highlights in the media for their microfiber catcher to prevent clothing microfiber from entering and polluting our waters.

Rozalia Project’s co-founder and TEDx guest speaker, Rachael Miller, will share with us recent research findings and experiences from their expedition through the Hudson River, and she will also introduce us to Rozalia's clever and innovative microfiber catcher.

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Saturday, October 1
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Protest, Public Religion, and Social Change Conference
Saturday, October 1
8:00 AM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Boston University School of Theology, 745 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/protest-public-religion-and-social-change-conference-tickets-273055375982 
Cost:  $10

Boston University is pleased to announce its second annual Graduate Conference on Religious Studies, on the theme of “Protest, Public Religion, and Social Change.” In this contentious election year, we are frequently reminded of how religious commitments inform all sides of our public debates over what it means to be a just society. This conference draws on B.U.’s rich history of religious activism in pursuit of social justice as a starting point for a broader conversation about how a wide variety of religious traditions engage with changing societies. We invited papers that reflect on how religion manifests publicly in moments of social crisis, and how religious groups use texts, material culture, ritual, theologies, and philosophical traditions to effect or to resist social change. 

Keynote address by
Pamela Lightsey
Boston University 

Faculty Roundtable Discussion on Social Justice and Religion
Featuring:  Dr. Anthony Petro and Dr. Diana Swancutt

We are no longer accepting paper proposals. But we encourage you to register soon to join the conference events. Online registration ends September 16th, 12:30 PM. Although same-day registration is available, lunch cannot be guaranteed. We look forward to meeting you all on October 1st!

Full schedule coming soon!

Check us out on Facebook at:
https://www.facebook.com/events/329299647412001/

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Let's Talk About Food Festival 
Saturday, October 1
9am - 5pm
Copley Square, Boston

This festival lets participants dive into the most important food conversations and debates happening in society today. Through hands-on cooking demonstrations, edible gardens, and more, participants can also explore how to take advantage of the food around them by cooking better and eating healthier. Check back often for more details.

More information at http://www.boston.com/sponsored/extra/letstalkaboutfood/festival

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Fashion Technology with Open Style Lab		
Saturday, October 1 
Presentation: 11:30 am and 12:30 pm; Showcase: 11:00 am – 1:30 pm
Museum of Science, 1 Science Park, Boston
Free with museum admission

Fashion Technology with Open Style Lab
Join us for a sneak peek at prototype designs for assistive clothing. Celebrate the collaborative work between engineers, occupational therapists, and designers who participated in an innovative summer program at MIT called Open Style Lab.

After ten weeks of working closely with each other and a client with disabilities, teams will share their experiences, processes, and designs. Check out creations that are both fashionable and functional!

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Somerville AgriCultural Festival
Saturday, October 1
3pm to 7pm
ArtFarm site, 10 Poplar Street, corner of Poplar and Linwood Streets, Somerville

First-ever celebration of “everything we grow from the earth, and the people who grow it, here in Somerville.”  A chance for growers to display iproduce and the rest of us urban ag types to share what we know.  Plus talks, hands-on demos, participatory art.

http://somervilleartscouncil.org/artfarm 

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HUBWEEK CLOSING PARTY, FEATURING BREW THE CHARLES
Saturday, October 1
5:00 – 10:00 PM
Power Station, 540 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118
RSVP at https://hubweek.org/events/brew-the-charles/
Cost:  $0-$25

Don’t miss the final celebration of HUBweek 2016.

On Saturday, October 1st at the SOWA Power Station, join us for the HUBweek Closing Party. Featuring multiple signature HUBweek experiences, including music, projections, and art installations; the much-anticipated Brew the Charles (see details below); and tasty bites from local food innovators, this will be a whole new take on space, art, science, and food. This event is open to the public and welcomes all ages–registration is required.

HUB Presents: Brew the Charles
Swimming in the Charles River is one thing. How about drinking it? Six local breweries have accepted the challenge. Working with Newton-based water technology company Desalitech, six local Massachusetts breweries are taking Charles River water and turning it into beer. This August, Desalitech ran thousands of gallons of Charles River water through its industry-leading treatment and purifi cation system. From there, the Boston Beer Company, Cape Ann Brewing Company, Castle Island Brewing Co., Harpoon Brewery, Idle Hands Craft Ales, and Ipswich Ale Brewery are creating custom, craft brews that turn science into beer. Which brewery will create the best beer? That’s for you and a group of local food and beverage experts to decide. Come to the Brew the Charles competition to taste for yourself and award a prize to the best Charles River HUBweek brew. Even the brewers will pick their favorite! Included in the registration fee is a sampling of up to 12 beers. 20% of all proceeds will be donated to the Charles River Conservancy’s Swim the Charles Program. Tickets for the “Brew the Charles” tasting are 21+.

Vibe: fun, creative, social, adventurous
Who it’s for: anyone over 21, beer lovers, science geeks

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Monday, October 3
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PAOC Colloquium - Kim Cobb (GaTech)
Monday, October 3
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Kim Cobb, GaTech
About the Speaker
Kim Cobb’s research uses corals and cave stalagmites to reconstruct tropical Pacific temperature and rainfall patterns over the last decades to millennia. She received her B.A. from Yale University in 1996, and her Ph.D. in Oceanography from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in 2002. She spent two years at Caltech in the Department of Geological and Planetary Sciences before joining the faculty at Georgia Tech in 2004. Kim has sailed on six oceanographic cruises and led five caving expeditions to the rainforests of Borneo in support of her research. Her papers regularly appear in high-profile journals, including 5 papers in Nature or Science. Kim has received numerous awards for her research, most notably a NSF CAREER Award in 2007, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2008, and a Sigma Chi Best Paper Award in 2013. She sits on the AAAS Climate Science Panel, the international CLIVAR Pacific Panel, and the international PAGES-CLIVAR Intersection Panel.

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Bayesian Inversion for Large Scale Antarctic Ice Sheet Flow
Monday, October 3
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Omar Ghattas, University of Texas, Austin

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/event/department-colloquium-series-12

Note: The colloquium talks now begin at noon. Please plan on arriving at 11:45AM to help yourself to lunch. 

Contact Name:   Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Governments as Partners: The Role of Collaboration in US Cleantech Startup Innovation
Monday, October 3
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Claudia Doblinger, University of Regensburg, Germany

This series is presented by the Energy Technology Innovation Policy/Consortium for Energy Policy Research at HKS. Lunch will be provided.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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One butterfly species tumbles off an adaptive peak and enters a lethal trap in the course of six host shifts observed across half a century
Monday, October 3
12:10 pm
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Michael Singer, Professor, University of Plymouth

More information at http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Computations Rule Everything Around Me
Monday, October 3
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E15-001, The ACT Cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Etienne Turpin

ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents:  Computations Rule Everything Around Me with Etienne Turpin

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking
Monday, October 3
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Weapons of Math Destruction:  How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy
Monday, October 3
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This event is free; no tickets are required.

Harvard Book Store welcomes data scientist CATHY O'NEIL for a discussion of Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, her book on the mathematical models that pervade modern life and threaten to rip apart our social fabric.
About Weapons of Math Destruction

We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives—where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance—are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: Everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated.
But as Cathy O’Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they’re wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination: If a poor student can’t get a loan because a lending model deems him too risky (by virtue of his zip code), he’s then cut off from the kind of education that could pull him out of poverty, and a vicious spiral ensues. Models are propping up the lucky and punishing the downtrodden, creating a “toxic cocktail for democracy.” Welcome to the dark side of Big Data.
Tracing the arc of a person’s life, O’Neil exposes the black box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society. These “weapons of math destruction” score teachers and students, sort résumés, grant (or deny) loans, evaluate workers, target voters, set parole, and monitor our health.
O’Neil calls on modelers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use. But in the end, it’s up to us to become more savvy about the models that govern our lives. This important book empowers us to ask the tough questions, uncover the truth, and demand change.

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SCIENCE ON SCREEN®:  A Face in the Crowd 
Monday, October 3
7:00pm
Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Street, Brookline
Cost:  $9 - $12

POWER! He loved it! He took it raw in big gulpfuls...he liked the taste, the way it mixed with the bourbon and the sin in his blood!

Andy Griffith sizzles in his first onscreen role as drunken drifter Lonesome Rhodes who becomes an overnight media sensation, rising from itinerant Ozark guitar picker to local media rabble-rouser to TV superstar and political king-maker. From director Elia Kazan and On the Waterfront writer Budd Schulberg, A Face in the Crowd was hailed by Francois Truffaut as "passionate, exalted, fierce...a pleasure for the mind."

Before the film, join Dr. Steven Schlozman, associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS), as he discusses our attraction to politically charismatic speakers, our tendency to create "us" versus "them" dichotomies, and how our brains work (and don’t work) during an election year. 

About the Speaker
Dr. Steven Schlozman is associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS). He also serves as course director of the psychopathology class for the MIT-HMS Program in Health, Sciences and Technology. Dr. Schlozman practices child and adult psychiatry at MGH, where he also serves as the primary consultant to the pediatric transplant service. He received BA's in English and biology from Stanford University, and his MD from the Dartmouth-Brown Program in Medicine.

Dr. Schlozman has done international research focusing on stigma and mental illness, and has written and presented extensively on the topic. He also writes short fiction, and has published one novel, The Zombie Autopsies. This novel has been optioned for film adaptation by George Romero, creator of Night of the Living Dead, and Dr. Schlozman is currently working on a sequel. Because of this work, he teaches a freshman seminar at Harvard University that focuses on horror and thrillers in literature and film.

More information at http://www.coolidge.org/films/face-crowd

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Tuesday, October 4
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Speaker Series: Zeynep Tufekci
Tuesday, October 4,
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275.15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Zeynep Tufekci, a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, writes about the social impacts of technology. She is an assistant professor in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, a faculty associate at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard, and a former fellow at the Center for Internet Technology Policy at Princeton. Her research revolves around politics, civics, movements, privacy and surveillance, as well as data and algorithms.

Originally from Turkey, Ms. Tufekci was a computer programmer by profession and academic training before turning her focus to the impact of technology on society and social change. She switched to social science, and started calling herself a “technosociologist.” She has been published widely on the interaction of new technologies with society, politics and culture. Her forthcoming book from Yale University Press is tentatively titled “Beautiful Tear Gas: The Ecstatic, Fragile Politics of Networked Protest in the 21st Century.”

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Methane Emission from Living Trees and Deadwood
Tuesday, October 4
12:00pm to 1:00pm
HUH Seminar Room, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Kristofer Covey, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Yale University

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Debate on MA Ballot Question 4: would legalize the recreational use of marijuana
Tuesday, October 4
2:30 PM to 4:00 PM
John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, 100 William T Morrissey Boulevard, McCormack Theatre, Second Floor, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/debates-on-ma-ballot-questions-tickets-27459973520

UMass Boston’s McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, WBUR radio, and The Boston Globe will host a series of live weekly debates exploring in depth the four statewide ballot questions to be decided by Massachusetts voters in the November 8 election.
The show’s host, Meghna Chakrabarti, will be joined each week by a co-moderator from The Boston Globe. Each debate will feature representatives on both sides of a ballot question, as designated by the groups formally proposing or opposing each question.

This series of debates is intended to raise the profile and further the discussion of the important ballot questions facing Massachusetts voters, as often ballot questions get little public notice.

Because the debates are taking place as part of WBUR’s “Radio Boston” program, from 3 to 4 p.m., the live audience must be in their seats in the McCormack Theatre by 2:45 p.m. The doors open at 2:30 and close at 2:45. The debates are free and open to the public, but registration will be required. 

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Exxon: The Road Not Taken with Lisa Song
Tuesday, October 4
4:00pm
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Lisa Song, Climate Reporter, Inside Climate News
Lisa Song, a reporter at InsideClimate News, will discuss the story behind "Exxon: the Road Not Taken," an investigative series that revealed Exxon's early engagement with climate science before the company turned to climate denial, manufacturing doubt about the scientific consensus its own scientists had confirmed. Lisa was part of the team that reported the series, which was named a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. Lisa will also talk about climate reporting in general, and the challenges and opportunities of doing watchdog environmental reporting.

Bio:  Lisa Song joined InsideClimate News in January 2011, where she reports on climate change, environmental health and natural gas drilling. She is co-author of the "The Dilbit Disaster" series, which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, and worked on the Exxon: The Road Not Taken stories. Song has degrees in environmental science and science writing from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

BURECS Seminar Series on Climate Change

This program is supported in part by a grant to Earth & Environment Professor Dave Marchant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Science Education Program.

http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/lisa-song.html

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MATERIALITY
Tuesday, October 4
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 1 Broadway 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/materiality-tickets-27529052136
Cost:  $8 – $12

Touted as the key to determining the best sustainability strategy, materiality assessments intimidate mere mortals trying to move their organization’s sustainability initiatives forward. Yet, those who have done them and live to tell the tale, say they are critical to gaining organizational alignment. We’ve asked BASG veterans of Materiality Assessments Asheen Phansey and Johanna Jobin to lead our discussion. If you have similar experience and an interest to join the panel, please contact us. 

A materiality assessment is a process of engaging stakeholders to identify what environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues are most important to an organization. These findings can help an organization prioritize both where their sustainability initiatives should focus and what’s most important for them to report.
Leading our discussion are:

Asheen Phansey has served in various roles as a corporate sustainability leader at Dassault Systèmes since 2010. Dassault Systèmes is a $3B software company that provides businesses and people with 3D modeling apps and experiences to harmonize product, nature, and life.
Asheen lectures and advises students at Babson College and Harvard University, serves on the Net Impact Advisory Council, and ranks as one of the most influential social media thought leaders in corporate sustainability (twitter: @asheen). Asheen has experience in the biotech and aerospace industries, and holds a BS in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University and an MBA in Technology Entrepreneurship from Babson College.
Asheen enjoys learning new languages, speaking at Toastmasters, philosophizing over espresso or whiskey, and running (sometimes after his young kids). Among his greatest achievements in life are speaking at BASG for now his third time, and counting Carol and Johanna as friends.
Asheen plans to speak about Dassault Systèmes Handprinting/Net-Positive as a way of addressing materiality challenges, and about conducting a scope 3 GHG materiality study for the aerospace sector on behalf of the International Aerospace Environmental Group.

and Johanna Jobin, Director, Global EHS & Sustainability at Biogen, has done many materiality assessments. Earlier this year we heard about Biogen’s journey to carbon neutrality. Before Biogen, Johanna was Head of Corporate Responsibility & Community Affairs of MilliporeSigma. She received her Master of Environmental Management degree, with a certificate in Energy and Environment, from Duke and is an ISO 14001 trained auditor. Johanna is also active with NAEM, USGBC, AIM, WPI, MSEP, the City of Cambridge Climate Protection Action Committee, and “e” inc.

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Presenting the 2016 Norman B. Leventhal Excellence in City Building AWARDS
Tuesday, October 4
6:00 – 9:00 pm
Boston Harbor Hotel Boston

HONORING
Thomas Glynn, CEO, Massport Cambridge Innovation Center
Tim Rowe, Founder & CEO and Brian Dacey, President
University of Massachusetts Boston, School for the Environment Ellen Douglas, PhD, Associate Professor of Hydrology and
Paul Kirshen, PhD, Professor of Climate Adaptation

A Better City, 33 Broad Street Boston, MA 02109  Norman B. Leventhal Excellence in City Building AWARDS
Join us in celebrating remarkable leaders who have made significant contributions that have enhanced Boston and the region’s economic competitiveness, mobility, sustainability and quality of life.
A formal invitation will follow.

For more information about A Better City, please contact Sarah Shields.
T. 617-502-6250 | E. sshields at abettercity.org
www.abettercity.org

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Rem Koolhaas
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Rem Koolhaas
COST  Free
DETAILS  Rem Koolhaas worked as a script writer and journalist before becoming an architect, studying at the Architectural Association in London. He founded the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) in 1975, together with Elia and Zoe Zenghelis and Madelon Vriesendorp; he leads the firm today, along with eight partners, including its conceptual branch, AMO, a think tank focused on social, economic, and technological issues. The service building for CCTV in Beijing and the 11th Street Bridge project in Washington, D.C. are among OMA’s many notable ongoing projects; those that opened in the last year include the Pierre Lassonde Pavilion at the Musée Nationale des Beaux Arts in Québec; the Repossi boutique on Place Vendôme in Paris; the Fondazione Prada in Milan; Holland Green, a mixed-use development in London; and Manus x Machina, an exhibition on fashion and technology at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Other recent works of note include the Netherlands Embassy in Berlin (2003), the McCormick Tribune Campus Center at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago (2003), the Seattle Central Library (2004), and the Casa da Musica in Porto, Portugal (2005) .
Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
LINK	http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/rem-koolhaas/

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Streams of Expression and Love: Joe Lovano Celebrates Gunther Schuller at MIT
Tuesday, October 4
8:00p–9:30p
MIT, Building 14W-111, Killian Hall, 160 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Joe Lovano
In addition to performing music from Rush Hour as a quartet (with vocal-jazz great Judi Silvano, Boston-bassist and MIT Affiliated Artist Keala Kaumeheiwa and MIT Director of Wind and Jazz Ensembles, Fred Harris, drums) Lovano will also perform MIT composer and Professor of Music Peter Child's Moonsculptures, an attractive Third Stream influenced composition for tenor saxophone, violin, and piano. Violinist and Schuller devotee Young-Nam Kim (Artistic Director of the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota), and pianist and Senior Lecturer in Music at MIT David Deveau (Rockport Chamber Music Festival Artistic Director) join Lovano. Other chamber works by Child and Harris round out the program performed by Kim and his son Daniel Kim, new violist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

One of Schuller's closest friends and perhaps greatest advocate, the legendary Third Stream pianist and educator Ran Blake (New England Conservatory) will make a very special solo guest appearance on the program.

MIT Sounding 
The 2016-17 season of innovative annual performance series MIT Sounding continues to blur the boundaries between contemporary and world music. Curated by Evan Ziporyn, Faculty Director of the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology, this season of Sounding integrates the avant-garde sounds of ancient instruments and traditional practices with cutting-edge composition and technology to present various visions of a new, evolving music that defies genre.

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/joe-lovano/#public-events
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free: donations will be accepted for efforts to preserve the legacy of Gunther Schuller 
Tickets: Registration available soon 
Sponsor(s): Music and Theater Arts, CAST
For more information, contact:  Leah Talatinian
617.253.5351
leaht at mit.edu 

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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, October 5
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The Cambridge Cyber Summit
Wednesday, October 5
8:00 am - 6:00 pm
MIT Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 
RSVP at http://www.cnbc.com/securing-our-future/

Share. Solve. Secure.

CNBC, the worldwide leader in business news, The Aspen Institute’s renowned Homeland Security Program and MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have created a new conference to unite business leaders with public and private-sector leaders in security, technology and defense.

The Cambridge Cyber Summit is a one-day summit at MIT’s Kresge Auditorium to discuss ways to combat urgent cyber threats and secure America’s future. Participants in the first-ever series on October 5 will see interviews and live demonstrations that focus on the next wave of cyberattacks and their perpetrators, countermeasures, privacy vs. security, and the government’s role in protecting private industry.

Featured speakers include:
Admiral Michael S. Rogers, Commander, U.S. Cyber Command; Director, National Security Agency; Chief, Central Security Service
Thomas A. Fanning, President and CEO, Southern Company
Glenn Gerstell, General Counsel, National Security Agency
Dr. Tom Leighton, Co-founder, Akamai Technologies
Matt Olsen, Co-founder, IronNet Cybersecurity; former Director,National Counterterrorism Center

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Water and Food Production Challenges in the Semi-Arid Tropics
Wednesday, October 5
12-1pm
MIT, Building 1-131, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Topics: environmental and socio-economic conditions of the SAT, limitations to water and food production, impacts of climate change, managing soil and water in the SAT, dryland cropping systems.

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Restrained by Design: Cyber Security and the Attenuation of War
Wednesday, October 5
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jon Lindsay (University of Toronto, Munk School)

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu

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The Prediction Project: A Lecture by Alyssa A. Goodman
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 4 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Alyssa A. Goodman, 2016-2017 Edward, Frances, and Shirley B. Daniels Fellow, Radcliffe Institute; Robert Wheeler Wilson Professor of Applied Astronomy, Harvard University
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Making predictions based on theory and on data has only been the scientific way for the past 400 years or so; before that, there was much more reliance on philosophy. In this lecture, Goodman will speak about how the history of humanity has predicted its own future, from ancient Mesopotamians reading signs in sheep entrails to modern computer simulation of climate change. Goodman is currently leading the creation of the most modular HarvardX online course yet created, called PredictionX.
LINK	http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2016-alyssa-a-goodman-fellow-presentation

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The Ethics of Democracy Entrepreneurship
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 4:10 – 5:40 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mt Auburn Street, Suite 200 North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)	
Marci Harris, CEO and Founder of PopVox 
Peter MacLeod, Principal and Founder of MASSLBP 
Tiago Carneiro Peixoto, Team Lead, World Bank’s Digital Engagement Unit 
Moderated by Archon Fung, Academic Dean and Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Citizenship at the Harvard Kennedy School 
DETAILS  The goal of the panel is to bring together leading practitioners and scholars for a frank discussion about the problems and possibilities of marketing participatory democratic innovations like citizens’ assemblies, participatory budgeting, or deliberative polling as a policy tool for government. Is there a tension between the ideal of spreading participatory innovations, and the need for organizations – whether private or non-profit – to actually sell these innovations to government? If so, what kinds of ethical dilemmas do organizations face in becoming “democracy entrepreneurs”?
This discussion is part of the Making Democracy Work Seminar Series
LINK	http://ash.harvard.edu/event/ethics-democracy-entrepreneurship

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The Syrian Refugee Crisis: Weathering the Storm in Turkey and Beyond
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CMES/WCFIA Seminar on Turkey in the Modern World
SPEAKER(S)  Ahmad Mamdoh Tarakji, MD, President, Syrian American Medical Society
CONTACT INFO  Liz Flanagan, elizabethflanagan at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Unless otherwise noted in the event description, CMES events are open to the public (no registration required), and off the record. Please note that events may be filmed and photographed by CMES for record-keeping and for use on the CMES website and publications.
LINK  http://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/syrian-refugee-crisis-weathering-storm-turkey-and-beyond

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A Conversation with Cornel West, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Christian Practice, Union Theological Seminary; Professor Emeritus, Princeton University
Wednesday, October 5 
5:00-6:30pm
Harvard University Science Center, Hall B, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

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Extravagant Weapons: The Story behind Arms Races in Animals and People
Wednesday, October 5
6:00pm
See also: Public Lectures, Evolution Matters Lecture Series
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Lecture and Book Signing
Douglas Emlen, Professor of Biology, University of Montana
The animal world is full of “weaponry” that has evolved for particular use by specific species: cats have claws, eagles have talons, porcupines have quills, and even the dogs we keep as pets have respectable sets of teeth. While these weapons may be small in some animals, they are massive in other species, and the same is true of weapons manufactured by humans. Douglas Emlen, author of Animal Weapons: The Evolution of Battle, will discuss the conditions that trigger arms races in both animals and humans and the role that duels play in this process. A journey that begins with biology becomes the story of all weapons, as Emlen discusses beetles and battleships, crabs and the Cold War.

The Evolution Matters Lecture Series is supported by a generous gift from Drs. Herman and Joan Suit.

Presented in collaboration with the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology.

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The Rita E. Hauser Forum for the Arts: Anna Deavere Smith, "Radical Hospitality" A Lecture/Performance
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Education, Environmental Sciences, Ethics, Humanities, Lecture, Poetry/Prose, Special Events, Theater
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Introductions by: Drew Faust and Homi Bhabha; Lecture/Performance by: Anna Deavere Smith; followed by a conversation with Homi Bhabha
WRITTEN BY  Anna Deavere Smith
COST  free, but tickets are required
TICKET WEB LINK  http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/event/hauser-forum-anna-deavere-smith-radical-hospitality
TICKET INFO  Tickets will be available starting at noon on Wednesday, September 28, at the Harvard Box Office in Farkas Hall. Tickets will also be available online or by phone (handling fees apply). Limit of two tickets per person. Tickets valid until 5:45pm.
CONTACT INFO	humcentr at fas.harvard.edu, 617-495-0738
LINK	http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/hauser-forum-anna-deavere-smith

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Money, Corporations, and Democracy: Moral and Religious Perspectives
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion, Special Events
SPONSOR	Office of Student Life 
CONTACT	studentlife at hds.harvard.edu
DETAILS  What are the moral questions that underlie issues of money in politics, corporate power, and wealth in democracy? What resources do we find in our various religious traditions to help us approach these questions with thoughtful consideration, moral insight, action, and hope? This panel discussion brings together leaders, scholars, writers, and activists of many faith traditions to discuss questions at the intersection of democracy, faith, money, and morals.
Panelists are Sojourners founder, Jim Wallis; Cambridge City Councillor, Nadeem Mazen; president of American Promise, Jeff Clements; recent HDS alum Tajay Bongsa; the Rev. Mariama White-Hammond; and Rabbi Aryeh Klapper.  The event and panel will be moderated by HDS Professor Dan McKanan.
This event is open to the public, and refreshments will be provided.
Event is created by HDS students with sponsorship from the HDS Office of Student Life and Free Speech for People, a national nonpartisan campaign working to restore democracy to the people.

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Moving to Mars - The Mars One Candidates
Wednesday, October 5
6:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Museum of Science, 1 Science Park, Boston
RSVP at http://www.mos.org/public-events/moving-to-mars  
Members, September 19th; Non-Members, September 21st

What would it be like to leave behind everything and everyone you know and move to a completely unknown world?

Hear firsthand from five intrepid adventurers about the Mars One selection process, the reactions of family and friends, and why they want to spend the rest of their lives separated from all they know and love.

Mars One mission candidates: Josh Richards, physicist, engineer, comedian | Peter Degen-Portnoy, software engineer | Yari Golden-Castaño, systems engineer | R. Daniel Golden-Castaño, US Army veteran and engineering student | Sara Director, artist

In 2026 the Mars One initiative intends to send the first group of humans to Mars and create the inaugural permanent settlement on another planet. 

Over 200,000 individuals worldwide applied for the one-way voyage. Now the final 100 are facing the psychological reality of moving to Mars. 

Embark on a fascinating evening exploring what it means to be a 21st-century settler and leave our planet forever. 

Reception with light snacks and cash bar to follow.

Advance registration begins at 9:00 am, Wednesday, September 21 (Monday, September 19 for Museum members).

This program is free thanks to the generosity of the Lowell Institute.

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Demand the Impossible!:  A Radical Manifesto
Wednesday, October 5
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This event is free; no tickets are required.
Harvard Book Store welcomes social justice activist and teacher BILL AYERS for a discussion of his latest book, Demand the Impossible!: A Radical Manifesto—a manifesto for movement-makers.

About Demand the Impossible!
In an era defined by mass incarceration, endless war, economic crisis, catastrophic environmental destruction, and a political system offering more of the same, radical social transformation has never been more urgent—or seemed more remote.
Demand the Impossible! urges us to imagine a world beyond what this rotten system would have us believe is possible.

In critiquing the world around us, insurgent educator and activist Bill Ayers uncovers cracks in that system, raising the horizons for radical change, and envisioning strategies for building the movement we need to make a world worth living in.

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How We Can Stop Climate Change
Wednesday, October 5
7:00-9:00 PM
Cambridge Friends Meeting, 5 Longfellow Park, Cambridge

Robert Pollin, Distinguished Professor of Economics at UMass Amherst and author of Greening the Global Economy, will discuss how we can make the carbon reductions needed to avert climate catastrophe, generate new jobs and protect people working for fossil fuel companies.

Activists will also discuss the connections between the nation's military policies and interventions and how climate and anti-war activists can work together.

Sponsored by Mass. Peace Action, 350MA, Unitarian Universalist Mass. Action, Clean Water Action, Sierra Club-Mass Chapter, American Friends Service Committee, 350MA Cambridge Node. info at masspeaceaction.org

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Thursday, October 6
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Calestous Juma on Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Information Technology, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Calestous Juma, Professor of the Practice of International Development; Director of the Science, Technology, and Globalization Project at the Harvard Kennedy School
CONTACT INFO	Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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Into the Great Wide Open:The promise and potential perils of climate geoengineering
Thursday, October 6
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Wil Burns
Despite the world community’s establishment of the new Paris Agreement, the globe is on pace for temperature increases of as much as 3.5C by the end of the century, with potentially disastrous implications for human institutions and ecosystems. As a consequence, there has been increasing interest in large-scale technological engineering of our environment in order to combat or counteract the effects of changes in atmospheric chemistry, usually referred to as “climate geoengineering.” The purpose of this presentation will be to discuss potential climate geoengineering options, including risks and benefits, as well as how climate geoengineering might be governed at the international level.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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The CRISPR/Cas9 Revolution and Gene Editing
Thursday, October 6
1:30PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard Medical School, The Joseph B.Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
RSVP: HMS_events at hms.harvard.edu
Seating available on a first-come first served basis

2016 WARREN ALPERT FOUNDATION PRIZE SYMPOSIUM
In honor of Rodolphe Barrangou, Emmanuelle Charpentier,  Jennifer Doudna, Philippe Horvath, Viginijus Siksnys for remarkable contributions to the understanding of the CRISPR bacterial defense system and the revolutionary discovery that it can be adapted for genome editing.

Featured Speakers include:
Rodolphe Barrangou, PhD, Todd R. Klaenhammer Distinguished Scholar in Probiotics Research, North Carolina State University
CRISPR-mediated immunity in bacteria: discovery and applications

Austin Burt, PhD, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, Imperial College London
Developing CRISPR-based gene drive for malaria control

Emmanuelle Charpentier, PhD, Prof. Dr.; Scientific Member of the Max Planck Society, Max Planck Director, Professor, Umeå University
The transformative genome engineering CRISPR-Cas9 technology: lessons learned from bacteria

Jennifer Doudna, PhD, Li Ka Shing Chancellor’s Chair in Biomedical and Health Sciences/HHMI Investigator, University of California, Berkeley
The Future of Genome Engineering: Biology, Technology and Ethics

Philippe Horvath, PhD, Senior Scientist, Dupont
CRISPR-mediated immunity in bacteria: discovery and applications

Virginijus Siksnys, PhD, Professor and Chief Scientist/Department Head, Institute of Biotechnology, Vilnius University
From mechanisms of microbial immunity to novel genome editing tools

Luhan Yang, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, eGenesis
Rewriting the pig genome to transform Xenotransplantation

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The diversity, stability and evolution of ecological networks
Thursday, October 6
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Buiding 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Andrew Gonzalez, Dept. of Biology, McGill University
Ecological systems form complex networks. For example, the movement of individuals among habitat patches creates spatial networks of populations that govern their evolution. Also, species are connected by their interactions to form food webs, mutualist webs, and host-disease webs. A complete theory of biodiversity requires the integration of the spatial and interaction dimensions of ecological networks. In this talk I will show that network structure is fundamental to understanding how ecological systems maintain diversity, persist and evolve under environmental change. In the first part of my talk I will use experimental evolution to show how spatial networks of populations and communities respond and evolve in response to extreme environmental stress. In the next part of my talk I will show how the structure of spatial networks can confine the spread of a perturbation using theory and experiments. I will close with an application of this network approach to the design of networks of ecosystems for urban biodiversity.

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu), Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00 
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
6172588685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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Allison Hahn: "This Land Is Our Land: Mobile Media, Protest, and Debate in Maasai and Mongolian Land Disputes"
Thursday, October 6
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

How has mobile media changed the ways that nomadic communities receive and send information, engage state actors, and participate in international deliberations? Allison Hahn examines the ways that two pastoral-nomadic communities, Maasai of Kenya and Tanzania and Mongolians of Mongolia and China, are utilizing new media and social media platforms to challenge power hierarchies and deliberative norms. Many governmental policy makers presume that this technological adaptation indicates a determination amongst nomadic communities to integrate and settle. This presentation asks if nomadic communities might instead be incorporating new media technologies as a method to preserve their traditional lifestyles while engaging in national and international deliberations about land policy. Hahn draws from evidence of this engagement found in Maasai and Mongolian use of YouTube, RenRen, Twitter and Facebook as well as in-person protests and her decade of fieldwork amongst pastoral-nomadic communities. 

Allison Hahn (Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh) is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at the City University of New York-Baruch College. Her current book project, Nomads, New Media, and the State (in progress) explores the ways pastoral-nomadic communities in Central Asia, East Africa, and the Middle East are utilizing new and mobile technologies to participate in conservation policy and negotiate land rights.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/allison-hahn-mobile-media-protest-debate-maasai-mongolian-land-disputes/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

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Askwith Forums: Life, Animated: Autism, Ableism, and Educators
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE	Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS	  Speaker: Ron Suskind, author, Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism; Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist; lecturer, Harvard Law School
Discussants:
Tom Hehir, Ed.D.’90, Silvana and Christopher Pascucci Professor of Practice in
Learning Differences, HGSE
Michael Stein, visiting professor and executive director, Harvard Law School Project on Disability
Ron Suskind will speak about Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism, the book and documentary about reaching his autistic son through Disney characters. He will engage in conversation with Michael Stein of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability and HGSE Professor Tom Hehir.
In conjunction with the “Disability at Work: The Power of Policy, Myth and Practice from Higher Education to Employment” conference. Conference sponsored by HGSE Access and Disability Services, the HGSE Office of Student Affairs, and the Harvard Law School Project on Disability.

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RPP Colloquium with Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee: Women as Catalysts for Local and Global Spiritually-Engaged Movements for Sustainable Peace
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 6 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion
SPONSOR  Religions and the Practice of Peace, Women's Studies in Religion Program, and the El-Hibri Foundation
CONTACT	 Ash Temin
DETAILS	  Religions and the Practice of Peace Colloquium Dinner Series
Space is limited. RSVP is required. Check back for online link.
“You can tell people of the need to struggle, but when the powerless start to see that they can really make a difference, nothing can quench the fire." —Leymah Gbowee
A 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate, Leymah Gbowee, is a Liberian peace activist, trained social worker, and women’s rights advocate. Leymah’s leadership of the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace–which brought together Christian and Muslim women in a nonviolent movement that played a pivotal role in ending Liberia’s civil war in 2003–is chronicled in her memoir, Mighty Be Our Powers (2011), and in the award-winning documentary, Pray the Devil Back to Hell (2008). She is founder and current President of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa. She was the founding head of the Liberian Reconciliation Initiative, and was the co-Founder and former Executive Director of Women Peace and Security Network Africa (WIPSEN-A). She is also a founding member and former Liberia Coordinator of Women in Peacebuilding Network/West Africa Network for Peacebuilding (WIPNET/WANEP). Leymah is currently named a Distinguished Activist-in-Residence at Union Theological Seminary. She travels internationally to advocate for human rights and peace & security. 
The event will be moderated by Ann Braude, director of the Women’s Studies in Religion Program and Senior Lecturer on American Religious History.
Co-sponsored by the Women's Studies in Religion Program at Harvard Divinity School. With generous support from the Provostial Fund for the Arts and Humanities at Harvard University and the El-Hibri Foundation.
Recommended Reading and Film
Leymah Gbowee. Mighty Be Our Powers: How Sisterhood, Prayer, and Sex Changed a Nation at War: A Memoir. New York: Beast Books, 2011.
Pray the Devil Back to Hell. Directed by Gini Reticker. Produced by Abigail E. Disney. Documentary Film DVD, 72 minutes. Passion River Films, 2008.
This monthly public series, convened by HDS Dean David N. Hempton, brings together a cross-disciplinary RPP Working Group of faculty, experts, graduate students, and alumni from across Harvard University and the local area to explore topics and cases in religions and the practice of peace. A diverse array of scholars, leaders, and religious peacebuilders are invited to present and engage with the RPP Working Group and general audience. A light dinner is served and a brief reception follows the program.

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Public Lecture: Peter Latz, “Pioneering New Territory”
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Peter Latz
For his life’s work, Peter Latz has been recognized by the Green Good Design People Award in 2010; the TOPOS Landscape Award in 2013; the Friedrich-Ludwig-von-Sckell Ring of Honor, awarded by the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, in 2014; and the IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award in 2016. In February 2015, Peter and Anneliese Latz became honorary fellows of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). Since 2011, the office has been run by their son, architect and landscape architect Tilman Latz.
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	events at gsd.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Peter Latz studied landscape architecture at the Technical University of Munich, and landscape architecture and planning at RWTH Aachen. Since founding his firm as a studio for landscape architecture and planning in 1968 with his wife Anneliese, he has been concerned primarily with ecological urban renewal. Abandoned in 1985 after decades of intense industrial activity, the 180-hectare Thyssen ironworks site was repurposed by Latz + Partner into a people’s park and became a vivid part of the city.
In his lecture, Latz will discuss that project as well as the Ariel Sharon Park in Tel Aviv, which since 2004 has been in the process of transformation from roadside landfill to terraced paradise under Latz + Partner’s guidance. The Landscape Park Duisburg Nord and Ariel Sharon Park received the Green Good Design Award in 2009 and 2010, respectively.
Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
LINK	http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/peter-latz-pioneering-new-territory/

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MIT IDEAS Fall Generator Dinner 2016
Thursday, October 6
6:45 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)
MIT, Morss Hall, Walker Memorial, 142 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Are you interested in learning more about innovation and social entrepreneurship opportunities at MIT?
Working on a project to help underserved communities? Need funding? Want to recruit new team members?
Want to get involved, but don't yet have an idea?

Join us for dinner. Pitch an idea. Find a team. 
This year we'll be kicking off the event with an Information Fair to showcase various opportunities for funding, mentorship, and support at MIT for projects on innovation and social entrepreneurship.
 
The IDEAS Generator Dinner is one of the best venues to find a team to join, pitch your idea to woo and recruit teammates, or pitch your skills to get hired onto a team. With the first chance to submit a Scope Statement just a few weeks away (October 27, 2016), get started at this event!
 
Event Program
6:45 Doors Open - Dinner & Information Fair
7:30 Opening Remarks
7:45 Sixty-second Pitches
8:30 Networking
9:00 Event Ends
 
PITCH YOUR IDEA / SKILL
During the event, we will have openings for 20-30 sixty-second pitches from attendees.You must sign up in advance to request a slot.
 
Sign up to pitch an idea or your skills when you register for this event. Those selected to pitch will be contacted before the event with instructions on the process.
 
Note: Pitching is optional! If you don’t want to pitch, just attend to mix and mingle, meet potential teammates, or hear about some of the exciting projects already underway. 

ABOUT THE COMPETITION 
Teams must be led by a full-time MIT student with MIT students making significant contributions to the project’s innovation. However, if you are not an MIT student, you are still welcome to attend the Generator Dinner to pitch an idea or get hired on a team. For full competition criteria and guidelines, please visit our website: http://globalchallenge.mit.edu/ 
 
What is MIT IDEAS?
The MIT IDEAS program provides students with an opportunity to develop their innovative ideas and make positive changes in the world. As an annual innovation and social entrepreneurship competition run by the MIT Public Service Center, the IDEAS Global Challenge enables students to apply their MIT education in real-world situations to tackle quality of life issues for people around the world. 
 
IDEAS projects can address issues in one or more sectors, such as health, education, agriculture, energy and environment, water, finance and entrepreneurship, mobile technology, and housing and transportation. Teams are created and led by MIT undergraduate and graduate students, but they can include anyone from around the world. If you are looking to join an IDEAS team that needs your skill set or are simply interested in learning more about how to get involved, join the conversation and help move ideas towards realization. 

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October 7-9, 2016
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11TH Annual HONK! Festival:  Festival of activist street bands.
October 7-9,
Various neighborhoods throughout Somerville, Cambridge, and Boston.
Rain or shine; free and open to all.
For further information: www.honkfest.org, 617-383-HONK (4665).

FESTIVAL OF ACTIVIST STREET BANDS, THIS YEAR TOTALLING 26 

a wide variety of musical/socio-political events planned in Somerville, Cambridge, & Boston

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

For eleven years now, the HONK! Festival of Activist Street Bands has been altering the outdoor musicscape of Somerville and surrounding areas, by celebrating the sound and spectacle of brass and percussion in the service of participatory culture and social justice.

The energy surrounding the HONK! Festival has been positively infectious, so much so that HONK!, which originated in Somerville, has spawned related festivals in Providence, New York City, Seattle, Eugene, Austin, Pittsburgh, and Detroit, not to mention Wollongong, Australia, and Rio de Janeiro. Participants, including the audience, have reported peak musical moments and life-changing experiences. There is even a Somerville-based School of HONK that carries on the spirit of the Festival all year round. Needless to say, it is thrilling that HONK! has generated the creative energy and unbridled enthusiasm that propels the original HONK! into its second decade of playing music that matters.

There will indeed be more than enough music to please everyone, with over two dozen bands performing this year. Some will be the usual suspects, from all over the US and Canada, who may be familiar, but who always sound fresh. In addition, HONK! has made arrangements to present two new bands from France, La Fanfare Invisible from Paris and Le Pompier Poney Club from Marseille. And as part of HONK!'s continuing commitment to pay tribute to the music and culture of New Orleans, HONK! has invited back by popular demand the The Original Pinettes Brass Band.

This year, the 26 participatory bands, travelling from far and near, are:
aNova Brazil (Somerville, MA); Boycott (Somerville, MA); Brass Messengers (Minneapolis, MN); The Brass Balagan (Burlington, VT); The Bread and Puppet Circus Band (Glover, VT); Caka!ak Thunder (Greensboro, NC); Chaotic Insurrection Ensemble (Montreal, QC); Detroit Party Marching Band (Detroit, MI); Dirty Water Brass Band (Boston, MA); Emperor Norton's Stationary Marching Band  (Somerville, MA); Environmental Encroachment (Chicago, IL); Expandable Brass Band (Northampton, MA); Extraordinary Rendition Band (Providence, RI); La Fanfare Invisible (Paris, France); Forward! Marching Band (Madison, WI); Hartford Hot Several (Hartford, CT); Leftist Marching Band (Portsmouth, NH); Mayday Marching Band (Pittsburgh, PA); The Original Pinettes Brass Band (New Orleans); The Party Band (Lowell, MA); Le Pompier Poney Club (Marseille, France); Rude Mechanical Orchestra (New York City, NY); School of HONK (Somerville, MA); Second Line Social Aid and Pleasure Society Brass Band (Somerville, MA); What Cheer? Brigade (Providence, RI); and Yes Ma'am Brass Band (Austin, TX).
Further information on each band can be found at www.honkfest.org/2016-festival/bands-2016.

The Festival will include all the HONK! traditional features that have compelled thousands of participants to return year after year, with family-friendly Lantern Parades through the neighborhoods of Somerville; nine hours of continuous free performances by dozens of HONK! bands in Davis Square; the massive and overwhelming energetic HONK! Parade that makes its way down Massachusetts Avenue to "Reclaim the Streets for Horns, Bikes and Feet,” followed by a full afternoon of HONK! performances at Oktoberfest in Harvard Square. HONK! organizers are planning to expand the HONK! Day of Action to incorporate more political themes and performances throughout the Festival, while never losing sight of pairing those undertakings with irresistible music, outrageous costumes, and dancing in the streets. Updates for the Festival will be posted at www.honkfest.org/2016-festival/schedule-2016.

Additional HONK! activities, coinciding with the Festival, are:
-- HONK! Volunteer Party, held Sunday October 2nd from 3-5pm at the Dilboy VFW Hall, 371 Summer St. in Somerville. For further information, email volunteer at honkfest.org;
-- HONK! supporters from the Nave Gallery Annex, located at 53 Chester St. in Somerville, have sent out a "call for entries" (deadline September 17th) soliciting photographs taken during HONK!s past, to be included in their upcoming HONK! Deconstruction of Joy. The exhibit runs from October 6-22, with an art opening on Thursday October 6th from 6-8 pm. The exhibit is being organized by Leonardo March, a photojournalist hailing from Puerto Rico, who is now based in Boston. For further information: www.navegallery.org/wp/honk-deconstruction-of-joy.

HONK! is a non-profit organization, with a limited budget, with their annual Kickstarter fundraiser now in full swing: www.honkfest.org/kickstarter. For complete information and continuous updates on the HONK! Festival, visit www.honkfest.org, www.facebook.com/honkfestival, and www.twitter.com/honkfest. 

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October 7-10
——————— 

Reality, Virtually, Hackathon!
October 7-10
MIT Media Lab, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.realityvirtuallyhack.com/register

A weekend of Free Workshops + Hackathon + Public Expo that transforms the future of immersive technologies

Designers, coders, hackers, makers, enthusiasts, experts, learners, artists and engineers
Calling everyone to create, learn and explore new and yet to be known VR and AR applications at the MIT Media Lab, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

The Reality, Virtually, Hackathon brings together interdisciplinary minds to explore the application of virtual reality and augmented reality technologies for building new experiences. VR and AR has blossomed with games and 360-degree video. You can now help push it into new directions.

The VR and AR applications you create will explore new areas such as AR and VR "for good", AEC (architecture, engineering and construction), Film and Journalism, Healthcare and Medicine, Gaming, Art and Entertainment, Learning, Education, Advertising and more.

If your passion isn't listed, bring it and build it.

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Friday, October 7
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Houghton Lecture: The Contemporary Global Carbon Budget
Friday, October 7
9:00a–10:00a
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Corinne Le Quere, University of East Anglia
Houghton Lecture Series: The Global Carbon Budget in a Changing Climate | "The Contemporary Global Carbon Budget" - The global carbon cycle plays a key role in regulating climate and climate change. Natural reservoirs on land and in the ocean hold large quantities of carbon, which is exchanged with the atmosphere on time scales ranging from seconds to hundreds of thousands of years. This first lecture will explain what we know about the contemporary carbon cycle. It will detail the processes that regulate the storage of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere and in the ocean and present the latest data on the trends and variability in these 'carbon sinks.' The observed changes in the carbon sinks will be discussed in the context of a changing climate. | EVENT WEBSITE

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Maglio
cliberty at mit.edu 

Editorial Comment:  Given that the latest reports indicate we may have already passed the 1.5ºC increase in global average temperature from preindustrial averages and that we may be well on the way to surpassing the 2ºC limit that the IPCC and the Paris COP 21 have set, this lecture is very germane.

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Strengthening Value Chains in Irrigated Agriculture 
Friday, October 7
12-1pm
MIT, Building 1-131, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Topics: inclusive market oriented development, cold chains, digital agriculture, seed technology, financial inclusiveness.

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Toward Democracy:  The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought
Friday, October 7
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes JAMES T. KLOPPENBERG, Professor of American History at Harvard, for his book Toward Democracy: The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought.

About Toward Democracy
In this magnificent and encyclopedic overview, James T. Kloppenberg presents the history of democracy from the perspective of those who struggled to envision and achieve it. The story of democracy remains one without an ending, a dynamic of progress and regress that continues to our own day. In the classical age "democracy" was seen as the failure rather than the ideal of good governance. Democracies were deemed chaotic and bloody, indicative of rule by the rabble rather than by enlightened minds. Beginning in the 16th and 17th centuries, however, first in Europe and then in England's North American colonies, the reputation of democracy began to rise, resulting in changes that were sometimes revolutionary and dramatic, sometimes gradual and incremental.

Kloppenberg offers a fresh look at how concepts and institutions of representative government developed and how understandings of self-rule changed over time on both sides of the Atlantic. Notions about what constituted true democracy preoccupied many of the most influential thinkers of the Western world, from Montaigne and Roger Williams to Milton and John Locke; from Rousseau and Jefferson to Wollstonecraft and Madison; and from de Tocqueville and J. S. Mill to Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Over three centuries, explosive ideas and practices of democracy sparked revolutions--English, American, and French--that again and again culminated in civil wars, disastrous failures of democracy that impeded further progress.

Comprehensive, provocative, and authoritative, Toward Democracy traces self-government through three pivotal centuries. The product of twenty years of research and reflection, this momentous work reveals how nations have repeatedly fallen short in their attempts to construct democratic societies based on the principles of autonomy, equality, deliberation, and reciprocity that they have claimed to prize. Underlying this exploration lies Kloppenberg's compelling conviction that democracy was and remains an ethical ideal rather than merely a set of institutions, a goal toward which we continue to struggle.

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Controlling Wind Turbines and Wind Farms for Utility Grid Reliability
Friday, October 7
3pm-4pm
BU, 8 St. Mary’s Street, PHO 210, Boston
Refreshments at 2:45pm

Lucy Pao, University of Colorado Boulder, CISE Resident Scholar
Wind energy is recognized worldwide as cost-effective and environmentally friendly and is among the world’s fastest-growing sources of electrical energy. Despite the amazing growth in global wind power installations in recent years, science and engineering challenges still exist. For instance, since electrical power supply and demand must match on the grid to maintain grid reliability, the variability of generated wind power creates challenges to integrating large amounts of wind energy on the utility grid. Recently, research utilizing systems and control techniques has begun to demonstrate that it is possible to actively control the power generated by wind turbines and wind farms to help stabilize the grid frequency. In this talk, we will first provide an overview of wind energy systems by introducing the primary structural components and operating regions of wind turbines. The operation of the utility grid will be briefly reviewed by discussing the electrical system, explaining the importance of preserving grid reliability through controlling the grid frequency (which is a measure of the balance between electrical generation and load), and describing the traditional methods of providing ancillary services for frequency support using conventional generation utilities. We will then outline how wind turbines and wind farms can be controlled to help stabilize and balance the frequency of the utility grid. Results of simulation studies as well as experimental field tests will be presented to show the promise of the techniques being developed. We shall close by discussing continuing challenges and on-going and future research avenues that can further facilitate the growth of wind energy.

Lucy Pao is currently Professor in the Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering Department and Professor (by courtesy) in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Colorado Boulder.


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Reconstruction after Natural Disasters: Lessons from Kobe, Tohoku, and Kumamoto
Friday, October 7
4:00PM TO 5:00PM
ADD TO CALENDAR
Harvard, CGIS South Building, Kang Seminar Room (S050), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

with Stephen Poland, Reischauer Institute Postdoctoral Fellow and moderated by Tomiko Yoda, Professor of Japanese Humanities.

Japan Forum
http://rijs.fas.harvard.edu/programs/forum.php

Contact Name:  Yukari Swanson
yswanson at fas.harvard.edu

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A Tale of two Projects; the World’s Smallest Motor and Cheapest Catalyst
Friday, October 7, 2016 -
4:00pm to 5:15pm
Harvard, Pierce 209, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Charles Sykes, Tufts University
We have experimentally demonstrated the world’s first single molecule electric motor, which is powered by electrons from a scanning probe tip. Surprisingly, the direction and rate of the motor’s rotation are related to the chirality of both the motor molecule and the tip. In the area of catalysis we discovered that dispersing single palladium or platinum atoms in inexpensive, catalytically-inert copper surfaces creates ultra-selective hydrogenation catalysts. 

Speaker Bio:  Charles Sykes is a Professor of Chemistry at Tufts University. Charles got his B.S. and M.S. from Oxford University before moving to Cambridge University for a Ph.D. under the supervision of Professor Richard Lambert. He then relocated to the U.S. for a postdoctoral fellowship with Professor Paul Weiss at Penn State. Sykes has been named a Beckman Young Investigator, Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar, IUPAC young observer and the Usen Family Career Development Professor. He is also the recipient of a 2009 NSF CAREER award, a 2011 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award and the 2012 AVS Peter Mark Memorial Award. Charles received the Young Talented Scientist Award at Chirality 2014 and was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2015. He is the author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications and has given over 130 invited talks at conferences and universities.

Applied Physics Colloquia
 
Website: http://ase.tufts.edu/chemistry/sykes/index.html
Contact: Deni Peric
Email: dperic at seas.harvard.edu

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Rock Against the TPP Concert 
Friday, October 7
6pm - 10pm*
Spontaneous Celebrations, 45 Danforth Street, Jamaica Plain
All ages. Wheelchair accessible.
FREE! RSVP required at http://click.actionnetwork.org/mpss/c/6wA/ni0YAA/t.20l/HgSVI8aTR8eiYhhNIep0Sw/h1/ld36MQfB21zS1IpPzWX4-2BtI60pn14roRCkKNe1kHl9kVOkFbuM1mcswrctERaSVU-2BrxQf-2FmnnjRHd6OVHzPo68MQ00-2BfkeDH9GuTp6JqlV-2BQ5SPXpaZf2fNY4LEuEVEFDnwQlLL2bZ-2F0Hm-2Fho48vNEGJHp2xcFmHezD2mdiUDOd27SHwehrO8tOUyXBkheurwHO96J3NUDLqKKfbBA2tx3pulJJG6KIJKpHtbAlH7gjKUyv16v0fG3fjWMHTblS8

I wanted to make sure you knew that we'll be in Boston on Friday October 7th for one of our biggest events for Internet freedom ever: Rock Against the TPP. It?s a part of a nationwide tour of large-scale concerts to raise awareness about the dangers of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement. Can you come? Grab your free ticket!*

Featuring: *Mirah*, *Debo Band*, *Foundation Movement*, FFTF campaign director 
*Evan Greer*, and more! Plus lots of information and ways to get involved in the fight to stop the TPP.

What is the TPP?

The TPP is basically terrible for everything you care about. It would export the worst parts of U.S. copyright law and Internet policy on the rest of the world, undermining free speech and opening the floodgates for SOPA-style online censorship. [1] Beyond that, it would grant monopolistic corporations extraordinary powers to circumvent our basic democratic process, affecting everything from the environment to food safety to access to medicine to basic workers? rights.[2]

As Tom Morello says, "Corporate lobbyists want to sneak the TPP through 
Congress quietly; that means it's time for us to get loud."

Let's make sure we stop it.

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"Foxy Brown" with star Pam Grier and scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. in person
Friday, October 7, 2016
7:00 PM
Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge
Cost:  $12

 Too often, "classic" films are handed to us, prepackaged and ready for the shelf. Decades of veneration and sentimentality can mire a classic in stereotypes of what it is and does. Widen your field of vision, though, particularly taking in films tarred with the brush of "pop culture," and you can be roused or jolted awake by unexpected conjunctions, fresh connections with the power to disturb or delight. That's the argument made by the Harvard Film Archive this fall on behalf of the "blaxploitation" films of Pam Grier. Her avatar Foxy Brown has been promoted as an “action heroine with a social conscience,” a streetwise vindicator whose navigation of the terrain of race and gender allows us to experience a kind of liberation as the film unspools. Forty years on and "Foxy Brown's" dynamism still astonishes – one qualification for classic status!

On this evening, Grier on the big screen will be complemented by Grier in person, in conversation with Harvard's University Professor of African and African American Studies Henry Louis Gates, Jr. 

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Saturday, October 8
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13th Annual HBS Energy Symposium – Shaping the Future of Energy
Saturday, October 8
9:00am-6:00pm
(Registration Begins at 7:30am in Spangler Hall), Harvard Business School, Allston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2016-energy-environment-club-symposium-tickets-26744421284
Cost:  Early Bird Admission Price: $25 student/$70 professional

Please join the Energy & Environment Club at Harvard Business School for an exciting line-up of panelist and keynotes, including Jim Robo (NextEra), David Foley (Blackstone Energy Partners), and Sonny Wu (GSR Ventures China).

See more at http://energyclubathbs.org/symposium/

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Monday, October 10
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Museum of Fine Arts Fall Open House
Monday, October 10
10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Enjoy free admission and special events at the MFA’s annual Fall Open House—and the Fenway Alliance’s 15th annual Opening Our Doors Day. Hear a medley of musical performances throughout the day including a concert by a 17-piece ensemble from The Boston Pops. Enjoy a range of art-making activities and tours for families and adults—and a full calendar of ASL and ASL interpreted events. Contact access at mfa.org for more information about accessible programming.

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Tuesday, October 11
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The Track Record of Charter Schools in Massachusetts
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, 8:30 – 10 a.m.
WHERE  Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston
TYPE OF EVENT	Lecture, Reception
TOPIC  Equity and Access, Learning, Policy, Schools
BUILDING/ROOM  Other
CONTACT NAME  Ashley Dixon
CONTACT EMAIL  ashley_dixon at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-496-9457
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture
DETAILS	
Moderator:  Andrés Antonio Alonso, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Presenters:
Thomas Kane, Harvard University 
Macke Raymond, Stanford University
Joshua Angrist, MIT
 
This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard University, and Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Japan's Soft Power in Asia and the World
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  Seiichi Kondo, Commissioner, Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan
Moderated by Theodore Bestor, Reischauer Institute Professor of Social Anthropology and Director, Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK	http://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/calendar/upcoming

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Speaker Series: Joy-Ann Reid
Tuesday, October 11
2:00-3:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Joy Reid is the host of “AM Joy,” airing every Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. ET on MSNBC. She is also the author of the 2015 book, “Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide,” a top-selling book on Amazon.com in the Politics category. Reid was the former Managing Editor of theGrio.com, a daily online news and opinion platform devoted to delivering stories and perspectives that reflect and impact African-American audiences. While serving in this role, she became one of the first national reporters to cover the Trayvon Martin case in depth. Reid joined theGrio.com with experience as a freelance columnist for the Miami Herald and as editor of the political blog The Reid Report. Joy is also a former talk radio producer and host for Radio One, and previously served as an online news editor for the NBC affiliate WTVJ in Miramar, FL. During the 2004 presidential campaign, Reid served as the Florida deputy communications director for the 527 “America Coming Together” initiative, and was a press aide in the final stretch of President Barack Obama’s Florida campaign in 2008. Joy’s columns and articles have appeared in New York magazine, The Daily Beast, the Miami Herald, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, the South Florida Times and on Salon.com. In May 2016, Reid was honored by the Miami Coalition of Christians and Jews with the Hank Meyer National Headliner Award, an award previously given to fellow journalists Chuck Todd and Tom Brokaw, among others. She is currently producing a documentary, “The Fight Years”—which takes a look into the sport of boxing during the 1950s and 1960s in Miami. Reid graduated from Harvard University in 1991 with a concentration in film, and is a 2003 Knight Center for Specialized Journalism fellow. She currently resides in Brooklyn with her husband and family.

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Is Climate Change Affecting Life in The Deep Sea? with Peter Girguis
Tuesday, October 11
4:00pm
4pm – 5pm
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Peter Girguis. Professor of Organismic & Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University
The deep sea is the largest habitat on Earth, and harbors the much -if not the majority-  of Earth’s biodiversity.  While scientists and policymakers have understandably focused their attention on how climate change is influencing terrestrial and shallow marine habitats such as coral reefs, there is growing evidence that changes in our atmosphere are resulting in chemical changes in the deep sea.  Here I will present an overview of life in the deep sea, and will discuss their potential sensitivities and strengths in coping with the thermal and chemical changes on our planet. It is my hope that you will leave this presentation armed with a better understanding of how the deep sea might respond to ongoing changes in climate, so that we can more appropriately manage our planet’s natural resources.

Bio:  His research resides at the crossroads of microbial ecology, physiology, and biogeochemistry, and as such is highly interdisciplinary. He uses the appropriate combinations of molecular biology (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, qPCR, mutagenesis), as well as physiological and geochemical techniques (gas chromatography, in situ and laboratory mass spectrometry, in situ and laboratory isotope analyses, x-ray diffraction, atomic spectroscopy) to examine the relationship between microbial diversity/physiology and biogeochemical cycles. Due to the limitations of existing in situ measurement and incubation technologies, he and his lab have develop novel instruments and samplers that enable them to better study microbial-geochemical relationships. This includes high-pressure systems to mimic natural environments, in situ geochemical sensors, in situ microbial fuel cells as experimental apparatus and power sources, and novel in situ preservation technologies.

BURECS Seminar Series on Climate Change

This program is supported in part by a grant to Earth & Environment Professor Dave Marchant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Science Education Program.

http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/peter-girguis.html

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Opportunity
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Effective Altruism MIT Sloan Meetup Group
http://www.meetup.com/effective-altruism-mit-sloan/

Want to make the world the best place it can be? 
Effective Altruism is a worldwide movement that uses rational thinking and science to have the best possible impact. Effective Altruism MIT Sloan is bringing together people from all over the area to share experiences and be more effective by working together. 
To learn more about effective altruism, read the introduction on the international EA website (https://www.effectivealtruism.org) or watch Peter Singer's TED talk.

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Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian at cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
http://www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit
@cambenergy 
http://facebook.com/cambridgeenergyalliance

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 27 and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 12 PM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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