[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - October 2, 2016

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Oct 2 10:34:43 PDT 2016


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Index
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Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.  Keep scrolling, please.

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Monday, October 3
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12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Kim Cobb (GaTech)
12pm  Bayesian Inversion for Large Scale Antarctic Ice Sheet Flow
12pm  Governments as Partners: The Role of Collaboration in US Cleantech Startup Innovation
12:!0pm  One butterfly species tumbles off an adaptive peak and enters a lethal trap in the course of six host shifts observed across half a century
6pm  ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Computations Rule Everything Around Me
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking
7pm  Weapons of Math Destruction:  How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy
7pm  SCIENCE ON SCREEN®:  A Face in the Crowd 

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Tuesday, October 4
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11:45am  A Microbiome Revolution and the Future of Medicien and Agriculture
12pm  Speaker Series: Zeynep Tufekci
12pm  Methane Emission from Living Trees and Deadwood
12pm  Translating Research into Online Tools to Increase Participation in Collaborative Communities
12pm  Humanizing Technology
2:30pm  Debate on MA Ballot Question 4: would legalize the recreational use of marijuana
4pm  Exxon: The Road Not Taken with Lisa Song
5:30pm  Implementing Technological Change at the Margins: The limits and opportunities brought by the use of technology as a poverty alleviation tool
6pm  Materiality
6pm  Presenting the 2016 Norman B. Leventhal Excellence in City Building AWARDS
6:30pm  Rem Koolhaas
7pm  Arlie Russell Hochschild, Strangers in Their Own Land
7pm  Passion, Politics and Everyday Life
8pm  Streams of Expression and Love: Joe Lovano Celebrates Gunther Schuller at MIT

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Wednesday, October 5 - Friday, October 7
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Engineering Possibilities 2016:  Technology You'll Use Tomorrow

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Wednesday, October 5
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8am  The Cambridge Cyber Summit
12pm  Water and Food Production Challenges in the Semi-Arid Tropics
12pm  Hell You Talmbout: Contemporary Perspective on State Violence Against Black Women and Girls
12pm  Restrained by Design: Cyber Security and the Attenuation of War
4pm  The Prediction Project: A Lecture by Alyssa A. Goodman
4:10pm  The Ethics of Democracy Entrepreneurship
4:30pm  The Syrian Refugee Crisis: Weathering the Storm in Turkey and Beyond
5pm  A Conversation with Cornel West, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Christian Practice, Union Theological Seminary; Professor Emeritus, Princeton University
6pm  Extravagant Weapons: The Story behind Arms Races in Animals and People
6pm  The Rita E. Hauser Forum for the Arts: Anna Deavere Smith, "Radical Hospitality" A Lecture/Performance
6pm  Cambridge Climate Congress "Origins" Discussion Group
6pm  “Secret Societies" and the Limits of Transparency
6:30pm  Money, Corporations, and Democracy: Moral and Religious Perspectives
6:30pm  Moving to Mars - The Mars One Candidates
7pm  Demand the Impossible!:  A Radical Manifesto
7pm  How We Can Stop Climate Change
7pm  Exhibition Panel Discussion: Refugee Crisis

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Thursday, October 6, 7:00 PM – Friday, October 7, 5:30 PM
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The Private Sector for Public Ideas

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Thursday, October 6
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11:45am  Calestous Juma on Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies
12pm  Into the Great Wide Open:  The promise and potential perils of climate geoengineering
12:15pm  Why Do Armed Nonstate Actors Recruit Foreign Fighters? Evidence from the Syrian Civil War
1:30pm  The CRISPR/Cas9 Revolution and Gene Editing
4pm  The diversity, stability and evolution of ecological networks
4pm  Genomic Scope of Adaptive Mutations in the Face of an Environmental Challenge
4pm  Humanitarian Negotiations on the Front Lines: Protecting Syria's Hospitals
5pm  Allison Hahn: "This Land Is Our Land: Mobile Media, Protest, and Debate in Maasai and Mongolian Land Disputes”
5:30pm  Askwith Forums: Life, Animated: Autism, Ableism, and Educators
6pm  RPP Colloquium with Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee: Women as Catalysts for Local and Global Spiritually-Engaged Movements for Sustainable Peace
6pm  A Night @ Engineering Possibilities 2016
6:30pm  Public Lecture: Peter Latz, “Pioneering New Territory”
6:45pm  MIT IDEAS Fall Generator Dinner 2016

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October 7-9, 2016
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11TH Annual HONK! Festival:  Festival of activist street bands

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October 7-10
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Reality, Virtually, Hackathon!

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Friday, October 7
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9am  Houghton Lecture: The Contemporary Global Carbon Budget
12pm  Strengthening Value Chains in Irrigated Agriculture 
12pm  Reconciling Fisheries Catch and Ocean Productivity in a Changing Climate
3pm  Toward Democracy:  The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought
3pm  Controlling Wind Turbines and Wind Farms for Utility Grid Reliability
4pm  Reconstruction after Natural Disasters: Lessons from Kobe, Tohoku, and Kumamoto
4pm  A Tale of two Projects:  the World’s Smallest Motor and Cheapest Catalyst
6pm  Rock Against the TPP Concert 
7pm  "Foxy Brown" with star Pam Grier and scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. in person

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Saturday, October 8
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13th Annual HBS Energy Symposium – Shaping the Future of Energy

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Monday, October 10
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10am  Museum of Fine Arts Fall Open House
6:30pm  Love Bites: Studying Mosquito Sex to Block Malaria Transmission

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Tuesday, October 11
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8:30am  The Track Record of Charter Schools in Massachusetts
12pm  Plant Respiration: Lessons from High Latitudes for Ecosystem Carbon Balance Modelling
12:30pm  Japan's Soft Power in Asia and the World
2pm  Speaker Series: Joy-Ann Reid
4pm  Is Climate Change Affecting Life in The Deep Sea?
5:30pm  Changing Media, Changing Politics

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

City Agriculture - September 25, 2016
http://cityag.blogspot.com/2016/09/city-agriculture-september-25-2016.html

Environmentalists Are Awful Voters
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/09/29/1574006/-Environmentalists-Are-Awful-Voters

The Atrocity Election:  A Ballardian Forecast
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/09/27/1574683/-The-Atrocity-Election-A-Ballardian-Forecast

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Monday, October 3
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PAOC Colloquium - Kim Cobb (GaTech)
Monday, October 3
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Kim Cobb, GaTech
About the Speaker
Kim Cobb’s research uses corals and cave stalagmites to reconstruct tropical Pacific temperature and rainfall patterns over the last decades to millennia. She received her B.A. from Yale University in 1996, and her Ph.D. in Oceanography from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in 2002. She spent two years at Caltech in the Department of Geological and Planetary Sciences before joining the faculty at Georgia Tech in 2004. Kim has sailed on six oceanographic cruises and led five caving expeditions to the rainforests of Borneo in support of her research. Her papers regularly appear in high-profile journals, including 5 papers in Nature or Science. Kim has received numerous awards for her research, most notably a NSF CAREER Award in 2007, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2008, and a Sigma Chi Best Paper Award in 2013. She sits on the AAAS Climate Science Panel, the international CLIVAR Pacific Panel, and the international PAGES-CLIVAR Intersection Panel.

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Bayesian Inversion for Large Scale Antarctic Ice Sheet Flow
Monday, October 3
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Omar Ghattas, University of Texas, Austin

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/event/department-colloquium-series-12

Note: The colloquium talks now begin at noon. Please plan on arriving at 11:45AM to help yourself to lunch. 

Contact Name:   Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Governments as Partners: The Role of Collaboration in US Cleantech Startup Innovation
Monday, October 3
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Claudia Doblinger, University of Regensburg, Germany

This series is presented by the Energy Technology Innovation Policy/Consortium for Energy Policy Research at HKS. Lunch will be provided.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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One butterfly species tumbles off an adaptive peak and enters a lethal trap in the course of six host shifts observed across half a century
Monday, October 3
12:10 pm
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Michael Singer, Professor, University of Plymouth

More information at http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Computations Rule Everything Around Me
Monday, October 3
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E15-001, The ACT Cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Etienne Turpin with a response from stefania druga, founder of HacKIDemia

Intangible infrastructures.
Nonorganic vitalities.
Digital solidarities.
Technical debts.
Human Machines.
Bot torrents.
Post-Media.

Through a survey of recent design projects from anexact office, The Nanyang Technological University Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore and PetaBencana.id, Etienne will argue for an interventive disposition toward the parametrization of life on earth.

Etienne Turpin is a philosopher studying, designing, curating, and writing about urban systems, knowledge infrastructures, visual and spatial cultures, and colonial-scientific histories. He is a Research Scientist with the MIT Urban Risk Lab, where he coordinates the Humanitarian Infrastructures Group and co-directs PetaBencana.id. Etienne is also the founding director of anexact office in Jakarta, Indonesia, and a Visiting Research Fellow at the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art in Singapore. He is co-editor of Fantasies of the Library (MIT Press, 2016), Art in the Anthropocene (Open Humanities Press, 2015) and Jakarta: Architecture + Adaptation (Universitas Indonesia Press, 2013), and editor of Architecture in the Anthropocene (Open Humanities Press, 2013).

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking
Monday, October 3
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
The popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 3
“Diffusion and Gelation in Peruvian Cooking”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Virgilio Martinez, (@VirgilioCentral), Central
Malena Martinez, (@MMVCentral), Central
Monday, Oct. 17
“Heat Transfer”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo Restaurants
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Weapons of Math Destruction:  How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy
Monday, October 3
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This event is free; no tickets are required.

Harvard Book Store welcomes data scientist CATHY O'NEIL for a discussion of Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy, her book on the mathematical models that pervade modern life and threaten to rip apart our social fabric.
About Weapons of Math Destruction

We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives—where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance—are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: Everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated.
But as Cathy O’Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they’re wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination: If a poor student can’t get a loan because a lending model deems him too risky (by virtue of his zip code), he’s then cut off from the kind of education that could pull him out of poverty, and a vicious spiral ensues. Models are propping up the lucky and punishing the downtrodden, creating a “toxic cocktail for democracy.” Welcome to the dark side of Big Data.
Tracing the arc of a person’s life, O’Neil exposes the black box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society. These “weapons of math destruction” score teachers and students, sort résumés, grant (or deny) loans, evaluate workers, target voters, set parole, and monitor our health.
O’Neil calls on modelers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use. But in the end, it’s up to us to become more savvy about the models that govern our lives. This important book empowers us to ask the tough questions, uncover the truth, and demand change.

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SCIENCE ON SCREEN®:  A Face in the Crowd 
Monday, October 3
7:00pm
Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard Street, Brookline
Cost:  $9 - $12

POWER! He loved it! He took it raw in big gulpfuls...he liked the taste, the way it mixed with the bourbon and the sin in his blood!

Andy Griffith sizzles in his first onscreen role as drunken drifter Lonesome Rhodes who becomes an overnight media sensation, rising from itinerant Ozark guitar picker to local media rabble-rouser to TV superstar and political king-maker. From director Elia Kazan and On the Waterfront writer Budd Schulberg, A Face in the Crowd was hailed by Francois Truffaut as "passionate, exalted, fierce...a pleasure for the mind."

Before the film, join Dr. Steven Schlozman, associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS), as he discusses our attraction to politically charismatic speakers, our tendency to create "us" versus "them" dichotomies, and how our brains work (and don’t work) during an election year. 

About the Speaker
Dr. Steven Schlozman is associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS). He also serves as course director of the psychopathology class for the MIT-HMS Program in Health, Sciences and Technology. Dr. Schlozman practices child and adult psychiatry at MGH, where he also serves as the primary consultant to the pediatric transplant service. He received BA's in English and biology from Stanford University, and his MD from the Dartmouth-Brown Program in Medicine.

Dr. Schlozman has done international research focusing on stigma and mental illness, and has written and presented extensively on the topic. He also writes short fiction, and has published one novel, The Zombie Autopsies. This novel has been optioned for film adaptation by George Romero, creator of Night of the Living Dead, and Dr. Schlozman is currently working on a sequel. Because of this work, he teaches a freshman seminar at Harvard University that focuses on horror and thrillers in literature and film.

More information at http://www.coolidge.org/films/face-crowd

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Tuesday, October 4
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A Microbiome Revolution and the Future of Medicien and Agriculture
Tuesday, October 4
11:45am to 1:00pm
Harvard, Geo Museum, Haller Hall, room 102, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Geoffrey von Maltzahn, Partner, Flagship Ventures
The science of host-microbiome interactions is fundamentally changing our understanding of human, animal, and plant biology. This talk will focus on medicine and agriculture—trillion dollar industries on the cusp of microbiome-based revolutions—and share VentureLabs’ work in creating innovative startups to drive this change.

Topics in Bioengineering

Contact: Luo Gu or Nisarg Shah
luogu at seas.harvard.edu

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Speaker Series: Zeynep Tufekci
Tuesday, October 4,
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275.15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Zeynep Tufekci, a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, writes about the social impacts of technology. She is an assistant professor in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, a faculty associate at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard, and a former fellow at the Center for Internet Technology Policy at Princeton. Her research revolves around politics, civics, movements, privacy and surveillance, as well as data and algorithms.

Originally from Turkey, Ms. Tufekci was a computer programmer by profession and academic training before turning her focus to the impact of technology on society and social change. She switched to social science, and started calling herself a “technosociologist.” She has been published widely on the interaction of new technologies with society, politics and culture. Her forthcoming book from Yale University Press is tentatively titled “Beautiful Tear Gas: The Ecstatic, Fragile Politics of Networked Protest in the 21st Century.”

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Methane Emission from Living Trees and Deadwood
Tuesday, October 4
12:00pm to 1:00pm
HUH Seminar Room, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Kristofer Covey, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Yale University

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Translating Research into Online Tools to Increase Participation in Collaborative Communities
Tuesday, October 4
12:00 pm
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/10/Hassan#RSVP
[PLEASE NOTE] Lunch will not be provided for this brown-bag event.
Event will be live webcast on https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/10/Hassan at 12:00 pm

with Berkman Klein Fellow Samer Hassan 
There is abundant research on commons-based Peer Production communities, from free/open source software and wikis to fablabs and even community gardens. Research shows how these communities, regardless of their type, follow a deeply unequal distribution of effort (the 1-9-90 rule). This fact frequently generates feelings of frustration and guilt among contributors and users.

How can we translate social research into evidence-based interventions to aid these communities? Which online tools would help reduce the invisible wall between contributors and users to facilitate participation? How can we ensure the tools we build respond to the communities' needs? 

Associate Professor Samer Hassan shares three years of research within the EU-funded P2Pvalue.eu project, aimed at translating social research into the building of online tools to increase the participation and sustainability of commons-based peer production communities. 

About Samer
Samer Hassan (PhD) is an activist and researcher, Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society (Harvard University) and Associate Professor at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Currently focused on decentralized collaboration, he has carried out research in decentralized systems, social simulation and artificial intelligence from positions in the University of Surrey (UK) and the American University of Science & Technology (Lebanon). Coming from a multidisciplinary background in Computer Science and Social Sciences, he has more than 45 publications in those fields. Engaged in free/open source projects, he co-founded the Comunes Nonprofit and the Move Commons webtool project. He's an accredited grassroots facilitator and has experience in multiple communities and grassroots initiatives. He's involved as UCM Principal Investigator in the EU-funded P2Pvalue project on building decentralized web-tools for collaborative communities and social movements. His research interests include Commons-based peer production, decentralized architectures, online communities, grassroots social movements & cyberethics. 

Samer's website http://samer.hassan.name
Samer's Twitter https://twitter.com/samerp2p
The Teem app: an easy way for communities to get people involved http://teem.works

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Dana Cho, “Humanizing Technology”
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gund 112, Stubbins Room, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Dana Cho
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
DETAILS  As a partner and managing director at IDEO in Palo Alto, Dana Cho, M.Arch. ’01, leads the company’s Silicon Valley outpost, working with designers, clients, and organizations to create memorable and scalable brand experiences. Her particular areas of expertise are healthcare, hospitality, and retail. Since joining IDEO in 2001, Cho co-founded the Smart Space practice, a business within IDEO focused on applying the human-centered innovation process to physical, experiential brand experiences at scale, real-estate development, and urban design, and has led multiple large-scale projects with clients such as Nike, Mayo Clinic, Sam’s Club, Virgin Group, and the Four Seasons. For the Ritz-Carlton, Cho created “Scenography,” a program that mobilized a new approach to service design and delivery, to be implemented in hotels worldwide. Cho has taught and lectured at California College of Arts and is a frequent visiting lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. She has also spoken at various conferences including PSFK, ULI, and GlobalShop. A graduate of Harvard GSD, where her thesis work was carried out under Rem Koolhaas, Cho worked at several architecture firms—including Gwathmey Siegel, Morphosis, and SOM—before joining IDEO. Cho currently serves on the external advisory board of the Master in Design Engineering, a collaborative degree program at Harvard GSD and Harvard SEAS.
LINK	http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/dana-cho-humanizing-technology/

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Debate on MA Ballot Question 4: would legalize the recreational use of marijuana
Tuesday, October 4
2:30 PM to 4:00 PM
John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, 100 William T Morrissey Boulevard, McCormack Theatre, Second Floor, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/debates-on-ma-ballot-questions-tickets-27459973520

UMass Boston’s McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, WBUR radio, and The Boston Globe will host a series of live weekly debates exploring in depth the four statewide ballot questions to be decided by Massachusetts voters in the November 8 election.
The show’s host, Meghna Chakrabarti, will be joined each week by a co-moderator from The Boston Globe. Each debate will feature representatives on both sides of a ballot question, as designated by the groups formally proposing or opposing each question.

This series of debates is intended to raise the profile and further the discussion of the important ballot questions facing Massachusetts voters, as often ballot questions get little public notice.

Because the debates are taking place as part of WBUR’s “Radio Boston” program, from 3 to 4 p.m., the live audience must be in their seats in the McCormack Theatre by 2:45 p.m. The doors open at 2:30 and close at 2:45. The debates are free and open to the public, but registration will be required. 

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Exxon: The Road Not Taken with Lisa Song
Tuesday, October 4
4:00pm
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Lisa Song, Climate Reporter, Inside Climate News
Lisa Song, a reporter at InsideClimate News, will discuss the story behind "Exxon: the Road Not Taken," an investigative series that revealed Exxon's early engagement with climate science before the company turned to climate denial, manufacturing doubt about the scientific consensus its own scientists had confirmed. Lisa was part of the team that reported the series, which was named a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. Lisa will also talk about climate reporting in general, and the challenges and opportunities of doing watchdog environmental reporting.

Bio:  Lisa Song joined InsideClimate News in January 2011, where she reports on climate change, environmental health and natural gas drilling. She is co-author of the "The Dilbit Disaster" series, which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, and worked on the Exxon: The Road Not Taken stories. Song has degrees in environmental science and science writing from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

BURECS Seminar Series on Climate Change

This program is supported in part by a grant to Earth & Environment Professor Dave Marchant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Science Education Program.

http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/lisa-song.html

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Implementing Technological Change at the Margins: The limits and opportunities brought by the use of technology as a poverty alleviation tool
Tuesday, October 4
5:30 - 6:30 PM 
MIT, Building E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSddCEDeLJLS_I7vt44nbavZL_yxncvrxPxzSCmswwvKNExRfw/viewform?c=0&w=1&usp=send_form

Cauam Ferreira Cardoso, a PhD Candidate in International Economic Development at MIT
Abstract:  Despite the long history of technology-driven initiatives aimed at poverty reduction, it is still challenging to find examples of policies, projects, and products generating the positive impact expected of them. It is not rare to see large-scale infrastructure, such as water, sanitation, and waste management systems, which have a limited impact due to poor design or bad implementation. Similarly, products such as cook stoves, water filers, and solar lanterns often struggle to reach the people in need on a sustainable basis, despite the efforts of those trying to deliver them. In this talk, Mr. Cardoso will draw from his experience as a practitioner and researcher to discuss some of the contextual factors – economic, social, political, cultural, and institutional – contributing to the success and failure of technology-driven poverty alleviation initiatives.

Speaker’s Bio:  Cauam Ferreira Cardoso is a Consultant and a PhD Candidate in International Economic Development at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Since the start of his professional career in 2002, he has lived on 6 different continents, and worked professionally on 5. After developing several socio-environmental and sanitation projects in Brazil, he spent two years in Angola, where he worked with large-scale sanitation and solid waste management projects. Between 2010 and 2012, he worked for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), initially serving in Cambodia, and later at FAO’s headquarters in Italy, supporting the implementation of food security projects worldwide.

At MIT, since the fall of 2012, Mr. Cardoso has been conducting research on the interface between technological change and economic development in emerging countries, as well as the implementation of development policies and projects. He has been part of the MIT-USAID Comprehensive Initiative on Technology Evaluation (CITE) research team since 2013, where he is currently supporting SEWA Bharat, an arm of the Self-Employed Women’s Association of India, to improve their technology evaluation capabilities. In addition to his academic activities, he also continues to work as a consultant for public, private, and non-profit organizations working in and with countries in the Global South. Mr. Cardoso holds a Master’s in Political Economy from the University of Sydney (Australia) and a Bachelor’s in Civil Engineering, with qualification in Sanitary and Environmental Engineering from Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil). 

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Materiality
Tuesday, October 4
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 1 Broadway 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/materiality-tickets-27529052136
Cost:  $8 – $12

Touted as the key to determining the best sustainability strategy, materiality assessments intimidate mere mortals trying to move their organization’s sustainability initiatives forward. Yet, those who have done them and live to tell the tale, say they are critical to gaining organizational alignment. We’ve asked BASG veterans of Materiality Assessments Asheen Phansey and Johanna Jobin to lead our discussion. If you have similar experience and an interest to join the panel, please contact us. 

A materiality assessment is a process of engaging stakeholders to identify what environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues are most important to an organization. These findings can help an organization prioritize both where their sustainability initiatives should focus and what’s most important for them to report.
Leading our discussion are:

Asheen Phansey has served in various roles as a corporate sustainability leader at Dassault Systèmes since 2010. Dassault Systèmes is a $3B software company that provides businesses and people with 3D modeling apps and experiences to harmonize product, nature, and life.
Asheen lectures and advises students at Babson College and Harvard University, serves on the Net Impact Advisory Council, and ranks as one of the most influential social media thought leaders in corporate sustainability (twitter: @asheen). Asheen has experience in the biotech and aerospace industries, and holds a BS in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University and an MBA in Technology Entrepreneurship from Babson College.
Asheen enjoys learning new languages, speaking at Toastmasters, philosophizing over espresso or whiskey, and running (sometimes after his young kids). Among his greatest achievements in life are speaking at BASG for now his third time, and counting Carol and Johanna as friends.
Asheen plans to speak about Dassault Systèmes Handprinting/Net-Positive as a way of addressing materiality challenges, and about conducting a scope 3 GHG materiality study for the aerospace sector on behalf of the International Aerospace Environmental Group.

and Johanna Jobin, Director, Global EHS & Sustainability at Biogen, has done many materiality assessments. Earlier this year we heard about Biogen’s journey to carbon neutrality. Before Biogen, Johanna was Head of Corporate Responsibility & Community Affairs of MilliporeSigma. She received her Master of Environmental Management degree, with a certificate in Energy and Environment, from Duke and is an ISO 14001 trained auditor. Johanna is also active with NAEM, USGBC, AIM, WPI, MSEP, the City of Cambridge Climate Protection Action Committee, and “e” inc.

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Presenting the 2016 Norman B. Leventhal Excellence in City Building AWARDS
Tuesday, October 4
6:00 – 9:00 pm
Boston Harbor Hotel Boston

HONORING
Thomas Glynn, CEO, Massport Cambridge Innovation Center
Tim Rowe, Founder & CEO and Brian Dacey, President
University of Massachusetts Boston, School for the Environment Ellen Douglas, PhD, Associate Professor of Hydrology and
Paul Kirshen, PhD, Professor of Climate Adaptation

A Better City, 33 Broad Street Boston, MA 02109  Norman B. Leventhal Excellence in City Building AWARDS
Join us in celebrating remarkable leaders who have made significant contributions that have enhanced Boston and the region’s economic competitiveness, mobility, sustainability and quality of life.
A formal invitation will follow.

For more information about A Better City, please contact Sarah Shields.
T. 617-502-6250 | E. sshields at abettercity.org
www.abettercity.org

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Rem Koolhaas
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Rem Koolhaas
COST  Free
DETAILS  Rem Koolhaas worked as a script writer and journalist before becoming an architect, studying at the Architectural Association in London. He founded the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) in 1975, together with Elia and Zoe Zenghelis and Madelon Vriesendorp; he leads the firm today, along with eight partners, including its conceptual branch, AMO, a think tank focused on social, economic, and technological issues. The service building for CCTV in Beijing and the 11th Street Bridge project in Washington, D.C. are among OMA’s many notable ongoing projects; those that opened in the last year include the Pierre Lassonde Pavilion at the Musée Nationale des Beaux Arts in Québec; the Repossi boutique on Place Vendôme in Paris; the Fondazione Prada in Milan; Holland Green, a mixed-use development in London; and Manus x Machina, an exhibition on fashion and technology at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Other recent works of note include the Netherlands Embassy in Berlin (2003), the McCormick Tribune Campus Center at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago (2003), the Seattle Central Library (2004), and the Casa da Musica in Porto, Portugal (2005) .
Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
LINK	http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/rem-koolhaas/

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Arlie Russell Hochschild, Strangers in Their Own Land
Tuesday, October 4
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

In Strangers in Their Own Land, the renowned sociologist Arlie Hochschild embarks on a thought-provoking journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, California, deep into Louisiana bayou country a stronghold of the conservative right. As she gets to know people who strongly oppose many of the ideas she famously champions, Hochschild nevertheless finds common ground and quickly warms to the people she meets -- among them, a Tea Party activist whose town has been swallowed by a sinkhole caused by a drilling accident -- people whose concerns are actually ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children. 

Strangers in Their Own Land goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that these are people who have been duped into voting against their own interests. Instead, Hochschild finds lives ripped apart by stagnant wages, a loss of home, an elusive American dream and political choices and views that make sense in the context of their lives. Hochschild draws on her expert knowledge of the sociology of emotion to help us understand what it feels like to live in red America. Along the way she finds answers to one of the crucial questions of contemporary American politics: why do the people who would seem to benefit most from liberal government intervention abhor the very idea?

Arlie Russell Hochschild is one of the most influential sociologists of her generation. She is the author of nine books, including The Second Shift, The Time Bind, The Managed Heart, The Outsourced Self, and Strangers in Their Own Land. Three of her books have been named as New York Times Notable Books of the Year and her work appears in sixteen languages. The winner of the Ulysses Medal as well as Guggenheim and Mellon grants, she lives in Berkeley, California.

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Passion, Politics and Everyday Life
Tuesday, October 4
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 1581 Beacon Street, Brookline
RSVP at http://www.bgsp.edu/event/passion-politics-daily-life/

Presenters
Stephen Soldz, Ph.D, Cert.Psya., Director of Social Justice and Human Rights Project
Patricia Hugenberger, Psya.D., BGSP Faculty
Politics arouse intense emotions in all of us particularly in this election year. Is it possible to step back and analyze how we respond to the 2016 election, while putting our personal loyalties aside for a moment?

This event addresses the 2016 election, examining the passions aroused in the social arena and clinically in the office, focusing on idiosyncratic countertransference and treatment issues.

Objectives: Participants will be able to:
Analyze and discuss from a group perspective, possible motivations, conscious and unconscious, for voting choices.
Identify and discuss possible countertransference reactions to candidates and people who vote for them.
Discuss understandings of voting motivations and how to deal with them in a clinical setting.

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Streams of Expression and Love: Joe Lovano Celebrates Gunther Schuller at MIT
Tuesday, October 4
8:00p–9:30p
MIT, Building 14W-111, Killian Hall, 160 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Joe Lovano
In addition to performing music from Rush Hour as a quartet (with vocal-jazz great Judi Silvano, Boston-bassist and MIT Affiliated Artist Keala Kaumeheiwa and MIT Director of Wind and Jazz Ensembles, Fred Harris, drums) Lovano will also perform MIT composer and Professor of Music Peter Child's Moonsculptures, an attractive Third Stream influenced composition for tenor saxophone, violin, and piano. Violinist and Schuller devotee Young-Nam Kim (Artistic Director of the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota), and pianist and Senior Lecturer in Music at MIT David Deveau (Rockport Chamber Music Festival Artistic Director) join Lovano. Other chamber works by Child and Harris round out the program performed by Kim and his son Daniel Kim, new violist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

One of Schuller's closest friends and perhaps greatest advocate, the legendary Third Stream pianist and educator Ran Blake (New England Conservatory) will make a very special solo guest appearance on the program.

MIT Sounding 
The 2016-17 season of innovative annual performance series MIT Sounding continues to blur the boundaries between contemporary and world music. Curated by Evan Ziporyn, Faculty Director of the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology, this season of Sounding integrates the avant-garde sounds of ancient instruments and traditional practices with cutting-edge composition and technology to present various visions of a new, evolving music that defies genre.

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/joe-lovano/#public-events
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free: donations will be accepted for efforts to preserve the legacy of Gunther Schuller 
Tickets: Registration available soon 
Sponsor(s): Music and Theater Arts, CAST
For more information, contact:  Leah Talatinian
617.253.5351
leaht at mit.edu 

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Wednesday, October 5 - Friday, October 7
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Engineering Possibilities 2016:  Technology You'll Use Tomorrow
October 5-7  
9 A.M. - 4 P.M.
Drapter Labs, 1 Hampshire Street, Cambridge

Welcome to EP16
At Draper, we believe exciting things happen when new capabilities are imagined and created.

This technology showcase represents Draper-funded research and development efforts that, if successful, will improve your life, change industries, and push the boundaries of what's technologically possible.

Whether formulating a concept and developing each component to achieve a field-ready prototype or combining existing technologies in new ways, Draper engineers apply multidisciplinary skills that provide new capabilities. Draper is strongly committed to delivering working solutions, to space and national security--and many areas in between.

Draper is an independent not-for-profit engineering research and development company dedicated to solving complex global challenges. You are about to see the real-world effect that engineers at Draper can have.

Follow the Draper approach as we turn ideas into powerful solutions.

More information at: http://www.draper.com/EP-16

Ideas
Transforming Synthetic Biology (DNA Synthesis)
Synthesized DNA is crucial to researchers working to understand diseases and develop cures, but today, research efforts are hampered by inefficient synthesis technology that limits the length of defect-free DNA available in the marketplace. Draper is working to develop instrumentation for the rapid, consistent printing of error-free DNA strands of 10,000 nucleotides in one day.
Contact Information:  Rob Larsen
rob at draper.com

Guiding Insect Navigation (DragonflEye)
Miniature aerial vehicles can’t match the efficiency and maneuverability of dragonflies. Insects benefit from ultra-thin wings to produce lift, neuromuscular feedback to coordinate wing strokes and replenishable energy from food. Draper engineers are developing a way to steer dragonflies using a tiny navigation system that guides them by interfacing directly with their nervous systems. 
Contact Information:  Jesse Wheeler
jwheeler at draper.com

Research
Monitoring Brain Activity (E-Field Sensor)
Existing MRI, CT, and PET scanning equipment is large and costly, limiting its uses to critical medical diagnostics. This limitation inhibits the numerous applications of brain behavior measurements beyond the clinical environment. Draper is developing a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor with the required performance to enable the first noncontact, on-demand neurosensing approach— electric field encephalography (EFEG) in a portable, affordable form factor.
Contact Information:  Jim Bickford
jbickford at draper.com

Connecting Chips without Substrates (Miniature Multiwire Systems)
Consumer demand for customized tech continues to grow. But today’s microelectronics are limited by the constraints of what is manufacturable in today’s semiconductor fabrication using time-consuming as well as costly process steps. Conventional wires used to wirebond microelectronics packaging suffer from cross talks and low signal integrity as frequency increases. But microscale coaxial wires can provide good power and signal transmission properties without the need for conventional high-density interconnect circuit boards--just stitch the chips to each other. 
Contact Information:  Hongmei Zhang
hzhang at draper.com

Concept
Enabling Stem Cells (Enabling Stem Cells for Precision Medicine)
Stem cells offer promising therapeutic opportunities. Unfortunately, a hurdle to the wide-spread application of these therapies exists because the current availability of donated human tissue does not meet patient treatment needs, nor does it represent the population’s genetic diversity. The same limitations affect tissue available for medical research. Draper is developing technology to turn adult or induced pluripotent stem cells into specific cell types for focused research and therapies.
Contact Information:  Jonathan Coppeta
jcoppeta at draper.com

Training Robots (Autonomy)
State-of-the-art autonomous systems, such as self-driving cars or unmanned aircraft, are designed to have limited interaction with the world—avoiding objects in the environment to ensure safety rather than manipulate them. Draper is building autonomous robots capable of safely interacting with, manipulating, and changing the dynamic, unstructured environments where people live and work. Engineers at Draper are focused on training neural networks to recognize relevant objects—a difficult task that enables robots to understand their environment.
Contact Information:  David M.S. Johnson
david.m.johnson at draper.com

Empowering Earth Imaging (Small Sat, Large N)
Governments, industries, even private citizens like fishers and gardeners, can benefit from the collection of regular, frequent images of Earth’s surface by small satellites. Though the number and frequency of these images has increased due to small satellite constellations, their benefits elude most people because they aren’t backed with efficient analysis, nor are they transmitted back to Earth in a timely manner. Satellites need to be able to send imagery and other data routinely to ground stations. This is not only to benefit analysts, but to free space in satellite memory to collect more images. Image analysts need software tools to detect and interpret subtle changes over time.
Contact Information:  Seamus Tuohy, Kim Slater
stuohy at draper.com  kslater at draper.com

Personalizing Software (Co-Adaptive Human Computer Interaction)
Software developers cram features into programs and interfaces to serve as broad a range of users as possible. This can make the software more time-consuming to learn and use. To help people use software efficiently, Draper is creating an interface that adapts to an individual user over time based on dynamic understanding of the person’s software usage patterns.
Contact Information:  Meredith Cunha
mcunha at draper.com

Design
Treating Patient-Specific Cancer  (Personalized Predictive Assay for Cancer Therapy)
Hundreds of drugs to treat cancer exist. New cancer treatments are tested in large clinical trials for safety and efficacy before they are approved for wider distribution, but those studies do not tell a doctor how well a particular drug will work on a unique patient's cancer. With Draper's Personalized Predictive Assay for Cancer Therapy (PPACT), this is about to change.
Contact Information:  Jeff Borenstein
jborenstein at draper.com

Beating Antibiotic Resistance (Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test)
It takes days of lab testing to determine what a patient is infected with and what the appropriate treatment is. This forces physicians to treat empirically with guidance from tracking patient outcomes. The negative consequences of this guesswork are many-fold, including death, prolonged illness, propagation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and collateral damage to healthy microflora resulting in C. difficile infections.
Contact Information:  Jason Holder
jholder at draper.com

Prototyping
Treating Diseases in the Brain (High-Fidelity Neural Stimulation)
Conventional treatment methods often fail to resolve the symptoms of neurological and psychiatric conditions. Fortunately, many patients have found relief from symptoms through electrical stimulation to the affected brain areas with neural implants. However, conventional devices provide limited control over the patterns of brain activity. To address this, Draper has developed an injectable miniature neural implant.
Contact Information:  Dan Freeman
dfreeman at draper.com

Enabling Flat Telescopes (Advanced Stellar Sensor)
Scientific telescopes require big lenses to maximize the amount of light they capture at the highest resolution possible. But their size makes them difficult to operate, maintain and store. Draper's Advanced Stellar Sensors contain high-performance optics of the smallest known size and weight—making them better options for an array of uses.
Contact Information:  J.P. Laine
jlaine at draper.com

Support
Resupplying Troops on Demand (Precision Airdrop)
Deployed troops need resupply, but in roadless terrain, trucks cannot deliver. Airdropping unguided packages requires aircrafts to fly low, exposing them to enemy fire, and supplies may land in dangerous locations. Using its expertise in guidance, navigation and control and in planning, Draper engineers advanced airdrop mission planning software and advanced airdrop parafoil steering systems enables precise aerial delivery.
Contact Information:  Chris Bessette
cbessette at draper.com

Improving Life in Space  (International Space Station)
The International Space Station's orbit around Earth provides a good vantage point for performing Earth observation and space science. But its distance from Earth poses challenges, such as resupply, maintaining clean air and keeping astronauts healthy. Draper has provided solutions to help the ISS team maximize efficiency, safety and health.
Contact Information:  Rick Loffi, Seamus Tuohy
rloffi at draper.com  stuohy at draper.com

Transition
Processing Big Data Efficiently (Translating Efficient Neurobiology Structures in Engineering Applications)
Computers process inputs much less efficiently than human brains—in terms of both time and energy used. Current computer technology applies a linear process, following commands or a list of steps in sequence. Draper is developing neuromorphic processing, a biomimetic processing architecture, to make computer processing efficiency at least three orders of magnitude greater than current systems.
Contact Information:  Dorri Poppe
dpoppe at draper.com

Integrating Wearable Tech (Immersive Situation Awareness Wear)
A fine line exists between useful data and noise. Immersive Situational Awareness Wear (isaWear) helps you recognize more data from your surroundings and understand them faster. isaWear presents data efficiently across your senses in ways that let you respond faster. For example, instead of displaying directions on a map, isaWear can deliver a heated pulse to your left wrist and show an icon on your heads-up display to signal “turn left.”
Contact Information:  Jana Schwartz
jana at draper.com

Supporting Startups  (SEMBLER)
The true market advantage of startups is their agility and speed. But taking things from concept to market is daunting. Startups and small companies developing innovative concepts can’t afford to build large prototyping capabilities and test facilities. Through Draper’s Sembler office, innovators can access Draper’s resources and technical expertise on a fee-for-service basis, including advice from Draper’s expert technical staff.
Contact Information:  Nathan Wiedenman
nwiedenman at draper.com

Stopping Cyber Attacks  (Inherently Secure Processing)
As the Internet of Things expands and more embedded devices are networked together, your data and hardware become more vulnerable to malicious computer hacking. The processors that drive these devices were designed long before security risks were understood. Draper’s newly developed processor, Dover, can stop the majority of cyberattacks that could corrupt or control these devices.
Contact Information:  Jothy Rosenberg
jothy at draper.com

Other
Strategic Systems
Extending the lifespan of the deployed Trident II Submarine-Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) System to last decades longer than originally designed while maintaining demonstrated performance at an affordable life-cycle cost poses many challenges. To enable a new guidance system in the existing SLBM, Draper chose a modular design approach and heavily leveraged Model-based Engineering (MBE). Modeling and simulation provided high confidence that the system design would work with emerging technologies, while minimizing physical hardware prototyping. From early functional modeling supporting system-level trades, to detailed reliability modeling supporting surveillance and obsolescence planning, MBE provided the “digital thread” through increasing fidelity of models throughout program life cycle.
Contact Information:  Sharon Donald
sdonald at draper.com

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Wednesday, October 5
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The Cambridge Cyber Summit
Wednesday, October 5
8:00 am - 6:00 pm
MIT Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 
RSVP at http://www.cnbc.com/securing-our-future/
Cost:  $250

Share. Solve. Secure.

CNBC, the worldwide leader in business news, The Aspen Institute’s renowned Homeland Security Program and MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have created a new conference to unite business leaders with public and private-sector leaders in security, technology and defense.

The Cambridge Cyber Summit is a one-day summit at MIT’s Kresge Auditorium to discuss ways to combat urgent cyber threats and secure America’s future. Participants in the first-ever series on October 5 will see interviews and live demonstrations that focus on the next wave of cyberattacks and their perpetrators, countermeasures, privacy vs. security, and the government’s role in protecting private industry.

Featured speakers include:
Admiral Michael S. Rogers, Commander, U.S. Cyber Command; Director, National Security Agency; Chief, Central Security Service
Thomas A. Fanning, President and CEO, Southern Company
Glenn Gerstell, General Counsel, National Security Agency
Dr. Tom Leighton, Co-founder, Akamai Technologies
Matt Olsen, Co-founder, IronNet Cybersecurity; former Director,National Counterterrorism Center

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Water and Food Production Challenges in the Semi-Arid Tropics
Wednesday, October 5
12-1pm
MIT, Building 1-131, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Topics: environmental and socio-economic conditions of the SAT, limitations to water and food production, impacts of climate change, managing soil and water in the SAT, dryland cropping systems.

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Hell You Talmbout: Contemporary Perspective on State Violence Against Black Women and Girls
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 12 p.m.
WHERE  HarvardThompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center
SPEAKER(S)  Treva Lindsey, Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Ohio State University
COST  Free & open to the public
DETAILS  A Q&A will follow the talk.
LINK	http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/october-5-2016-1200pm/fall-colloquium-treva-lindsey

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Restrained by Design: Cyber Security and the Attenuation of War
Wednesday, October 5
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jon Lindsay, University of Toronto, Munk School

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu

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The Prediction Project: A Lecture by Alyssa A. Goodman
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 4 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Alyssa A. Goodman, 2016-2017 Edward, Frances, and Shirley B. Daniels Fellow, Radcliffe Institute; Robert Wheeler Wilson Professor of Applied Astronomy, Harvard University
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Making predictions based on theory and on data has only been the scientific way for the past 400 years or so; before that, there was much more reliance on philosophy. In this lecture, Goodman will speak about how the history of humanity has predicted its own future, from ancient Mesopotamians reading signs in sheep entrails to modern computer simulation of climate change. Goodman is currently leading the creation of the most modular HarvardX online course yet created, called PredictionX.
LINK	http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2016-alyssa-a-goodman-fellow-presentation

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The Ethics of Democracy Entrepreneurship
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 4:10 – 5:40 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mt Auburn Street, Suite 200 North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)	
Marci Harris, CEO and Founder of PopVox 
Peter MacLeod, Principal and Founder of MASSLBP 
Tiago Carneiro Peixoto, Team Lead, World Bank’s Digital Engagement Unit 
Moderated by Archon Fung, Academic Dean and Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Citizenship at the Harvard Kennedy School 
DETAILS  The goal of the panel is to bring together leading practitioners and scholars for a frank discussion about the problems and possibilities of marketing participatory democratic innovations like citizens’ assemblies, participatory budgeting, or deliberative polling as a policy tool for government. Is there a tension between the ideal of spreading participatory innovations, and the need for organizations – whether private or non-profit – to actually sell these innovations to government? If so, what kinds of ethical dilemmas do organizations face in becoming “democracy entrepreneurs”?
This discussion is part of the Making Democracy Work Seminar Series
LINK	http://ash.harvard.edu/event/ethics-democracy-entrepreneurship

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The Syrian Refugee Crisis: Weathering the Storm in Turkey and Beyond
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CMES/WCFIA Seminar on Turkey in the Modern World
SPEAKER(S)  Ahmad Mamdoh Tarakji, MD, President, Syrian American Medical Society
CONTACT INFO  Liz Flanagan, elizabethflanagan at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Unless otherwise noted in the event description, CMES events are open to the public (no registration required), and off the record. Please note that events may be filmed and photographed by CMES for record-keeping and for use on the CMES website and publications.
LINK  http://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/syrian-refugee-crisis-weathering-storm-turkey-and-beyond

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A Conversation with Cornel West, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Christian Practice, Union Theological Seminary; Professor Emeritus, Princeton University
Wednesday, October 5 
5:00-6:30pm
Harvard University Science Center, Hall B, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

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Extravagant Weapons: The Story behind Arms Races in Animals and People
Wednesday, October 5
6:00pm
See also: Public Lectures, Evolution Matters Lecture Series
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Lecture and Book Signing
Douglas Emlen, Professor of Biology, University of Montana
The animal world is full of “weaponry” that has evolved for particular use by specific species: cats have claws, eagles have talons, porcupines have quills, and even the dogs we keep as pets have respectable sets of teeth. While these weapons may be small in some animals, they are massive in other species, and the same is true of weapons manufactured by humans. Douglas Emlen, author of Animal Weapons: The Evolution of Battle, will discuss the conditions that trigger arms races in both animals and humans and the role that duels play in this process. A journey that begins with biology becomes the story of all weapons, as Emlen discusses beetles and battleships, crabs and the Cold War.

The Evolution Matters Lecture Series is supported by a generous gift from Drs. Herman and Joan Suit.

Presented in collaboration with the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology.

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The Rita E. Hauser Forum for the Arts: Anna Deavere Smith, "Radical Hospitality" A Lecture/Performance
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Education, Environmental Sciences, Ethics, Humanities, Lecture, Poetry/Prose, Special Events, Theater
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Introductions by: Drew Faust and Homi Bhabha; Lecture/Performance by: Anna Deavere Smith; followed by a conversation with Homi Bhabha
WRITTEN BY  Anna Deavere Smith
COST  free, but tickets are required
TICKET WEB LINK  http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/event/hauser-forum-anna-deavere-smith-radical-hospitality
TICKET INFO  Tickets will be available starting at noon on Wednesday, September 28, at the Harvard Box Office in Farkas Hall. Tickets will also be available online or by phone (handling fees apply). Limit of two tickets per person. Tickets valid until 5:45pm.
CONTACT INFO	humcentr at fas.harvard.edu, 617-495-0738
LINK	http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/hauser-forum-anna-deavere-smith

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Cambridge Climate Congress "Origins" Discussion Group
Wednesday, October 5
6pm – 8pm
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.v8ihpf1pqc3kpmatiumqfdh74g?authuser=0

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“Secret Societies" and the Limits of Transparency
Wednesday, October 5
6 - 9pm
MIT, act cube E15-001, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Ricupero will present her curatorial approach to the exhibition Secret Societies (Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt and CAPC de Bordeaux, 2011-2012) as well as The Crime Was Almost Perfect (Witte de With, Rotterdam and PAC Milan, 2014) and New Ways of Doing Nothing (Kunsthalle Vienna, 2014). She will also present a selection of film extracts to explore the aesthetic codes and scenographic strategies of secret societies.

Cristina Ricupero recently co-curated together with Vanessa Müller a group show for the Kunsthalle Vienna called "New Ways of Doing Nothing" (2014) as well as a large group exhibition "The Crime was Almost Perfect" at Witte de With in Rotterdam (2014), which traveled to PAC-Padiglione d'Arte Contemporanea in Milan later that year. This group show featured over forty artists and led to a publication. She also curated together with Swiss-German artist Fabian Marti a group exhibition and publication called "Cosmic Laughter - timewave zero then what?" for the Ursula Blickle Stiftung, Germany (September-October 2012) and a major exhibition project, "Secret Societies," for the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfort (2011), which then toured to the CAPC de Bordeaux (2011-2012). A catalogue in German, English and French was published for this occasion.

In 2006, Ricupero was commissioned to cover the European section of the Gwangju Biennale in South Korea. She worked as a curator at NIFCA (Nordic Institute for Contemporary Art) in Helsinki from 2000 to 2005 and also as Associate Director of Exhibitions at the ICA in London from 2000 until 2004. She has also been a frequent lecturer at the Faculty of Art and Architecture at NTNU, Trondheim in Norway, at Kunstuniversität Linz, Autstria, HEAD-Haute école d'art et de design, Geneva and other art academies in Europe.

More information at http://act.mit.edu/projects-and-events/lectures-series/

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Money, Corporations, and Democracy: Moral and Religious Perspectives
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion, Special Events
SPONSOR	Office of Student Life 
CONTACT	studentlife at hds.harvard.edu
DETAILS  What are the moral questions that underlie issues of money in politics, corporate power, and wealth in democracy? What resources do we find in our various religious traditions to help us approach these questions with thoughtful consideration, moral insight, action, and hope? This panel discussion brings together leaders, scholars, writers, and activists of many faith traditions to discuss questions at the intersection of democracy, faith, money, and morals.
Panelists are Sojourners founder, Jim Wallis; Cambridge City Councillor, Nadeem Mazen; president of American Promise, Jeff Clements; recent HDS alum Tajay Bongsa; the Rev. Mariama White-Hammond; and Rabbi Aryeh Klapper.  The event and panel will be moderated by HDS Professor Dan McKanan.
This event is open to the public, and refreshments will be provided.
Event is created by HDS students with sponsorship from the HDS Office of Student Life and Free Speech for People, a national nonpartisan campaign working to restore democracy to the people.

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Moving to Mars - The Mars One Candidates
Wednesday, October 5
6:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Museum of Science, 1 Science Park, Boston
RSVP at http://www.mos.org/public-events/moving-to-mars  
Members, September 19th; Non-Members, September 21st

What would it be like to leave behind everything and everyone you know and move to a completely unknown world?

Hear firsthand from five intrepid adventurers about the Mars One selection process, the reactions of family and friends, and why they want to spend the rest of their lives separated from all they know and love.

Mars One mission candidates: Josh Richards, physicist, engineer, comedian | Peter Degen-Portnoy, software engineer | Yari Golden-Castaño, systems engineer | R. Daniel Golden-Castaño, US Army veteran and engineering student | Sara Director, artist

In 2026 the Mars One initiative intends to send the first group of humans to Mars and create the inaugural permanent settlement on another planet. 

Over 200,000 individuals worldwide applied for the one-way voyage. Now the final 100 are facing the psychological reality of moving to Mars. 

Embark on a fascinating evening exploring what it means to be a 21st-century settler and leave our planet forever. 

Reception with light snacks and cash bar to follow.

Advance registration begins at 9:00 am, Wednesday, September 21 (Monday, September 19 for Museum members).

This program is free thanks to the generosity of the Lowell Institute.

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Demand the Impossible!:  A Radical Manifesto
Wednesday, October 5
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This event is free; no tickets are required.
Harvard Book Store welcomes social justice activist and teacher BILL AYERS for a discussion of his latest book, Demand the Impossible!: A Radical Manifesto—a manifesto for movement-makers.

About Demand the Impossible!
In an era defined by mass incarceration, endless war, economic crisis, catastrophic environmental destruction, and a political system offering more of the same, radical social transformation has never been more urgent—or seemed more remote.
Demand the Impossible! urges us to imagine a world beyond what this rotten system would have us believe is possible.

In critiquing the world around us, insurgent educator and activist Bill Ayers uncovers cracks in that system, raising the horizons for radical change, and envisioning strategies for building the movement we need to make a world worth living in.

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How We Can Stop Climate Change
Wednesday, October 5
7:00-9:00 PM
Cambridge Friends Meeting, 5 Longfellow Park, Cambridge

Robert Pollin, Distinguished Professor of Economics at UMass Amherst and author of Greening the Global Economy, will discuss how we can make the carbon reductions needed to avert climate catastrophe, generate new jobs and protect people working for fossil fuel companies.

Activists will also discuss the connections between the nation's military policies and interventions and how climate and anti-war activists can work together.

Sponsored by Mass. Peace Action, 350MA, Unitarian Universalist Mass. Action, Clean Water Action, Sierra Club-Mass Chapter, American Friends Service Committee, 350MA Cambridge Node. info at masspeaceaction.org

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Exhibition Panel Discussion: Refugee Crisis
Wednesday, October 5
7:00pm to 9:00pm 
Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
RSVP at http://edportal.harvard.edu/event/exhibition-panel-discussion-refugee-crisis

The Harvard Ed Portal, together with the Nieman Foundation for Jounalism at Harvard, is proud to present the work of Maciek Nabrdalik in his latest exhibition, Refugee Crisis.

Nabrdalik, a current Nieman Fellow, is a Warsaw-based documentary photographer and member of the VII Photo Agency, whose primary focus is on sociological changes in Eastern Europe.

In the series, Nabrdalik followed refugees over several weeks, accompanying them on their journey through Europe. He seeks to “document this odyssey with the hope that, in the end, these refugees will find their efforts and sacrifices are rewarded by the knowledge that human rights are dispensed equally in this part of the world.”

The reception, followed by a discussion with Nieman Fellows Maciek Nabrdalik, Georg Diez, Christian Feld, and Karin Pettersson, is free and open to the public.

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Thursday, October 6, 7:00 PM – Friday, October 7, 5:30 PM
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The Private Sector for Public Ideas
Thursday, October 6, 7:00 PM – Friday, October 7, 5:30 PM
Breed Memorial Hall, Tufts University, 51 Winthrop Street, Medford
The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-private-sector-for-public-ideas-tickets-27664738979

The Fletcher School is pleased to present the fourth and last in a series of conferences examining the "Ideas Industry." Created and hosted by Professor of International Politics Daniel Drezner, the series has already addressed the topics "Is the Academy Needed or Wanted?," "Thinking About Think Tanks," and "Foreign Policy Ideas on the Campaign Hustings." This final installation will examine the role that the private sector plays in the marketplace of foreign policy ideas, involving an array of academics, journalists, policymakers, political risk analysts, and private-sector consultants. 

The conference will begin with a welcome dinner on Thursday, October 6, at Breed Memorial Hall, Tufts University, 51 Winthrop St., Medford, MA. The following day, on Friday, October 7, the conference will kick off with a welcome by Dr. Drezner, followed by a keynote address. Throughout the day, panels will address the topics of finance and management consulting, political risk, technology, and the overall impact of the private sector. A full schedule of the conference is at http://fletcher.tufts.edu/Ideas_Industry/The-Private-Sector-for-Public-Ideas/Schedule

Fletcher students and interested members of the community are invited to participate in any segment of the conference by registering for panels below. 

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Thursday, October 6
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Calestous Juma on Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Information Technology, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Calestous Juma, Professor of the Practice of International Development; Director of the Science, Technology, and Globalization Project at the Harvard Kennedy School
CONTACT INFO	Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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Into the Great Wide Open:  The promise and potential perils of climate geoengineering
Thursday, October 6
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Wil Burns
Despite the world community’s establishment of the new Paris Agreement, the globe is on pace for temperature increases of as much as 3.5C by the end of the century, with potentially disastrous implications for human institutions and ecosystems. As a consequence, there has been increasing interest in large-scale technological engineering of our environment in order to combat or counteract the effects of changes in atmospheric chemistry, usually referred to as “climate geoengineering.” The purpose of this presentation will be to discuss potential climate geoengineering options, including risks and benefits, as well as how climate geoengineering might be governed at the international level.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Why Do Armed Nonstate Actors Recruit Foreign Fighters? Evidence from the Syrian Civil War
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Center Library, Littauer-369, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	International Security Program
SPEAKER(S)  Barak Mendelsohn, Associate Professor of Political Science, Haverford College
CONTACT INFO	susan_lynch at harvard.edu
LINK	http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/7128/why_do_armed_nonstate_actors_recruit_foreign_fighters_evidence_from_the_syrian_civil_war.html

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The CRISPR/Cas9 Revolution and Gene Editing
Thursday, October 6
1:30PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard Medical School, The Joseph B.Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
RSVP: HMS_events at hms.harvard.edu
Seating available on a first-come first served basis

2016 WARREN ALPERT FOUNDATION PRIZE SYMPOSIUM
In honor of Rodolphe Barrangou, Emmanuelle Charpentier,  Jennifer Doudna, Philippe Horvath, Viginijus Siksnys for remarkable contributions to the understanding of the CRISPR bacterial defense system and the revolutionary discovery that it can be adapted for genome editing.

Featured Speakers include:
Rodolphe Barrangou, PhD, Todd R. Klaenhammer Distinguished Scholar in Probiotics Research, North Carolina State University
CRISPR-mediated immunity in bacteria: discovery and applications

Austin Burt, PhD, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, Imperial College London
Developing CRISPR-based gene drive for malaria control

Emmanuelle Charpentier, PhD, Prof. Dr.; Scientific Member of the Max Planck Society, Max Planck Director, Professor, Umeå University
The transformative genome engineering CRISPR-Cas9 technology: lessons learned from bacteria

Jennifer Doudna, PhD, Li Ka Shing Chancellor’s Chair in Biomedical and Health Sciences/HHMI Investigator, University of California, Berkeley
The Future of Genome Engineering: Biology, Technology and Ethics

Philippe Horvath, PhD, Senior Scientist, Dupont
CRISPR-mediated immunity in bacteria: discovery and applications

Virginijus Siksnys, PhD, Professor and Chief Scientist/Department Head, Institute of Biotechnology, Vilnius University
From mechanisms of microbial immunity to novel genome editing tools

Luhan Yang, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, eGenesis
Rewriting the pig genome to transform Xenotransplantation

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The diversity, stability and evolution of ecological networks
Thursday, October 6
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Buiding 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Andrew Gonzalez, Dept. of Biology, McGill University
Ecological systems form complex networks. For example, the movement of individuals among habitat patches creates spatial networks of populations that govern their evolution. Also, species are connected by their interactions to form food webs, mutualist webs, and host-disease webs. A complete theory of biodiversity requires the integration of the spatial and interaction dimensions of ecological networks. In this talk I will show that network structure is fundamental to understanding how ecological systems maintain diversity, persist and evolve under environmental change. In the first part of my talk I will use experimental evolution to show how spatial networks of populations and communities respond and evolve in response to extreme environmental stress. In the next part of my talk I will show how the structure of spatial networks can confine the spread of a perturbation using theory and experiments. I will close with an application of this network approach to the design of networks of ecosystems for urban biodiversity.

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu), Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00 
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
6172588685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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Genomic Scope of Adaptive Mutations in the Face of an Environmental Challenge
Thursday, October 6
4:00PM TO 5:00PM
Harvard, BioLabs Lecture Hall (1050), 16 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Sarah Otto, University of British Columbia
Abstract:  As evolutionary biologists, we are only now getting a clear picture of the genetic basis of adaptation.  Through genomic sequencing, we can pinpoint the mutations responsible for adaptation and use these mutations to parameterize models and to test evolutionary theory, providing a much sounder empirical basis for this theory.  In this talk, I will describe experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae aimed at clarifying the nature and distribution of beneficial mutations.  A panel of independent adaptive mutations was obtained by exposing haploid yeast to harsh environmental conditions: a fungicide (nystatin) or toxic levels of copper. The array of mutations allowing adaptation to the either environment was determined by genome-wide sequencing of 35 different adapted lines from each of the two environments. This panel was then used to measure trade-offs among environments and among ploidy levels, as well as properties such as dominance across environments. The implications for Haldane's sieve, the role of ploidy in adaptation, and speciation will be discussed.

OEB Seminar Series
http://oeb.harvard.edu/event/oeb-seminar-series-2

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Humanitarian Negotiations on the Front Lines: Protecting Syria's Hospitals
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Middle East Initiative, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HSPH)
SPEAKER(S)  A panel discussion with Michael VanRooyen, Director, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative; Chairman, Brigham and Women's Hospital Department of Emergency Medicine; Professor, Harvard Medical School and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Mahmoud Hariri, MD, General and Trauma Surgeon from Aleppo, Syria.
Moderated by Claude Bruderlein, Director, Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research, Lecturer on International Health and Co-Director of the Master’s Program in Global Health, Harvard School of Public Health, and MEI Faculty Affiliate.
COST  Free; RSVP requested
LINK  http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/7131/humanitarian_negotiation_series.html

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Allison Hahn: "This Land Is Our Land: Mobile Media, Protest, and Debate in Maasai and Mongolian Land Disputes"
Thursday, October 6
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

How has mobile media changed the ways that nomadic communities receive and send information, engage state actors, and participate in international deliberations? Allison Hahn examines the ways that two pastoral-nomadic communities, Maasai of Kenya and Tanzania and Mongolians of Mongolia and China, are utilizing new media and social media platforms to challenge power hierarchies and deliberative norms. Many governmental policy makers presume that this technological adaptation indicates a determination amongst nomadic communities to integrate and settle. This presentation asks if nomadic communities might instead be incorporating new media technologies as a method to preserve their traditional lifestyles while engaging in national and international deliberations about land policy. Hahn draws from evidence of this engagement found in Maasai and Mongolian use of YouTube, RenRen, Twitter and Facebook as well as in-person protests and her decade of fieldwork amongst pastoral-nomadic communities. 

Allison Hahn (Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh) is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at the City University of New York-Baruch College. Her current book project, Nomads, New Media, and the State (in progress) explores the ways pastoral-nomadic communities in Central Asia, East Africa, and the Middle East are utilizing new and mobile technologies to participate in conservation policy and negotiate land rights.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/allison-hahn-mobile-media-protest-debate-maasai-mongolian-land-disputes/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

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Askwith Forums: Life, Animated: Autism, Ableism, and Educators
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE	Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS	  Speaker: Ron Suskind, author, Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism; Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist; lecturer, Harvard Law School
Discussants:
Tom Hehir, Ed.D.’90, Silvana and Christopher Pascucci Professor of Practice in
Learning Differences, HGSE
Michael Stein, visiting professor and executive director, Harvard Law School Project on Disability
Ron Suskind will speak about Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism, the book and documentary about reaching his autistic son through Disney characters. He will engage in conversation with Michael Stein of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability and HGSE Professor Tom Hehir.
In conjunction with the “Disability at Work: The Power of Policy, Myth and Practice from Higher Education to Employment” conference. Conference sponsored by HGSE Access and Disability Services, the HGSE Office of Student Affairs, and the Harvard Law School Project on Disability.

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RPP Colloquium with Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee: Women as Catalysts for Local and Global Spiritually-Engaged Movements for Sustainable Peace
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 6 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion
SPONSOR  Religions and the Practice of Peace, Women's Studies in Religion Program, and the El-Hibri Foundation
CONTACT	 Ash Temin
DETAILS	  Religions and the Practice of Peace Colloquium Dinner Series
Space is limited. RSVP is required. Check back for online link.
“You can tell people of the need to struggle, but when the powerless start to see that they can really make a difference, nothing can quench the fire." —Leymah Gbowee
A 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate, Leymah Gbowee, is a Liberian peace activist, trained social worker, and women’s rights advocate. Leymah’s leadership of the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace–which brought together Christian and Muslim women in a nonviolent movement that played a pivotal role in ending Liberia’s civil war in 2003–is chronicled in her memoir, Mighty Be Our Powers (2011), and in the award-winning documentary, Pray the Devil Back to Hell (2008). She is founder and current President of the Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa. She was the founding head of the Liberian Reconciliation Initiative, and was the co-Founder and former Executive Director of Women Peace and Security Network Africa (WIPSEN-A). She is also a founding member and former Liberia Coordinator of Women in Peacebuilding Network/West Africa Network for Peacebuilding (WIPNET/WANEP). Leymah is currently named a Distinguished Activist-in-Residence at Union Theological Seminary. She travels internationally to advocate for human rights and peace & security. 
The event will be moderated by Ann Braude, director of the Women’s Studies in Religion Program and Senior Lecturer on American Religious History.
Co-sponsored by the Women's Studies in Religion Program at Harvard Divinity School. With generous support from the Provostial Fund for the Arts and Humanities at Harvard University and the El-Hibri Foundation.
Recommended Reading and Film
Leymah Gbowee. Mighty Be Our Powers: How Sisterhood, Prayer, and Sex Changed a Nation at War: A Memoir. New York: Beast Books, 2011.
Pray the Devil Back to Hell. Directed by Gini Reticker. Produced by Abigail E. Disney. Documentary Film DVD, 72 minutes. Passion River Films, 2008.
This monthly public series, convened by HDS Dean David N. Hempton, brings together a cross-disciplinary RPP Working Group of faculty, experts, graduate students, and alumni from across Harvard University and the local area to explore topics and cases in religions and the practice of peace. A diverse array of scholars, leaders, and religious peacebuilders are invited to present and engage with the RPP Working Group and general audience. A light dinner is served and a brief reception follows the program.

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A Night @ Engineering Possibilities 2016
Friday, October 7, 2016
6:00 PM
Draper, 1 Hampshire Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Engineering-Possibilities-DraperLab/events/234154864/

Join Draper technical staff and the MeetUp community at EP16 for a night of food and refreshments. This technology showcase represents Draper-funded research and development efforts that, if successful, will improve your life, change industries, and push the boundaries of what's technologically possible. Follow the Draper approach as we turn ideas into powerful solutions. 

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Public Lecture: Peter Latz, “Pioneering New Territory”
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Peter Latz
For his life’s work, Peter Latz has been recognized by the Green Good Design People Award in 2010; the TOPOS Landscape Award in 2013; the Friedrich-Ludwig-von-Sckell Ring of Honor, awarded by the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, in 2014; and the IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award in 2016. In February 2015, Peter and Anneliese Latz became honorary fellows of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). Since 2011, the office has been run by their son, architect and landscape architect Tilman Latz.
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	events at gsd.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Peter Latz studied landscape architecture at the Technical University of Munich, and landscape architecture and planning at RWTH Aachen. Since founding his firm as a studio for landscape architecture and planning in 1968 with his wife Anneliese, he has been concerned primarily with ecological urban renewal. Abandoned in 1985 after decades of intense industrial activity, the 180-hectare Thyssen ironworks site was repurposed by Latz + Partner into a people’s park and became a vivid part of the city.
In his lecture, Latz will discuss that project as well as the Ariel Sharon Park in Tel Aviv, which since 2004 has been in the process of transformation from roadside landfill to terraced paradise under Latz + Partner’s guidance. The Landscape Park Duisburg Nord and Ariel Sharon Park received the Green Good Design Award in 2009 and 2010, respectively.
Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
LINK	http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/peter-latz-pioneering-new-territory/

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MIT IDEAS Fall Generator Dinner 2016
Thursday, October 6
6:45 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)
MIT, Morss Hall, Walker Memorial, 142 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Are you interested in learning more about innovation and social entrepreneurship opportunities at MIT?
Working on a project to help underserved communities? Need funding? Want to recruit new team members?
Want to get involved, but don't yet have an idea?

Join us for dinner. Pitch an idea. Find a team. 
This year we'll be kicking off the event with an Information Fair to showcase various opportunities for funding, mentorship, and support at MIT for projects on innovation and social entrepreneurship.

The IDEAS Generator Dinner is one of the best venues to find a team to join, pitch your idea to woo and recruit teammates, or pitch your skills to get hired onto a team. With the first chance to submit a Scope Statement just a few weeks away (October 27, 2016), get started at this event!

Event Program
6:45 Doors Open - Dinner & Information Fair
7:30 Opening Remarks
7:45 Sixty-second Pitches
8:30 Networking
9:00 Event Ends

PITCH YOUR IDEA / SKILL
During the event, we will have openings for 20-30 sixty-second pitches from attendees.You must sign up in advance to request a slot.

Sign up to pitch an idea or your skills when you register for this event. Those selected to pitch will be contacted before the event with instructions on the process.

Note: Pitching is optional! If you don’t want to pitch, just attend to mix and mingle, meet potential teammates, or hear about some of the exciting projects already underway. 

ABOUT THE COMPETITION 
Teams must be led by a full-time MIT student with MIT students making significant contributions to the project’s innovation. However, if you are not an MIT student, you are still welcome to attend the Generator Dinner to pitch an idea or get hired on a team. For full competition criteria and guidelines, please visit our website: http://globalchallenge.mit.edu/ 

What is MIT IDEAS?
The MIT IDEAS program provides students with an opportunity to develop their innovative ideas and make positive changes in the world. As an annual innovation and social entrepreneurship competition run by the MIT Public Service Center, the IDEAS Global Challenge enables students to apply their MIT education in real-world situations to tackle quality of life issues for people around the world. 

IDEAS projects can address issues in one or more sectors, such as health, education, agriculture, energy and environment, water, finance and entrepreneurship, mobile technology, and housing and transportation. Teams are created and led by MIT undergraduate and graduate students, but they can include anyone from around the world. If you are looking to join an IDEAS team that needs your skill set or are simply interested in learning more about how to get involved, join the conversation and help move ideas towards realization. 

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October 7-9, 2016
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11TH Annual HONK! Festival:  Festival of activist street bands.
October 7-9
Various neighborhoods throughout Somerville, Cambridge, and Boston.
Rain or shine; free and open to all.
For further information: www.honkfest.org, 617-383-HONK (4665).

FESTIVAL OF ACTIVIST STREET BANDS, THIS YEAR TOTALLING 26 

a wide variety of musical/socio-political events planned in Somerville, Cambridge, & Boston

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

For eleven years now, the HONK! Festival of Activist Street Bands has been altering the outdoor musicscape of Somerville and surrounding areas, by celebrating the sound and spectacle of brass and percussion in the service of participatory culture and social justice.

The energy surrounding the HONK! Festival has been positively infectious, so much so that HONK!, which originated in Somerville, has spawned related festivals in Providence, New York City, Seattle, Eugene, Austin, Pittsburgh, and Detroit, not to mention Wollongong, Australia, and Rio de Janeiro. Participants, including the audience, have reported peak musical moments and life-changing experiences. There is even a Somerville-based School of HONK that carries on the spirit of the Festival all year round. Needless to say, it is thrilling that HONK! has generated the creative energy and unbridled enthusiasm that propels the original HONK! into its second decade of playing music that matters.

There will indeed be more than enough music to please everyone, with over two dozen bands performing this year. Some will be the usual suspects, from all over the US and Canada, who may be familiar, but who always sound fresh. In addition, HONK! has made arrangements to present two new bands from France, La Fanfare Invisible from Paris and Le Pompier Poney Club from Marseille. And as part of HONK!'s continuing commitment to pay tribute to the music and culture of New Orleans, HONK! has invited back by popular demand the The Original Pinettes Brass Band.

This year, the 26 participatory bands, travelling from far and near, are:
aNova Brazil (Somerville, MA); Boycott (Somerville, MA); Brass Messengers (Minneapolis, MN); The Brass Balagan (Burlington, VT); The Bread and Puppet Circus Band (Glover, VT); Caka!ak Thunder (Greensboro, NC); Chaotic Insurrection Ensemble (Montreal, QC); Detroit Party Marching Band (Detroit, MI); Dirty Water Brass Band (Boston, MA); Emperor Norton's Stationary Marching Band  (Somerville, MA); Environmental Encroachment (Chicago, IL); Expandable Brass Band (Northampton, MA); Extraordinary Rendition Band (Providence, RI); La Fanfare Invisible (Paris, France); Forward! Marching Band (Madison, WI); Hartford Hot Several (Hartford, CT); Leftist Marching Band (Portsmouth, NH); Mayday Marching Band (Pittsburgh, PA); The Original Pinettes Brass Band (New Orleans); The Party Band (Lowell, MA); Le Pompier Poney Club (Marseille, France); Rude Mechanical Orchestra (New York City, NY); School of HONK (Somerville, MA); Second Line Social Aid and Pleasure Society Brass Band (Somerville, MA); What Cheer? Brigade (Providence, RI); and Yes Ma'am Brass Band (Austin, TX).
Further information on each band can be found at www.honkfest.org/2016-festival/bands-2016.

The Festival will include all the HONK! traditional features that have compelled thousands of participants to return year after year, with family-friendly Lantern Parades through the neighborhoods of Somerville; nine hours of continuous free performances by dozens of HONK! bands in Davis Square; the massive and overwhelming energetic HONK! Parade that makes its way down Massachusetts Avenue to "Reclaim the Streets for Horns, Bikes and Feet,” followed by a full afternoon of HONK! performances at Oktoberfest in Harvard Square. HONK! organizers are planning to expand the HONK! Day of Action to incorporate more political themes and performances throughout the Festival, while never losing sight of pairing those undertakings with irresistible music, outrageous costumes, and dancing in the streets. Updates for the Festival will be posted at www.honkfest.org/2016-festival/schedule-2016.

Additional HONK! activities, coinciding with the Festival, are:
-- HONK! Volunteer Party, held Sunday October 2nd from 3-5pm at the Dilboy VFW Hall, 371 Summer St. in Somerville. For further information, email volunteer at honkfest.org;
-- HONK! supporters from the Nave Gallery Annex, located at 53 Chester St. in Somerville, have sent out a "call for entries" (deadline September 17th) soliciting photographs taken during HONK!s past, to be included in their upcoming HONK! Deconstruction of Joy. The exhibit runs from October 6-22, with an art opening on Thursday October 6th from 6-8 pm. The exhibit is being organized by Leonardo March, a photojournalist hailing from Puerto Rico, who is now based in Boston. For further information: www.navegallery.org/wp/honk-deconstruction-of-joy.

HONK! is a non-profit organization, with a limited budget, with their annual Kickstarter fundraiser now in full swing: www.honkfest.org/kickstarter. For complete information and continuous updates on the HONK! Festival, visit www.honkfest.org, www.facebook.com/honkfestival, and www.twitter.com/honkfest. 

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October 7-10
——————— 

Reality, Virtually, Hackathon!
October 7-10
MIT Media Lab, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.realityvirtuallyhack.com/register

A weekend of Free Workshops + Hackathon + Public Expo that transforms the future of immersive technologies

Designers, coders, hackers, makers, enthusiasts, experts, learners, artists and engineers
Calling everyone to create, learn and explore new and yet to be known VR and AR applications at the MIT Media Lab, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

The Reality, Virtually, Hackathon brings together interdisciplinary minds to explore the application of virtual reality and augmented reality technologies for building new experiences. VR and AR has blossomed with games and 360-degree video. You can now help push it into new directions.

The VR and AR applications you create will explore new areas such as AR and VR "for good", AEC (architecture, engineering and construction), Film and Journalism, Healthcare and Medicine, Gaming, Art and Entertainment, Learning, Education, Advertising and more.

If your passion isn't listed, bring it and build it.

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Friday, October 7
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Houghton Lecture: The Contemporary Global Carbon Budget
Friday, October 7
9:00a–10:00a
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Corinne Le Quere, University of East Anglia
Houghton Lecture Series: The Global Carbon Budget in a Changing Climate | "The Contemporary Global Carbon Budget" - The global carbon cycle plays a key role in regulating climate and climate change. Natural reservoirs on land and in the ocean hold large quantities of carbon, which is exchanged with the atmosphere on time scales ranging from seconds to hundreds of thousands of years. This first lecture will explain what we know about the contemporary carbon cycle. It will detail the processes that regulate the storage of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere and in the ocean and present the latest data on the trends and variability in these 'carbon sinks.' The observed changes in the carbon sinks will be discussed in the context of a changing climate.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Maglio
cliberty at mit.edu 

Editorial Comment:  Given that the latest reports indicate we may have already passed the 1.5ºC increase in global average temperature from preindustrial averages and that we may be well on the way to surpassing the 2ºC limit that the IPCC and the Paris COP 21 have set, this lecture is very germane.  The Houghton Lectures are a weekly series of lectures on climate change this year, Fridays throughout October.

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Strengthening Value Chains in Irrigated Agriculture 
Friday, October 7
12-1pm
MIT, Building 1-131, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Topics: inclusive market oriented development, cold chains, digital agriculture, seed technology, financial inclusiveness.

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Reconciling Fisheries Catch and Ocean Productivity in a Changing Climate
Friday, October 7 
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Charles Stock, NOAA

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/88496

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Toward Democracy:  The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought
Friday, October 7
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes JAMES T. KLOPPENBERG, Professor of American History at Harvard, for his book Toward Democracy: The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought.

About Toward Democracy
In this magnificent and encyclopedic overview, James T. Kloppenberg presents the history of democracy from the perspective of those who struggled to envision and achieve it. The story of democracy remains one without an ending, a dynamic of progress and regress that continues to our own day. In the classical age "democracy" was seen as the failure rather than the ideal of good governance. Democracies were deemed chaotic and bloody, indicative of rule by the rabble rather than by enlightened minds. Beginning in the 16th and 17th centuries, however, first in Europe and then in England's North American colonies, the reputation of democracy began to rise, resulting in changes that were sometimes revolutionary and dramatic, sometimes gradual and incremental.

Kloppenberg offers a fresh look at how concepts and institutions of representative government developed and how understandings of self-rule changed over time on both sides of the Atlantic. Notions about what constituted true democracy preoccupied many of the most influential thinkers of the Western world, from Montaigne and Roger Williams to Milton and John Locke; from Rousseau and Jefferson to Wollstonecraft and Madison; and from de Tocqueville and J. S. Mill to Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Over three centuries, explosive ideas and practices of democracy sparked revolutions--English, American, and French--that again and again culminated in civil wars, disastrous failures of democracy that impeded further progress.

Comprehensive, provocative, and authoritative, Toward Democracy traces self-government through three pivotal centuries. The product of twenty years of research and reflection, this momentous work reveals how nations have repeatedly fallen short in their attempts to construct democratic societies based on the principles of autonomy, equality, deliberation, and reciprocity that they have claimed to prize. Underlying this exploration lies Kloppenberg's compelling conviction that democracy was and remains an ethical ideal rather than merely a set of institutions, a goal toward which we continue to struggle.

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Controlling Wind Turbines and Wind Farms for Utility Grid Reliability
Friday, October 7
3pm-4pm
BU, 8 St. Mary’s Street, PHO 210, Boston
Refreshments at 2:45pm

Lucy Pao, University of Colorado Boulder, CISE Resident Scholar
Wind energy is recognized worldwide as cost-effective and environmentally friendly and is among the world’s fastest-growing sources of electrical energy. Despite the amazing growth in global wind power installations in recent years, science and engineering challenges still exist. For instance, since electrical power supply and demand must match on the grid to maintain grid reliability, the variability of generated wind power creates challenges to integrating large amounts of wind energy on the utility grid. Recently, research utilizing systems and control techniques has begun to demonstrate that it is possible to actively control the power generated by wind turbines and wind farms to help stabilize the grid frequency. In this talk, we will first provide an overview of wind energy systems by introducing the primary structural components and operating regions of wind turbines. The operation of the utility grid will be briefly reviewed by discussing the electrical system, explaining the importance of preserving grid reliability through controlling the grid frequency (which is a measure of the balance between electrical generation and load), and describing the traditional methods of providing ancillary services for frequency support using conventional generation utilities. We will then outline how wind turbines and wind farms can be controlled to help stabilize and balance the frequency of the utility grid. Results of simulation studies as well as experimental field tests will be presented to show the promise of the techniques being developed. We shall close by discussing continuing challenges and on-going and future research avenues that can further facilitate the growth of wind energy.

Lucy Pao is currently Professor in the Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering Department and Professor (by courtesy) in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Colorado Boulder.

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Reconstruction after Natural Disasters: Lessons from Kobe, Tohoku, and Kumamoto
Friday, October 7
4:00PM TO 5:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South Building, Kang Seminar Room (S050), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

with Stephen Poland, Reischauer Institute Postdoctoral Fellow and moderated by Tomiko Yoda, Professor of Japanese Humanities.

Japan Forum
http://rijs.fas.harvard.edu/programs/forum.php

Contact Name:  Yukari Swanson
yswanson at fas.harvard.edu

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A Tale of two Projects:  the World’s Smallest Motor and Cheapest Catalyst
Friday, October 7, 2016 -
4:00pm to 5:15pm
Harvard, Pierce 209, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Charles Sykes, Tufts University
We have experimentally demonstrated the world’s first single molecule electric motor, which is powered by electrons from a scanning probe tip. Surprisingly, the direction and rate of the motor’s rotation are related to the chirality of both the motor molecule and the tip. In the area of catalysis we discovered that dispersing single palladium or platinum atoms in inexpensive, catalytically-inert copper surfaces creates ultra-selective hydrogenation catalysts. 

Speaker Bio:  Charles Sykes is a Professor of Chemistry at Tufts University. Charles got his B.S. and M.S. from Oxford University before moving to Cambridge University for a Ph.D. under the supervision of Professor Richard Lambert. He then relocated to the U.S. for a postdoctoral fellowship with Professor Paul Weiss at Penn State. Sykes has been named a Beckman Young Investigator, Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar, IUPAC young observer and the Usen Family Career Development Professor. He is also the recipient of a 2009 NSF CAREER award, a 2011 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award and the 2012 AVS Peter Mark Memorial Award. Charles received the Young Talented Scientist Award at Chirality 2014 and was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2015. He is the author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications and has given over 130 invited talks at conferences and universities.

Applied Physics Colloquia

Website: http://ase.tufts.edu/chemistry/sykes/index.html
Contact: Deni Peric
Email: dperic at seas.harvard.edu

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Rock Against the TPP Concert 
Friday, October 7
6pm - 10pm*
Spontaneous Celebrations, 45 Danforth Street, Jamaica Plain
All ages. Wheelchair accessible.
FREE! RSVP required at http://click.actionnetwork.org/mpss/c/6wA/ni0YAA/t.20l/HgSVI8aTR8eiYhhNIep0Sw/h1/ld36MQfB21zS1IpPzWX4-2BtI60pn14roRCkKNe1kHl9kVOkFbuM1mcswrctERaSVU-2BrxQf-2FmnnjRHd6OVHzPo68MQ00-2BfkeDH9GuTp6JqlV-2BQ5SPXpaZf2fNY4LEuEVEFDnwQlLL2bZ-2F0Hm-2Fho48vNEGJHp2xcFmHezD2mdiUDOd27SHwehrO8tOUyXBkheurwHO96J3NUDLqKKfbBA2tx3pulJJG6KIJKpHtbAlH7gjKUyv16v0fG3fjWMHTblS8

I wanted to make sure you knew that we'll be in Boston on Friday October 7th for one of our biggest events for Internet freedom ever: Rock Against the TPP. It?s a part of a nationwide tour of large-scale concerts to raise awareness about the dangers of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement. Can you come? Grab your free ticket!*

Featuring: *Mirah*, *Debo Band*, *Foundation Movement*, FFTF campaign director 
*Evan Greer*, and more! Plus lots of information and ways to get involved in the fight to stop the TPP.

What is the TPP?

The TPP is basically terrible for everything you care about. It would export the worst parts of U.S. copyright law and Internet policy on the rest of the world, undermining free speech and opening the floodgates for SOPA-style online censorship. [1] Beyond that, it would grant monopolistic corporations extraordinary powers to circumvent our basic democratic process, affecting everything from the environment to food safety to access to medicine to basic workers? rights.[2]

As Tom Morello says, "Corporate lobbyists want to sneak the TPP through 
Congress quietly; that means it's time for us to get loud."

Let's make sure we stop it.

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"Foxy Brown" with star Pam Grier and scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. in person
Friday, October 7, 2016
7:00 PM
Harvard Film Archive, 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge
Cost:  $12

Too often, "classic" films are handed to us, prepackaged and ready for the shelf. Decades of veneration and sentimentality can mire a classic in stereotypes of what it is and does. Widen your field of vision, though, particularly taking in films tarred with the brush of "pop culture," and you can be roused or jolted awake by unexpected conjunctions, fresh connections with the power to disturb or delight. That's the argument made by the Harvard Film Archive this fall on behalf of the "blaxploitation" films of Pam Grier. Her avatar Foxy Brown has been promoted as an “action heroine with a social conscience,” a streetwise vindicator whose navigation of the terrain of race and gender allows us to experience a kind of liberation as the film unspools. Forty years on and "Foxy Brown's" dynamism still astonishes – one qualification for classic status!

On this evening, Grier on the big screen will be complemented by Grier in person, in conversation with Harvard's University Professor of African and African American Studies Henry Louis Gates, Jr. 

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Saturday, October 8
——————————

13th Annual HBS Energy Symposium – Shaping the Future of Energy
Saturday, October 8
9:00am-6:00pm
(Registration Begins at 7:30am in Spangler Hall), Harvard Business School, Allston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2016-energy-environment-club-symposium-tickets-26744421284
Cost:  Early Bird Admission Price: $25 student/$70 professional

Please join the Energy & Environment Club at Harvard Business School for an exciting line-up of panelist and keynotes, including Jim Robo (NextEra), David Foley (Blackstone Energy Partners), and Sonny Wu (GSR Ventures China).

See more at http://energyclubathbs.org/symposium/

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Monday, October 10
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Museum of Fine Arts Fall Open House
Monday, October 10
10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Enjoy free admission and special events at the MFA’s annual Fall Open House—and the Fenway Alliance’s 15th annual Opening Our Doors Day. Hear a medley of musical performances throughout the day including a concert by a 17-piece ensemble from The Boston Pops. Enjoy a range of art-making activities and tours for families and adults—and a full calendar of ASL and ASL interpreted events. Contact access at mfa.org for more information about accessible programming.

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Love Bites: Studying Mosquito Sex to Block Malaria Transmission
Monday, October 10
6:30-8:30pm 
Burren, 247 Elm Street, Somerville

Flaminia Catteruccia, Ph.D., is a molecular entomologist and an Associate Professor of Immunology and Infectious Disease at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She specializes in the reproductive biology of Anopheles mosquitoes, the only mosquitoes capable of transmitting human malaria. Since the beginning of the millennium, malaria has caused over 10 million deaths. Targeting and preventing Anopheles mosquito reproduction would curb malaria transmission and limit the significant public health burden caused by this disease.

To this end, her research group studies the molecular and behavioral parameters necessary for Anopheles mosquitos to spread the Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria. Investigating how Anopheles mosquitos reproduce and the vector-Plasmodium interactions underlying their ability to spread disease are two of the main endeavors in her laboratory. Translating bench-side research to the field is a priority of the lab. Fieldwork studies in Africa on Anopheles mating biology and natural malaria infections are undertaken in collaboration with IRSS in Burkina Faso, ICIPE in Kenya and other partners. Insecticide resistance among Anopheles mosquito populations threatens existing efforts to control malaria and thus developing products that can be used instead of, or in addition to, current control measures is a long-standing goal of Dr. Catteruccia’s research.

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/science-by-the-pint/

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Tuesday, October 11
——————————

The Track Record of Charter Schools in Massachusetts
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, 8:30 – 10 a.m.
WHERE  Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston
TYPE OF EVENT	Lecture, Reception
TOPIC  Equity and Access, Learning, Policy, Schools
BUILDING/ROOM  Other
CONTACT NAME  Ashley Dixon
CONTACT EMAIL  ashley_dixon at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-496-9457
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture
DETAILS	
Moderator:  Andrés Antonio Alonso, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Presenters:
Thomas Kane, Harvard University 
Macke Raymond, Stanford University
Joshua Angrist, MIT

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard University, and Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Plant Respiration: Lessons from High Latitudes for Ecosystem Carbon Balance Modelling
Tuesday, October 11
12:00pm to 1:00pm
HUH Seminar Room, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge
Paul Gauthier, Associate Research Scholar in Plant Physiology and Environmental Plant Metabolism, Princeton University, Department of Geosciences

Herbaria Seminar Series

More information at http://huh.harvard.edu/event/paul-gauthier

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Japan's Soft Power in Asia and the World
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  Seiichi Kondo, Commissioner, Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan
Moderated by Theodore Bestor, Reischauer Institute Professor of Social Anthropology and Director, Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK	http://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/calendar/upcoming

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Speaker Series: Joy-Ann Reid
Tuesday, October 11
2:00-3:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Joy Reid is the host of “AM Joy,” airing every Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. ET on MSNBC. She is also the author of the 2015 book, “Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide,” a top-selling book on Amazon.com in the Politics category. Reid was the former Managing Editor of theGrio.com, a daily online news and opinion platform devoted to delivering stories and perspectives that reflect and impact African-American audiences. While serving in this role, she became one of the first national reporters to cover the Trayvon Martin case in depth. Reid joined theGrio.com with experience as a freelance columnist for the Miami Herald and as editor of the political blog The Reid Report. Joy is also a former talk radio producer and host for Radio One, and previously served as an online news editor for the NBC affiliate WTVJ in Miramar, FL. During the 2004 presidential campaign, Reid served as the Florida deputy communications director for the 527 “America Coming Together” initiative, and was a press aide in the final stretch of President Barack Obama’s Florida campaign in 2008. Joy’s columns and articles have appeared in New York magazine, The Daily Beast, the Miami Herald, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, the South Florida Times and on Salon.com. In May 2016, Reid was honored by the Miami Coalition of Christians and Jews with the Hank Meyer National Headliner Award, an award previously given to fellow journalists Chuck Todd and Tom Brokaw, among others. She is currently producing a documentary, “The Fight Years”—which takes a look into the sport of boxing during the 1950s and 1960s in Miami. Reid graduated from Harvard University in 1991 with a concentration in film, and is a 2003 Knight Center for Specialized Journalism fellow. She currently resides in Brooklyn with her husband and family.

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Is Climate Change Affecting Life in The Deep Sea?
Tuesday, October 11
4:00pm
4pm – 5pm
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Peter Girguis. Professor of Organismic & Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University
The deep sea is the largest habitat on Earth, and harbors the much -if not the majority-  of Earth’s biodiversity.  While scientists and policymakers have understandably focused their attention on how climate change is influencing terrestrial and shallow marine habitats such as coral reefs, there is growing evidence that changes in our atmosphere are resulting in chemical changes in the deep sea.  Here I will present an overview of life in the deep sea, and will discuss their potential sensitivities and strengths in coping with the thermal and chemical changes on our planet. It is my hope that you will leave this presentation armed with a better understanding of how the deep sea might respond to ongoing changes in climate, so that we can more appropriately manage our planet’s natural resources.

Bio:  His research resides at the crossroads of microbial ecology, physiology, and biogeochemistry, and as such is highly interdisciplinary. He uses the appropriate combinations of molecular biology (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, qPCR, mutagenesis), as well as physiological and geochemical techniques (gas chromatography, in situ and laboratory mass spectrometry, in situ and laboratory isotope analyses, x-ray diffraction, atomic spectroscopy) to examine the relationship between microbial diversity/physiology and biogeochemical cycles. Due to the limitations of existing in situ measurement and incubation technologies, he and his lab have develop novel instruments and samplers that enable them to better study microbial-geochemical relationships. This includes high-pressure systems to mimic natural environments, in situ geochemical sensors, in situ microbial fuel cells as experimental apparatus and power sources, and novel in situ preservation technologies.

BURECS Seminar Series on Climate Change

This program is supported in part by a grant to Earth & Environment Professor Dave Marchant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Science Education Program.

http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/peter-girguis.html

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Changing Media, Changing Politics
Tuesday, October 11
5:30 PM-7:00 PM
Google Cambridge, 355 Main Street, 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-technology-review-at-google-a-thought-leadership-speaker-series-in-the-heart-of-kendall-square-tickets-28008296569

We look at how shifting technology has altered the media environment in 2016. What has been the impact on the presidential race? Plus, how might this affect a president’s ability to govern, shape policy, and communicate with the public?

Panelists:  Deb Roy, Chief Media Scientist, Twitter; Professor at MIT
Nicco Mele, Director of the Shorenstein Center at Harvard

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Upcoming Events
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*****************  

———————————————————————
Wednesday, October 12 - Thursday, October 13
———————————————————————

Conference on Race and Justice in the Age of Obama
Harvard Kennedy School, various locations
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/conference-on-race-and-justice-in-the-age-of-obama-tickets-27393502704

The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the Harvard Kennedy School, along with the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy; Shorenstein Center for Media, Politics and Public Policy; and Hutchins Center for African & African American Research are proud to host a symposium on Race and Justice in the Age of Obama on October 12th and 13th.  This conference will offer an important opportunity for scholars, journalists, and public officials to debate President Obama’s impact on race relations in the United States during his eight years in office. For a more detailed agenda, panel topics, and speaker information, please visit the Ash Center website.  

Wednesday, October 12
Join us for a keynote discussion in the evening to open the conference in the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum (registration is not required).

Thursday, October 13
8:30am - 4pm
You are invited to the Nye Conference Center, Taubman Building, 5th Floor, 15 Eliot Street, for a number of panels featuring:
Khalil Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Leah Wright Rigueur, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Mary Frances Berry, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, History, and Africana Studies; University of Pennsylvania
Doug Blackmon, Host and Executive Producer of American Forum; Miller Center, University of Virginia
Keith Boykin, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Political Science, Columbia University
Matt Guterl, Professor of Africana Studies and American Studies, Chair of American Studies, Brown University
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor, Department of African American Studies, Princeton University
Glenn Loury, Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences. Department of Economics. Brown University
Alex Wagner, Senior Editor, The Atlantic
Joshua Dubois, Founder, Values Partnerships and Former Head of White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships
Megan Ming Francis, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington
Heather Ann Thompson, Professor; Afroamerican and African Studies, History; University of Michigan
Ronald Sullivan, Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Criminal Justice Institute, Harvard Law School
Callie Crossley, Host, Under the Radar with Callie Crossley, WGBH
Both days are free and open to the public.  Due to space limitations, registration is required to attend any of the October 13th panels:
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/conference-on-race-and-justice-in-the-age-of-obama-tickets-27393502704

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Wednesday, October 12
————————————

Etymology of a Movement: Center for Green Schools and Global Impact Investment Network
Wednesday, October 12
12:30–1:30 pm
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, FXB G-13, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/etymology-of-a-movement-center-for-green-schools-and-global-impact-investing-network-tickets-26841711281
Limited seats, registration required.

Rachel Gutter, Director, Center for Green Schools
Kelly McCarthy, Senior Manager, Global Impact Investing Network
This fall, the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment is hosting a Sustainability for Health Leadership Series showcasing trailblazing professionals in the field of sustainability and health. This speaker series will introduce attendees to pressing issues students will explore in the new Sustainability, Health, and the Global Environment Master in Public Health program at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In this program students will learn the latest research techniques, and have opportunities to connect with cutting edge though leaders in global businesses and governments who are focused on the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings.

More information at http://chgeharvard.org/events

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How Bitcoin enables a Machine-Payable Web
Wednesday, October 12
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
MIT, Building 32-G882, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Balaji S. Srinivasan , 21.co and a16z 
Abstract:  First, we had the World Wide Web, a web of links between documents. Then we had the Social Web, a social network of relationships between people. We believe the third web will be the Machine-Payable Web, where each node in the network is a machine and each edge is a micropayment between machines. Towards this end, we've developed open source software called 21 that makes it easy to perform Bitcoin micropayments over HTTP. The software allows you to get digital currency onto any machine headlessly, set up web services that accept and transmit bitcoin over HTTP, and discover other machines with similar services to autonomously trade with. The overall effect is to turn digital currency into a scarce system resource on par with CPU, RAM, and hard drive space. That is, just as one can create a database index that spends disk space to save time, we show that one can instead spends digital currency to outsource a computation to save time. To illustrate the applications, we conclude with several working examples: bitcoin-aware intelligent agents, APIs that implement autonomous surge pricing, and the development of a market data structure as an alternative in many situations to the well known queue. We ask that audience members bring their laptops to code along with the speaker!

Bio:  Balaji S. Srinivasan is the CEO & cofounder of 21.co and a Board Partner at Andreessen Horowitz. Prior to taking the role of CEO at 21, Dr. Srinivasan was a General Partner at Andreessen Horowitz. He was named to the MIT TR35, was the cofounder and CTO of Founders Fund-backed Counsyl, and taught a MOOC with 200k+ students at startup.stanford.edu. He holds a BS, MS, and PhD in Electrical Engineering and an MS in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University.

Contact: Frank Wang, frankw at csail.mit.edu

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The City of Tomorrow: Sensors, Networks, Hackers, and the Future of Urban Life
Wednesday, October 12
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building 56-154, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Carlo Ratti & Matthew Claudel
Please join us as we celebrate the publication of The City of Tomorrow, an exciting new book from Carlo Ratti and 
Matthew Claudel which explores the implications of their innovative work at MIT's Senseable City Lab and the radical changes that pervasive digital technology may bring to future urban life.

authors at mit 
a lecture series cosponsored by MIT Libraries and The MIT Press Bookstore.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries, The MIT Press Bookstore
For more information, contact:  John Jenkins
(617) 253-5249
jjenkins at mit.edu 

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The Future Of Voting In Your Hands:  2016 MA Community Voting Day
Wednesday, October 12
5:30 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Microsoft NERD Center, 1 Memorial Drive 10th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-future-of-voting-in-your-hands-tickets-27054790607

Voatz is hosting a community voting day via its award winning mobile voting platform. Potential voters and various local stakeholders will be able participate in live voting focusing on several current events and issues of importance (including a mock version of the upcoming Massachusetts State Primary) via a compatible smartphone (or via a Voatz Ballot Station in case you don’t have a compatible smartphone).

All votes will be fully anonymous and realtime results will be available for some of the contests. Participants will have a unique opportunity to learn more about the new Voatz platform and also provide feedback. There will also be a small panel discussion and some guest speakers.  

The event will be fun, non-partisan and aims to showcase the use of some new, innovative technologies which can potentially make our democratic processes more accessible and inclusive.
Light snacks and refreshments will be served.
Schedule:  
5:30pm - 6:00pm: Registration, Device Setup, Networking Reception
6:00pm - 6:30pm: Introduction, Panel Discussion
6:30pm - 7:00pm: Mock Campaigning, Ballot Measures, Voting Events Overview
7:00pm - 7:30pm: Live Voting
7:30pm - 7:40pm: Live Tallying, Results
7:40pm - 8:00pm: Closing Notes, Next Steps
8:00pm - 8:30pm: Networking

FAQs:
Are there ID requirements or an age limit to enter the event?
Yes, you will need a valid United States Photo-ID (e.g. drivers license, state id, passport, etc) to enter the venue and to vote. Please make sure to check in with the Microsoft building security when you arrive.
What are my transport/parking options getting to the event?
The location is a short walk from the Red Line Kendall Sq T Station. For those who intend to drive, there is a paid parking lot underneath the building, and limited meter parking in the area. Additionally, the MIT Hayward St parking lot is free after 5pm. 
What kind of smartphone will I need to vote in the event?
iPhone 5s (or newer) with Touch ID enabled, Samsung Galaxy S5/S6/S7. If you don't have a compatible device, you will still be able to vote in person via the Voatz Ballot Stations available on site. Just remember to bring a valid photo-ID with you.
What kind of events does Voatz support?
Public Elections (municipal/city/state/national) including Ballot Measures, Referendums
Political Party Elections, Convention Floor Voting
Participatory Budget Voting
Democracy Vouchers
Corporate Elections
Shareholder Proxy Voting
College/University Elections (student bodies/alumni)
Labor Union Elections
Coop Voting
Verified Opinion Polling
Other Custom Voting Events
Photography
The organizers will be recording footage during the course of the program to use at their discretion. Please indicate if you do not want to be photographed or taped; otherwise, your silence will act as a form of consent.
Where can I contact the organizer with any questions?
You can contact the Voatz team via email at info at voatz.com 
About the Organizer:  Voatz
Voatz is an award winning, mobile election voting platform focused on simplifying the electoral process internationally and making it safer, simpler and more accessible through the use of cutting edge technologies such as smart biometrics and the Blockchain. Voatz has been recognized with several awards some of which include the 2016 MIT Startup Spotlight Cult Favorite Winner, SXSW Citrix Hackathon Winner, Mass Innovation Nights Audience Favorite Winner, etc. To learn more, follow us on Twitter @voatz and visit voatz.com.
Event space graciously provided by:
The Microsoft Innovation & Policy Center
The Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center aims for Microsoft to be “of” the community, not just exist within it. Through the Innovation and Policy Center, we are extending beyond the tech community to: Connect stakeholders from tech to the broader business, academic and government community; Catalyze important technology and public policy discussions; and Contribute more directly with the health and vitality of greater New England.

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MIT Water Innovation Prize Kick-off Dinner
Wednesday, October 12
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
MIT, Building E14-648, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-water-innovation-prize-kick-off-dinner-tickets-28205072130

Come to learn more about water innovation, pitch your own idea, or network to find teammates. We will hear from speakers across sectors about the world’s water challenges and new innovations to address them. We also invite individuals or teams to pitch an idea (3-5 min) - we welcome anything water-related. Please e-mail waterinnovation at mit.edu if interested.

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Boston New Technology October 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT70
Wednesday, October 12
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Akamai Technologies, 150 Broadway, Cambridge

Free event! Come learn about 7 innovative and exciting technology products and network with the Boston/Cambridge startup community!   

Each presenter gets 5 minutes for product demonstration and 5 minutes for Q&A.  

Agenda:  
6:00 to 7:00 - Networking with Dinner
7:00 to 7:10 - Announcements
7:10 to 8:20 - Presentations, Questions & Answers
8:20 to 9:00 - Meet the Presenters

Upon Arrival:  Akamai staff will be escorting attendees from the lobby up the stairs to the first floor, where you'll find our check-in table. Type the first few letters of your name on the screen and tap your name to print your name tag.

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Cambridge Forum: The Manifesto Against Parenting
Wednesday, October 12
7:00 PM (Doors at 6:00)
The Atrium, 4th Floor, 50 Church Street, Cambridge

Cambridge Forum welcomes ALISON GOPNIK for a discussion of her book The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children.
A book signing will precede the program starting at 6pm, with refreshments.
Gopnik is the author of The Gardener and the Carpenter, the NY Times parenting and education best seller, and a professor of psychology and philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. An internationally recognized leader in the study of children's learning and development, Gopnik writes the “Mind and Matter” column for The Wall Street Journal and is the author of The Philosophical Baby and coauthor of The Scientist in the Crib.  She has three sons and lives in Berkeley, California, with her husband, Alvy Ray Smith.
About The Gardener and the Carpenter

Caring deeply about our children is part of what makes us human. Yet the thing we call "parenting" is a surprisingly new invention. In the past thirty years, the concept of parenting and the multibillion dollar industry surrounding it have transformed child care into obsessive, controlling, and goal-oriented labor intended to create a particular kind of child and therefore a particular kind of adult. In The Gardener and the Carpenter, the pioneering developmental psychologist and philosopher Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar twenty-first-century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong—it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too.
Drawing on the study of human evolution and her own cutting-edge scientific research into how children learn, Gopnik shows that although caring for children is profoundly important, it is not a matter of shaping them to turn out a particular way. Children are designed to be messy and unpredictable, playful and imaginative, and to be very different both from their parents and from each other. The variability and flexibility of childhood lets them innovate, create, and survive in an unpredictable world. “Parenting" won't make children learn―but caring parents let children learn by creating a secure, loving environment.

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Tetris: The Games People Play
Wednesday October 12
7:00 pm 
Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Street, Brookline

Box Brown in conversation with Liz Prince 
Alexey Pajitnov had big ideas about games. In 1984, he created Tetris in his spare time while developing software for the Soviet government. Once Tetris emerged from behind the Iron Curtain, it was an instant hit. A bidding war was sparked, followed by clandestine trips to Moscow, backroom deals, innumerable miscommunications, and outright theft. For the first time and in unparalleled detail, Tetris: The Games People Play tells the true story of the world’s most popular video game. Box Brown will appear in conversation with Liz Prince (Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir).

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BostonTalks Investigates: Health Care for Refugee Women
October 12 
7:00 p.m.
WGBH Studios, One Guest Street, Brighton
RSVP at http://www.wgbh.org/events/event.cfm?eid=Investigates%3A%20Healthcare%20for%20Refugee%20Women-135#pBlock
Cost:  $11.54

At the end of 2015, a staggering number of people around the world—one out of every 113 people, to be exact—were estimated to be forcibly displaced from their homes. Half of these people, labeled asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons or refugees, are women, according to the United Nations. Join WGBH’s Beat the Press TV host, Emily Rooney (@EmilyRooneyWGBH) and experienced Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) aid workers for a discussion about the unique and pressing health challenges facing displaced women. Learn how Doctors Without Borders provides family planning, obstetric care, and medical treatment for sexual violence to patients on the move or living in refugee camps—and how Doctors Without Borders offers mental health care, a crucial component of treatment for survivors of violence.

This talk is part of Doctors Without Borders’ new interactive outdoor exhibition, Forced From Home, shown on Boston’s Long Wharf between October 15-23, 2016. Tickets are free, but RSVP is required.

About WGBH’s BostonTalks: Investigates event series

WGBH investigates stories that matter to our region. Now, you’re invited to join the conversation at our BostonTalks: Investigates series, featuring in-depth panel discussions with major players, followed by a reception.

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Eyes on the Street:  The Life of Jane Jacobs
Wednesday, October 12
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes award-winning author and former M.I.T. professor ROBERT KANIGEL for a discussion of Eyes on the Street: The Life of Jane Jacobs, the first major biography of the woman who changed the way we view and live in cities, whose influence can still be felt in any discussion of urban planning to this day.
About Eyes on the Street

Eyes on the Street is a revelation of the phenomenal woman who raised three children, wrote seven groundbreaking books, saved neighborhoods, stopped expressways, was arrested twice, and engaged at home and on the streets in thousands of debates--all of which she won. Here is the child who challenged her third-grade teacher; the high school poet; the journalist who honed her writing skills at Iron Age, Architectural Forum, Fortune, and other outlets, while amassing the knowledge she would draw upon to write her most famous book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Here, too, is the activist who helped lead an ultimately successful protest against Robert Moses's proposed expressway through her beloved Greenwich Village; and who, in order to keep her sons out of the Vietnam War, moved to Canada, where she became as well known and admired as she was in the United States.

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Thursday, October 13
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The Bolivian Eco-Municipality: A new sustainability framework?
Thursday, October 13
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

William Powers 
The Latin American concept of buen vivir, or “living well”, suggests well-being “is only possible in the specific context of a community, which is social but also ecological.” (Gudynas, 2011). Powers’ 2016 World Policy Institute field study in Bolivia examines how - even in the context of contradictory neo-extractivist pressures which cuts against sustainability - new biocentric policies around buen vivir play out in one of Bolivia’s twenty-four nationally-designated “ecological municipalities.” A lively discussion will probe this new model, and transferable South-North lessons.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Meeting our Climate and Energy Goals in 2030 and Beyond
Thursday, October 13
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Goodwin Procter, 100 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://members.e2.org/ext/jsp/controller?sponsor=HARTBER&sv=NE_ClimateEneGoals
Cost:  $30

Dr. Elizabeth A. Stanton, Former Principal Economist with Synapse Energy Economics & Dr. Philip Duffy, President & Executive Director of the Woods Hole Research Center
Each of the nine northeastern states in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) has pledged to reduce their overall GHG emissions by about 40% by 2030. Is that really possible? The answer: ABSOLUTELY! A recent study by Synapse Energy Economics showed that not only could they reduce emissions, but in the process would generate nearly 60,000 jobs per year and save customers about $25 billion a year.

On the other hand, even under the most optimistic scenarios for reductions in fossil fuel use we will need to remove massive quantities of CO2 from the atmosphere in order to avoid unacceptable climate outcomes. How to do this is perhaps the greatest unsolved technical and policy problem in climate change.

Please join E2 New England for a discussion of these issues with Dr. Elizabeth Stanton, the principal author of the Synapse study, and Dr. Philip Duffy, the President & Executive Director of the Woods Hole Research center, which in 2015 was ranked the #1 Climate Change Think Tank for the second rear in a row by the International Center for Climate Governance (ICCG).

All registered attendees will be sent confirmation and directions the week prior to the event.  Contact ying at e2.org if you have questions. 

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Workshop on the Sustainability of the World's Food and Farming Systems
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S250, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Weatherhead Center for International Affairs
SPEAKER(S)  Jock Herron, Instructor in Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO  hconrad at wcfia.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Jock Herron is an Instructor focused on food systems and health at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He co-led the Smart Cities and Wellness project sponsored by the Humana Corporation and the Responsive Environments and Artifacts Lab at the GSD. This past year, he served on the Steering Committee of the Worcester County Food Hub Initiative, and he is currently working on a rotational grazing project in Central Massachusetts. Co-manager of family farms in southern Ohio and a former chairman of the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research, he has a longstanding view that food systems are at the nexus of population and habitat health.

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China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mount Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Arthur R. Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know, a senior non-resident fellow of the Brookings-Tsinghua Center for Public Policy, adjunct professor at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, and a member of the National Committee on US-China Relations.
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS	  The Ash Center cordially invites you to a book talk with Arthur R. Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know. This discussion will be moderated by Edward Cunningham, China Programs Director at the Ash Center.
Arthur R. Kroebe is founding partner of Gavekal Dragonomics, a China-focused economic research consultancy he helped establish in Beijing in 2002 after 15 years as a freelance financial journalist in Asia, and editor of its flagship publication China Economic Quarterly. He is also head of research at the parent company Gavekal, a financial services firm based in Hong Kong, where he advises financial, corporate and government clients on economic and political developments in China.
LINK  http://ash.harvard.edu/event/china’s-economy-what-everyone-needs-know

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Families in Flight: Today's International Refugee Crisis
Thursday, October 13
4:15 pm
Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://radcliffe-nenmf.formstack.com/forms/families_in_flight

The Radcliffe Institute will host a panel discussion to explore topics of pressing global concern: refugees, forced migration, and internally displaced people. The speakers—which include a professor of law, a medical doctor, a United Nations officer, and an independent photographer—will focus on the Syrian refugee crisis with special attention to issues of gender and family. The discussion will highlight some of the forces that compel the uprooting of millions of people from their homes and lands and will help us better understand the shape, context, and on-the-ground realities facing Syrian and other refugee communities in 2016.
Free and open to the public.
Please register and join us.
We welcome walk-in attendees on the day of the event whenever space is available. If the event reaches capacity, then the information on this page will be updated. Thank you.
This program is scheduled to complement the reunions of the Harvard and Radcliffe Classes of 1971, 1976, and 1986.  We hope to welcome many alumni/ae from these classes to the Radcliffe Institute as part of their reunion activities when they return to Cambridge in the fall.
PANELISTS:
Susan M. Akram, Clinical Professor of Law, Boston University Law School
Noel Calhoun, Senior Policy Officer, Office of the Special Adviser for the Summit on Addressing Large Numbers of Refugees and Migrants, United Nations
Rania Matar, Independent Photographer
Abdulkarim Ekzayez, Health Program Manager, Save the Children International Syria Response
MODERATOR:
Jacqueline Bhabha, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Director of Research, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard University

The annual Rama S. Mehta event at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study was established by Catherine Atwater Galbraith, John Kenneth Galbraith, and the Mehta family, in memory of Rama S. Mehta. Each event includes a distinguished woman in public affairs, the sciences, or the arts who has a deep understanding of the problems of women in developing countries. 

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Starr Forum: Democracy and Violence
Thursday, October 13
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 54-100

Speaker: David Art, Heidi Beirich, Jolyon Howorth, Richard Samuels (moderator)
Starr Forum panel discussion on far right extremism in politics, within the US and internationally. Panelists include MIT professor Richard Samuels (moderating), David Art (Tufts), Heidi Beirich (Southern Poverty Law Center), and Jolyon Howorth (Yale).

CIS Starr Forum 
A public events series on pressing issues in international affairs, sponsored by the MIT Center for International Studies.

Web site: http://mit.edu/cis/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:
617-253-8306
starrforum at mit.edu 

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How Did the Computer Learn to See?
Thursday, October 13
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

How did the computer learn to see? A common response to the question is that the computer learned to see from cinema and photography, that is, from modernity's most highly evolved technologies of vision. In this talk we will explore a different response to the question, that the computer learned to see not from cinema but from sculpture. With reference to the work of artists Sarah Oppenheimer and Zach Blas, along with techniques for digital image compression, we will explore the uniquely computational mode of vision. 

Alexander Galloway is a writer and computer programmer working on issues in philosophy, technology, and theories of mediation. He is author of several books, most recently a monograph on the work of Francois Laruelle, and is currently a visiting professor in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/alexander-galloway-computer-learn-see/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

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Askwith Forums: A Conversation with Jeb Bush
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  Speaker: Jeb Bush, academic visitor, Program on Education Policy and Governance, Harvard Kennedy School; founder, president and chairman, Foundation for Excellence in Education; former governor, Florida
Moderator: Martin West, associate professor of education, HGSE; deputy director, Program on Education Policy and Governance, Harvard Kennedy School
Introduction: James E. Ryan, dean and Charles William Eliot Professor, HGSE

Recent changes in federal policy have put states back in the driver’s seat for ensuring equity and excellence in American education. Drawing on his experience as Florida governor and chairman of the Foundation for Excellence in Education, Governor Bush will address the new opportunities for state leadership on K-12 education policy, what it will take for governors and other state officials to capitalize on those opportunities, and the challenges of maintaining bi-partisan support for education reform in a time of heightened polarization. After brief remarks, Governor Bush will engage in a discussion moderated by Associate Professor Martin West and featuring questions from HGSE faculty members and the audience.

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Using Design Thinking to Generate Insights for Innovation
Thursday, October 13 
5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Impact Hub Boston, 50 Milk Street, 17th floor, Boston
RSVP at http://impacthubboston.net/event/using-design-thinking-to-generate-insights-for-innovation/

A user-centered approach to problem solving and application of design thinking tools can help create breakthrough ideas for your organization. In this workshop, we’ll use a live case study to illustrate the power of this methodology and send you home with tools you can apply to your organization immediately.

About the Speaker:  Drew is co-founder of Emzingo, a social enterprise focused on creating the next generation of responsible leaders. He and his colleagues work with businesses, universities, individuals, and professional organizations to design and deliver experiences that instill the mindset of responsible leadership, drive employee engagement, promote social innovation and environmental awareness, and create a culture of collaboration. Drew holds an M.S. in Engineering from Cornell University and an MBA from IE Business School. He lives in Somerville, MA with his wife, Emily and puppy Sierra.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/emzingo

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District Energy in Cities: Unlocking Efficiency, Sustainability and Resiliency through Infrastructure Investment
Thursday, October 13
6:00 - 8:00 PM 
BU, SAR 102, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScTuobnPemggjFlDF0d8IPyzHFF9xS2FjZH2XL3Yp4siIYQXA/viewform

Rob Thornton, President and CEO of International District Energy Association.
How cities around the globe from Copenhagen to Dubai, Paris to Boston are investing in district energy thermal heating and cooling networks to enhance resource efficiency, conserve fuel and water, and strengthen energy resiliency for local economies. City leaders have recognized that heating and cooling buildings represents a significant opportunity to optimize efficiency, utilize local and sustainable energy supplies and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This lecture will explore the shifting utility paradigm from central station generation to more distributed solutions; discuss planning approaches for energy mapping and investment strategies and share illustrative case examples of highly successful district energy systems as strategic foundation for more sustainable cities. ALL ARE WELCOME! http://www.unep.org/energy/districtenergyincities www.districtenergy.org

Co-hosted by the Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future (All are welcome)

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Climate Congress "Faiths" Discussion Group
Thursday, October 13
6pm – 8pm
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.nvbpopunldec4ge92ne4i0cer4?authuser=0

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The Intelligent Integrated Store: An IoT Event
October 13 
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
RSVP at https://mitefcamb.z2systems.com/np/clients/mitefcamb/eventRegistration.jsp?event=693&
Cost:  $0 - $30
Pre-Registration is required

Retailers have a vision for an intelligent integrated store.But where exactly are we in the realization of this vision? 

There has been much discussion about marrying continuous overhead RFID/RTLS locating capabilities, video analytics, BLE, traffic counters, EAS, POS data, receiving data, and other store-based sensors to create an integrated, intelligent, self-aware store.  

Retailers want highly granular insights into the movements, actions and intentions of shoppers in their stores.  They want store associates to be alerted the moment a shopper needs attention or an item needs to be restocked, merchants and store planners to know exactly how shoppers are buying, which items are being tried on but put back on the shelf and the physical paths taken through the store and shoppers to be presented with a personalized context-relevant digital-physical experience.

In this session, we will hear from technologists and retailers about the vision and the reality on the ground.

Speakers
Jonathan Aitken, IT Director,  lululemon athletica (via Skype)
Ashlee Aldridge, SVP and CIO, DSW
Vibhu Norby, Co-Founder, CEO @ b8ta
Beth Rick, Director, Customer Portfolio Transformation, DSW
Moderator
Bill McBeath, Chief Research Officer, ChainLink Research

Agenda
6:00-6:30 PM  Registration and networking
6:30-8:30 PM Panel presentations, discussion, and Q&A

MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge
Phone:  617-253-8240
Email:  entforumcambridge AT mit DOT edu

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Sustainability Collaborative
Thursday, October 13 
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 5th floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge

Join us each month for the Coalesce Sustainability Collaborative. Come back for more info on this month’s guest as we get closer and email Sierra Flanigan at (sierra at coalesce.earth) for more info.

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Public Lecture: Tatiana Bilbao, "The House and the City"
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Tatiana Bilbao has been a visiting professor at Yale School of Architecture and Rice School of Architecture. She was named as an Emerging Voice by the Architecture League of New York in 2009 and received the Kunstpreis Berlin in 2012 and the Global Award for Sustainable Architecture Prize in 2014. Her work is in the collections of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago.
COST	Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO  events at gsd.harvard.edu
DETAILS	  Tatiana Bilbao, through the work of her multicultural and multidisciplinary office based in Mexico City, attempts to understand the place that surrounds her and to translate its rigid codes into architecture. As a reaction to global capitalism, the studio aspires to regenerate spaces in order to humanize them and to open up niches for cultural and economic development. The firm’s recent projects include a botanical garden, a master plan and open chapel for a pilgrimage route, a biotechnological center for a technology institution, a house that can be built for $8,000, and a funeral home. Their work has been published in A+U, Domus, and the New York Times, among other periodicals.
Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
LINK  http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/tatiana-bilbao-the-house-and-the-city/

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Judith Schwartz, Water in Plain Sight
Thursday, October 13
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Water scarcity is on everyone's mind. Long taken for granted, water availability has entered the realm of economics, politics, and people's food and lifestyle choices. But as anxiety mounts many are finding new routes to water security with key implications for food access, economic resilience, biodiversity and climate change. Judith D. Schwartz shows there are alternatives to praying for rain or sandbagging like crazy, demonstrating that we can ally with the water cycle to revive the earth and restore lush, productive landscapes. Take for instance a river in rural Zimbabwe that, thanks to restorative grazing, now flows a kilometer farther than in living memory. Or a food forest of oranges, pomegranates, and native fruit-bearing plants in Tucson, grown through harvesting urban wastewater. Or a mini-oasis in West Texas nourished by dew.

Water in Plain Sight shares stories of water innovators and takes readers though the US and the world to find new water—water held in the soil, cycled through plants, captured as dew. We gain new insights on how water flows across the land, insights that can help us replenish water sources and make the best use of what we have.

Judith D. Schwartz is a journalist whose recent work looks at ecological restoration as a way to address environmental, economic, and social challenges. She writes on this theme for numerous publications and speaks in venues around the world. Her 2013 book Cows Save the Planet was awarded a Nautilus Book Award Silver Prize for Sustainability and is among Booklist's Top 10 Books On Sustainability. A graduate of the Columbia Journalism School and Brown University, she lives in Vermont.

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Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age
Thursday,  October 13
7:00 pm 
Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Street, Brookline

Sherry Turkle
Preeminent author and researcher Sherry Turkle has been studying digital culture for over thirty years. Long an enthusiast for its possibilities, here she investigates a troubling consequence: at work, at home, in politics, and in love, we find ways around conversation, tempted by the possibilities of a text or an email in which we don’t have to look, listen, or reveal ourselves. Based on five years of research and interviews in homes, schools, and the workplace, Turkle argues that we have come to a better understanding of where our technology can and cannot take us and that the time is right to reclaim conversation. The most human—and humanizing—thing that we do.

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A Chance to Dress: screening and discussion
Thursday, October 13
7:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building 6-120, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Alice Bourvrie, filmmaker; John Southard; Jean Southard; Chris Bourg, Director of Libraries
Dr. John Southard, a world renowned and respected geologist and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, is an open cross-dresser. A Chance To Dress follows Dr. Southard's challenges and difficulties in coming out at the age of 65 to his friends, neighbors and colleagues, but also his exuberance and sense of liberation after a lifetime of secrecy. Join us for a viewing of the film, followed by a discussion.

Web site: http://libraries.mit.edu/news/discussion-chance-dress/22877/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Women's and Gender Studies, MIT Libraries, LBGTQ at MIT
For more information, contact:  Nina Davis-Millis
617-253-5652
ninadm at mit.edu 

--------------------------

Sixth Annual John H. Carlson Lecture:  Big Ice: Antarctica, Greenland, and Boston
Thursday, October 13
7:00p–9:00p
Simons IMAX Theatre, NE Aquarium, 1 Museum Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=106705&view=Detail

Speaker: Richard Alley, Penn State
An ice sheet is a two-mile-thick, continent-wide pile of old snow, spreading under its own weight and sculpting the land beneath. The ice sheet that buried Boston 20,000 years ago melted when slowly acting features of Earth's orbit raised summer sunshine and atmospheric CO2, warming the climate. The history of that Ice Age can still be read in Boston Harbor, and in the layers of the surviving ice sheets on Antarctica and Greenland. But, more warming may melt those ice records, as break-off of huge icebergs and outburst floods speed sea-level rise. 

Web site: http://bit.ly/2aYSTTe
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE (register via event website)
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS), Lorenz Center
For more information, contact:  Allison Provaire
provaire at mit.edu 

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Friday, October 14
---------------------

Houghton Lecture: Marine Ecosystems and Ocean Acidification
Friday, October 14
9:00a–10:00a
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Corinne Le Quere, University of East Anglia
The ocean holds 50 times more carbon than the atmosphere. Because of its large buffer capacity, the ocean will eventually absorb 60 to 85% of the carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere on a time scale of 1000 years or longer. However the uptake of carbon dioxide by the ocean has the side effect of acidifying the water, with negative consequences for marine ecosystems and unclear implications for the functioning of the marine carbon cycle. This lecture will detail the linkages between marine ecosystem processes (from bacteria to jellyfish) and the carbon cycle. It will show how ecosystem processes can be understood through their biogeochemical functionality, and explain the knowns and unknowns of the impacts of ocean acidification. The lecture will end with a discussion of how changes in marine ecosystems could have knock on effects on climate regulation. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Magi
cliberty at mit.edu 

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Charles River Crypto Day
Friday October 14 
MIT, Building 32 G-882 (Hewlett),  Vassar Street, Cambridge

Come to the first Charles River Crypto Day of this academic year and get your fix of coffee, blockchains, rational proofs, memory hard functions and (need we say) indistinguishability obfuscation.

9:30 – 10:00.	Introduction/Coffee
10:00 – 11:00.	 Nir Bitansky, MIT  From Cryptomania to Obfustopia through Secret-Key Functional Encryption
11:00 – 12:00.	 Rachel Lin, UC Santa Barbara  Indistinguishability Obfuscation from DDH-like Assumptions on Constant-Degree Graded Encodings
12:00 – 1:30.	Lunch (provided)
1:30 – 2:30.	Jing Chen, Stony Brook  Rational Proofs with Multiple Provers
2:30 – 3:30.	Elaine Shi, Cornell  Blockchains and Beyond: Rethinking Distributed Consensus in New Settings
3:30 – 4:00.	Coffee Break
4:00 – 5:00.	Jeremiah Blocki, Purdue  Towards a Theory of Data-Independent Memory Hard Functions

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Green Arts Network: Artist Showcase 2016
Friday, October 14
12pm - 6pm
Massachusetts College of Art & Design, Pozen Center, 621 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Come celebrate sustainability with artwork, local grassroots organizations, and open discussion on climate politics! 

Help MassArt's Clay for Change ceramics group raise funds for RESIST THE PIPELINE (http://www.resistthepipeline.org/), the movement against the West Roxbury lateral pipeline!

More local organizations and student groups will be present:
Boston Climate Action Network (BCAN) 
350Mass For A Better Future
JP Green House
The Restore
MassAction: For the Planet
MassArt Garden Collective

FREE art supply samples, refreshments, and more!

Questions? Email: greenartsnetwork at gmail.com
Updates and more details: facebook.com/thegreenartsnetwork

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Cannibal Family Farms: Grotesque Intimacy and Rural Dysfunction in 20th Century America
Friday, October 14
2:30p–4:30p
MIT, Building E51-095, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Gabriel N. Rosenberg, Assistant Professor in the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University

Seminar on Environmental and Agricultural History

Web site: http://history.mit.edu/lectures-and-seminars/seminar-environmental-and-agricultural-history
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): History Office, Program in Science Technology and Society
For more information, contact:  Margo Collett
617-253-4965
history-info at mit.edu 

----------------------------

The Curse of Cash
Friday, October 14
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Harvard professor and former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund KENNETH S. ROGOFF for a discussion of his latest book, The Curse of Cash.

About The Curse of Cash
From the New York Times bestselling author of This Time Is Different, The Curse of Cash is "a fascinating and important book" (Ben Bernanke) about phasing out most paper money to fight crime and tax evasion—and to battle financial crises by tapping the power of negative interest rates.

The world is drowning in cash—and it's making us poorer and less safe. In The Curse of Cash, Kenneth Rogoff, one of the world's leading economists, makes a persuasive and fascinating case for an idea that until recently would have seemed outlandish: getting rid of most paper money.

Even as people in advanced economies are using less paper money, there is more cash in circulation—a record $1.4 trillion in U.S. dollars alone, or $4,200 for every American, mostly in $100 bills. And the United States is hardly exceptional. So what is all that cash being used for? The answer is simple: a large part is feeding tax evasion, corruption, terrorism, the drug trade, human trafficking, and the rest of a massive global underground economy.

As Rogoff shows, paper money can also cripple monetary policy. In the aftermath of the recent financial crisis, central banks have been unable to stimulate growth and inflation by cutting interest rates significantly below zero for fear that it would drive investors to abandon treasury bills and stockpile cash. This constraint has paralyzed monetary policy in virtually every advanced economy, and is likely to be a recurring problem in the future.

The Curse of Cash offers a plan for phasing out most paper money—while leaving small-denomination bills and coins in circulation indefinitely—and addresses the issues the transition will pose, ranging from fears about privacy and price stability to the need to provide subsidized debit cards for the poor.

While phasing out the bulk of paper money will hardly solve the world's problems, it would be a significant step toward addressing a surprising number of very big ones. Provocative, engaging, and backed by compelling original arguments and evidence, The Curse of Cash is certain to spark widespread debate.

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MIT Energy Night!
Friday, October 14
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-energy-night-tickets-27550426066

MIT Energy Club invites you to ENERGY NIGHT, a showcase and celebration of energy research, entrepreneurship, and innovation. Join researchers, entrepreneurs, and energy enthusiasts from throughout the Boston and Cambridge community for the MIT Energy Club's marquee Fall event.
Admission is FREE. Drinks and hors d'oeuvres will be served.

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Saturday, October 15
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Boston Book Festival
Saturday, October 15
Copley Square, Boston

More information at https://bostonbookfest.org/

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Tech Conference at Harvard Business School
Saturday, October 15
8am - 5pm
Harvard Business School, Spangler Auditorium, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tech-conference-at-harvard-business-school-tickets-27526764293
Cost:  $25 – $30

How can autonomous transportation impact every sector of the economy?  When will we be able to take vacations to the moon?  What does the Pokemon Go phenomenon mean for the future of virtual reality?

On Saturday, October 15th, 2016, thought and business leaders who are shaping the future of these technologies will come together for a day of keynote speeches, panel discussions, technology demonstrations, and networking at 2016 Tech Conference at Harvard Business School: “Hello, World!”

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Sunday, October 16
---------------------

MIT Swapfest
Sunday, October 16
9:00a–2:00p
MIT, N4, Albany Garage and Lots, Albany Street between Massachusetts Avenue and Main Street, Cambridge 

MIT's monthly Hi Tech, Computer, Electronics and Ham Radio Fleamarket. 
Buy Sell or Swap all things nerdly. 
Held the third Sunday of each month April thru October. 
Rain or Shine covered space is available for all sellers. 
In the Albany St Garage and adjacent lot. 
On Albany St between Mass Ave and Main St, Cambridge. 
$6 Buyers admission from 9AM to 2PM. 
$4 with MIT/ Harvard Student ID 
Free for MIT and Harvard Undergraduates with current ID

Web site: www.swapfest.us
Open to: the general public
Cost: $6
This event occurs on the 3rd Sunday of every month through October 16, 2016.
Sponsor(s): MIT Radio Society, Electronic Research Society, MIT, UHF Repeater Assn. W1XM, MIT
For more information, contact:  Mitchell Berger
617-253-3776

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Boston Agricultural Exposition 
Sunday, October 16
10AM – 4PM
Haley House Bakery Café (outdoors), 12 Dade Street, Dudley Square, Roxbury

Come be part of it!
Join us for a celebration of community gardening, backyard growing, and local agriculture at the first annual Boston Agricultural Exposition on Sunday, October 16th from 10AM - 4PM (rain or shine) at Haley House Bakery Cafe in Boston’s Dudley Square.

The Trustees, Agricultural Hall, and Haley House are partnering to create a special day devoted to the celebration and enjoyment of community gardening, backyard growing, and local agriculture. We’ll have displays, exhibits, contests, animals, old-time games and activities for kids, and tasty treats featuring locally grown and locally produced products. Plans are in the works for agricultural exhibits including beekeeping, backyard chickens, mushroom cultivation, cider pressing, composting to name just a few.

Psst: Don’t miss the goat milking contest!

Looking to exhibit as an educator or nonprofit organization?
Here’s the link to more information and a registration form:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfG0Rk52-QHF9wEZ6fKG0gdd9itL7u47AdklGw9dwsUEz8xCg/viewform

Are you a local grower or local producer interested in exhibiting and/or selling at the Exposition?
Please be in touch with Peter Bowne via email pbowne at thetrustees.org or cell 617.869.6720. If you are interested we need to hear from you by close of business Friday, September 30th.

We are having (friendly) contests! We’d love for you to enter a pie, baked good, or fresh-picked or preserved garden bounty. Check our Facebook event page for up-to-date information and registration information.

Questions? Peter@ pbowne at thetrustees.org or 617.869.6720

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Monday, October 17 – Wednesday, October 19
---------------------------------------------

Harvard Forum & Nano Course Series on Population Health Equity
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 17 – Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016
WHERE  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Education, Health Sciences, Science, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with generous support of the Aetna Foundation
SPEAKER(S)  Keynote addresses will be delivered by Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, who will address “Hot-Spotting: Using Big Data for Health Equity”; Dr. Kathryn Edin, who will discuss “The New Poverty: Living on Less Than $2/Day in America”; and Dr. Nancy Krieger, who will share her latest research on “Health Equity & The Erroneous Temptation of Making the Causes of Health Sum to 100%: An Ecosocial Analysis.” Two panel discussions featuring national experts will be held as well on Social Network Interventions to Address Health Equity and Housing, Neighborhoods, and Social Mobility.
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9YWG7lGcHn1LnaR
TICKET INFO  Registration Is Free of Charge
CONTACT INFO  E-mail: pophealthequity at hsph.harvard.edu
DETAILS	 You're invited to the 2016 Forum on Population Health Equity, Oct. 18–19 at the Martin Conference Center, in Boston. Registration is free; breakfast & lunch served both days. Participants are invited to register for pre-meeting Nano Courses, on 10/17.
* Info/Agenda: Tinyurl.com/2016PopForumInfo
* E-mail: pophealthequity at hsph.harvard.edu
* Twitter: @PopHealthEquity; #PopHealthEquity
* Facebook: Facebook.com/PopHealthEquity
* YouTube: Tinyurl.com/YouTubePop
* Instagram: Instagram.com/PopHealthEquity
LINK  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/social-and-behavioral-sciences/inaugural-forum-on-population-health-equity-3/

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Monday, October 17
——————————

The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies
Monday, October 17
12:00AM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Bldg, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Paul Beaton, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Lunch will be provided. 

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series 
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
cepr at hks.harvard.edu
(617) 495 - 8693

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Righting the Record: Conservatism and the Archives
Monday, October 17
4:15 pm
Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://radcliffe-nenmf.formstack.com/forms/righting_the_record

Over the past half-century, grassroots activists and organizations both left and right have focused on women’s roles, family values, homosexuality, and reproductive policy, transforming modern American life. Yet the collections of major public repositories, especially those housed at universities, tend to document only one side of this complicated history: the left side. The Schlesinger Library is hosting a conversation among scholars, intellectuals, and activists—moderated by the New York Times columnist Ross Douthat—to explore the consequences of the current situation and examine possible solutions. “Righting the Record” is part of the library’s multifaceted approach to enhancing the diversity of the documentary record, to ensure that students, researchers, and scholars can write more complete and balanced histories of our times. 
Free and open to the public.
Please register and join us. 
We welcome walk-in attendees on the day of the event whenever space is available. If the event reaches capacity, then the information on this page will be updated. Thank you.
MODERATOR:
Ross Douthat, Op-ed Columnist, New York Times
PANELISTS:
Donald Critchlow, Professor of History and Director of the Center for Political Thought and Leadership, Arizona State University
Jennifer A. Marshall, Vice President, Heritage Foundation
Michelle Nickerson, Associate Professor of History, Loyola University Chicago
Charmaine Yoest, Senior Fellow, American Values

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Mass Innovation Nights #91:  Women Founders 
Monday, October 17
6pm-8:30pm  
District Hall Boston, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://mass.innovationnights.com/node/add/rsvp

It's time for our 3rd Annual "Women Founders" event MIN #91 at District Hall. MIN #91 "Women Founders" is kicking off the WEBOS week on MONDAY (yes, MONDAY - we like to keep you on your toes) October 17th 2016. We have 14 original and dynamic products that will be showcased, some great experts and a few surprises! 

Check out the new PRODUCTS and VOTE for your favorites 
Support local innovation -- network and have fun at the same time! 
Don't miss it

More information at http://mass.innovationnights.com/events/mass-innovation-nights-91

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Heat Transfer
Monday, October 17
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo RestaurantsThe popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Cambridge Forum: NO JUSTICE, NO PEACE: Race and Power in America
Monday, October 17
7:00 PM
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Cambridge Forum welcomes authors TOMMIE SHELBY, KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD, and ELIZABETH HINTON for a facilitated discussion around issues of race and structural injustice, and the steps that citizens and governments can take to find practical solutions to problems such as mass incarceration, extreme poverty in disadvantaged communities, and problematic notions of black criminality. This discussion will be moderated by DANIELLE ALLEN, Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.

This Cambridge Forum event is a collaboration with Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard Book Store, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University Press and Boston Review.

Books will be available for sale at the event. This event will not include a book signing.

About Dark Ghettos
Why do American ghettos persist? Decades after Moynihan’s report on the black family and the Kerner Commission’s investigations of urban disorders, deeply disadvantaged black communities remain a disturbing reality. Scholars and commentators today often identify some factor—such as single motherhood, joblessness, or violent street crime—as the key to solving the problem and recommend policies accordingly. But, Tommie Shelby argues, these attempts to “fix” ghettos or “help” their poor inhabitants ignore fundamental questions of justice and fail to see the urban poor as moral agents responding to injustice.

Drawing on liberal-egalitarian philosophy and informed by leading social science research, Dark Ghettos examines the thorny questions of political morality raised by ghettos. Should government foster integrated neighborhoods? If a “culture of poverty” exists, what interventions are justified? Should single parenthood be avoided or deterred? Is voluntary nonwork or crime an acceptable mode of dissent? How should a criminal justice system treat the oppressed? Shelby offers practical answers, framed in terms of what justice requires of both a government and its citizens, and he views the oppressed as allies in the fight for a society that warrants everyone’s allegiance.

“The ghetto is not ‘their’ problem but ours, privileged and disadvantaged alike,” Shelby writes. The existence of ghettos is evidence that our society is marred by structural injustices that demand immediate rectification. Dark Ghettos advances a social vision and political ethics that calls for putting the abolition of ghettos at the center of reform.

About The Condemnation of Blackness
Lynch mobs, chain gangs, and popular views of black southern criminals that defined the Jim Crow South are well known. We know less about the role of the urban North in shaping views of race and crime in American society.
Following the 1890 census, the first to measure the g
eneration of African Americans born after slavery, crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land of opportunity were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites—liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners—as indisputable proof of blacks’ inferiority. In the heyday of “separate but equal,” what else but pathology could explain black failure in the “land of opportunity”?
The idea of black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America, as were African Americans’ own ideas about race and crime. Chronicling the emergence of deeply embedded notions of black people as a dangerous race of criminals by explicit contrast to working-class whites and European immigrants, this fascinating book reveals the influence such ideas have had on urban development and social policies.
About From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime

In the United States today, one in every thirty-one adults is under some form of penal control, including one in eleven African American men. How did the “land of the free” become the home of the world’s largest prison system? Challenging the belief that America’s prison problem originated with the Reagan administration’s War on Drugs, Elizabeth Hinton traces the rise of mass incarceration to an ironic source: the social welfare programs of Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society at the height of the civil rights era.

Johnson’s War on Poverty policies sought to foster equality and economic opportunity. But these initiatives were also rooted in widely shared assumptions about African Americans’ role in urban disorder, which prompted Johnson to call for a simultaneous War on Crime. The 1965 Law Enforcement Assistance Act empowered the national government to take a direct role in militarizing local police. Federal anticrime funding soon incentivized social service providers to ally with police departments, courts, and prisons. Under Richard Nixon and his successors, welfare programs fell by the wayside while investment in policing and punishment expanded. Anticipating future crime, policymakers urged states to build new prisons and introduced law enforcement measures into urban schools and public housing, turning neighborhoods into targets of police surveillance.

By the 1980s, crime control and incarceration dominated national responses to poverty and inequality. The initiatives of that decade were less a sharp departure than the full realization of the punitive transformation of urban policy implemented by Republicans and Democrats alike since the 1960s.

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Business + Sustainability: Finding Energy by Saving It
Monday, October 17
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
MIT, Building E51-315, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/business-sustainability-finding-energy-by-saving-it-tickets-28191390207

MBA students and other graduate and professional students have found nearly $1.5 billion in energy savings
through the Environmental Defense Fund Climate Corps program.

Join guest speakers from EDF and MIT for a networking reception on leveraging the power of partnerships to improve energy efficiency.
Casual dress. Refreshments and light fare will be provided. Brief remarks will be followed by Q&A with the presenters.
Free of charge, but space is limited.

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Tuesday, October 18
—————————— 

Boston TechBreakfast: intermedia mmh, Future Moments, Navitome, GoPapaya
Tuesday, October 18
8:00 AM
Microsoft NERD, Horace Mann Room, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations.
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast:
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Food & Coffee and chit-chat 
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements 
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs! 
intermedia mmh: Mellon - Lorenzo dell'Uva
Future Moments: iOS apps = MicSwap, AudioFix: For Videos, AudioMaster - Gary Levitt
Navitome: - Dylan Murphy
GoPapaya: - Zach Weiss
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words Boston 

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Materials Day & Poster Session
Tuesday, October 18
8:00a–5:30p
MIT, Building W-16, 48 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge
RSVP at https://mpc-www.mit.edu/

Hosted annually by the Materials Processing Center, Materials Day features emerging research applications in materials science & engineering for products and process across the industrial spectrum. 

The theme for this year's symposium is Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage. Topics will include: advanced metal-ion, metal-air and flow batteries for applications ranging from consumer electronics to transportation and grid level energy management. 

Materials Day activities include conference speakers from both MIT and Industry. The student poster session immediately follows the technical symposium and showcases the latest results from the diverse materials research communities in MIT's Schools of Science and Engineering.

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free of charge but registration is required.
Tickets: https://mpc-www.mit.edu/
Sponsor(s): Materials Processing Center
For more information, contact:  Maria Aglietti
617-253-6472
aglietti at mit.edu 

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Speaker Series: Amy Walter
Tuesday, October 18
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Amy Walter is the National Editor of The Cook Political Report where she provides analysis of the issues, trends and events that shape the political environment. Her weekly column appears at CookPolitical.com.

Over the past 14 years, Amy Walter has built a reputation as an accurate, objective, and insightful political analyst with unparalleled access to campaign insiders and decision-makers. Known as one of the best political journalists covering Washington, she is the former political director of ABC News. She is also an exclusive panelist on NBC’s Meet the Press and a regular panelist on PBS’ Washington Week with Gwen Ifill and Fox News’ Special Report with Bret Baier. She provides political analysis every Monday evening for the PBS NewsHour.

This is Amy’s second tour of duty with The Cook Political Report. From 1997 to 2007, she served as Senior Editor where she covered the U.S. House.Walter was named one of DC’s “50 Top Journalists” by Washingtonian Magazine in 2009 and honored with the Washington Post’s Crystal Ball award for her spot-on election predictions in 2000. She is a member of the Board of Trustees at Colby College where she graduated summa cum laude.

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Plants That Purify: The Natural and Supernatural History of Smudging
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Braun Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion
SPONSOR	Women's Studies in Religion Program
CONTACT	Tracy Wall
DETAILS  WSRP Research Associate Rosalyn LaPier will deliver the talk, "Plants That Purify: The Natural and Supernatural History of Smudging."

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Climate Change, Water Quality and Ocean Acidification for the Coastal Ocean along the US Northeast
Tuesday, October 18
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Scott Doney, Waste Water Discharge, WHOI

Human-driven climate change inherently affects people and theenvironment at regional and local scales. For a variety of reasons,the coastal boundary between the land and the sea will be especially vulnerable to ongoing and future climate change and ocean acidification. Research contributes to identifying and quantifying impacts, targeting and assessing the efficacy of adaptation strategies, and providing a framework for discussing trade-offs among possible solutions with stakeholders. This talk will focus specifically on examples for the coastal waters of Buzzards Bay, MA and adjacent ocean continental shelf off of southern New England. A case study will be presented examining the interplay of climate warming and nitrogen loading on near-shore coastal water quality.

Bio:  My science interests span oceanography, climate and biogeochemistry. Much of my research involves how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change, which may act to either damp or accelerate climate trends. A current focus is on ocean acidification due to the invasion into the ocean of carbon dioxide and other chemicals from fossil fuel burning.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Dr. Will Turner, Conservation International Senior Vice President of Global Strategies
Tuesday, October 18
4:15 – 5:45pm
MIT, Building 4-270, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

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Looking Up: How coalitions of bottom-up organizations are driving action for sustainable development
Tuesday, October 18
5:00PM TO 7:00PM
Harvard, Emerson Hall, Room 105, 25 Quincy Street, Cambridge

with RACHEL KYTE, CEO of Sustainable Energy for All, and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General.
PANELISTS
William Clark, Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy, and Human Development, Harvard Kennedy School
Henry Lee, Jassim M. Jaidah Family Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Harvard Kennedy School
Michael Mehling, Executive Director, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR), MIT
Moderated by Sheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:  Rachel Kyte is Chief Executive Officer of the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Sustainable Energy for All. Ms. Kyte drives SE4All’s work to mobilize action towards its 2030 goals of ensuring universal access to modern energy services; doubling the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency; and doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix. As Special Representative for the Secretary General she is the point person in the UN for action towards the recently agreed global goal on sustainable energy. Ms Kyte served until December 2015 as World Bank Group Vice President and Special Envoy for Climate Change, leading the Bank Group’s efforts to campaign for an ambitious agreement at the 21st Convention of the Parties of the UNFCCC (COP 21). She was previously World Bank Vice President for Sustainable Development and was the International Finance Corporation Vice President for Business Advisory Services.

Science & Democracy Lecture Series
ABOUT THE SCIENCE & DEMOCRACY SERIES:
Once a semester, the STS Program, with co-sponsorship from other local institutions, hosts an installation in its Science and Democracy Lecture Series. The series aims to spark lively, university-wide discussion of the place and meaning of science and technology, broadly conceived, in democratic societies. We hope to explore both the promised benefits of our era’s most salient scientific and technological breakthroughs and the potentially harmful consequences of developments that are inadequately understood, debated, or managed by politicians, institutions, and lay publics.

Sponsored by the Program on Science, Technology, and Society. Co-sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment; the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and the Graduate School of Design.

Contact Name:  Shana Ashar
Shana_Ashar at hks.harvard.edu

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Creating Language in Man and Machine
Tuesday, October 18
5:15pm 
Harvard, Bolyston Hall, 110 Fong Auditorium, Cambridge

More information at http://stevenpinker.com/event/creating-language-man-and-machine

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Climate, Water, and the Evolution of Early Societies at the Harvard Museum of Natural History
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Museum of Natural History, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture, Science, Special Events, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Museum of Natural History
SPEAKER(S)  Vernon L. Scarborough, Distinguished University Research Professor and Charles P. Taft Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Cincinnati
COST  Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	hmnh at hmsc.harvard.edu, (617)495-3045
DETAILS	  The earliest complex societies found in the Western Hemisphere developed under very different environmental conditions. The Maya, for instance, emerged in the tropical lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula, a region with high seasonal rainfall and rich biodiversity. The Puebloans, in contrast, developed in the semiarid region of what is today Arizona and New Mexico, an area with limited rainfall and biodiversity. Vernon Scarborough will discuss two important archaeological sites from these different ecological and cultural zones—Tikal in Guatemala and the Chaco Canyon in New Mexico—to illustrate how the availability of water and climate influence the evolution of societies and what we can learn from these historical precedents.
LINK  https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/climate-water-evolution

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An Evening with Arthur Ganson
Tuesday, October 18
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-arthur-ganson-registration-28290788510

Join us in celebrating the reopening of our popular exhibit Gestural Engineering: The Sculpture of Arthur Ganson. The night will commence in our ground-floor 360 space as celebrated artist and engineer Arthur Ganson joins MIT Museum Director John Durant for a conversation regarding the exhibited pieces. A Q&A period will follow before an unveiling of Arthur's work in our newly renovated gallery. He will be available for individual questions and conversation during this time.
Light refreshments will be served.

Event is free and open to the public but pre-registration is recommended as space is limited for this event. There will be some capacity reserved for our impromptu walk-in guests, but seating is not guaranteed. Please note that unclaimed reserved seating will be released once the event has begun.

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Transforming the Renewable Energy and Entrepreneurship Industries in Emerging Economies
Tuesday, October 18
6:30p–8:30p
MIT, Building 2-190, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Sherife AbdelMessih

This year the MIT Egyptian Student Association (ESA) celebrates its 10th year anniversary! And who is better than ESA's original founder to celebrate with! 

Please join us for a talk with Sherife AbdelMessih, MIT Class 2009, CEO, Future Energy Corporation Chairman, SPARK Ventures, and the founder of MIT ESA. 

Sherife is selected by Yahoo! as one of the top 10 social entrepreneurs in Egypt; profiled as one of the 500 most influential people in the Middle East by Arabian Business magazine; and chosen as one of the top 200 economic leaders in Africa by L'Institut Choiseul. Sherife was the youngest on all 3 lists! 

Sherife is regularly invited to speak at industry events hosted by institutions such as Financial Times, Bloomberg, the World Bank, and prestigious universities. 

Come & join the conversation regarding the challenges and opportunities of the renewable energy and entrepreneurship sector in emerging markets. 

http://whereis.mit.edu/?go=2
Web site: https://www.facebook.com/events/1620394294920366/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Egyptian Student Association
For more information, contact:  Amr Suleiman
clubegypt-board at mit.edu 

Editorial Comment:  Certainly this subject is important.  I’ve been very impressed with the members and events of the MIT Egyptian Student Association over the years.

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Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part I
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Law, Special Events
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-juryx-deliberations-for-social-change-interactive-workshop-in-active-registration-27781258492
DETAILS  What is the citizen's role in deciding guilt? Is the loudest juror in the room more entitled to an opinion than the soft-spoken counterpart? And is a "difficult topic" a good enough excuse for a one-sided discussion?
In the first installment of a two-part workshop series, Charles Nesson, Weld Professor of Law at Harvard and founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society (now the Berkman Klein Center), will discuss his research on facilitating meaningful dialogue in the classroom, through the lens of JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, an open online course that Nesson is teaching this year.
Using a mock criminal case on gun law, workshop participants will experience firsthand Nesson's method for processing and approaching a dilemma.
This workshop is part of a two-part series. We encourage you to sign up and attend JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II as well.
LINK	http://edportal.harvard.edu/event/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-part-i

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Meeting the Unique Medical Needs of Migrants and Refugees
October 18
7.30pm
Old South Meeting House,. 310 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.forcedfromhome.com/events/panel-discussion-boston/#tickets

Join Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) for a free panel discussion at the Old South Meeting House in Boston that will take an in-depth look at the unique and often life-threatening health challenges facing the world’s 65 million displaced people.

For decades, Doctors Without Borders has treated displaced people along every stage of their journeys—in their home countries, along the routes they traverse, and in refugee camps and other destinations—paying special attention to the specific health risks in the chaotic, overcrowded, and uncertain circumstances they must endure. But now, when there are more displaced people in the world than there have been since World War II—many of whom arrive with chronic conditions, many who are trying to survive outside of established refugee camp settings—Doctors Without Borders has had to find new ways to address the medical issues of people on the move.

Our panel of experienced aid workers will share their stories of treating people in these precarious circumstances and discuss the particular challenges facing people who have been, through no fault of their own, forced from home.

Presented in collaboration with Old South Meeting House as a Partners in Public Dialogue Program.

A Q&A will follow the discussion.

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Opportunity
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Effective Altruism MIT Sloan Meetup Group
http://www.meetup.com/effective-altruism-mit-sloan/

Want to make the world the best place it can be? 
Effective Altruism is a worldwide movement that uses rational thinking and science to have the best possible impact. Effective Altruism MIT Sloan is bringing together people from all over the area to share experiences and be more effective by working together. 
To learn more about effective altruism, read the introduction on the international EA website (https://www.effectivealtruism.org) or watch Peter Singer's TED talk.

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Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian at cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
http://www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit
@cambenergy 
http://facebook.com/cambridgeenergyalliance

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Resource
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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 27 and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 12 PM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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