[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - October 9, 2016

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Oct 9 10:58:47 PDT 2016


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Index
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Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.  Keep scrolling, please.

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Monday, October 10
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10am  Museum of Fine Arts Fall Open House
6:30pm  Love Bites: Studying Mosquito Sex to Block Malaria Transmission
7pm  Today’s Crisis: Is another world really possible?

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Tuesday, October 11
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8:30am  The Track Record of Charter Schools in Massachusetts
12pm  Plant Respiration: Lessons from High Latitudes for Ecosystem Carbon Balance Modelling
12:30pm  Japan's Soft Power in Asia and the World
2pm  Speaker Series: Joy-Ann Reid
3pm  Simulating the self-assembly of DNA polyhedral nanostructures using a coarse-grained model 
4pm  Is Climate Change Affecting Life in The Deep Sea?
5:30pm  Changing Media, Changing Politics
7pm  Compassion in the Digital Age with Dungse Jampal Norbu

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Wednesday, October 12 - Thursday, October 13
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Conference on Race and Justice in the Age of Obama

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Wednesday, October 12
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12pm  Methane Emissions from the Oil and Gas Sector
12:30pm  Etymology of a Movement: Center for Green Schools and Global Impact Investment Network
4pm  How Bitcoin enables a Machine-Payable Web
5pm  The City of Tomorrow: Sensors, Networks, Hackers, and the Future of Urban Life
5:30pm  The Future Of Voting In Your Hands:  2016 MA Community Voting Day
6pm  MIT Water Innovation Prize Kick-off Dinner
6pm  Boston New Technology October 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT70
6:30pm  Ending Torture: An Alum's Journey from HDS to IBJ
7pm  BOOK TALK: DEVOURED: A JOURNEY INTO THE AMERICAN FOOD PSYCHE 
7pm  Cambridge Forum: The Manifesto Against Parenting
7pm  Tetris: The Games People Play
7pm  BostonTalks Investigates: Health Care for Refugee Women
7pm  Eyes on the Street:  The Life of Jane Jacobs

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Thursday, October 13
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11:45am  Moray Dewhurst, Former CFO of NextEra
12pm  The Bolivian Eco-Municipality: A new sustainability framework?
12pm  The Potential of Mediation in the Context of the Refugee Crisis
12pm  Meeting our Climate and Energy Goals in 2030 and Beyond
4pm  Workshop on the Sustainability of the World's Food and Farming Systems
4pm  Information Design
4:10pm  China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know
4:10pm  10 Big Ideas in Inequality
4:15pm  Families in Flight: Today's International Refugee Crisis
4:30pm  Starr Forum: Democracy and Violence
5pm  How Did the Computer Learn to See?
5:30pm  Askwith Forums: A Conversation with Jeb Bush
5:30pm  Using Design Thinking to Generate Insights for Innovation
6pm  District Energy in Cities: Unlocking Efficiency, Sustainability and Resiliency through Infrastructure Investment
6pm  Climate Congress "Faiths" Discussion Group
6pm  The Intelligent Integrated Store: An IoT Event
6:30pm  Sustainability Collaborative
6:30pm  Public Lecture: Tatiana Bilbao, "The House and the City”
7pm  Judith Schwartz, Water in Plain Sight
7pm  Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age
7pm  A Chance to Dress: screening and discussion
7pm  Bogs and Fens: New England’s Most Pristine Ecosystems
7pm  Sixth Annual John H. Carlson Lecture:  Big Ice: Antarctica, Greenland, and Boston
7pm  HEEC Film Screening: Young Voices for the Planet
7pm  Boston Area Solar Energy Association Forum:   DOER's 'Next Generation Solar Incentive Straw Proposal’ - the Good, the Bad & the Ugly

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Friday, October 14
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9am  Houghton Lecture: Marine Ecosystems and Ocean Acidification
Charles River Crypto Day
12pm  Green Arts Network: Artist Showcase 2016
12pm  Modeling and Evaluating the Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Policies
1pm  Next in Science: Astronomy and Astrophysics 
2:30pm  Cannibal Family Farms: Grotesque Intimacy and Rural Dysfunction in 20th Century America
3pm  The Curse of Cash
3pm  Adaptation and Learning by Networked Agents
4pm  A Conversation with CNN President Jeff Zucker
6pm  MIT Energy Night!
6pm  TADHack Boston - Global Communications Hackathon

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Saturday, October 15
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Boston Book Festival
8am  Tech Conference at Harvard Business School

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Sunday, October 16
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9am  MIT Swapfest
10am  Boston Agricultural Exposition 
1:30pm  Panel: Humanism, Racial Justice, and the 2016 Election

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Monday, October 17 – Wednesday, October 19
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Harvard Forum & Nano Course Series on Population Health Equity

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Monday, October 17
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12pm  The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies
12:30pm  Personalized Comfort
4:15pm  Righting the Record: Conservatism and the Archives
4:30pm  Bridging the Partisan Divide
6pm  Mass Innovation Nights #91:  Women Founders 
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Heat Transfer
7pm  Cambridge Forum: NO JUSTICE, NO PEACE: Race and Power in America
7pm  Business + Sustainability: Finding Energy by Saving It

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Tuesday, October 18
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8am  Boston TechBreakfast: intermedia mmh, Future Moments, Navitome, GoPapaya
8am  Materials Day & Poster Session
12pm  Speaker Series: Amy Walter
12pm  Brown Bag: Come Together Right Now: An Introduction to the Open Access Network - with Rebecca Kennison
12pm  Plants That Purify: The Natural and Supernatural History of Smudging
4pm  Climate Change, Water Quality and Ocean Acidification for the Coastal Ocean along the US Northeast
4:15pm  Dr. Will Turner, Conservation International Senior Vice President of Global Strategies
5pm  Looking Up: How coalitions of bottom-up organizations are driving action for sustainable development
5:15pm  Creating Language in Man and Machine
6pm  Climate, Water, and the Evolution of Early Societies at the Harvard Museum of Natural History
6pm  An Evening with Arthur Ganson
6pm  Ava DuVernay’s “The 13th” Film Screening and Discussion
6pm  Moth+Flame and Paracosm at Laugh Boston
6:30pm  The Center for Green Buildings and Cities (CGBC) hosts its 2nd Annual Lecture featuring Richard Rogers, a founding partner of Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners
6:30pm  Transforming the Renewable Energy and Entrepreneurship Industries in Emerging Economies
6:30pm  Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part I
7pm  Meeting the Unique Medical Needs of Migrants and Refugees
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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

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—————————— 
Monday, October 10
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Museum of Fine Arts Fall Open House
Monday, October 10
10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Enjoy free admission and special events at the MFA’s annual Fall Open House—and the Fenway Alliance’s 15th annual Opening Our Doors Day. Hear a medley of musical performances throughout the day including a concert by a 17-piece ensemble from The Boston Pops. Enjoy a range of art-making activities and tours for families and adults—and a full calendar of ASL and ASL interpreted events. Contact access at mfa.org for more information about accessible programming.

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Love Bites: Studying Mosquito Sex to Block Malaria Transmission
Monday, October 10
6:30-8:30pm 
Burren, 247 Elm Street, Somerville

Flaminia Catteruccia, Ph.D., is a molecular entomologist and an Associate Professor of Immunology and Infectious Disease at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She specializes in the reproductive biology of Anopheles mosquitoes, the only mosquitoes capable of transmitting human malaria. Since the beginning of the millennium, malaria has caused over 10 million deaths. Targeting and preventing Anopheles mosquito reproduction would curb malaria transmission and limit the significant public health burden caused by this disease.

To this end, her research group studies the molecular and behavioral parameters necessary for Anopheles mosquitos to spread the Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria. Investigating how Anopheles mosquitos reproduce and the vector-Plasmodium interactions underlying their ability to spread disease are two of the main endeavors in her laboratory. Translating bench-side research to the field is a priority of the lab. Fieldwork studies in Africa on Anopheles mating biology and natural malaria infections are undertaken in collaboration with IRSS in Burkina Faso, ICIPE in Kenya and other partners. Insecticide resistance among Anopheles mosquito populations threatens existing efforts to control malaria and thus developing products that can be used instead of, or in addition to, current control measures is a long-standing goal of Dr. Catteruccia’s research.

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/science-by-the-pint/

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Today’s Crisis: Is another world really possible?
Monday, October 10
7:00 p.m. 
encuentro5,  9A Hamilton Place, Boston

Since 1957 Richard Greeman has been active in civil rights, anti-war, anti-nuke, environmental and labor struggles in the U.S., Latin America, Russia (where he founded the Victor Serge Library) and France (where he is based). Translator and prefacer of Victor Serge’s novels, Richard studied at Yale (where he became a socialist) the Sorbonne in Paris (where he joined Socialisme ou Barbarie) and Columbia (where he was part of the May 1968 student strike). This Fall he is back in New York, leading the Victor Serge Reading Group at the Brooklyn Commons. Richard?s current writing project is called The Invisible Internationals. You can read Richard’s 2012 collection Beware of Capitalist Sharks! at this address :
https://richardgreeman.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/lulu-capitalist_sharks_final-2.pdf 

"If there remains a marginal chance chance for human society to survive capitalism's crises, It would entail replacing the competitive profit system with a planetary 
network of produce -- a green cooperative commonwealth. Against the near certainty of planetary catastrophe under capitalism, we must bet on the unlikely dream of a harmonious, healthy ecosocialist world. Ecotopia is a bet we can't refuse, even if the chances are only one in a hundred. And if that one chance exists, it must be possible to at least imagine it.  Without a positive dream, we will always be fighting against, and never winning. Excluding the hypothesis of extra-terrestial or Divine 
intervention), the history of revolution and communications technology, cybernetics, complexity and emergece theory, and thinkers from Marx, Kropotkin to Dunayevskaya and Castoriadis all suggest the possibility of  a wired revolutionary planetary Emergence overcoming predatory capitalism through networked global solidarity.”

Editorial Comment:  Anybody who namechecks Kropotkin gets a second look from me.

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Tuesday, October 11
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The Track Record of Charter Schools in Massachusetts
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, 8:30 – 10 a.m.
WHERE  Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston
TYPE OF EVENT	Lecture, Reception
TOPIC  Equity and Access, Learning, Policy, Schools
BUILDING/ROOM  Other
CONTACT NAME  Ashley Dixon
CONTACT EMAIL  ashley_dixon at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-496-9457
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture
DETAILS	
Moderator:  Andrés Antonio Alonso, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Presenters:
Thomas Kane, Harvard University 
Macke Raymond, Stanford University
Joshua Angrist, MIT

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard University, and Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Plant Respiration: Lessons from High Latitudes for Ecosystem Carbon Balance Modelling
Tuesday, October 11
12:00pm to 1:00pm
HUH Seminar Room, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge
Paul Gauthier, Associate Research Scholar in Plant Physiology and Environmental Plant Metabolism, Princeton University, Department of Geosciences

Herbaria Seminar Series

More information at http://huh.harvard.edu/event/paul-gauthier

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Japan's Soft Power in Asia and the World
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  Seiichi Kondo, Commissioner, Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan
Moderated by Theodore Bestor, Reischauer Institute Professor of Social Anthropology and Director, Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK	http://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/calendar/upcoming

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Speaker Series: Joy-Ann Reid
Tuesday, October 11
2:00-3:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Joy Reid is the host of “AM Joy,” airing every Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. ET on MSNBC. She is also the author of the 2015 book, “Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide,” a top-selling book on Amazon.com in the Politics category. Reid was the former Managing Editor of theGrio.com, a daily online news and opinion platform devoted to delivering stories and perspectives that reflect and impact African-American audiences. While serving in this role, she became one of the first national reporters to cover the Trayvon Martin case in depth. Reid joined theGrio.com with experience as a freelance columnist for the Miami Herald and as editor of the political blog The Reid Report. Joy is also a former talk radio producer and host for Radio One, and previously served as an online news editor for the NBC affiliate WTVJ in Miramar, FL. During the 2004 presidential campaign, Reid served as the Florida deputy communications director for the 527 “America Coming Together” initiative, and was a press aide in the final stretch of President Barack Obama’s Florida campaign in 2008. Joy’s columns and articles have appeared in New York magazine, The Daily Beast, the Miami Herald, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, the South Florida Times and on Salon.com. In May 2016, Reid was honored by the Miami Coalition of Christians and Jews with the Hank Meyer National Headliner Award, an award previously given to fellow journalists Chuck Todd and Tom Brokaw, among others. She is currently producing a documentary, “The Fight Years”—which takes a look into the sport of boxing during the 1950s and 1960s in Miami. Reid graduated from Harvard University in 1991 with a concentration in film, and is a 2003 Knight Center for Specialized Journalism fellow. She currently resides in Brooklyn with her husband and family.

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Simulating the self-assembly of DNA polyhedral nanostructures using a coarse-grained model 
Tuesday, October 11
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Harvardm Pierce 209, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

John Schreck, Columbia University
A main challenge in the self-assembly of DNA nanostructures is how to precisely control the assembly product.  The classic techniques such as DNA origami, and more recently DNA bricks, use the information content of DNA to ensure the assembly target is the only possible maximally base-paired structure and so is the free-energy global minimum. These thermodynamic methods are limited by the fact that the number of separate strand types grows linearly with the size of the self-assembling objects. To make progress towards much larger scale assemblies, techniques that use fewer strand types will be needed.   In that case, thermodynamic control is harder to design or achieve, and kinetic factors may play an important role. Of course the kinetics of large structures made of hundreds or even thousands of bases is notoriously complex. Nevertheless experimentalists, most notably the group of Chengde Mao at Purdue have succeeded in building large polyhedral structures by exploiting kinetic control.
 
We use the coarse-grained model of DNA, oxDNA, to study the kinetics of assembly of large DNA systems. The model has been previously validated through quantitative agreement with experiments for a variety of systems ranging from single-molecule DNA experiments to active DNA nanodevices and nanostructures. In my talk I specifically consider the assembly of DNA star tiles, one of the iconic self-assembling systems in the field of DNA nanotechnology, specifically looking at an example from the Mao group that forms a polyhedral target containing more than 1000 nucleotides. We are able to show how the combination of base-pairing, molecular flexibility, and stacking provide levers of control to guide the kinetic self-assembly pathways of large DNA complexes as a function of physical details of the assemblies, and solution concentration. While we mainly focus on a concrete system pioneered by the Mao group, the principles are applicable to a much wider set of systems, and should help guide future experiments that exploit kinetic control to design ever more complicated 3D DNA nanostructures.

Widely Applied Mathematics Seminar

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Is Climate Change Affecting Life in The Deep Sea?
Tuesday, October 11
4:00pm
4pm – 5pm
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Peter Girguis. Professor of Organismic & Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University
The deep sea is the largest habitat on Earth, and harbors the much -if not the majority-  of Earth’s biodiversity.  While scientists and policymakers have understandably focused their attention on how climate change is influencing terrestrial and shallow marine habitats such as coral reefs, there is growing evidence that changes in our atmosphere are resulting in chemical changes in the deep sea.  Here I will present an overview of life in the deep sea, and will discuss their potential sensitivities and strengths in coping with the thermal and chemical changes on our planet. It is my hope that you will leave this presentation armed with a better understanding of how the deep sea might respond to ongoing changes in climate, so that we can more appropriately manage our planet’s natural resources.

Bio:  His research resides at the crossroads of microbial ecology, physiology, and biogeochemistry, and as such is highly interdisciplinary. He uses the appropriate combinations of molecular biology (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, qPCR, mutagenesis), as well as physiological and geochemical techniques (gas chromatography, in situ and laboratory mass spectrometry, in situ and laboratory isotope analyses, x-ray diffraction, atomic spectroscopy) to examine the relationship between microbial diversity/physiology and biogeochemical cycles. Due to the limitations of existing in situ measurement and incubation technologies, he and his lab have develop novel instruments and samplers that enable them to better study microbial-geochemical relationships. This includes high-pressure systems to mimic natural environments, in situ geochemical sensors, in situ microbial fuel cells as experimental apparatus and power sources, and novel in situ preservation technologies.

BURECS Seminar Series on Climate Change

This program is supported in part by a grant to Earth & Environment Professor Dave Marchant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Science Education Program.

http://burecseminars.blogspot.com/2016/08/peter-girguis.html

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Changing Media, Changing Politics
Tuesday, October 11
5:30 PM-7:00 PM
Google Cambridge, 355 Main Street, 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-technology-review-at-google-a-thought-leadership-speaker-series-in-the-heart-of-kendall-square-tickets-28008296569

We look at how shifting technology has altered the media environment in 2016. What has been the impact on the presidential race? Plus, how might this affect a president’s ability to govern, shape policy, and communicate with the public?

Panelists:  Deb Roy, Chief Media Scientist, Twitter; Professor at MIT
Nicco Mele, Director of the Shorenstein Center at Harvard

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Compassion in the Digital Age with Dungse Jampal Norbu
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, 7 – 9 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Andover Chapel, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Religion
SPONSOR	Buddhist Ministry Initiative and Boston Mangalam Group
CONTACT	Julie Barker Gillette: 617-496-5586
RELIGIOUS TRADITION  Buddhist
DETAILS  Technology has drawn us closer together, but it has also pulled us farther apart. It is easy to connect with friends thousands of miles away, but it is also easy to remain indifferent to others, who may only appear as blips on a screen. In a time where our connection with the joys and sorrows of the world is highlighted no matter where we are, compassion is essential to guide the digital age towards a positive future.
Dungse Jampal Norbu was born in 1988 to Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche, a Tibetan Buddhist meditation master. His wife, Elizabeth Mattis-Namgyel. Dungse-la trained from a young age under his father’s tutelage, recently completing a five-year course in Tibetan philosophy. He sees Buddhism as a practical set of skills that enhance our ability to live in a full and compassionate way. His humor, insight, and familiarity with the Western world allow him to pinpoint the relevance of the Buddhist teachings to a range of modern life’s concerns.
This event is free and open to the public.

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Wednesday, October 12 - Thursday, October 13
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Conference on Race and Justice in the Age of Obama
Harvard Kennedy School, various locations
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/conference-on-race-and-justice-in-the-age-of-obama-tickets-27393502704

The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the Harvard Kennedy School, along with the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy; Shorenstein Center for Media, Politics and Public Policy; and Hutchins Center for African & African American Research are proud to host a symposium on Race and Justice in the Age of Obama on October 12th and 13th.  This conference will offer an important opportunity for scholars, journalists, and public officials to debate President Obama’s impact on race relations in the United States during his eight years in office. For a more detailed agenda, panel topics, and speaker information, please visit the Ash Center website.  

Wednesday, October 12
Join us for a keynote discussion in the evening to open the conference in the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum (registration is not required).

Thursday, October 13
8:30am - 4pm
You are invited to the Nye Conference Center, Taubman Building, 5th Floor, 15 Eliot Street, for a number of panels featuring:
Khalil Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Leah Wright Rigueur, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Mary Frances Berry, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, History, and Africana Studies; University of Pennsylvania
Doug Blackmon, Host and Executive Producer of American Forum; Miller Center, University of Virginia
Keith Boykin, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Political Science, Columbia University
Matt Guterl, Professor of Africana Studies and American Studies, Chair of American Studies, Brown University
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Assistant Professor, Department of African American Studies, Princeton University
Glenn Loury, Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences. Department of Economics. Brown University
Alex Wagner, Senior Editor, The Atlantic
Joshua Dubois, Founder, Values Partnerships and Former Head of White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships
Megan Ming Francis, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington
Heather Ann Thompson, Professor; Afroamerican and African Studies, History; University of Michigan
Ronald Sullivan, Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Criminal Justice Institute, Harvard Law School
Callie Crossley, Host, Under the Radar with Callie Crossley, WGBH
Both days are free and open to the public.  Due to space limitations, registration is required to attend any of the October 13th panels:
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/conference-on-race-and-justice-in-the-age-of-obama-tickets-27393502704

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Wednesday, October 12
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Methane Emissions from the Oil and Gas Sector
Wednesday, October 12
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, Wasserstein Building,  Environmental Clinic Conference Room (4129), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

The Harvard Environmental Policy Initiative invites you for to a lunch discussion with Mark Boling, Southwestern Energy/V+ Development Solutions.

Contact Name:  Kate Konschnik
kkonschnik at law.harvard.edu

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Etymology of a Movement: Center for Green Schools and Global Impact Investment Network
Wednesday, October 12
12:30–1:30 pm
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, FXB G-13, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/etymology-of-a-movement-center-for-green-schools-and-global-impact-investing-network-tickets-26841711281
Limited seats, registration required.

Rachel Gutter, Director, Center for Green Schools
Kelly McCarthy, Senior Manager, Global Impact Investing Network
This fall, the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment is hosting a Sustainability for Health Leadership Series showcasing trailblazing professionals in the field of sustainability and health. This speaker series will introduce attendees to pressing issues students will explore in the new Sustainability, Health, and the Global Environment Master in Public Health program at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In this program students will learn the latest research techniques, and have opportunities to connect with cutting edge though leaders in global businesses and governments who are focused on the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings.

More information at http://chgeharvard.org/events

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How Bitcoin enables a Machine-Payable Web
Wednesday, October 12
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
MIT, Building 32-G882, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Balaji S. Srinivasan , 21.co and a16z 
Abstract:  First, we had the World Wide Web, a web of links between documents. Then we had the Social Web, a social network of relationships between people. We believe the third web will be the Machine-Payable Web, where each node in the network is a machine and each edge is a micropayment between machines. Towards this end, we've developed open source software called 21 that makes it easy to perform Bitcoin micropayments over HTTP. The software allows you to get digital currency onto any machine headlessly, set up web services that accept and transmit bitcoin over HTTP, and discover other machines with similar services to autonomously trade with. The overall effect is to turn digital currency into a scarce system resource on par with CPU, RAM, and hard drive space. That is, just as one can create a database index that spends disk space to save time, we show that one can instead spends digital currency to outsource a computation to save time. To illustrate the applications, we conclude with several working examples: bitcoin-aware intelligent agents, APIs that implement autonomous surge pricing, and the development of a market data structure as an alternative in many situations to the well known queue. We ask that audience members bring their laptops to code along with the speaker!

Bio:  Balaji S. Srinivasan is the CEO & cofounder of 21.co and a Board Partner at Andreessen Horowitz. Prior to taking the role of CEO at 21, Dr. Srinivasan was a General Partner at Andreessen Horowitz. He was named to the MIT TR35, was the cofounder and CTO of Founders Fund-backed Counsyl, and taught a MOOC with 200k+ students at startup.stanford.edu. He holds a BS, MS, and PhD in Electrical Engineering and an MS in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University.

Contact: Frank Wang, frankw at csail.mit.edu

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The City of Tomorrow: Sensors, Networks, Hackers, and the Future of Urban Life
Wednesday, October 12
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building 56-154, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Carlo Ratti & Matthew Claudel
Please join us as we celebrate the publication of The City of Tomorrow, an exciting new book from Carlo Ratti and 
Matthew Claudel which explores the implications of their innovative work at MIT's Senseable City Lab and the radical changes that pervasive digital technology may bring to future urban life.

authors at mit 
a lecture series cosponsored by MIT Libraries and The MIT Press Bookstore.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries, The MIT Press Bookstore
For more information, contact:  John Jenkins
(617) 253-5249
jjenkins at mit.edu 

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The Future Of Voting In Your Hands:  2016 MA Community Voting Day
Wednesday, October 12
5:30 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Microsoft NERD Center, 1 Memorial Drive 10th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-future-of-voting-in-your-hands-tickets-27054790607

Voatz is hosting a community voting day via its award winning mobile voting platform. Potential voters and various local stakeholders will be able participate in live voting focusing on several current events and issues of importance (including a mock version of the upcoming Massachusetts State Primary) via a compatible smartphone (or via a Voatz Ballot Station in case you don’t have a compatible smartphone).

All votes will be fully anonymous and realtime results will be available for some of the contests. Participants will have a unique opportunity to learn more about the new Voatz platform and also provide feedback. There will also be a small panel discussion and some guest speakers.  

The event will be fun, non-partisan and aims to showcase the use of some new, innovative technologies which can potentially make our democratic processes more accessible and inclusive.
Light snacks and refreshments will be served.
Schedule:  
5:30pm - 6:00pm: Registration, Device Setup, Networking Reception
6:00pm - 6:30pm: Introduction, Panel Discussion
6:30pm - 7:00pm: Mock Campaigning, Ballot Measures, Voting Events Overview
7:00pm - 7:30pm: Live Voting
7:30pm - 7:40pm: Live Tallying, Results
7:40pm - 8:00pm: Closing Notes, Next Steps
8:00pm - 8:30pm: Networking

FAQs:
Are there ID requirements or an age limit to enter the event?
Yes, you will need a valid United States Photo-ID (e.g. drivers license, state id, passport, etc) to enter the venue and to vote. Please make sure to check in with the Microsoft building security when you arrive.
What are my transport/parking options getting to the event?
The location is a short walk from the Red Line Kendall Sq T Station. For those who intend to drive, there is a paid parking lot underneath the building, and limited meter parking in the area. Additionally, the MIT Hayward St parking lot is free after 5pm. 
What kind of smartphone will I need to vote in the event?
iPhone 5s (or newer) with Touch ID enabled, Samsung Galaxy S5/S6/S7. If you don't have a compatible device, you will still be able to vote in person via the Voatz Ballot Stations available on site. Just remember to bring a valid photo-ID with you.
What kind of events does Voatz support?
Public Elections (municipal/city/state/national) including Ballot Measures, Referendums
Political Party Elections, Convention Floor Voting
Participatory Budget Voting
Democracy Vouchers
Corporate Elections
Shareholder Proxy Voting
College/University Elections (student bodies/alumni)
Labor Union Elections
Coop Voting
Verified Opinion Polling
Other Custom Voting Events
Photography
The organizers will be recording footage during the course of the program to use at their discretion. Please indicate if you do not want to be photographed or taped; otherwise, your silence will act as a form of consent.
Where can I contact the organizer with any questions?
You can contact the Voatz team via email at info at voatz.com 
About the Organizer:  Voatz
Voatz is an award winning, mobile election voting platform focused on simplifying the electoral process internationally and making it safer, simpler and more accessible through the use of cutting edge technologies such as smart biometrics and the Blockchain. Voatz has been recognized with several awards some of which include the 2016 MIT Startup Spotlight Cult Favorite Winner, SXSW Citrix Hackathon Winner, Mass Innovation Nights Audience Favorite Winner, etc. To learn more, follow us on Twitter @voatz and visit voatz.com.
Event space graciously provided by:
The Microsoft Innovation & Policy Center
The Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center aims for Microsoft to be “of” the community, not just exist within it. Through the Innovation and Policy Center, we are extending beyond the tech community to: Connect stakeholders from tech to the broader business, academic and government community; Catalyze important technology and public policy discussions; and Contribute more directly with the health and vitality of greater New England.

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MIT Water Innovation Prize Kick-off Dinner
Wednesday, October 12
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
MIT, Building E14-648, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-water-innovation-prize-kick-off-dinner-tickets-28205072130

Come to learn more about water innovation, pitch your own idea, or network to find teammates. We will hear from speakers across sectors about the world’s water challenges and new innovations to address them. We also invite individuals or teams to pitch an idea (3-5 min) - we welcome anything water-related. Please e-mail waterinnovation at mit.edu if interested.

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Boston New Technology October 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT70
Wednesday, October 12
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Akamai Technologies, 150 Broadway, Cambridge

Free event! Come learn about 7 innovative and exciting technology products and network with the Boston/Cambridge startup community!   

Each presenter gets 5 minutes for product demonstration and 5 minutes for Q&A.  

Agenda:  
6:00 to 7:00 - Networking with Dinner
7:00 to 7:10 - Announcements
7:10 to 8:20 - Presentations, Questions & Answers
8:20 to 9:00 - Meet the Presenters

Upon Arrival:  Akamai staff will be escorting attendees from the lobby up the stairs to the first floor, where you'll find our check-in table. Type the first few letters of your name on the screen and tap your name to print your name tag.

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Ending Torture: An Alum's Journey from HDS to IBJ
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Law, Religion, Special Events
SPONSOR	Harvard Divinity School
CONTACT	Michael Goetz
DETAILS  After years as a public defender and human rights lawyer, Karen Tse, MDiv ’00, heard the call to ministry and enrolled at HDS. While a student, she was inspired to combine her vocations and found International Bridges to Justice (IBJ), a global nonprofit that works to end torture as an investigative tool through early access to counsel.
Today, IBJ is active in over 40 countries around the world, training scores of police, prosecutors, and judges. Named one of America’s Best Leaders by US News and World Report, Ms. Tse has served as a United Nations Judicial Mentor, negotiated measures for judicial reform in China, Vietnam, and Cambodia, and expanded IBJ’s programming to Rwanda, Burundi, Zimbabwe, and India.
Join Karen Tse for this special bicentennial colloquium on “leading from within,” human rights as ministry, and how to leverage the HDS experience to effect global change.

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BOOK TALK: DEVOURED: A JOURNEY INTO THE AMERICAN FOOD PSYCHE 
Wednesday, October 12
7:00pm to 8:30pm
Harvard, Emerson Hall 305, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

Join FLP for an exciting book event and reception with New York Times food and health writer and Culinary Institute of America program director Sophie Egan. Her new book, Devoured: From Chicken Wings to Kale Smoothies--How What We Eat Defines Who We Are, is a provocative look at how and what Americans eat and why—a flavorful blend of The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Salt Sugar Fat, and Freakonomics that reveals how the way we live shapes the way we eat. 

Editorial Comment:  May the Harvard dining hall workers strike be over by then. 

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Cambridge Forum: The Manifesto Against Parenting
Wednesday, October 12
7:00 PM (Doors at 6:00)
The Atrium, 4th Floor, 50 Church Street, Cambridge

Cambridge Forum welcomes ALISON GOPNIK for a discussion of her book The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children.
A book signing will precede the program starting at 6pm, with refreshments.
Gopnik is the author of The Gardener and the Carpenter, the NY Times parenting and education best seller, and a professor of psychology and philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. An internationally recognized leader in the study of children's learning and development, Gopnik writes the “Mind and Matter” column for The Wall Street Journal and is the author of The Philosophical Baby and coauthor of The Scientist in the Crib.  She has three sons and lives in Berkeley, California, with her husband, Alvy Ray Smith.
About The Gardener and the Carpenter

Caring deeply about our children is part of what makes us human. Yet the thing we call "parenting" is a surprisingly new invention. In the past thirty years, the concept of parenting and the multibillion dollar industry surrounding it have transformed child care into obsessive, controlling, and goal-oriented labor intended to create a particular kind of child and therefore a particular kind of adult. In The Gardener and the Carpenter, the pioneering developmental psychologist and philosopher Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar twenty-first-century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong—it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too.
Drawing on the study of human evolution and her own cutting-edge scientific research into how children learn, Gopnik shows that although caring for children is profoundly important, it is not a matter of shaping them to turn out a particular way. Children are designed to be messy and unpredictable, playful and imaginative, and to be very different both from their parents and from each other. The variability and flexibility of childhood lets them innovate, create, and survive in an unpredictable world. “Parenting" won't make children learn―but caring parents let children learn by creating a secure, loving environment.

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Tetris: The Games People Play
Wednesday October 12
7:00 pm 
Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Street, Brookline

Box Brown in conversation with Liz Prince 
Alexey Pajitnov had big ideas about games. In 1984, he created Tetris in his spare time while developing software for the Soviet government. Once Tetris emerged from behind the Iron Curtain, it was an instant hit. A bidding war was sparked, followed by clandestine trips to Moscow, backroom deals, innumerable miscommunications, and outright theft. For the first time and in unparalleled detail, Tetris: The Games People Play tells the true story of the world’s most popular video game. Box Brown will appear in conversation with Liz Prince (Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir).

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BostonTalks Investigates: Health Care for Refugee Women
October 12 
7:00 p.m.
WGBH Studios, One Guest Street, Brighton
RSVP at http://www.wgbh.org/events/event.cfm?eid=Investigates%3A%20Healthcare%20for%20Refugee%20Women-135#pBlock
Cost:  $11.54

At the end of 2015, a staggering number of people around the world—one out of every 113 people, to be exact—were estimated to be forcibly displaced from their homes. Half of these people, labeled asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons or refugees, are women, according to the United Nations. Join WGBH’s Beat the Press TV host, Emily Rooney (@EmilyRooneyWGBH) and experienced Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) aid workers for a discussion about the unique and pressing health challenges facing displaced women. Learn how Doctors Without Borders provides family planning, obstetric care, and medical treatment for sexual violence to patients on the move or living in refugee camps—and how Doctors Without Borders offers mental health care, a crucial component of treatment for survivors of violence.

This talk is part of Doctors Without Borders’ new interactive outdoor exhibition, Forced From Home, shown on Boston’s Long Wharf between October 15-23, 2016. Tickets are free, but RSVP is required.

About WGBH’s BostonTalks: Investigates event series

WGBH investigates stories that matter to our region. Now, you’re invited to join the conversation at our BostonTalks: Investigates series, featuring in-depth panel discussions with major players, followed by a reception.

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Eyes on the Street:  The Life of Jane Jacobs
Wednesday, October 12
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes award-winning author and former M.I.T. professor ROBERT KANIGEL for a discussion of Eyes on the Street: The Life of Jane Jacobs, the first major biography of the woman who changed the way we view and live in cities, whose influence can still be felt in any discussion of urban planning to this day.
About Eyes on the Street

Eyes on the Street is a revelation of the phenomenal woman who raised three children, wrote seven groundbreaking books, saved neighborhoods, stopped expressways, was arrested twice, and engaged at home and on the streets in thousands of debates--all of which she won. Here is the child who challenged her third-grade teacher; the high school poet; the journalist who honed her writing skills at Iron Age, Architectural Forum, Fortune, and other outlets, while amassing the knowledge she would draw upon to write her most famous book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Here, too, is the activist who helped lead an ultimately successful protest against Robert Moses's proposed expressway through her beloved Greenwich Village; and who, in order to keep her sons out of the Vietnam War, moved to Canada, where she became as well known and admired as she was in the United States.

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Thursday, October 13
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Moray Dewhurst, Former CFO of NextEra
Thursday, October 13
11:45am
MIT, Building E62-250, 100 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP:  https://sloangroups.mit.edu/sustain/rsvp?id=314771

Come learn from Moray Dewhurst, MIT Sloan alum who recently retired after 15 years as CFO at NextEra Energy (NYSE:NEE), a Florida-based utility company and the world's largest renewable energy developer. Moray has served on the boards of NEIL, the nuclear industry’s mutual insurance company, and the Florida Chamber of Commerce. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in naval architecture and marine engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Master of Science in management from the MIT Sloan School of Management. While at the Sloan School, he earned the Henry Ford II Award for outstanding scholastic achievement. Moray will provide his perspective on working as a CFO, as well as his insights on the broader clean energy industry.

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The Bolivian Eco-Municipality: A new sustainability framework?
Thursday, October 13
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

William Powers 
The Latin American concept of buen vivir, or “living well”, suggests well-being “is only possible in the specific context of a community, which is social but also ecological.” (Gudynas, 2011). Powers’ 2016 World Policy Institute field study in Bolivia examines how - even in the context of contradictory neo-extractivist pressures which cuts against sustainability - new biocentric policies around buen vivir play out in one of Bolivia’s twenty-four nationally-designated “ecological municipalities.” A lively discussion will probe this new model, and transferable South-North lessons.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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The Potential of Mediation in the Context of the Refugee Crisis
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Law School, Hauser Hall, Room 102, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Law, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School
SPEAKER(S)  Ljubjana Wüstehube, Co-Founder  Inmedio Berlin, Institute for Mediation, Consulting and Development
Dirk Splinter, Co-Director, Inmedio Berlin, Institute for Mediation, Consulting and Development
CONTACT INFO	Julie Barrett
jbarrett at law.harvard.edu
DETAILS	
Ljubjana Wüstehube and Dirk Splinter will highlight Inmedio’s various projects in Syria, Kenya, Bosnia/Kosovo, and Germany, where they are implementing peer mediation in refugee camps.
LINK	http://www.pon.harvard.edu/events/the-potential-of-mediation-in-the-context-of-the-refugee-crisis/

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Meeting our Climate and Energy Goals in 2030 and Beyond
Thursday, October 13
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Goodwin Procter, 100 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://members.e2.org/ext/jsp/controller?sponsor=HARTBER&sv=NE_ClimateEneGoals
Cost:  $30

Dr. Elizabeth A. Stanton, Former Principal Economist with Synapse Energy Economics & Dr. Philip Duffy, President & Executive Director of the Woods Hole Research Center
Each of the nine northeastern states in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) has pledged to reduce their overall GHG emissions by about 40% by 2030. Is that really possible? The answer: ABSOLUTELY! A recent study by Synapse Energy Economics showed that not only could they reduce emissions, but in the process would generate nearly 60,000 jobs per year and save customers about $25 billion a year.

On the other hand, even under the most optimistic scenarios for reductions in fossil fuel use we will need to remove massive quantities of CO2 from the atmosphere in order to avoid unacceptable climate outcomes. How to do this is perhaps the greatest unsolved technical and policy problem in climate change.

Please join E2 New England for a discussion of these issues with Dr. Elizabeth Stanton, the principal author of the Synapse study, and Dr. Philip Duffy, the President & Executive Director of the Woods Hole Research center, which in 2015 was ranked the #1 Climate Change Think Tank for the second rear in a row by the International Center for Climate Governance (ICCG).

All registered attendees will be sent confirmation and directions the week prior to the event.  Contact ying at e2.org if you have questions. 

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Workshop on the Sustainability of the World's Food and Farming Systems
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S250, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Weatherhead Center for International Affairs
SPEAKER(S)  Jock Herron, Instructor in Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO  hconrad at wcfia.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Jock Herron is an Instructor focused on food systems and health at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He co-led the Smart Cities and Wellness project sponsored by the Humana Corporation and the Responsive Environments and Artifacts Lab at the GSD. This past year, he served on the Steering Committee of the Worcester County Food Hub Initiative, and he is currently working on a rotational grazing project in Central Massachusetts. Co-manager of family farms in southern Ohio and a former chairman of the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research, he has a longstanding view that food systems are at the nexus of population and habitat health.

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Information Design
Thursday, October 13
4:00 - 5:30PM 
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall D, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Professor Stephen Morris, Princeton University

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China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mount Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Arthur R. Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know, a senior non-resident fellow of the Brookings-Tsinghua Center for Public Policy, adjunct professor at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, and a member of the National Committee on US-China Relations.
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS	  The Ash Center cordially invites you to a book talk with Arthur R. Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know. This discussion will be moderated by Edward Cunningham, China Programs Director at the Ash Center.
Arthur R. Kroebe is founding partner of Gavekal Dragonomics, a China-focused economic research consultancy he helped establish in Beijing in 2002 after 15 years as a freelance financial journalist in Asia, and editor of its flagship publication China Economic Quarterly. He is also head of research at the parent company Gavekal, a financial services firm based in Hong Kong, where he advises financial, corporate and government clients on economic and political developments in China.
LINK  http://ash.harvard.edu/event/china’s-economy-what-everyone-needs-know

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10 Big Ideas in Inequality
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 4:10 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Starr Auditorium, Belfer 200, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Harvard Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy. Part of the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy at Harvard Kennedy School.
SPEAKER(S)  Welcome and introduction
Devah Pager, Professor of Sociology and Public Policy, and Director of the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy.
David T. Ellwood, Scott M. Black Professor of Political Economy and Director of the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, Harvard Kennedy School.
Moderator
Bruce Western, Professor of Sociology and Guggenheim Professor of Criminal Justice Policy. Chair of the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at the Harvard Kennedy School.

The 10 Big Ideas
Matthew Desmond, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences.
Douglas Elmendorf, Dean of the Harvard Kennedy School and Don K. Price Professor of Public Policy.
Lawrence Katz, Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics.
Alexandra Killewald, Professor of Sociology.
David A. Moss, Paul Whiton Cherington Professor, Harvard Business School.
Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race, and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; Suzanne Young Murray Professor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.
Sendhil Mullainathan, Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics.
Dani Rodrik, Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy, Harvard Kennedy School.
Theda Skocpol, Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and of Sociology.
Stefanie Stantcheva, Assistant Professor of Economics.
COST  This event is free and open to the Harvard community
CONTACT INFO	inequality at harvard.edu
DETAILS  10 Big Ideas. 8 minutes each. Infinite possibilities.
Ten Harvard faculty members from across Harvard University's social sciences share 10 Big Ideas in the study of inequality and wealth concentration. Bringing insights from diverse academic fields and approaches, each will present one big idea for the study of inequality—a big idea that captivates their attention, motivates their work, and illuminates promising areas for future progress.
What are the big ideas, the most important questions, that should guide work in this area going forward? What have we learned? What are the central puzzles yet to be solved? Where are the new frontiers in the study of inequality, and how can social policy stem the tide or lessen the adverse consequences of rising inequality?
LINK  http://inequality.hks.harvard.edu/event/10-big-ideas-inequality-and-wealth-concentration

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Families in Flight: Today's International Refugee Crisis
Thursday, October 13
4:15 pm
Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://radcliffe-nenmf.formstack.com/forms/families_in_flight

The Radcliffe Institute will host a panel discussion to explore topics of pressing global concern: refugees, forced migration, and internally displaced people. The speakers—which include a professor of law, a medical doctor, a United Nations officer, and an independent photographer—will focus on the Syrian refugee crisis with special attention to issues of gender and family. The discussion will highlight some of the forces that compel the uprooting of millions of people from their homes and lands and will help us better understand the shape, context, and on-the-ground realities facing Syrian and other refugee communities in 2016.
Free and open to the public.
Please register and join us.
We welcome walk-in attendees on the day of the event whenever space is available. If the event reaches capacity, then the information on this page will be updated. Thank you.
This program is scheduled to complement the reunions of the Harvard and Radcliffe Classes of 1971, 1976, and 1986.  We hope to welcome many alumni/ae from these classes to the Radcliffe Institute as part of their reunion activities when they return to Cambridge in the fall.
PANELISTS:
Susan M. Akram, Clinical Professor of Law, Boston University Law School
Noel Calhoun, Senior Policy Officer, Office of the Special Adviser for the Summit on Addressing Large Numbers of Refugees and Migrants, United Nations
Rania Matar, Independent Photographer
Abdulkarim Ekzayez, Health Program Manager, Save the Children International Syria Response
MODERATOR:
Jacqueline Bhabha, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Director of Research, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard University

The annual Rama S. Mehta event at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study was established by Catherine Atwater Galbraith, John Kenneth Galbraith, and the Mehta family, in memory of Rama S. Mehta. Each event includes a distinguished woman in public affairs, the sciences, or the arts who has a deep understanding of the problems of women in developing countries. 

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Starr Forum: Democracy and Violence
Thursday, October 13
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 54-100, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: David Art, Heidi Beirich, Jolyon Howorth, Richard Samuels (moderator)
Starr Forum panel discussion on far right extremism in politics, within the US and internationally. Panelists include MIT professor Richard Samuels (moderating), David Art (Tufts), Heidi Beirich (Southern Poverty Law Center), and Jolyon Howorth (Yale).

CIS Starr Forum 
A public events series on pressing issues in international affairs, sponsored by the MIT Center for International Studies.

Web site: http://mit.edu/cis/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:
617-253-8306
starrforum at mit.edu 

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How Did the Computer Learn to See?
Thursday, October 13
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

How did the computer learn to see? A common response to the question is that the computer learned to see from cinema and photography, that is, from modernity's most highly evolved technologies of vision. In this talk we will explore a different response to the question, that the computer learned to see not from cinema but from sculpture. With reference to the work of artists Sarah Oppenheimer and Zach Blas, along with techniques for digital image compression, we will explore the uniquely computational mode of vision. 

Alexander Galloway is a writer and computer programmer working on issues in philosophy, technology, and theories of mediation. He is author of several books, most recently a monograph on the work of Francois Laruelle, and is currently a visiting professor in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/alexander-galloway-computer-learn-see/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

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Askwith Forums: A Conversation with Jeb Bush
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  Speaker: Jeb Bush, academic visitor, Program on Education Policy and Governance, Harvard Kennedy School; founder, president and chairman, Foundation for Excellence in Education; former governor, Florida
Moderator: Martin West, associate professor of education, HGSE; deputy director, Program on Education Policy and Governance, Harvard Kennedy School
Introduction: James E. Ryan, dean and Charles William Eliot Professor, HGSE

Recent changes in federal policy have put states back in the driver’s seat for ensuring equity and excellence in American education. Drawing on his experience as Florida governor and chairman of the Foundation for Excellence in Education, Governor Bush will address the new opportunities for state leadership on K-12 education policy, what it will take for governors and other state officials to capitalize on those opportunities, and the challenges of maintaining bi-partisan support for education reform in a time of heightened polarization. After brief remarks, Governor Bush will engage in a discussion moderated by Associate Professor Martin West and featuring questions from HGSE faculty members and the audience.

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Using Design Thinking to Generate Insights for Innovation
Thursday, October 13 
5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Impact Hub Boston, 50 Milk Street, 17th floor, Boston
RSVP at http://impacthubboston.net/event/using-design-thinking-to-generate-insights-for-innovation/

A user-centered approach to problem solving and application of design thinking tools can help create breakthrough ideas for your organization. In this workshop, we’ll use a live case study to illustrate the power of this methodology and send you home with tools you can apply to your organization immediately.

About the Speaker:  Drew is co-founder of Emzingo, a social enterprise focused on creating the next generation of responsible leaders. He and his colleagues work with businesses, universities, individuals, and professional organizations to design and deliver experiences that instill the mindset of responsible leadership, drive employee engagement, promote social innovation and environmental awareness, and create a culture of collaboration. Drew holds an M.S. in Engineering from Cornell University and an MBA from IE Business School. He lives in Somerville, MA with his wife, Emily and puppy Sierra.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/emzingo

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District Energy in Cities: Unlocking Efficiency, Sustainability and Resiliency through Infrastructure Investment
Thursday, October 13
6:00 - 8:00 PM 
BU, SAR 102, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScTuobnPemggjFlDF0d8IPyzHFF9xS2FjZH2XL3Yp4siIYQXA/viewform

Rob Thornton, President and CEO of International District Energy Association.
How cities around the globe from Copenhagen to Dubai, Paris to Boston are investing in district energy thermal heating and cooling networks to enhance resource efficiency, conserve fuel and water, and strengthen energy resiliency for local economies. City leaders have recognized that heating and cooling buildings represents a significant opportunity to optimize efficiency, utilize local and sustainable energy supplies and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This lecture will explore the shifting utility paradigm from central station generation to more distributed solutions; discuss planning approaches for energy mapping and investment strategies and share illustrative case examples of highly successful district energy systems as strategic foundation for more sustainable cities. ALL ARE WELCOME! http://www.unep.org/energy/districtenergyincities www.districtenergy.org

Co-hosted by the Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future (All are welcome)

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Climate Congress "Faiths" Discussion Group
Thursday, October 13
6pm – 8pm
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.nvbpopunldec4ge92ne4i0cer4?authuser=0

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The Intelligent Integrated Store: An IoT Event
October 13 
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
RSVP at https://mitefcamb.z2systems.com/np/clients/mitefcamb/eventRegistration.jsp?event=693&
Cost:  $0 - $30
Pre-Registration is required

Retailers have a vision for an intelligent integrated store.But where exactly are we in the realization of this vision? 

There has been much discussion about marrying continuous overhead RFID/RTLS locating capabilities, video analytics, BLE, traffic counters, EAS, POS data, receiving data, and other store-based sensors to create an integrated, intelligent, self-aware store.  

Retailers want highly granular insights into the movements, actions and intentions of shoppers in their stores.  They want store associates to be alerted the moment a shopper needs attention or an item needs to be restocked, merchants and store planners to know exactly how shoppers are buying, which items are being tried on but put back on the shelf and the physical paths taken through the store and shoppers to be presented with a personalized context-relevant digital-physical experience.

In this session, we will hear from technologists and retailers about the vision and the reality on the ground.

Speakers
Jonathan Aitken, IT Director,  lululemon athletica (via Skype)
Ashlee Aldridge, SVP and CIO, DSW
Vibhu Norby, Co-Founder, CEO @ b8ta
Beth Rick, Director, Customer Portfolio Transformation, DSW
Moderator
Bill McBeath, Chief Research Officer, ChainLink Research

Agenda
6:00-6:30 PM  Registration and networking
6:30-8:30 PM Panel presentations, discussion, and Q&A

MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge
Phone:  617-253-8240
Email:  entforumcambridge AT mit DOT edu

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Sustainability Collaborative
Thursday, October 13 
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 5th floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge

Join us each month for the Coalesce Sustainability Collaborative. Come back for more info on this month’s guest as we get closer and email Sierra Flanigan at (sierra at coalesce.earth) for more info.

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Public Lecture: Tatiana Bilbao, "The House and the City"
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Tatiana Bilbao has been a visiting professor at Yale School of Architecture and Rice School of Architecture. She was named as an Emerging Voice by the Architecture League of New York in 2009 and received the Kunstpreis Berlin in 2012 and the Global Award for Sustainable Architecture Prize in 2014. Her work is in the collections of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago.
COST	Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO  events at gsd.harvard.edu
DETAILS	  Tatiana Bilbao, through the work of her multicultural and multidisciplinary office based in Mexico City, attempts to understand the place that surrounds her and to translate its rigid codes into architecture. As a reaction to global capitalism, the studio aspires to regenerate spaces in order to humanize them and to open up niches for cultural and economic development. The firm’s recent projects include a botanical garden, a master plan and open chapel for a pilgrimage route, a biotechnological center for a technology institution, a house that can be built for $8,000, and a funeral home. Their work has been published in A+U, Domus, and the New York Times, among other periodicals.
Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
LINK  http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/tatiana-bilbao-the-house-and-the-city/

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Judith Schwartz, Water in Plain Sight
Thursday, October 13
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Water scarcity is on everyone's mind. Long taken for granted, water availability has entered the realm of economics, politics, and people's food and lifestyle choices. But as anxiety mounts many are finding new routes to water security with key implications for food access, economic resilience, biodiversity and climate change. Judith D. Schwartz shows there are alternatives to praying for rain or sandbagging like crazy, demonstrating that we can ally with the water cycle to revive the earth and restore lush, productive landscapes. Take for instance a river in rural Zimbabwe that, thanks to restorative grazing, now flows a kilometer farther than in living memory. Or a food forest of oranges, pomegranates, and native fruit-bearing plants in Tucson, grown through harvesting urban wastewater. Or a mini-oasis in West Texas nourished by dew.

Water in Plain Sight shares stories of water innovators and takes readers though the US and the world to find new water—water held in the soil, cycled through plants, captured as dew. We gain new insights on how water flows across the land, insights that can help us replenish water sources and make the best use of what we have.

Judith D. Schwartz is a journalist whose recent work looks at ecological restoration as a way to address environmental, economic, and social challenges. She writes on this theme for numerous publications and speaks in venues around the world. Her 2013 book Cows Save the Planet was awarded a Nautilus Book Award Silver Prize for Sustainability and is among Booklist's Top 10 Books On Sustainability. A graduate of the Columbia Journalism School and Brown University, she lives in Vermont.

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Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age
Thursday,  October 13
7:00 pm 
Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Street, Brookline

Sherry Turkle
Preeminent author and researcher Sherry Turkle has been studying digital culture for over thirty years. Long an enthusiast for its possibilities, here she investigates a troubling consequence: at work, at home, in politics, and in love, we find ways around conversation, tempted by the possibilities of a text or an email in which we don’t have to look, listen, or reveal ourselves. Based on five years of research and interviews in homes, schools, and the workplace, Turkle argues that we have come to a better understanding of where our technology can and cannot take us and that the time is right to reclaim conversation. The most human—and humanizing—thing that we do.

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A Chance to Dress: screening and discussion
Thursday, October 13
7:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building 6-120, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Alice Bourvrie, filmmaker; John Southard; Jean Southard; Chris Bourg, Director of Libraries
Dr. John Southard, a world renowned and respected geologist and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, is an open cross-dresser. A Chance To Dress follows Dr. Southard's challenges and difficulties in coming out at the age of 65 to his friends, neighbors and colleagues, but also his exuberance and sense of liberation after a lifetime of secrecy. Join us for a viewing of the film, followed by a discussion.

Web site: http://libraries.mit.edu/news/discussion-chance-dress/22877/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Women's and Gender Studies, MIT Libraries, LBGTQ at MIT
For more information, contact:  Nina Davis-Millis
617-253-5652
ninadm at mit.edu 

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Bogs and Fens: New England’s Most Pristine Ecosystems
Thursday, October 13
7:00PM TO 8:30PM
Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan
RSVP at https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1546&DayPlannerDate=10/13/2016
Cost:  $0 - $5

The Arnold Arboretum and Mass Audubon's Boston Nature Center welcome Ronald B. Davis, Professor Emeritus, School of Biology and Ecology and the Climate Change Institute, University of Maine, for a special lecture on bogs and fens in New England.

Bogs and fens are wetlands underlain by deep water-saturated peat. In New England, at least 25 of them can be visited on boardwalks, where one can see unique assemblages of flora and fauna, including carnivorous plants, orchids, and uncommon bird species. Dr. Ronald Davis will illustrate his lecture with outstanding photographs and explain some of the unique features of these beautiful and fascinating ecosystems.

Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

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Sixth Annual John H. Carlson Lecture:  Big Ice: Antarctica, Greenland, and Boston
Thursday, October 13
7:00p–9:00p
Simons IMAX Theatre, NE Aquarium, 1 Museum Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=106705&view=Detail

Speaker: Richard Alley, Penn State
An ice sheet is a two-mile-thick, continent-wide pile of old snow, spreading under its own weight and sculpting the land beneath. The ice sheet that buried Boston 20,000 years ago melted when slowly acting features of Earth's orbit raised summer sunshine and atmospheric CO2, warming the climate. The history of that Ice Age can still be read in Boston Harbor, and in the layers of the surviving ice sheets on Antarctica and Greenland. But, more warming may melt those ice records, as break-off of huge icebergs and outburst floods speed sea-level rise. 

Web site: http://bit.ly/2aYSTTe
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE (register via event website)
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS), Lorenz Center
For more information, contact:  Allison Provaire
provaire at mit.edu 

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HEEC Film Screening: Young Voices for the Planet
Thursday, October 13
7:00PM TO 9:00PM
Harvard, Emerson Hall 210, 19 Quincy Street, Cambridge

The Harvard Extension Environmental Club (HEEC) invite you to a special screening of the film "Young Voices for the Planet," produced by filmmaker Lynne Cherry (also author/illustrator of award-winning environmental children’s books including “The Great Kapok Tree”). The YVFP films document youth solutions to the climate crisis -- Changing minds, changing policy, changing the world!

About the filmmaker: Lynne Cherry is the producer/director of the Young Voices for the Planet film series. Author, illustrator, lecturer on climate change messaging and environmental education and author/illustrator of 30 award­winning children’s books. Lynne received her BA from Tyler School of Art and a Masters in History at Yale University. She has had artist­-in­residencies at Princeton University, the Smithsonian Institution and Cornell University and science­-writing fellowships from the Marine Biological Lab and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. She was a winner of a Metcalf Fellowship and the Brandwein Prize.

Event Special appearance: Alice Van Evera and Mari McBride (along with their teammate Lily Georgopoulos) have participated individually and together in local climate actions since 2009. From a global warming experiment for Estabrook’s Science Fair, 2010 Hands Across the Sand, 2014 NYC Climate March, 2014 bottle bill campaign in Massachusetts, to donating birthday money opting for cash over presents, they have been actively involved in pushing for climate solutions. Inspired by Lynne’s Young Voices, the friends of the Save Tomorrow team hope to band together to have an even larger impact on climate, like helping to solarize Lexington, MA.

More information at https://www.facebook.com/events/873285306136291/
Contact Name:  Daniel Peon
danielpeon at gmail.com

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Boston Area Solar Energy Association Forum:   DOER's 'Next Generation Solar Incentive Straw Proposal’ - the Good, the Bad & the Ugly
Thursday, October 13
Doors open at 7:00 p.m.; Presentation begins at 7:30 p.m
First Parish in Cambridge Unitarian Universalist;  3 Church Street, Harvard Square
 
Update and call to action, from MassSolar (solarisworking.org) 

Solar incentives are fundamentally changing in Massachusetts. The Next Generation Solar Incentive Straw Proposal reveals the outline of the new program being developed by the Department of Environmental Resources (DOER). Public comments on the proposed program design are due October 28th, so, sharpen your pencils!

The draft program spells the end of SREC's (Solar Renewable Energy Certificates) and proposes a tariff system to replace it. Although the DOER notes "ALL PROGRAM DESIGN DETAILS SUBJECT TO CHANGE", it is clear that we are heading toward fundamental incentive changes and uncharted territory for solar system developers.

MassSolar will be our guide to grasping the Straw Proposal, and to helping us create written comments to voice our concerns with DOER. For anyone who followed the last couple of years of legislative wrangling and solar power advocacy, MassSolar proved to be an invaluable resource for information, analysis and coordination of advocacy efforts.

Ambitiously, the DOER aims for implementing the next generation incentive program in the summer of 2017. With the existing SREC-II program expected to "max out" sometime this coming winter, there is looming concern that solar developers will be left without an interim incentive program, unless DOER extends SREC-II or furnishes other emergency measures to span the gap. The fate of solar development hangs on what happens these next few months.

Join us at the BASEA Forum, Thursday, October 16th, to glimpse the future of solar incentives for Massachusetts.

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Friday, October 14
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Houghton Lecture: Marine Ecosystems and Ocean Acidification
Friday, October 14
9:00a–10:00a
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Corinne Le Quere, University of East Anglia
The ocean holds 50 times more carbon than the atmosphere. Because of its large buffer capacity, the ocean will eventually absorb 60 to 85% of the carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere on a time scale of 1000 years or longer. However the uptake of carbon dioxide by the ocean has the side effect of acidifying the water, with negative consequences for marine ecosystems and unclear implications for the functioning of the marine carbon cycle. This lecture will detail the linkages between marine ecosystem processes (from bacteria to jellyfish) and the carbon cycle. It will show how ecosystem processes can be understood through their biogeochemical functionality, and explain the knowns and unknowns of the impacts of ocean acidification. The lecture will end with a discussion of how changes in marine ecosystems could have knock on effects on climate regulation. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Magi
cliberty at mit.edu 

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Charles River Crypto Day
Friday October 14 
MIT, Building 32 G-882 (Hewlett),  Vassar Street, Cambridge

Come to the first Charles River Crypto Day of this academic year and get your fix of coffee, blockchains, rational proofs, memory hard functions and (need we say) indistinguishability obfuscation.

9:30 – 10:00.	Introduction/Coffee
10:00 – 11:00.	 Nir Bitansky, MIT  From Cryptomania to Obfustopia through Secret-Key Functional Encryption
11:00 – 12:00.	 Rachel Lin, UC Santa Barbara  Indistinguishability Obfuscation from DDH-like Assumptions on Constant-Degree Graded Encodings
12:00 – 1:30.	Lunch (provided)
1:30 – 2:30.	Jing Chen, Stony Brook  Rational Proofs with Multiple Provers
2:30 – 3:30.	Elaine Shi, Cornell  Blockchains and Beyond: Rethinking Distributed Consensus in New Settings
3:30 – 4:00.	Coffee Break
4:00 – 5:00.	Jeremiah Blocki, Purdue  Towards a Theory of Data-Independent Memory Hard Functions

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Green Arts Network: Artist Showcase 2016
Friday, October 14
12pm - 6pm
Massachusetts College of Art & Design, Pozen Center, 621 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Come celebrate sustainability with artwork, local grassroots organizations, and open discussion on climate politics! 

Help MassArt's Clay for Change ceramics group raise funds for RESIST THE PIPELINE (http://www.resistthepipeline.org/), the movement against the West Roxbury lateral pipeline!

More local organizations and student groups will be present:
Boston Climate Action Network (BCAN) 
350Mass For A Better Future
JP Green House
The Restore
MassAction: For the Planet
MassArt Garden Collective

FREE art supply samples, refreshments, and more!

Questions? Email: greenartsnetwork at gmail.com
Updates and more details: facebook.com/thegreenartsnetwork

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Modeling and Evaluating the Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Policies
Friday, October 14
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

ith Noelle Selin, MIT

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
http://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/88506

Contact Name:  Hannah Horowitz
hmhorow at fas.harvard.edu

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Next in Science: Astronomy and Astrophysics 
Friday, October 14
1:00PM
Radcliffe, Sheerr Room, Fay House, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

The focus of this year’s program will be on frontiers in astronomy and astrophysics. Scholars will discuss new interdisciplinary research on what the structure of the universe tells us about particle interactions, gravitational waves from circling black holes, magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and the possibility of life on exoplanets.

Speakers:
Blakesley Burkhart, Einstein Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Cora Dvorkin, Shutzer Assistant Professor, Radcliffe Institute,  and assistant professor of physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University
Sara Rugheimer, Simons Origins of Life Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of St. Andrews (Scotland)
Salvatore Vitale, research scientist, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
The event is free and open to the public. 

Next in Science: Astronomy and Astrophysics 
http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2016-next-in-science-astronomy-and-astrop...
The “Next in Science” series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

Contact Name:  Kristine Osborne
kristen_osborne at radcliffe.harvard.edu

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Cannibal Family Farms: Grotesque Intimacy and Rural Dysfunction in 20th Century America
Friday, October 14
2:30p–4:30p
MIT, Building E51-095, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Gabriel N. Rosenberg, Assistant Professor in the Program in Women's Studies, Duke University

Seminar on Environmental and Agricultural History

Web site: http://history.mit.edu/lectures-and-seminars/seminar-environmental-and-agricultural-history
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): History Office, Program in Science Technology and Society
For more information, contact:  Margo Collett
617-253-4965
history-info at mit.edu 

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The Curse of Cash
Friday, October 14
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Harvard professor and former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund KENNETH S. ROGOFF for a discussion of his latest book, The Curse of Cash.

About The Curse of Cash
From the New York Times bestselling author of This Time Is Different, The Curse of Cash is "a fascinating and important book" (Ben Bernanke) about phasing out most paper money to fight crime and tax evasion—and to battle financial crises by tapping the power of negative interest rates.

The world is drowning in cash—and it's making us poorer and less safe. In The Curse of Cash, Kenneth Rogoff, one of the world's leading economists, makes a persuasive and fascinating case for an idea that until recently would have seemed outlandish: getting rid of most paper money.

Even as people in advanced economies are using less paper money, there is more cash in circulation—a record $1.4 trillion in U.S. dollars alone, or $4,200 for every American, mostly in $100 bills. And the United States is hardly exceptional. So what is all that cash being used for? The answer is simple: a large part is feeding tax evasion, corruption, terrorism, the drug trade, human trafficking, and the rest of a massive global underground economy.

As Rogoff shows, paper money can also cripple monetary policy. In the aftermath of the recent financial crisis, central banks have been unable to stimulate growth and inflation by cutting interest rates significantly below zero for fear that it would drive investors to abandon treasury bills and stockpile cash. This constraint has paralyzed monetary policy in virtually every advanced economy, and is likely to be a recurring problem in the future.

The Curse of Cash offers a plan for phasing out most paper money—while leaving small-denomination bills and coins in circulation indefinitely—and addresses the issues the transition will pose, ranging from fears about privacy and price stability to the need to provide subsidized debit cards for the poor.

While phasing out the bulk of paper money will hardly solve the world's problems, it would be a significant step toward addressing a surprising number of very big ones. Provocative, engaging, and backed by compelling original arguments and evidence, The Curse of Cash is certain to spark widespread debate.

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Adaptation and Learning by Networked Agents
Friday, October 14
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G125, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Ali H. Sayed, UCLA
Network science deals with issues related to the aggregation, processing, and diffusion of information over graphs.  While interactions among agents can be studied from the perspective of cluster formations, degrees of connectivity, and small-world effects, it is the possibility of having agents interact dynamically with each other, and influence each other's behavior, that opens up a plethora of notable possibilities.  For example, examination of how local interactions influence global behavior can lead to a broader understanding of how localized interactions in the social sciences, life sciences, and system sciences influence the evolution of the respective networks.  In this presentation, we examine the learning behavior of adaptive networked agents over both strongly and weakly-connected graphs.  The discussion will reveal some interesting patterns of behavior on how information flows over graphs.  In the strongly-connected case, all agents are able to learn the desired true state within the same accuracy level, thus attaining a level of “social equilibrium,” even when the agents are subjected to different noise conditions.  In contrast, in the weakly-connected case, a leader-follower relationship develops with some agents dictating the behavior of other agents regardless of the local information clues that are sensed by these other agents.  The findings clarify how asymmetries in the exchange of data over graphs can make some agents dependent on other agents.  This scenario arises, for example, from intruder attacks by malicious agents, from the presence of stubborn agents, or from failures by critical links.

Speaker Bio:  A. H. Sayed is a distinguished professor and former chairman of electrical engineering at UCLA (www.ee.ucla.edu/asl).  An author/co-author of over 480 publications and six books, his research involves several areas including adaptation and learning, statistical inference, network and data science, and biologically-inspired designs.  His work has been recognized with several awards including the 2015 Education Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society, the 2014 Athanasios Papoulis Award from the European Association for Signal Processing, the 2013 Meritorious Service Award and the 2012 Technical Achievement Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society, the 2005 Terman Award from the American Society for Engineering Education, and the 2003 Kuwait Prize.  He has been awarded several Best Paper Awards from the IEEE, and is a Fellow of both the IEEE and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).  He is recognized as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters.  He is currently serving as President-Elect of the IEEE Signal Processing Society during the two-year period 2016-2017, followed as President during 2018-2019.

Electrical Engineering Seminar Series

Contact: Gioia Sweetland
Phone: 617-495-2919
Email: gioia at seas.harvard.edu

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A Conversation with CNN President Jeff Zucker
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, 4 – 5:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
Center for Public Leadership
SPEAKER(S)  Jeff Zucker
President of CNN
Lois Romano (moderator), Editor, Washington Post Live
Editorial Director, POLITICO Events
Institute of Politics Resident Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School (Spring 2008)
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum Office
617-495-1380
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/conversation-cnn-president-jeff-zucker

Editorial Comment:  Zucker is a Harvard alum and when he was part of NBC instrumental in hiring Donald J Trump for “The Apprentice."

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MIT Energy Night!
Friday, October 14
6:00 PM – 10:00 PM
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-energy-night-tickets-27550426066

MIT Energy Club invites you to ENERGY NIGHT, a showcase and celebration of energy research, entrepreneurship, and innovation. Join researchers, entrepreneurs, and energy enthusiasts from throughout the Boston and Cambridge community for the MIT Energy Club's marquee Fall event.
Admission is FREE. Drinks and hors d'oeuvres will be served.

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TADHack Boston - Global Communications Hackathon
Friday, October 14, 6:00 PM to Saturday, October 15, 8:00 PM
McGraw-Hill Education Labs, 281 Summer Street, Boston
RSVP at http://tadhack.com/2016/global/register-boston

Ready to be creative about communications and win some prizes?

TADHack is the world’s largest communications-focused hackathon with local hosts in more than 30 cities and more than $48,000 in prizes. McGraw Hill Education has graciously offered to host TADHack Boston on October 14 and 15th. In addition to global prizes, TADHack Boston will also have local prizes, plenty of goodies, and of course food, caffeine, and drinks to get you across the finish line.

Several mentors will be on-site to help you win! We have a certified Google Developer Expert, 2 former TADHack winners, and more there to help. You are guaranteed to come away smarter. 

Check out the TADHack global page and rules here: http://tadhack.com/2016/  
Register for the Boston location here: http://tadhack.com/2016/global/register-boston

Timelines
TADHack is a casual hackathon - you can come and go as you please and there is no need to stay up all night (unless you want to). Our mentors are there to help, teach and guide you. 

Week of October 10th - we will send you local prize info to help you prepare
Friday, October 14th 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM - Doors open. Meet your mentors and get started  
Saturday, October 15th 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM - more mentoring, complete your hacks
Saturday, October 15th 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM - hacks due, local judging starts, we'll help with your recording for the global contest  
Sunday, October 16th - global prizes awarded

About TADHack  
TADHack’s mission is to bring together start-ups, students, developers and enterprises–anyone interested in adding communications capabilities to their innovative applications, services or business processes–and show them the tools and provide the support to help bring their creations to life. Over 2000 people around the globe participated in TADHack 2015, and the 2016 edition is bound to be even larger.

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Saturday, October 15
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Boston Book Festival
Saturday, October 15
Copley Square, Boston

More information at https://bostonbookfest.org/

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Tech Conference at Harvard Business School
Saturday, October 15
8am - 5pm
Harvard Business School, Spangler Auditorium, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tech-conference-at-harvard-business-school-tickets-27526764293
Cost:  $25 – $30

How can autonomous transportation impact every sector of the economy?  When will we be able to take vacations to the moon?  What does the Pokemon Go phenomenon mean for the future of virtual reality?

On Saturday, October 15th, 2016, thought and business leaders who are shaping the future of these technologies will come together for a day of keynote speeches, panel discussions, technology demonstrations, and networking at 2016 Tech Conference at Harvard Business School: “Hello, World!”

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Sunday, October 16
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MIT Swapfest
Sunday, October 16
9:00a–2:00p
MIT, N4, Albany Garage and Lots, Albany Street between Massachusetts Avenue and Main Street, Cambridge 

MIT's monthly Hi Tech, Computer, Electronics and Ham Radio Fleamarket. 
Buy Sell or Swap all things nerdly. 
Held the third Sunday of each month April thru October. 
Rain or Shine covered space is available for all sellers. 
In the Albany St Garage and adjacent lot. 
On Albany St between Mass Ave and Main St, Cambridge. 
$6 Buyers admission from 9AM to 2PM. 
$4 with MIT/ Harvard Student ID 
Free for MIT and Harvard Undergraduates with current ID

Web site: www.swapfest.us
Open to: the general public
Cost: $6
This event occurs on the 3rd Sunday of every month through October 16, 2016.
Sponsor(s): MIT Radio Society, Electronic Research Society, MIT, UHF Repeater Assn. W1XM, MIT
For more information, contact:  Mitchell Berger
617-253-3776

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Boston Agricultural Exposition 
Sunday, October 16
10AM – 4PM
Haley House Bakery Café (outdoors), 12 Dade Street, Dudley Square, Roxbury

Come be part of it!
Join us for a celebration of community gardening, backyard growing, and local agriculture at the first annual Boston Agricultural Exposition on Sunday, October 16th from 10AM - 4PM (rain or shine) at Haley House Bakery Cafe in Boston’s Dudley Square.

The Trustees, Agricultural Hall, and Haley House are partnering to create a special day devoted to the celebration and enjoyment of community gardening, backyard growing, and local agriculture. We’ll have displays, exhibits, contests, animals, old-time games and activities for kids, and tasty treats featuring locally grown and locally produced products. Plans are in the works for agricultural exhibits including beekeeping, backyard chickens, mushroom cultivation, cider pressing, composting to name just a few.

Psst: Don’t miss the goat milking contest!

Looking to exhibit as an educator or nonprofit organization?
Here’s the link to more information and a registration form:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfG0Rk52-QHF9wEZ6fKG0gdd9itL7u47AdklGw9dwsUEz8xCg/viewform

Are you a local grower or local producer interested in exhibiting and/or selling at the Exposition?
Please be in touch with Peter Bowne via email pbowne at thetrustees.org or cell 617.869.6720. If you are interested we need to hear from you by close of business Friday, September 30th.

We are having (friendly) contests! We’d love for you to enter a pie, baked good, or fresh-picked or preserved garden bounty. Check our Facebook event page for up-to-date information and registration information.

Questions? Peter@ pbowne at thetrustees.org or 617.869.6720

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Panel: Humanism, Racial Justice, and the 2016 Election
Sunday, October 16
1:30 PM
Humanist Hub, 30 JFK Street, 4th Floor, Harvard Square, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/HarvardHumanist/events/234295308/

New movements for racial justice have dominated the headlines throughout America in 2016, and for good reason. Across this country and beyond, communities are becoming increasingly aware of the suffering caused by systemic racism, with many of us asking: what can I do? What can we do? And will the 2016 election mark the beginning of real progress for racial justice in American politics, or will it further divide us and pit us against one another? Meanwhile, one of the largest and fastest growing communities in America today is that of the nonreligious: atheists, agnostics and humanists make up a huge percentage of the young people who are rallying to the cause of racial justice, but we often lack the sense of connectedness to one another in community that can allow churches, synagogues, mosques and other congregations to influence elections and make a difference around the issues they care about. In this panel we will bring together one of the most distinguished and renowned groups of experts on race, privilege, and community building ever to speak to an audience of the nonreligious and allies. Featuring:

Thandeka is an ordained Unitarian Universalist minister and congregational consultant, an Emmy award-winning television producer, and founder of affect theology, which studies religious experience from the standpoint of emotions. She is the author of Learning to be White: Money, Race and God in America. Dr. Eddie Moore Jr. is the Founder/Program Director for the White Privilege Conference, President of not-for-profit The Privilege Institute, and a nationally known consultant as America & Moore, LLC. Dr. Moore is co-founder of the online journal Understanding and Dismantling Privilege, co-editor of Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice: 15 Stories and the forthcoming online workbook, A Guide for White Women Teaching Black Boys.

Professor Cheryl Giles is the Francis Greenwood Peabody Senior Lecturer on Pastoral Care and Counseling at Harvard Divinity School and a licensed clinical psychologist. Her primary research interests are identifying the role of risk and resilience in developing healthy adolescents, exploring the impact of contemplative care for the dying, and increasing awareness of healthcare disparities of African-Americans.

Debby Irving brings to racial justice the perspective of working as an organizer and teacher for 25 years without understanding her own whiteness. Author of the award-winning book, Waking Up White, and Finding Myself in the Story of Race, she now devotes herself to working with white people grappling with the impact white skin can have on perception, problem solving, and engaging in racial justice work.

Greg Epstein is the Humanist Chaplain at Harvard, author of Good Without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe and the forthcoming The Godless Congregation, and the Humanist Hub Executive Director.

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Monday, October 17 – Wednesday, October 19
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Harvard Forum & Nano Course Series on Population Health Equity
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 17 – Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016
WHERE  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Education, Health Sciences, Science, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with generous support of the Aetna Foundation
SPEAKER(S)  Keynote addresses will be delivered by Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, who will address “Hot-Spotting: Using Big Data for Health Equity”; Dr. Kathryn Edin, who will discuss “The New Poverty: Living on Less Than $2/Day in America”; and Dr. Nancy Krieger, who will share her latest research on “Health Equity & The Erroneous Temptation of Making the Causes of Health Sum to 100%: An Ecosocial Analysis.” Two panel discussions featuring national experts will be held as well on Social Network Interventions to Address Health Equity and Housing, Neighborhoods, and Social Mobility.
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9YWG7lGcHn1LnaR
TICKET INFO  Registration Is Free of Charge
CONTACT INFO  E-mail: pophealthequity at hsph.harvard.edu
DETAILS	 You're invited to the 2016 Forum on Population Health Equity, Oct. 18–19 at the Martin Conference Center, in Boston. Registration is free; breakfast & lunch served both days. Participants are invited to register for pre-meeting Nano Courses, on 10/17.
* Info/Agenda: Tinyurl.com/2016PopForumInfo
* E-mail: pophealthequity at hsph.harvard.edu
* Twitter: @PopHealthEquity; #PopHealthEquity
* Facebook: Facebook.com/PopHealthEquity
* YouTube: Tinyurl.com/YouTubePop
* Instagram: Instagram.com/PopHealthEquity
LINK  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/social-and-behavioral-sciences/inaugural-forum-on-population-health-equity-3/

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Monday, October 17
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The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies
Monday, October 17
12:00AM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Bldg, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Paul Beaton, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Lunch will be provided. 

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series 
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
cepr at hks.harvard.edu
(617) 495 - 8693

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Personalized Comfort
Monday, October 17
12:30p–2:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Architecture Lecture: Stefano Schiavon

MIT Architecture Lecture Series

Fall 2016 Architecture Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, Building Technology Program
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

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Righting the Record: Conservatism and the Archives
Monday, October 17
4:15 pm
Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://radcliffe-nenmf.formstack.com/forms/righting_the_record

Over the past half-century, grassroots activists and organizations both left and right have focused on women’s roles, family values, homosexuality, and reproductive policy, transforming modern American life. Yet the collections of major public repositories, especially those housed at universities, tend to document only one side of this complicated history: the left side. The Schlesinger Library is hosting a conversation among scholars, intellectuals, and activists—moderated by the New York Times columnist Ross Douthat—to explore the consequences of the current situation and examine possible solutions. “Righting the Record” is part of the library’s multifaceted approach to enhancing the diversity of the documentary record, to ensure that students, researchers, and scholars can write more complete and balanced histories of our times. 
Free and open to the public.
Please register and join us. 
We welcome walk-in attendees on the day of the event whenever space is available. If the event reaches capacity, then the information on this page will be updated. Thank you.
MODERATOR:
Ross Douthat, Op-ed Columnist, New York Times
PANELISTS:
Donald Critchlow, Professor of History and Director of the Center for Political Thought and Leadership, Arizona State University
Jennifer A. Marshall, Vice President, Heritage Foundation
Michelle Nickerson, Associate Professor of History, Loyola University Chicago
Charmaine Yoest, Senior Fellow, American Values

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Bridging the Partisan Divide
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 17, 2016, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium, S-010, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Herbert C. Kelman Seminar on International Conflict
SPEAKER(S)  Mark Gerzon, Founder & President, Mediators Foundation
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	Donna Hicks, Chair dhicks at wcfia.harvard.edu

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Mass Innovation Nights #91:  Women Founders 
Monday, October 17
6pm-8:30pm  
District Hall Boston, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://mass.innovationnights.com/node/add/rsvp

It's time for our 3rd Annual "Women Founders" event MIN #91 at District Hall. MIN #91 "Women Founders" is kicking off the WEBOS week on MONDAY (yes, MONDAY - we like to keep you on your toes) October 17th 2016. We have 14 original and dynamic products that will be showcased, some great experts and a few surprises! 

Check out the new PRODUCTS and VOTE for your favorites 
Support local innovation -- network and have fun at the same time! 
Don't miss it

More information at http://mass.innovationnights.com/events/mass-innovation-nights-91

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Heat Transfer
Monday, October 17
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo RestaurantsThe popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Cambridge Forum: NO JUSTICE, NO PEACE: Race and Power in America
Monday, October 17
7:00 PM
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Cambridge Forum welcomes authors TOMMIE SHELBY, KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD, and ELIZABETH HINTON for a facilitated discussion around issues of race and structural injustice, and the steps that citizens and governments can take to find practical solutions to problems such as mass incarceration, extreme poverty in disadvantaged communities, and problematic notions of black criminality. This discussion will be moderated by DANIELLE ALLEN, Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.

This Cambridge Forum event is a collaboration with Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard Book Store, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University Press and Boston Review.

Books will be available for sale at the event. This event will not include a book signing.

About Dark Ghettos
Why do American ghettos persist? Decades after Moynihan’s report on the black family and the Kerner Commission’s investigations of urban disorders, deeply disadvantaged black communities remain a disturbing reality. Scholars and commentators today often identify some factor—such as single motherhood, joblessness, or violent street crime—as the key to solving the problem and recommend policies accordingly. But, Tommie Shelby argues, these attempts to “fix” ghettos or “help” their poor inhabitants ignore fundamental questions of justice and fail to see the urban poor as moral agents responding to injustice.

Drawing on liberal-egalitarian philosophy and informed by leading social science research, Dark Ghettos examines the thorny questions of political morality raised by ghettos. Should government foster integrated neighborhoods? If a “culture of poverty” exists, what interventions are justified? Should single parenthood be avoided or deterred? Is voluntary nonwork or crime an acceptable mode of dissent? How should a criminal justice system treat the oppressed? Shelby offers practical answers, framed in terms of what justice requires of both a government and its citizens, and he views the oppressed as allies in the fight for a society that warrants everyone’s allegiance.

“The ghetto is not ‘their’ problem but ours, privileged and disadvantaged alike,” Shelby writes. The existence of ghettos is evidence that our society is marred by structural injustices that demand immediate rectification. Dark Ghettos advances a social vision and political ethics that calls for putting the abolition of ghettos at the center of reform.

About The Condemnation of Blackness
Lynch mobs, chain gangs, and popular views of black southern criminals that defined the Jim Crow South are well known. We know less about the role of the urban North in shaping views of race and crime in American society.
Following the 1890 census, the first to measure the g
eneration of African Americans born after slavery, crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land of opportunity were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites—liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners—as indisputable proof of blacks’ inferiority. In the heyday of “separate but equal,” what else but pathology could explain black failure in the “land of opportunity”?
The idea of black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America, as were African Americans’ own ideas about race and crime. Chronicling the emergence of deeply embedded notions of black people as a dangerous race of criminals by explicit contrast to working-class whites and European immigrants, this fascinating book reveals the influence such ideas have had on urban development and social policies.
About From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime

In the United States today, one in every thirty-one adults is under some form of penal control, including one in eleven African American men. How did the “land of the free” become the home of the world’s largest prison system? Challenging the belief that America’s prison problem originated with the Reagan administration’s War on Drugs, Elizabeth Hinton traces the rise of mass incarceration to an ironic source: the social welfare programs of Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society at the height of the civil rights era.

Johnson’s War on Poverty policies sought to foster equality and economic opportunity. But these initiatives were also rooted in widely shared assumptions about African Americans’ role in urban disorder, which prompted Johnson to call for a simultaneous War on Crime. The 1965 Law Enforcement Assistance Act empowered the national government to take a direct role in militarizing local police. Federal anticrime funding soon incentivized social service providers to ally with police departments, courts, and prisons. Under Richard Nixon and his successors, welfare programs fell by the wayside while investment in policing and punishment expanded. Anticipating future crime, policymakers urged states to build new prisons and introduced law enforcement measures into urban schools and public housing, turning neighborhoods into targets of police surveillance.

By the 1980s, crime control and incarceration dominated national responses to poverty and inequality. The initiatives of that decade were less a sharp departure than the full realization of the punitive transformation of urban policy implemented by Republicans and Democrats alike since the 1960s.

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Business + Sustainability: Finding Energy by Saving It
Monday, October 17
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
MIT, Building E51-315, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/business-sustainability-finding-energy-by-saving-it-tickets-28191390207

MBA students and other graduate and professional students have found nearly $1.5 billion in energy savings
through the Environmental Defense Fund Climate Corps program.

Join guest speakers from EDF and MIT for a networking reception on leveraging the power of partnerships to improve energy efficiency.
Casual dress. Refreshments and light fare will be provided. Brief remarks will be followed by Q&A with the presenters.
Free of charge, but space is limited.

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Tuesday, October 18
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Boston TechBreakfast: intermedia mmh, Future Moments, Navitome, GoPapaya
Tuesday, October 18
8:00 AM
Microsoft NERD, Horace Mann Room, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations.
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast:
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Food & Coffee and chit-chat 
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements 
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs! 
intermedia mmh: Mellon - Lorenzo dell'Uva
Future Moments: iOS apps = MicSwap, AudioFix: For Videos, AudioMaster - Gary Levitt
Navitome: - Dylan Murphy
GoPapaya: - Zach Weiss
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words Boston 

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Materials Day & Poster Session
Tuesday, October 18
8:00a–5:30p
MIT, Building W-16, 48 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge
RSVP at https://mpc-www.mit.edu/

Hosted annually by the Materials Processing Center, Materials Day features emerging research applications in materials science & engineering for products and process across the industrial spectrum. 

The theme for this year's symposium is Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage. Topics will include: advanced metal-ion, metal-air and flow batteries for applications ranging from consumer electronics to transportation and grid level energy management. 

Materials Day activities include conference speakers from both MIT and Industry. The student poster session immediately follows the technical symposium and showcases the latest results from the diverse materials research communities in MIT's Schools of Science and Engineering.

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free of charge but registration is required.
Tickets: https://mpc-www.mit.edu/
Sponsor(s): Materials Processing Center
For more information, contact:  Maria Aglietti
617-253-6472
aglietti at mit.edu 

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Speaker Series: Amy Walter
Tuesday, October 18
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Amy Walter is the National Editor of The Cook Political Report where she provides analysis of the issues, trends and events that shape the political environment. Her weekly column appears at CookPolitical.com.

Over the past 14 years, Amy Walter has built a reputation as an accurate, objective, and insightful political analyst with unparalleled access to campaign insiders and decision-makers. Known as one of the best political journalists covering Washington, she is the former political director of ABC News. She is also an exclusive panelist on NBC’s Meet the Press and a regular panelist on PBS’ Washington Week with Gwen Ifill and Fox News’ Special Report with Bret Baier. She provides political analysis every Monday evening for the PBS NewsHour.

This is Amy’s second tour of duty with The Cook Political Report. From 1997 to 2007, she served as Senior Editor where she covered the U.S. House.Walter was named one of DC’s “50 Top Journalists” by Washingtonian Magazine in 2009 and honored with the Washington Post’s Crystal Ball award for her spot-on election predictions in 2000. She is a member of the Board of Trustees at Colby College where she graduated summa cum laude.

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Brown Bag: Come Together Right Now: An Introduction to the Open Access Network - with Rebecca Kennison
Tuesday, October 18
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building E53-212, 30 Wadsworth Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Rebecca Kennison

Officially launched just over a year ago, the Open Access Network (OAN) offers a transformative, sustainable, and scalable model of open access (OA) publishing and preservation that encourages partnerships among scholarly societies, research libraries, and other partners (e.g., academic publishers, university presses, collaborative e-archives) who share a common mission to support the creation and distribution of open research and scholarship and to encourage more affordable education, which can be a direct outcome of OA publishing. Our ultimate goal is to develop a collective funding approach that is fair and open and that fully sustains the infrastructure needed to support the full life-cycle for communication of the scholarly record, including new and evolving forms of research output. Simply put, we intend to Make Knowledge Public.

Web site: http://informatics.mit.edu/event/brown-bag-discussion-rebecca-kennison
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries
For more information, contact:  Kelly Hopkins
6172533044
khopkins at mit.edu 

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Plants That Purify: The Natural and Supernatural History of Smudging
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Braun Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion
SPONSOR	Women's Studies in Religion Program
CONTACT	Tracy Wall
DETAILS  WSRP Research Associate Rosalyn LaPier will deliver the talk, "Plants That Purify: The Natural and Supernatural History of Smudging."

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Climate Change, Water Quality and Ocean Acidification for the Coastal Ocean along the US Northeast
Tuesday, October 18
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Scott Doney, Waste Water Discharge, WHOI

Human-driven climate change inherently affects people and theenvironment at regional and local scales. For a variety of reasons,the coastal boundary between the land and the sea will be especially vulnerable to ongoing and future climate change and ocean acidification. Research contributes to identifying and quantifying impacts, targeting and assessing the efficacy of adaptation strategies, and providing a framework for discussing trade-offs among possible solutions with stakeholders. This talk will focus specifically on examples for the coastal waters of Buzzards Bay, MA and adjacent ocean continental shelf off of southern New England. A case study will be presented examining the interplay of climate warming and nitrogen loading on near-shore coastal water quality.

Bio:  My science interests span oceanography, climate and biogeochemistry. Much of my research involves how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change, which may act to either damp or accelerate climate trends. A current focus is on ocean acidification due to the invasion into the ocean of carbon dioxide and other chemicals from fossil fuel burning.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Dr. Will Turner, Conservation International Senior Vice President of Global Strategies
Tuesday, October 18
4:15 – 5:45pm
MIT, Building  3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Will Turner and Sandy Andelman

ESI People & the Planet Lecture Series 
The Environmental Solutions Initiative 2016 People & the Planet Lecture Series presents individuals and organizations working to advance understanding and action toward a humane and sustainable future.

Join Will Turner and Sandy Andelman of Conservation International for a discussion of how we can track the health of the planet--from ecosystems to agricultural systems to human well-being--and harness science, engineering, analytics, and visualization to better value, monitor, and ultimately manage the ecosystems that people around the world rely on. 

Reception follows.

Web site: https://environmentalsolutions.mit.edu/lecture-series/
Open to: the general public
Cost: free 
Sponsor(s): Environmental Solutions Initiative
For more information, contact:  Hannah Loomis
617-715-4048
esi at mit.edu 

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Looking Up: How coalitions of bottom-up organizations are driving action for sustainable development
Tuesday, October 18
5:00PM TO 7:00PM
Harvard, Emerson Hall, Room 105, 25 Quincy Street, Cambridge

with RACHEL KYTE, CEO of Sustainable Energy for All, and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General.
PANELISTS
William Clark, Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy, and Human Development, Harvard Kennedy School
Henry Lee, Jassim M. Jaidah Family Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Harvard Kennedy School
Michael Mehling, Executive Director, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR), MIT
Moderated by Sheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:  Rachel Kyte is Chief Executive Officer of the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Sustainable Energy for All. Ms. Kyte drives SE4All’s work to mobilize action towards its 2030 goals of ensuring universal access to modern energy services; doubling the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency; and doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix. As Special Representative for the Secretary General she is the point person in the UN for action towards the recently agreed global goal on sustainable energy. Ms Kyte served until December 2015 as World Bank Group Vice President and Special Envoy for Climate Change, leading the Bank Group’s efforts to campaign for an ambitious agreement at the 21st Convention of the Parties of the UNFCCC (COP 21). She was previously World Bank Vice President for Sustainable Development and was the International Finance Corporation Vice President for Business Advisory Services.

Science & Democracy Lecture Series
ABOUT THE SCIENCE & DEMOCRACY SERIES:
Once a semester, the STS Program, with co-sponsorship from other local institutions, hosts an installation in its Science and Democracy Lecture Series. The series aims to spark lively, university-wide discussion of the place and meaning of science and technology, broadly conceived, in democratic societies. We hope to explore both the promised benefits of our era’s most salient scientific and technological breakthroughs and the potentially harmful consequences of developments that are inadequately understood, debated, or managed by politicians, institutions, and lay publics.

Sponsored by the Program on Science, Technology, and Society. Co-sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment; the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and the Graduate School of Design.

Contact Name:  Shana Ashar
Shana_Ashar at hks.harvard.edu

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Creating Language in Man and Machine
Tuesday, October 18
5:15pm 
Harvard, Bolyston Hall, 110 Fong Auditorium, Cambridge

More information at http://stevenpinker.com/event/creating-language-man-and-machine

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Climate, Water, and the Evolution of Early Societies at the Harvard Museum of Natural History
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Museum of Natural History, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture, Science, Special Events, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Museum of Natural History
SPEAKER(S)  Vernon L. Scarborough, Distinguished University Research Professor and Charles P. Taft Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Cincinnati
COST  Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	hmnh at hmsc.harvard.edu, (617)495-3045
DETAILS  The earliest complex societies found in the Western Hemisphere developed under very different environmental conditions. The Maya, for instance, emerged in the tropical lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula, a region with high seasonal rainfall and rich biodiversity. The Puebloans, in contrast, developed in the semiarid region of what is today Arizona and New Mexico, an area with limited rainfall and biodiversity. Vernon Scarborough will discuss two important archaeological sites from these different ecological and cultural zones—Tikal in Guatemala and the Chaco Canyon in New Mexico—to illustrate how the availability of water and climate influence the evolution of societies and what we can learn from these historical precedents.
LINK  https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/climate-water-evolution

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An Evening with Arthur Ganson
Tuesday, October 18
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-arthur-ganson-registration-28290788510

Join us in celebrating the reopening of our popular exhibit Gestural Engineering: The Sculpture of Arthur Ganson. The night will commence in our ground-floor 360 space as celebrated artist and engineer Arthur Ganson joins MIT Museum Director John Durant for a conversation regarding the exhibited pieces. A Q&A period will follow before an unveiling of Arthur's work in our newly renovated gallery. He will be available for individual questions and conversation during this time.
Light refreshments will be served.

Event is free and open to the public but pre-registration is recommended as space is limited for this event. There will be some capacity reserved for our impromptu walk-in guests, but seating is not guaranteed. Please note that unclaimed reserved seating will be released once the event has begun.

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Ava DuVernay’s “The 13th” Film Screening and Discussion
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Film
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard Kennedy School, the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, and the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
DIRECTED BY  Ava DuVernay
WRITTEN BY  Ava DuVernay
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-13th-film-screening-and-discussion-tickets-28257394628
TICKET INFO  Due to space limitations, guests must RSVP to attend
DETAILS  The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard Kennedy School, along with the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, and the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research will host a film Screening and Discussion ofThe 13th with Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study as part of Harvard Kennedy School’s Race and American Politics series.
In collaboration with Netflix this screening is free and open to the public, but due to space limitations guests must RSVP to attend.
The title of Ava DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing documentary refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which reads “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States...” The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass criminalization and the sprawling American prison industry is laid out by DuVernay with bracing lucidity. With a potent mixture of archival footage and testimony from a dazzling array of activists, politicians, historians, and formerly incarcerated women and men, DuVernay creates a work of grand historical synthesis. 
LINK	http://ash.harvard.edu/event/ava-duvernay’s-“-13th”-film-screening-and-discussion

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Moth+Flame and Paracosm at Laugh Boston
Tuesday, October 18
6:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Laugh Boston, 425 Summer Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Boston-Virtual-Reality/events/234129306/

Come see two excellent presenters, Moth & Flame, and Paracosm! No cover charge for this one, free snacks will be provided, and excellent food and drinks are available for purchase. We will also have an array of VR and AR demonstrations with devices like the HTC Vive, the MS Hololens, and more. 

MOTH + FLAME Presents "Remember Remember" 
This VR narrative explores how we process memories and how quickly those memories can be snatched away. Set in a world after an alien invasion, the piece cuts back and forth between the user's life prior to the catastrophe and the user being held prisoner and told their memories aren't real. Users are forced to question what is real and what is invented and question what they know. Remember Remember was developed in partnership with AMD to show off the benchmarking prowess of their top-of-the-line GPUs.  

Our presenter, Courtney Harding will discuss this interesting work of art, and it will be available all night as a Vive Demonstration.   See http://mothandflamevr.com/

PARACOSM  
Amir Rubin, co-founder/CEO of Paracosm will be presenting Paracosm's next generation 3D-mapping technology. Their team of computer vision engineers have spent the past 3.5 years developing hardware + software to capture and digitize real-world environments in a matter of minutes. Large area 3D-mapping will open up entirely new applications for VR + AR in both enterprise and consumer markets. Amir will give examples and  discuss some real-world/enterprise applications of 3D-mapping. 
 https://paracosm.io/

SCHEDULE 
6:00pm - Doors open, demos begin, snacks are served.   
7:00 - 7:30   Paracosm's presentation.
7:30 - 8:00  Moth+Flame's presentation.
8:15 - 9:45  Demofest!!   Also, order food and drink as you like. 

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The Center for Green Buildings and Cities (CGBC) hosts its 2nd Annual Lecture featuring Richard Rogers, a founding partner of Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners
Tuesday, October 18
6:30PM
Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, GSD, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

CGBC Annual Lecture: Richard Rogers 
http://harvardcgbc.org/

Situated within the Harvard GSD Lecture Series, the CGBC Annual Lecture intends to expose a large audience of students, faculty and members of the public to the importance of green design and planning by highlighting the work of key leaders within this movement. 

Richard Rogers is a founding partner of Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners. In a career spanning more than fifty years, he and his partners have designed many buildings including Centre Pompidou, Lloyd’s of London, the Bordeaux Law Courts, the Welsh Assembly, the Millennium Dome, the Leadenhall Building, and new terminals at Madrid Barajas and London Heathrow airports.

Free and open to the public. 

Contact Name:  Jeff Fitton
jfitton at gsd.harvard.edu

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Transforming the Renewable Energy and Entrepreneurship Industries in Emerging Economies
Tuesday, October 18
6:30p–8:30p
MIT, Building 2-190, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Sherife AbdelMessih

This year the MIT Egyptian Student Association (ESA) celebrates its 10th year anniversary! And who is better than ESA's original founder to celebrate with! 

Please join us for a talk with Sherife AbdelMessih, MIT Class 2009, CEO, Future Energy Corporation Chairman, SPARK Ventures, and the founder of MIT ESA. 

Sherife is selected by Yahoo! as one of the top 10 social entrepreneurs in Egypt; profiled as one of the 500 most influential people in the Middle East by Arabian Business magazine; and chosen as one of the top 200 economic leaders in Africa by L'Institut Choiseul. Sherife was the youngest on all 3 lists! 

Sherife is regularly invited to speak at industry events hosted by institutions such as Financial Times, Bloomberg, the World Bank, and prestigious universities. 

Come & join the conversation regarding the challenges and opportunities of the renewable energy and entrepreneurship sector in emerging markets. 

http://whereis.mit.edu/?go=2
Web site: https://www.facebook.com/events/1620394294920366/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Egyptian Student Association
For more information, contact:  Amr Suleiman
clubegypt-board at mit.edu 

Editorial Comment:  Certainly this subject is important.  I’ve been very impressed with the members and events of the MIT Egyptian Student Association over the years.

—————————————

Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part I
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Law, Special Events
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-juryx-deliberations-for-social-change-interactive-workshop-in-active-registration-27781258492
DETAILS  What is the citizen's role in deciding guilt? Is the loudest juror in the room more entitled to an opinion than the soft-spoken counterpart? And is a "difficult topic" a good enough excuse for a one-sided discussion?
In the first installment of a two-part workshop series, Charles Nesson, Weld Professor of Law at Harvard and founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society (now the Berkman Klein Center), will discuss his research on facilitating meaningful dialogue in the classroom, through the lens of JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, an open online course that Nesson is teaching this year.
Using a mock criminal case on gun law, workshop participants will experience firsthand Nesson's method for processing and approaching a dilemma.
This workshop is part of a two-part series. We encourage you to sign up and attend JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II as well.
LINK	http://edportal.harvard.edu/event/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-part-i

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Meeting the Unique Medical Needs of Migrants and Refugees
October 18
7.30pm
Old South Meeting House,. 310 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.forcedfromhome.com/events/panel-discussion-boston/#tickets

Join Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) for a free panel discussion at the Old South Meeting House in Boston that will take an in-depth look at the unique and often life-threatening health challenges facing the world’s 65 million displaced people.

For decades, Doctors Without Borders has treated displaced people along every stage of their journeys—in their home countries, along the routes they traverse, and in refugee camps and other destinations—paying special attention to the specific health risks in the chaotic, overcrowded, and uncertain circumstances they must endure. But now, when there are more displaced people in the world than there have been since World War II—many of whom arrive with chronic conditions, many who are trying to survive outside of established refugee camp settings—Doctors Without Borders has had to find new ways to address the medical issues of people on the move.

Our panel of experienced aid workers will share their stories of treating people in these precarious circumstances and discuss the particular challenges facing people who have been, through no fault of their own, forced from home.

Presented in collaboration with Old South Meeting House as a Partners in Public Dialogue Program.

A Q&A will follow the discussion.

*****************
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Upcoming Events
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*****************  

———————————————————————
Wednesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 20
———————————————————————

Forum on Population Health Equity
Wednesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 20
Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Forum: October 19 - 20
Emerging Population Health Equity Researcher Poster Session: October 18
Pre-Conference Nano Course Series: October 17

The 2016 Forum on Population Health Equity once again will be hosted by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with generous support from the Aetna Foundation.

This year’s Forum will feature keynote talks by Drs. Jeffrey Brenner, Kathryn Edin, and Nancy Krieger, as well as panel discussions on “Social Network Interventions to Address Health Equity” and “Housing, Neighborhoods, and Social Mobility.”

More information at https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/social-and-behavioral-sciences/inaugural-forum-on-population-health-equity-3/

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Wednesday, October 19
————————————

October Boston Sustainability Breakfast
Wednesday, October 19
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM
Pret A Manger, 101 Arch Street, Boston

Join us for the October Sustainability Breakfast - Net Impact Boston's informal breakfast meetup of sustainability professionals together for networking, discussion and moral support. It's important to remind ourselves that we are not the only ones out there in the business world trying to do good! Feel free to drop by any time between 7:30 and 830 am.

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Leading in a World of Uncertainty free webinar with Deborah Ancona
Wednesday, October 19
12:00p–1:00p
Webinar

Speaker: Deborah Ancona
Join MIT Sloan Professor Deborah Ancona for a free, live webinar that introduces MIT's unique leadership perspective???a powerful, innovative approach to executive leadership that will help you make your organization more knowledge-driven and more innovative.

Innovation at work webinar series 
Thousands of people globally have registered for the MIT Sloan Executive Education INNOVATION at WORK Webinar Series. During these complimentary, live events attendees hear from MIT Sloan's renowned faculty about a variety of cutting-edge topics, including how the world???s most successful organizations stay on top; how to bridge the gap that exists between IT and business leaders; and how to manage the risks and opportunities of social media in the workplace.

Web site: http://engage.vevent.com/rt/mitsloanexeced~101916?code=mit_homepage
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Tickets: http://engage.vevent.com/rt/mitsloanexeced~101916?code=mit_homepage
Sponsor(s): MIT Sloan Executive Education
For more information, contact:  MIT Sloan Executive Education
617-253-7166
execedstaff at sloan.mit.edu 

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Historical Ecology Meets Critical Anthropology in Chickasaw Territory
Wednesday, October 19 
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Harvard, Tozzer 203, 21 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Charles Cobb

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Countering Violent Extremism (CVE): The Two-Pyramids Model of Radicalization
Wednesday, October 19
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Clark McCauley (Bryn Mawr)

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu 

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China's Evolving Vulnerability to Climate Change Impacts: A Spatial Analysis of its Infrastructure System
Wednesday, October 19
3:30PM TO 4:45PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Xi (Sisi) HU, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford; visiting fellow, Harvard China Project

China Project Research Seminar
http://chinaproject.harvard.edu/hu161019

Contact Name:  Tiffany Chan
tiffanychan at seas.harvard.edu

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The Arab War Against Rape as a Weapon of War
Wednesday, October 19
5:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building 3-370, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Miriam Cooke
The McMillan-Stewart lectures provide a space for scholars, artists, journalists, activists, and other experts to reflect on issues related to women in the developing world, specifically (but not exclusively) in the Middle East and North Africa. Lectures are free and open to the public.

Web site: http://wgs.mit.edu/mcmillanstewart-lecture-series/
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Tickets: none needed
Sponsor(s): Women's and Gender Studies
For more information, contact:  The Friendly WGS Staff
617-253-8844
wgs at mit.edu 

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Askwith Forums: Education and the 2016 Election
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM	Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE  This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  HGSE faculty panel:
David Deming, professor of education and economics
Roberto Gonzales, assistant professor of education
Meira Levinson, professor of education
Martin West, associate professor of education
Moderator: Paul Reville, Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration
A conversation with HGSE faculty about the 2016 election. Why has education been largely absent from the discussion? What are the likely implications for education policy depending on the outcome of the election? Should educators be focusing more on who controls the senate, house, or statehouses rather than who is in the White House?

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Pre-Release Screening & Discussion: Before the Flood
Wednesday, October 19
5:30PM
Harvard, Science Center Hall B, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

From Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Fisher Stevens and Academy Award-winning actor, environmental activist and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio, Before the Flood presents a riveting account of the dramatic changes now occurring around the world due to climate change, as well as the actions we as individuals and as a society can take to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet. The film follows DiCaprio as he travels to five continents and the Arctic speaking to scientists, world leaders, activists and local residents to gain a deeper understanding of this complex issue and investigate concrete solutions to the most pressing environmental challenge of our time.

Film screening is free and open to the public. [Harvard] Students are invited to stay for pizza and discussion with Harvard faculty following the screening (registration required at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdgkosH1GVoasVqMfMjJOB_A0Nh8vqeJbg2CKyOTYK2fbMy4Q/viewform?c=0&w=1 )

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/videos/before-the-flood-trailer/

Contact Name:   Laura Hanrahan
laura_hanrahan at harvard.edu
(617) 495-3039

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Bob Kramer: Patterns of Excellence
Wednesday, October 19
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 6-120, Eastman Lecture Hall, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Bob Kramer
Master bladesmith Bob Kramer will share his relentless quest to forge the perfect knife. Kramer will discuss how his methodically crafted blades combine metallurgy and art effortlessly. Technical discussion of steel alloys, Damascus patterning, and his forging processes will also be covered.

DMSE Metal Arts Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
For more information, contact:  DMSE
617-253-3300

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Climate Congress "Personal Resources" Discussion Group
Wednesday, October 19
6pm – 8pm
Cambridge Citywide Senior Center
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.2laa8501348dg0uqdr53v2444s?authuser=0

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Extinction or Internationalism:  A Lecture and Conversation with Noam Chomsky
Wednesday, October 19
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Old South Church, 645 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/noam-chomsky-extinction-or-internationalism-tickets-27712991303

A Landmark Lecture by the World's Most Important Living Intellectual
This event is free and open to the public - BUT tickets must be reserved online at http://ChomskySpeaks.org

To co-sponsor the event as an organization and request tabling opportunities (limited availability), use the website to reach Paul Shannon.

Special guest, Wallace Shawn will moderate the event and also engage Noam in conversation about the difficult topic.

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Thursday, October 20
———————————

Confronting Deep and Persistent Climate Change Uncertainty
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Regulatory Policy Program at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at the Harvard Kennedy School.
SPEAKER(S)  Gernot Wagner, research associate at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Richard Zeckhauser, Professor of Political Economy at HKS
CONTACT INFO  Lunch will be served, please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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The Challenges of Protecting Unpopular Species: Snakes
Thursday, October 20
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Thomas French       
A core responsibility of state and federal fish and wildlife agencies is to protect and manage native species.  Ecologically, and in the eyes of Massachusetts law, all state-listed Endangered Species should be treated equally, but this is still not the case in the court of public opinion.  Dr. French will discuss the unique case of snakes, a fear of which is share by more American adults than any other fear.  It raises the question of what role, if any, should emotional species bias play in the policies of a science-based agency.  Ecologically, the Bald Eagle is no more or less important than the Timber Rattlesnake, but protecting one is popular, and protecting the other is not.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Smart Cities
Thursday, October 20
12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
Suffolk University, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/smart-cities-tickets-28380041468

This event is going to be about Smart Cities. We are going to address three topics within the subject: transportation, architecture, and technology. This event is going to take place on the 20th of October from 12:00pm until 1:30pm.

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In Search of the Lost Development: Sustainability, Competitiveness and Economic Growth in Brazil
Thursday, October 20
12:00PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S-050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

The DRCLAS Brazil Studies Program welcomes Rogerio Studart, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. This talk will discuss the significant growth of sustainable investments (in energy, transportation, and urban infrastructure) in Brazil. 

Rogério Studart is an economist (Ph.D.) with 30 years of experience as an expert on development, international macroeconomics and sustainable finance. He is currently an Associate Professor of Economics, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institutions; Senior Visiting Fellow and a Distinguished Fellow, Global Federation of Competitiveness Councils. 

http://drclas.harvard.edu/event/brazil-rogerio-studart

Contact Name:   Juliana Deleo
jdeleo at fas.harvard.edu

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Climate Change Displacement: Finding Solutions to an Emerging Crisis
Thursday, October 20
3:00PM TO 5:00PM
Harvard, Milstein West, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Join the Harvard Environmental Law Program Clinic, along with the Immigration and Refugee Program and the International Human Rights Clinic, for a conversation between Mary Robinson and Martha Minow on the topic of climate change, human rights and displacement. Mrs. Robinson is formerly the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights, as well as the former UN Special Envoy on Climate Change. This conversation is part of a three-day conference examining challenges of climate change, human rights, and displacement, and efforts to address this emerging crisis in the wake of the Paris COP 21 agreement.

http://environment.law.harvard.edu/2016/10/save-date-climate-change-displacement-finding-solutions-emerging-crisis/

Contact Name:  Cara Solomon

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Synthesized ecology with ecological networks
Thursday, October 20
4pm
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Speaker: Neo Martinez, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Arizona University

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) 
Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
617-258-8685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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Nudging Toward A Cleaner Future: Behavioral Insights into Energy and Environment
Thursday, October 20 
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Harvard, Room 275, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Discover the cutting edge of research in behavioral science as applied to energy, environment, and climate solutions at a hands-on workshop and panel discussion. Details for each can be found on the website. 

Rachel Zuraw, Director of Analytics at Opower, and Keerthi Reddy, Associate Advisor at the Behavioral Insights Team, will give an overview of cutting edge research in behavioral science as applied to energy demand reduction and other climate solutions. The discussion will be moderated by Harvard Kennedy School Professor Joseph Aldy, who is a visiting fellow at Resources for the Future and previously served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment.

Panelists
Keerthi Reddy, Associate Advisor, Behavioral Insights Team, New York
Keerthi Reddy is an Associate Advisor at BIT North America. Her work focuses on the application of behavioral insights to improve the delivery of municipal services. Through Bloomberg Philanthropies' What Works Cities program, she and her colleagues collaborate with mayor's offices across the US, designing behavioral interventions and the randomized controlled trials to test them, analyzing data, and developing policy suggestions based on the results. Prior to joining BIT, Reddy worked as a lab manager for psychology professors Fiery Cushman and Joshua Greene at Harvard University. During this time, she studied moral thinking and the application of reinforcement learning models to goal setting.

Rachel Zuraw, Director of Analytics, Opower
Rachel Zuraw has over 15 years of analytics experience and leads the Analytics team at Opower, which is now a part of Oracle Utilities Global Business Unit. This team utilizes quantitative techniques to understand the impact of products on customer behavior and enhance the effectiveness of Opower products and programs. Her responsibilities include evaluating results such as self reported outcomes across products and programs, customer segmentation, advanced analytics on smart meter data, and predictive modeling. Zuraw communicates these findings to Opower’s clients, drives optimization of outcomes, and helps deliver valuable interactions to the end utility consumer. Prior to joining Opower, Zuraw led the Web Analytics group at GEICO focused on improving the online experience through site optimization.

Professor Joseph Aldy, Associate Professor of Public Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
Joseph Aldy is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, a Visiting Fellow at Resources for the Future, a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a Senior Adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He is also the Faculty Chair for the Regulatory Policy Program at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government. His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation. In 2009-2010, Aldy served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change at the White House. Aldy was a Fellow at Resources for the Future from 2005 to 2008 and served on the staff of the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 1997 to 2000. He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a BA from Duke University.

Contact Name:  Christina Chang
chang.christina.marie at gmail.com

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On Not Joining the Dots: Land… Earth… Globe… Gaia
Thursday, October 20
4:15pm
Harvard, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

Bruno Latour, Institut d'Etudes Politiques, Paris

Introduction:  Lizabeth Cohen, Dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Respondents
Diane Davis, Charles Dyer Norton Professor of Regional Planning and Urbanism, Graduate School of Design
Peter Galison, Joseph Pellegrino University Professor, Harvard University
Moderator:  Homi Bhabha, Director, Mahindra Humanities Center

————————————

The Flint Water Crisis: Keeping the Citizens of Flint Safe
Thursday, October 20
5:30 pm
Northeastern, Snell Library (Room 90) 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://files.bsces.org/file/BSCESEventRegForm.pdf
Cost:  $20 - $65
Appetizers and beverages will be provided prior to and after the presentation. Register to attend this meeting by October 14th

Emily Garner
Ms. Garner will speak on how the Flint Water Study team at Virginia Tech uncovered the water quality issues in Flint. Emily Garner is currently a PhD student at Virginia Tech studying Environmental and Water Resources Engineering. She is a member of the Flint Water Study team led by Dr. Marc Edwards that worked with citizens of Flint, Michigan to identify unsafe levels of lead in their drinking water and advocate for a resolution. She will present about her team's journey to provide the citizens of Flint with scientific evidence to support their claims that their drinking water was unsafe for consumption.

More information at http://www.bsces.org/events/the-flint-water-crisis-keeping-the-citizens-of-flint-safe-409

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Lessons from the Dodo: Saving Species and Rebuilding Ecosystems in Mauritius
Thursday, October 20
6:00pm 
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge


Carl Jones, Chief Scientist, Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and  Scientific Director, Mauritian Wildlife Foundation
Conservation pioneer Carl Jones, recipient of the 2016 Indianapolis Prize for his efforts to save species on the brink of extinction, will discuss how his decades of work have directly revitalized multiple endangered animal populations and habitats—most famously, perhaps, the Mauritius kestrel. With only four kestrels left on Earth, Jones’ techniques not only changed the fate of those birds, but also ensured a thriving population, now nearing 400. Jones will offer insights into restoring both individual species and the ecosystems of Mauritius. He will highlight his journey to save the Rodrigues fruit bat, pink pigeon, echo parakeet, and others from disappearing forever and describe his innovative approach to rebuilding the Mauritian habitat using ecological replacements for extinct animals.

Lecture presented in collaboration with the Indianapolis Prize.

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Architecture in Northern Landscapes
Thursday, October 20
6:00p–7:30p
MIT, Building 7-429

Todd Saunders

Fall 2016 MIT Architecture Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

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TOUR - WIND TECHNOLOGY TESTING CENTER - MASS CLEAN ENERGY CENTER
Thursday, October 20
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
100 Terminal Street, Building 80, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tour-wind-technology-testing-center-mass-clean-energy-center-tickets-27760603713

THIS EVENT WILL HAVE A LIMITED NUMBER OF SPACES !!!!
Wind turbine blade testing is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and evaluating the latest technological developments in airfoils and materials. Adequate testing will allow wind energy to be more competitive. In addition, blade testing is required as part of turbine certification to meet international design standards including IEC, GL, DNV. Meeting international standards allows developers to mitigate the technical and financial risk of deploying mass-produced wind turbines. 

Blade Testing At WTTC
The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center’s (MassCEC) Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC) offers a full suite of certification tests for turbine blades up to 90 meters in length.  WTTC also offers the latest wind turbine blade testing and prototype development methodologies to help the wind industry deploy the next generation of land-based and offshore wind turbine technologies.

WTTC Experience
The WTTC’s principle technical team includes blade engineers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) trained in blade testing at the current test facility in Colorado.  Expertise and personnel from NREL are playing key roles in commissioning and overseeing the operation of the WTTC. NREL has tested numerous blades ranging in size from 9 to 47 meters over the last 15 years. In addition, WTTC/NREL engineers have previous experience testing blades at leading wind turbine design and manufacturing companies.
Full suite of static and fatigue tests per IEC61400-23 standard
Three test stands and 100-ton overhead bridge crane capacity
Blade material testing
Dual axis static or fatigue testing
Lightning protection testing (pending design)
Prototype development and blade repair capabilities
Research and development partnerships
Hands-on workforce training
Strong commitment to client intellectual property protection
Located on a deepwater port to accept all blade sizes

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Our Future with Bees
Thursday, October 20
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Rabb Hall, Central Library in Copley Square, 700 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/our-future-with-bees-tickets-27046697400

The world’s bees can create economic and ecological sustainability, if only we let them. We know the vital importance of bees, yet we also know that they are dying off. What does the future human condition look like in a world that incorporates bees into our architecture, healthcare, and every day lives?
Presented by Noah Wilson-Rich, Ph.D., Co-Founder & Chief Scientific Officer, The Best Bees Company (www.bestbees.com)

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Music + Tech: Save the Date!
Thursday, October 20
6:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Workbar Cambridge, 45 Prospect Street, Cambridge

Save the date for the next Music-Tech Meetup, scheduled on Thursday, October 20, 2016, at 6:30 pm, hosted by WorkBar, Cambridge and BerkleeICE.  

The night's theme is still to be determined, so get in touch if you're interested in presenting or have a suggested topic.

Event Overview: 
6:30 - 6:45:  Arrive and snag some hot pizza! 
6:45 - 6:55: Welcome and Introductions
7:00 - 8:30: TBD - Give us your feedback here for future events
8:30 - 9:00: Open Networking

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Nanotechnology: Exploring the Latest Trends & Developments
Thursday, October 20
6:30pm – 9:00pm
Draper, Hill Building, 1 Hampshire Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nanotechnology-exploring-the-latest-trends-developments-tickets-28157214988

This event will delve into The Latest Developments & Trends in Nanotechnology. Guest speakers will present on current research within the industry and provide a look into the recently launched database, Nano.  

IMPORTANT NOTE: Because Draper, our host, is a defense contractor, pre-registration is necessary and attendance is limited to US Citizens and Green Card holders.  We apologize for any inconvenience and will be glad to make follow-up arrangements with anyone who will therefore not be able to attend.   All attendees must bring a government issued photo ID such as a driver’s license, passport, military ID, or original green card. 

Who Should Attend
Researchers, Scientists, Librarians, Research & Development professionals, CEOs, Product Managers who are interested in learning more about the latest developments and insights from experts at Springer Nature.

Brief Agenda
6:30pm - Small Bites, Cocktails, Networking, and a Showcase of Draper Technology
7:00pm – Welcoming remarks from Springer Nature and Draper
Kristen Wallerius, Springer Nature
Betty Edwards, Draper 
7:30pm – Keynote: "Carbon Nanotube Bearings"
 Eugene Cook, Research Engineer & Senior Member of the Technical Staff in Draper’s Micro Devices Group
8:00pm – Nano product intro
Robin Padilla, SN Corporate Markets and Databases
8:20pm – 9:00pm – Wrap Up & Networking

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Future of Work: Opportunities for the next Industrial Revolution
Thursday, October 20
6:45 PM – 7:45 PM
CIC, Venture Café (Havana room), 5th Floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/future-of-work-opportunities-for-the-next-industrial-revolution-tickets-27857916779

A new type of hands-on, project-based learning is appearing on the STEM education scene to fill the skills-gap for the next Industrial Revolution. Moderator Sarah Boisvert will explore with training program leaders the opportunities to work in 3D Printing, robotics, lasers, and CAD design. 

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Free Webinar: Uncovering the Mysteries of How Dirty Energy Affects Public Health
Thursday, October 20
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Webinar
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/free-webinar-uncovering-the-mysteries-of-how-dirty-energy-affects-public-health-tickets-28100767151

We all know that power plants emit toxic fumes, which cause undesirable health affects, but there are numerous other sources and effects of pollution that many people are unaware of. Join us for an exciting webinar to uncover the mysteries behind the science in dirty energy. 

About The Speaker
B. D. Erickson II is the CEO of Satic USA and Blue Planet Solar. Having started four successful companies, he's excited and passionate about Satic's product line and business model with plans for growth in American manufacturing. B.D.'s main focus at Satic is to create an advanced line of clean energy devices that are made in the USA. B.D. is also a great speaker who enjoys motivating and educating with live presentations. 

About the Sponsor
CREW Energy is a public benefit corporation that helps its customers get affordable green energy solutions while helping its team members as active stakeholders in its company.

Learn more about CREW's solar energy offerings at http://www.owntheswitch.com/solarinnovators.

To learn about opening your own green energy business with CREW with no upfront investment, visit jointhecrew.com/solarinnovators.

Learn about CREW's selection of "Dirty Electricity" Filters at shop.owntheswitch.com.

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Friday, October 21
----------------------

Symposium - "Behavioral Ethics: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives" Featuring Peter Singer
Friday, October 21
Spangler Auditorium, Harvard Business School, Allston

This symposium will integrate psychology and philosophy to explore a goal state for ethical behavior, why we fail to achieve that goal state, and what society can do create more ethical behavior.

9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.  Welcome  Danielle Allen and Max Bazerman
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.  What does the greatest good look like in contemporary society?
Peter Singer, Joshua Greene, and Steven Pinker
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.  Lunch Break
1:15 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.  Why don’t we get there?  Mahzarin Banaji, Fiery Cushman, and Michael Norton
3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.  What can be done to change behavior (nudging and beyond)?
Francesca Gino, Iris Bohnet, and Max Bazerman
4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.  Closing Statement  Max Bazerman

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Houghton Lecture: Potential and Risks of Carbon Geoengineering
Friday, October 21
9:00a–10:00a
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Corinne Le Quere, University of East Anglia
Multiple options have been proposed to deliberately enhance the storage of carbon in natural reservoirs, and thus reduce the magnitude of climate change and/or the efforts otherwise needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions directly. These 'Carbon Geoengineering' options range from afforestation to bio-energy with carbon capture and storage to ocean iron fertilisation. But what is their potential (and their costs!), and what are the possible unintended consequences? This lecture will give an overview of the current understanding on this rapidly moving topic. | 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Maglio
cliberty at mit.edu 

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Global Health - Millennium Goal #3 Good Health and Wellbeing
Friday, October 21
10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Stratton Student Center, 84 Massachusetts Avenue, 4th Floor, Cambridge

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Socially assistive robotics
Friday, October 21
12:30pm to 2:00pm - Lunch 12:30pm; Talk 1pm
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Maja Matarić, University of Southern California
Abstract: Socially assistive robotics (SAR) is a new field of intelligent robotics that focuses on developing machines capable of assisting users through social rather than physical interaction. The robot’s physical embodiment is at the heart of SAR’s effectiveness, as it hinges on the inherently human tendency to engage with lifelike (but not necessarily human-like or otherwise biomimetic) agents. People readily ascribe intention, personality, and emotion to robots; SAR leverages this engagement stemming from non-contact social interaction involving speech, gesture, movement demonstration and imitation, and encouragement, to develop robots capable of monitoring, motivating, and sustaining user activities and improving human learning, training, performance and health outcomes. Human-robot interaction (HRI) for SAR is a growing multifaceted research area at the intersection of engineering, health sciences, neuroscience, social, and cognitive sciences.   This talk will describe our research into embodiment, modeling and steering social dynamics, and long-term user adaptation for SAR. The research will be grounded in projects involving analysis of multi-modal activity data, modeling personality and engagement, formalizing social use of space and non-verbal communication, and personalizing the interaction with the user over a period of months, among others. The presented methods and algorithms will be validated on implemented SAR systems evaluated by human subject cohorts from a variety of user populations, including stroke patients, children with autism spectrum disorder, and elderly with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia.  

Speaker Bio:  Maja Matarić is professor and Chan Soon-Shiong chair in Computer Science Department, Neuroscience Program, and the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Southern California, founding director of the USC Robotics and Autonomous Systems Center (RASC), co-director of the USC Robotics Research Lab and Vice Dean for Research in the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. She received her PhD in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence from MIT in 1994, MS in Computer Science from MIT in 1990, and BS in Computer Science from the University of Kansas in 1987.
She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Fellow of the IEEE and AAAI, and recipient of the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science, Mathematics & Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM), the Anita Borg Institute Women of Vision Award for Innovation, Okawa Foundation Award, NSF Career Award, the MIT TR35 Innovation Award, and the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Early Career Award. She served as the elected president of the USC faculty and the Academic Senate. At USC she has been awarded the Viterbi School of Engineering Service Award and Junior Research Award, the Provost's Mentoring Award and Center for Interdisciplinary Research Fellowship, the Mellon Mentoring Award, the Academic Senate Distinguished Faculty Service Award, and a Remarkable Woman Award. She is featured in the science documentary movie "Me & Isaac Newton", in The New Yorker ("Robots that Care" by Jerome Groopman, 2009), Popular Science ("The New Face of Autism Therapy", 2010), the IEEE Spectrum ("Caregiver Robots", 2010), and is one of the LA Times Magazine 2010 Visionaries.  

IACS Seminar Series

Host: Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS)
Contact: Natasha Baker
Phone: 617-496-2623
Email: nrbaker at seas.harvard.edu

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Major Transitions in Political Order
Monday, October 24
3pm
Tufts, Cohen Auditorium, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford

Simon De Deo runs the Laboratory for Social Minds at Indiana University, where he is a professor of complex systems and cognitive science. He is also on the external faculty of the Santa Fe Institute (SFI). 

Abstract: We present three major transitions that occur on the way to the elaborate and diverse societies of the modern era. Our account links the worlds of social animals such as pigtail macaques and monk parakeets to examples from human history, including 18th Century London and the contemporary online phenomenon of Wikipedia. From the first awareness and use of group-level social facts to the emergence of norms and their self-assembly into normative bundles, each transition represents a new relationship between the individual and the group. At the center of this relationship is the use of coarse-grained information gained via lossy compression. The role of top-down causation in the origin of society parallels that conjectured to occur in the origin and evolution of life itself.

Cognitive Science colloquium (CBS--Cognitive and Brain Science) lecture

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Seminar on Social Exclusion and Inclusion — The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CES, 27 Kirkland Street, Hoffmann Room, Busch Hall, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CES
SPEAKER(S)  Justin Gest
Assistant Professor of Public Policy , George Mason University’s School of Policy, Government and International Affairs
LINK  https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2016/10/the-new-minority-white-working-class-politics-in-an-age-of-immigration-and-inequality

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Seminar on Social Exclusion and Inclusion — The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CES, 27 Kirkland Street, Hoffmann Room, Busch Hall, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CES
SPEAKER(S)  Justin Gest
Assistant Professor of Public Policy , George Mason University’s School of Policy, Government and International Affairs
LINK  https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2016/10/the-new-minority-white-working-class-politics-in-an-age-of-immigration-and-inequality

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What Respect is Owed to Illusions about Immigration and Culture?
Friday, October 21 
5:00-6:30pm
Harvard, CGIS, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/politicaltheoryconference/event/harvard-graduate-conference-political-theory

10th Annual Harvard Graduate Conference in Political Theory
Keynote by Jeremy Waldron, University Professor, NYU School of Law

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Building worlds: From gameplay to peacemaking
Friday, October 21
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Deanna Van Buren

MIT Architecture Lecture Series 
Lecture co-presented by the Design and Computation Group, Architecture and City Design and Development Group and Housing and Economic Development Group, Urban Studies and Planning.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, Department of Urban Studies and Planning
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

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Boston Renewable Energy Forum
Friday, October 21
7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Patagonia Boston, 346 Newbury Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-renewable-energy-forum-tickets-28475976412

As November approaches, many are thinking about their vote in the upcoming election. But how are we voting every day with our decisions and our dollars? The Boston Renewable Energy Forum, hosted by Patagonia’s eco-team, is an evening dedicated to sharing some proactive ways in which everyone can vote with their dollar for local clean energy solutions here in Massachusetts. 

Presenters from Co-op Power and Mass Energy will speak about community solar, rooftop solar, wind and more, and how we can bring more of the clean energy and jobs we want to the Commonwealth. Alcohol and other refreshments will be served.

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White Like Me
Friday, October 21
8PM
MassArt Tower Auditorium, 621 Huntington Avenie, Boston
RSVP at https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/10116200
Cost:  $15 - $25

Paul Zaloom, created with Lynn Jeffries
A timely response to the current loaded discussion about race in America.
Recommended for adults and teens 13+.

It’s the year 2040, and White Man discovers that he is now an American minority. Join political satirist and puppeteer Paul Zaloom on an outrageous mission to downgrade the status of Planet Caucazoid and blast White Privilege to the far reaches of the galaxy.

ABOUT THE SHOW: Zaloom introduces Mr. Butch Manly, an old school ventriloquist dummy, who has been packed away in a box for 50 years. As he updates the dummy on current affairs – particularly race relations – Butch learns that things are not quite what they seem in 2016. Zaloom is forced to confront his own prejudices, as the wickedly sarcastic doll exposes his self-righteousness, liberal guilt, and hypocrisy.

The show segues into The Adventures of White-Man, a toy theater spectacle about the male Caucasian human. Under orders from God, White-Man leaves his home planet of Caucazoid, arrives on Earth and ''civilizes'' it, becomes the philanthropist Santa Claus, kicks ''aliens'' out of Arizona, and finally realizes with shock that white folks will become a minority in the U.S. in 2040. What will White-Man do?

The puppet cast is drawn from Zaloom’s enormous collection of weird junk, busted dolls, action figures, toy cars, random tchotchkes, and other charming debris. 

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Saturday, October 22
-----------------------

The Healing Power of Compassion
WHEN  Saturday, Oct. 22, 9 a.m. – Sunday, Oct. 23, 2016, 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Various locations, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Religion
SPONSOR	Buddhist Ministry Initiative, Courage of Care
CONTACT	Julie Barker Gillette
DETAILS  Courage of Care founders John Makransky and Brooke D. Lavelle will lead this two-day, intensive Sustainable Compassion Training (SCT) workshop. SCT is a method designed to help all people who care for others within their family, work, and community realize a power of unconditional care from within that is deeply healing and sustaining, that makes them more fully present to themselves and others, and that empowers a strong, active compassion for persons that is not subject to empathy, fatigue, and burnout.
This event  is open to the public. Space is limited, and registration is required. Current HDS students should contact Julie Barker Gillette for more information and registration. All others should register online at http://courageofcare.org/event/the-healing-power-of-compassion/

CE credits are available.

-------------------------- 

The Media and the Elections
Saturday, October 22
10am - 3pm
Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway, Cambridge

For the past year and a half, everyone has been talking about the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. It's what you've been talking about with your friends and family, and it's what the media has been talking about nonstop on air, online and in print. So what kind of impact has the media had on Election 2016? Join Cambridge Community Television for a mini-conference on "The Media and the Election" from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, October 22 at the Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway. Doors open at 9:30 a.m.

Our three panels will cover political reporting from this election cycle, and be filled with local media professionals.

Confirmed panelists to date include:
Jim Braude, host of Greater Boston on WGBH
Lauren Dezenski, reporter for Politico Massachusetts
Chris Faraone, editor at Dig Boston and founder of BINJ, the Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism
Renee Graham, columnist for the Boston Globe
Donna Halper, media critic and Lesley University professor
Dan Kennedy, media commentator for WGBH and Nieman Journalism Lab
Sarah Moawad, co-editor of Muftah's Egypt & North Africa pages
Caitlin O'Connell, media and marketing consultant at Politico States
Dante Ramos, columnist for the Boston Globe

The conference's first two panels will take a look at "Political Reporting: What Happened?" and will delve into issues such as journalistic responsibility, media bias, antagonism in and toward the media, "free" campaign ads, political advertising versus viral social media versus mainstream media coverage, which candidates were promoted and which were vilified, and the media's effects on third-party candidates.

The third and final panel will review the "Lead Up to the Election: What We are Seeing Now," and will explore how the media landscape and tone has changed moving from the primaries to the general election; the influence of national and battleground polls; and how candidates down ballot are impacted by media coverage of the presidential election.

The conference will also include community breakout sessions and lunch for attendees. The event is free and open to the public.

Complete Schedule:
9:30 a.m. Doors open
10:00 a.m. Opening remarks, video
10:15 a.m. First panel: "Political Reporting, What happened? Pt. 1"
11:15 a.m. Second panel: "Political Reporting, What happened? Pt. 2"
12:15 Lunch/break-out discussions
1:15 p.m. Third panel: "Lead Up to the Election: What We are Seeing Now"
2:15 p.m. Closing remarks

Stay tuned for updates.

More information at https://www.cctvcambridge.org/mediaandelections 

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The Boston Vegetarian Society's The 21st Annual Boston Veg Food Fest
Saturday, October 22 11AM* - 6PM - Sunday, October 23 10AM - 4PM
Reggie Lewis Athletic Center, 1350 Tremont Street, Boston

FREE Admission! FREE Parking! FREE Food Sampling!
*Saturday 10 - 11 a.m. Preview Hour. A limited number of tickets ($5) are now on sale here to enter the Exhibitor Room at 10 a.m., before the doors open at 11 a.m. for Free Admission to all.

This Festival brings together an amazing array of vegetarian natural food providers, top national speakers and chefs, and educational exhibitors in a fun and welcoming environment. It is a chance to talk directly to food producers, learn the newest items in the marketplace, taste free food samples, shop at show special discounts, or simply learn what vegetarian foods are available and where you can find them!

Whether you are a longtime vegetarian or vegan, or someone simply wanting to add more delicious plant-based foods to your meal repertoire, or if you are just curious what it's all about, you are welcome here! We offer you free admission, free food sampling, free speaker presentations, free parking and a T stop across the street.

You also can learn of ways to help animals and protect the environment, and enhance your health and well being. There are activities for kids, too!

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White Like Me
Saturday, October 22
8PM
MassArt Tower Auditorium, 621 Huntington Avenie, Boston
RSVP at https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/10116201
Cost:  $15 - $25

Paul Zaloom, created with Lynn Jeffries
A timely response to the current loaded discussion about race in America.
Recommended for adults and teens 13+.

It’s the year 2040, and White Man discovers that he is now an American minority. Join political satirist and puppeteer Paul Zaloom on an outrageous mission to downgrade the status of Planet Caucazoid and blast White Privilege to the far reaches of the galaxy.

ABOUT THE SHOW: Zaloom introduces Mr. Butch Manly, an old school ventriloquist dummy, who has been packed away in a box for 50 years. As he updates the dummy on current affairs – particularly race relations – Butch learns that things are not quite what they seem in 2016. Zaloom is forced to confront his own prejudices, as the wickedly sarcastic doll exposes his self-righteousness, liberal guilt, and hypocrisy.

The show segues into The Adventures of White-Man, a toy theater spectacle about the male Caucasian human. Under orders from God, White-Man leaves his home planet of Caucazoid, arrives on Earth and ''civilizes'' it, becomes the philanthropist Santa Claus, kicks ''aliens'' out of Arizona, and finally realizes with shock that white folks will become a minority in the U.S. in 2040. What will White-Man do?

The puppet cast is drawn from Zaloom’s enormous collection of weird junk, busted dolls, action figures, toy cars, random tchotchkes, and other charming debris. 

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Sunday, October 23
—————————— 

Shaun King: Racial Justice in the 21st Century: What the Nonreligious Community 
Sunday, October 23
1:30pm
Harvard, Science Center, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/shaun-king-racial-justice-in-the-21st-century-what-the-nonreligious-community-needs-to-know-tickets-27610985200
 
Join the Humanist Hub as we welcome Shaun King for a conversation about racial justice in the 21st century, and what the nonreligious community needs to know.
Shaun King is the Senior Justice Writer for the New York Daily News. He is widely known as a prominent voice in the Black Lives Matter Movement, and is quickly becoming known as one of the leading voices for social justice in the US today. 

The Humanist Hub is a positive community of atheists, agnostics, and humanists (one of the largest growing groups in the country, especially for the younger population). At the Hub, one of our priorities is to act to make the world better, and one of our goals for this year is to learn more about how the nonreligious community can become a more effective force for social justice.

If you value our work, please consider making a small donation: www.humanisthub.org

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Monday, October 24
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Massachusetts Food Day!
October 24, 2016

Food Day  the nationwide grassroots campaign for healthy, affordable, and sustainably produced food has served as a platform for many around our state to celebrate and educate their community with regards to our local food system. MA organizers have reached out to me to ask if Food Day is still being celebrated and the answer is YES.

Food Day is still being celebrated by many across the Commonwealth, and our country, yet the coordinating office, Center for Science in the Public Interest, based in DC, was not able to secure funding for their staff or materials.

One thing is true, the hundreds of organizers who created events, shared information, taught cooking to old and young alike, advocated for policy change and so much more, did so because they cared about the health and wellbeing of their community!

That said, the 6th Annual FOOD DAY is a month away and you are encouraged to reach out to others in your community, workplace, place of worship, and schools/campuses to host an activity to highlight what is important to you within our local food system.

What do you want to share or teach?
What can you highlight or change regarding your local food system?
How can you and your peers make a fun, easy and informative event/activity that can strengthen community networks as you focus on a healthy and sustainable food system for all of residents in your community?

Across Massachusetts last year, over 600 events were created and hosted by individuals and organizations working to make our food system more sustainable, accessible and healthier. Some events lasted a few hours, some days and a few were month long. Activities were small and large; the key was the education, communication and information-sharing initiated across the state with neighbors, students, families, co-workers and clients.

Listed below are a few Ideas for the activities you could plan:
MA schools will take the “Eat Real” 2015 challenge (over 450 schools did last year!)
Film screenings in your living room, work, local college
“Sourcing local challenge” within your organization
Cooking demonstrations and food education workshops
Host an “Apple Crunch” with community groups or at your office
Farm tours and community activities with your local farmer
Health center staff members and businesses hosting local food potlucks
Food system forums at local community centers
College campus organizing-dozens of campuses participated across MA!

For those of you who “do this every day”, it is an opportunity to broaden your reach, to create larger networks and to build on your current work. You can still visit the national website at www.foodday.org for more information; you can use the logos, materials, etc. for your celebration.
Thank you for all you do on Food Day and every day!
 
Rose Arruda, Urban Agriculture Coordinator
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources, 251 Causeway Street, Suite 500, Boston
Desk 617-626-1849
Cell:  617-851-3644

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PAOC Colloquium - Jonathan Zehr (UC Santa Cruz)
Monday, October 24
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker:  Jonathan Zehr, UC Santa Cruz
Research in Zehr Laboratory focuses on how microorganisms control the availability of nitrogen, a critical element in all life as we know it. Nitrogen, a major plant nutrient, is transformed from one form to another by microorganisms, and moves between habitats. A large reservoir of nitrogen on Earth resides in the air we breath: 80% of the atmosphere is nitrogen gas. Nitrogen gas, or dinitrogen (2 nitrogen atoms triple bonded together) is unavailable to most organisms, in particular the eukaryotic plants and animals. Many diverse prokaryotic microorganisms have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into a biologically available form. Biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by an enzyme, called nitrogenase. Since most of the microorganisms in the natural environment have yet to be cultivated, we study the microorganisms in the environment that fix nitrogen by looking for the genes and proteins involved in nitrogen fixation.

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. 2016/2017 co-ordinator: Christine Chen (ccy at mit.edu)

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Three Scientists Walk into a Barricade…' Expert mobilization in Two Boston-area Social Movements
Monday, October 24
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Scott Frickel, Brown University

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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The Welfare Impact of Consumer Reviews: A Case Study of the Hotel Industry
Monday, October 24
2:30p–4:00p
MIT, Building E52-432, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Giorgios Zervas, Boston University

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): IO Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Major Transitions in Political Order
Monday, October 24
3pm
Tufts, Cohen Auditorium, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford

DR Simon De Deo runs the Laboratory for Social Minds at Indiana University, where he is a professor of complex systems and cognitive science. He is also on the external faculty of the Santa Fe Institute (SFI).

Abstract: We present three major transitions that occur on the way to the elaborate and diverse societies of the modern era. Our account links the worlds of social animals such as pigtail macaques and monk parakeets to examples from human history, including 18th Century London and the contemporary online phenomenon of Wikipedia. From the first awareness and use of group-level social facts to the emergence of norms and their self-assembly into normative bundles, each transition represents a new relationship between the individual and the group. At the center of this relationship is the use of coarse-grained information gained via lossy compression. The role of top-down causation in the origin of society parallels that conjectured to occur in the origin and evolution of life itself.

—————————

Engaging our Communities in a Dialogue and Action on Racial Justice
Monday, October 24
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Boston University Photonics Center, 8 Saint Marys Street, Floor 9, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/engaging-our-communities-in-a-dialogue-and-action-on-racial-justice-tickets-28187625948

Join the Boston University School of Social Work Dean’s Office, the BUSSW Equity and Inclusion Committee, and Howard Thurman Center at Boston University for a presentation and discussion on racial justice with Dean Larry E. Davis. 

Dr. Larry E. Davis is the Dean of the Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, where he is the Donald M. Henderson Professor and also the Director of the Center on Race and Social Problems. He has spent his life and career dedicated to issues of race, civil rights, and social justice. He earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Michigan State University and a Masters in social work and a Masters in psychology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Davis then decided to work in the trenches, joining VISTA and spending three years in one of New York City’s poorest neighborhoods. He returned to academia and became the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. from the dual-degree program in social work and psychology at the University of Michigan. 

Dr. Davis has long been recognized as a leading scholar of the narrative about race in America and its role in social justice.  His academic life has been dedicated to the creation of solution-based dialogues that promote a more racially equitable society. 

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Distributional Consequences of Changes in Labor Demand: Evidence from a Natural Resource Boom
Monday, October 24
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E52-164, 50 Memorial Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Alex Bartik, MIT

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Predicting and Adapting to Increased Hurricane Risk
Monday, October 24
5:00 pm
Radcliffe, Sheerr Room, Fay House, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

Lecture by Kerry A. Emanuel, Professor of Atmospheric Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Introduction by John Huth, Codirector of the science program at the Radcliffe Institute and Donner Professor of Science in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences
This event is free and open to the public. Doors open at 4:45 p.m.; lecture begins at 5 p.m.
Part of the 2016–2017 Oceans Lecture Series. A larger, one-day public symposium on the topic takes place on Friday, October 28, 2016.

Oceans Lecture Series

More information at http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2016-kerry-a-emanuel-lecture

------------------

Forum: Jose Antonio Vargas
Monday, October 24
6:00 p.m. 
Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, Littauer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jose Antonio Vargas is a journalist and filmmaker, and serves as the CEO of Define American and #EmergingUS. Jose was part of The Washington Post team that won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting for coverage of the Virginia Tech shooting. Vargas revealed his undocumented immigration status in an article in The New York Times Magazine. He went on to produce and direct his autobiographical  documentary, Documented, broadcasted by CNN, and later directed MTV’s White People. You can watch a short video of Jose’s story on Define American.

-------------------- 

2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Viscosity and Polymers
Monday, October 24
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
 
Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Doctors Without Borders Recruitment Information Session
Monday, October 24 
7:00-8:30PM
Boston Public Library – Central Library, 230 Dartmouth Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.forcedfromhome.com/events/recruitment-information-session-boston-massachusetts/#tickets

Every day, Doctors Without Borders aid workers from around the world provide assistance to people whose survival is threatened by violence, neglect, or catastrophe—treating those most in need regardless of political, religious, or economic interest. Whether an emergency involves armed conflicts or epidemics, malnutrition or natural disasters, Doctors Without Borders is committed to bringing quality medical care to people caught in crisis.

On Monday, October 24th, medical and non-medical professionals are invited to attend an evening presentation to learn more about joining Doctors Without Borders’ pool of dedicated aid workers.

An aid worker and Field Human Resources Officer will discuss requirements and the application process, and you’ll meet experienced Doctors Without Borders aid workers from the area and hear their firsthand stories of “life in the field.”

Please take a moment to review our recruitment requirements before registering for this event:  http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/work-us/work-field/general-requirements

The presentation will last 90 minutes, including Q&A.

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ONE Time Film Screening of PURSUING HAPPINESS
Monday, October 24
7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Regal Fenway Stadium 13, 201 Brookline Avenue, Boston
RSVP at  https://www.tugg.com/events/pursuing-happiness
Cost:  $11

What is happiness? 

From the beginning of life itself, we have been in a constant pursuit of happiness.But instead of living the actual moment of true joy we are in constant search for something. Filmmakers Adam Shell and Nicholas Kraft set out to find the secret of the happiest people in America. 

I had the honor of meeting Adam Shell and he gracious offered me to do a screening of his film at Regal Fenway Stadium 13 in Boston. We need YOUR support - In order to make this screening happen, we need to sell 80 tickets before October 10th! Invite your friends, colleagues, parents and grandparents! 

Please join us for an exclusive, one-night only screening of "Pursuing Happiness". Get your tickets here: https://www.tugg.com/events/pursuing-happiness

After the film, please join Dr. Jen Brownstein for a stimulating discussion. I will provide some tips to increase your well-being. 

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Tuesday, October 25
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Behind the Kitchen Door: The State of Working Conditions in Boston's Growing Restaurant Industry
Tuesday, October 25
10:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Boston Public Market, The Kitchen, 100 Hanover Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/behind-the-kitchen-door-the-state-of-working-conditions-in-bostons-growing-restaurant-industry-tickets-28156728533

"Behind the Kitchen Door" is a groundbreaking report, conducted by the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Boston, which investigates the obstacles and opportunities of creating racial and economic equity for workers in the Boston restaurant industry.
Join us for a Restaurant Industry Summit that will bring together diverse stakeholders —including employers, restaurant workers, advocates and policy makers— to discuss the most recent report on the Boston’s restaurant industry. 

Event will feature remarks from:  Saru Jayaraman, Co-Founder/Co-Director of ROC United and Local restaurant workers, employers and policymakers
Plus a Q&A session tackling the most pressing issues facing Boston's restaurant industry
Lunch will be served immediately after the panel discussion. The event will be catered by local high-road employer and RAISE member, Bon Me! www.bonmetruck.com

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Speaker Series: Tim Wu
Tuesday, October 25
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Tim Wu is an author, policy advocate, and professor at Columbia University, best known for coining the term “net neutrality.” In 2006, Scientific American named him one of 50 leaders in science and technology; in 2007, 01238 magazine listed him as one of Harvard’s 100 most influential graduates; in 2013, National Law Journal included him in “America’s 100 Most Influential Lawyers”; and in 2014 and 2015, he was named to the “Politico 50.” He formerly wrote for Slate, where he won the Lowell Thomas Gold medal for Travel Journalism, and is a contributing writer for The New Yorker. In 2015, he was appointed to the Executive Staff of the Office of New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman as a senior enforcement counsel and special adviser.

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Climate Threats and Solutions at the Community Level
Tuesday, October 25
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Bradley Campbell, President, Conservation Law Foundation

Mr. Campbell will speak on the challenges of communicating climate threats and the need to transform planning and development at the community level, using as example CLF’s recent lawsuit against ExxonMobil for climate deceit and risks to Mystic River communities.

Bio:  Bradley Campbell is President of the Conservation Law Foundation, an organization recognized for bringing innovative, pragmatic solutions to New England’s toughest environmental challenges.  As Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (2002-2006), Campbell successfully led major initiatives to protect water resources, reshape development, restore natural resources, and address global climate change. He enforced federal environmental laws as regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Mid-Atlantic region (1999-2001), served in the Clinton administration as associate director of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (1995-1999), and litigated natural resource cases for the U.S. Department of Justice (1990-1995). His many honors and awards include the prestigious John Marshall Award, the highest level of recognition from the Department of Justice.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Askwith Forums: Assessing the DREAM and 15 years of Congressional Inaction
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE	617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE  This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  Speakers:
Julieta Garibay, founding board member and deputy advocacy director, United We Dream 
Donald E. Graham, co-founder, TheDream.US; chairman of the board, Graham Holdings Company; founding chairman, District of Columbia College Access Program
Angela Maria Kelley, executive director, Center for American Progress Action Fund; senior vice president, Center for American Progress
Jose Antonio Vargas, journalist, filmmaker, and founder, Define American
Moderator: Roberto Gonzales, assistant professor of education, HGSE

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the initial introduction of the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act – legislation that would provide undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children a path toward legal status through education or the military. Despite widespread and bipartisan support, the DREAM Act has failed to pass at the federal level, placing the dreams of more than 2 million young people on hold. What lessons have we learned over these last fifteen years? What has been the cost of inaction? And how have communities, institutions and local governments responded in the absence of immigration reform? Join us as we reflect on and contemplate the bill that aimed at creating opportunity for this vital segment of the immigrant community.

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The Attention Merchants:  The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads
Tuesday, October 25
6:30 PM (Doors at 6:00)
WorkBar, 45 Prospect Street, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Columbia University professor TIM WU—author of The Master Switch and known for coining the term "net neutrality"—for a discussion of his latest book, The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads.
About The Attention Merchants

Attention merchant: an industrial-scale harvester of human attention. A firm whose business model is the mass capture of attention for resale to advertisers.

In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of advertising enticements, branding efforts, sponsored social media, commercials and other efforts to harvest our attention. Over the last century, few times or spaces have remained uncultivated by the "attention merchants," contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times. Tim Wu argues that this is not simply the byproduct of recent inventions but the end result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention. From the pre-Madison Avenue birth of advertising to TV's golden age to our present age of radically individualized choices, the business model of "attention merchants" has always been the same. He describes the revolts that have risen against these relentless attempts to influence our consumption, from the remote control to FDA regulations to Apple's ad-blocking OS. But he makes clear that attention merchants grow ever-new heads, and their means of harvesting our attention have given rise to the defining industries of our time, changing our nature—cognitive, social, and otherwise—in ways unimaginable even a generation ago.

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Troubled Waters: Fewer Fish, Increasing Malnutrition
Tuesday, October 25
6:30 PM
Belmont Media Center, 9 Lexington Street, Belmont

Christopher Golden, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: Associate Director, Planetary Health Alliance, Harvard University Center for the Environment. Dr. Golden is an ecologist and epidemiologist, whose research is concerned with the effects of global environmental trends on human health.

Many developing nations depend on fish as the main source of nutrition, and for centuries those populations were assured of an abundance of fish. In recent years a combination of climate change, massive depletion of fish stocks by commercial fishing fleets, and exploitative trade policies are together creating nutritional crises in many poor nations. Dr. Golden explains the impact of these conditions on the health of millions of people. He also provides important facts about the nutritional differences between wild and farmed fish.

Contemporary Science Issues and Innovations

More information at http://www.scienceforthepublic.org/coming-events/oct-25-troubled-waters-fewer-fish-increasing-malnutrition

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Chuck Collins, Born on Third Base
Tuesday, October 25
7:00pm 
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

As inequality grabs headlines, steals the show in presidential debates, and drives deep divides between the haves and have nots in America, class war brews. On one side, the wealthy wield power and advantage, wittingly or not, to keep the system operating in their favor—all while retreating into enclaves that separate them further and further from the poor and working class. On the other side, those who find it increasingly difficult to keep up or get ahead lash out—waging a rhetorical war against the rich and letting anger and resentment, however justifiable, keep us from seeing new potential solutions.

But can we suspend both class wars long enough to consider a new way forward? Is it really good for anyone that most of society’s wealth is pooling at the very top of the wealth ladder? Does anyone, including the one percent, really want to live in a society plagued by economic apartheid?

It is time to think differently, says longtime inequality expert and activist Chuck Collins. Born into the one percent, Collins gave away his inheritance at 26 and spent the next three decades mobilizing against inequality. He uses his perspective from both sides of the divide to deliver a new narrative.

Collins calls for a ceasefire and invites the wealthy to come back home, investing themselves and their wealth in struggling communities.  And he asks the non-wealthy to build alliances with the one percent and others at the top of the wealth ladder.

Stories told along the way explore the roots of advantage, show how taxpayers subsidize the wealthy, and reveal how charity, used incorrectly, can actually reinforce extreme inequality. Readers meet pioneers who are crossing the divide to work together in new ways, including residents in the author’s own Boston-area neighborhood who have launched some of the most interesting community transition efforts in the nation.

In the end, Collins’s national and local solutions not only challenge inequality but also respond to climate change and offer an unexpected, fresh take on one of our most intransigent problems.

Chuck Collins is a researcher, campaigner, storyteller, and writer based at the Institute for Policy Studies where he co-edits Inequality.org. He has written extensively on wealth inequality in previous books like 99 to 1, Wealth and Our Commonwealth (with Bill Gates Sr.), and Economic Apartheid in America as well as in The Nation, The American Prospect, and numerous other magazines and news outlets. Collins grew up in the 1 percent as the great grandson of meatpacker Oscar Mayer, but at age 26 he gave away his inheritance. He has been working to reduce inequality and strengthen communities since 1982 and in the process has cofounded numerous initiatives, including Wealth for the Common Good (now merged with the Patriotic Millionaires), United for a Fair Economy, and Divest-Invest. He is also a leader in the transition movement, and a co-founder of the Jamaica Plain New Economy Transition and the Jamaica Plain Forum, both in the Boston-area community in which he lives.

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Neighborhood Solar Informational Meeting 
Tuesday October 25
7:00 PM
Arlington Library Community Room, Robbins Public Library, 700 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington

An informational meeting for a time-limited solar offer for the towns of Arlington, Cambridge, Watertown, Belmont, and Somerville, endorsed by Sustainable Arlington, Green Cambridge, and the Watertown Environmental and Energy Efficiency Committee

This solar initiative is designed to be local, fair, and transparent.  Details are available at neighborhoodsolar.org.  The program is open to all residents, businesses, and non-profits.  Any questions or concerns about participation, please contact Jocelyn Tager at info at neighborhoodsolar.org to determine eligibility. If you live in Arlington, please contact David Landskov at landskov at gmail.com. If you live in Cambridge, please contact Quinton Zondervan at solar at greencambridge.org

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Nuclear Weapons, The Environment and the US Presidential Elections
Tuesday, October 25
7:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building 6-120, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Kerry Emanuel, Jim Walsh, R.Scott Kemp
The planet has two existential threats-nuclear weapons and global climate change. The question of how they are handled should be central to the choice of a president. How would a Clinton Whitehouse differ from a Trump Whitehouse? 

Join us for a discussion with two preeminent scholars, James Walsh (nuclear) and Kerry Emanuel (environmental), moderated by Nuclear Science and Engineering Professor, R. Scott Kemp.

Web site: radius.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Cost: n/a
Sponsor(s): Radius/T&C, Nuclear (Weapons) Matter
For more information, contact:  Patricia-Maria Weinmann
617-253-0108
weinmann at mit.edu 

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Opportunity
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Effective Altruism MIT Sloan Meetup Group
http://www.meetup.com/effective-altruism-mit-sloan/

Want to make the world the best place it can be? 
Effective Altruism is a worldwide movement that uses rational thinking and science to have the best possible impact. Effective Altruism MIT Sloan is bringing together people from all over the area to share experiences and be more effective by working together. 
To learn more about effective altruism, read the introduction on the international EA website (https://www.effectivealtruism.org) or watch Peter Singer's TED talk.

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Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian at cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
http://www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit
@cambenergy 
http://facebook.com/cambridgeenergyalliance

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 27 and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 12 PM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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