[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - October 16, 2016

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Oct 16 10:59:56 PDT 2016


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Index
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Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.  Keep scrolling, please.

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Monday, October 17 – Wednesday, October 19
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Harvard Forum & Nano Course Series on Population Health Equity

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Monday, October 17
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12pm  Agile Project Dynamics for Aerospace and Defense Technologies Plus Lessons for Other Sectors
12pm  The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies
12:15pm  A Very Special Relationship: Germany and Russia in the Era Putin
12:30pm  Personalized Comfort
4pm  Robots and Jobs: Evidence from US Labor Markets
4pm  In the Climate Policy Trenches: Lessons from the British Columbia Carbon Tax and Other Climate Policies
4:15pm  Righting the Record: Conservatism and the Archives
4:30pm  Bridging the Partisan Divide
4:45pm Rally for safe streets in Cambridge
6pm  Time Traveling with James Gleick
6pm  Mass Innovation Nights #91:  Women Founders 
6:30pm  Electric Sector Reforms in Mexico: Goals and Accomplishments
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Heat Transfer
7pm  Cambridge Forum: NO JUSTICE, NO PEACE: Race and Power in America
7pm  A Year Like No Other: Politics and the Press in 2016 
7pm  Business + Sustainability: Finding Energy by Saving It

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Tuesday, October 18
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8am  Boston TechBreakfast: intermedia mmh, Future Moments, Navitome, GoPapaya
8am  Materials Day & Poster Session
11:45am  Kendall Square Construction Community Meeting
12pm  Speaker Series: Amy Walter
12pm  Brown Bag: Come Together Right Now: An Introduction to the Open Access Network - with Rebecca Kennison
12pm  Plants That Purify: The Natural and Supernatural History of Smudging
2pm  Mass Extinctions, the- Spatial Fossil Record, and How Paleoecology May Help Save the Planet
4pm  Climate Change, Water Quality and Ocean Acidification for the Coastal Ocean along the US Northeast
4pm  Can the Next Technology Revolution Save the Planet?
5pm  Looking Up: How coalitions of bottom-up organizations are driving action for sustainable development
5:15pm  Creating Language in Man and Machine
5:30pm  Obstacles to Energy Development in Africa: Environment, Economics, and Climate Hegemony
6pm  Climate, Water, and the Evolution of Early Societies at the Harvard Museum of Natural History
6pm  The Continuing Challenges Faced by Arab Americans
6pm  An Evening with Arthur Ganson
6pm  Ava DuVernay’s “The 13th” Film Screening and Discussion
6pm  Moth+Flame and Paracosm at Laugh Boston
6:30pm  The Center for Green Buildings and Cities (CGBC) hosts its 2nd Annual Lecture featuring Richard Rogers, a founding partner of Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners
6:30pm  Transforming the Renewable Energy and Entrepreneurship Industries in Emerging Economies
6:30pm  Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part I
7pm  Maintaining an Aging Nuclear Fleet (New) 
7pm  Private Owernship of Wildlife in South Africa: Economics and Conservation
7pm  Science Media Expert Panel 
7:30pm  Meeting the Unique Medical Needs of Migrants and Refugees

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Wednesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 20
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Forum on Population Health Equity

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Wednesday, October 19
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7:30am  October Boston Sustainability Breakfast
8am  WISE [Women Investing for a Sustainable Economy]-Boston October Breakfast
12pm  Leading in a World of Uncertainty free webinar with Deborah Ancona
12pm  Historical Ecology Meets Critical Anthropology in Chickasaw Territory
12pm  Countering Violent Extremism (CVE): The Two-Pyramids Model of Radicalization
3:30pm  China's Evolving Vulnerability to Climate Change Impacts: A Spatial Analysis of its Infrastructure System
3:30pm  New Challenges in Governing Geoengineering
4pm  Energy Access in Remote Communities: A Practitioner’s Experience
5pm  The Arab War Against Rape as a Weapon of War
5:30pm  Askwith Forums: Education and the 2016 Election
5:30pm  Pre-Release Screening & Discussion: Before the Flood
6pm  Bob Kramer: Patterns of Excellence
6pm  Trash Talk: The PIA IDEAS Global Challenge for Inclusive Waste Management
6pm  Climate Congress "Personal Resources" Discussion Group
7pm  Extinction or Internationalism:  A Lecture and Conversation with Noam Chomsky

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Thursday, October 20
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11:45am  Confronting Deep and Persistent Climate Change Uncertainty
12pm  The Challenges of Protecting Unpopular Species: Snakes
12pm  Smart Cities
12pm  In Search of the Lost Development: Sustainability, Competitiveness and Economic Growth in Brazil
12:30pm  Observations and Modeling of Natural Gas Seeps in the Deep Ocean
12:30pm  Climate Change, the Middle East and North Africa, and Future US Diplomacy
1pm  MIT Talks Fusion on AMA
2pm  Robot Harvest: Agribotics for Farm, Field and Orchard
3pm  Climate Change Displacement: Finding Solutions to an Emerging Crisis
4pm  Synthesized ecology with ecological networks
4pm  Nudging Toward A Cleaner Future: Behavioral Insights into Energy and Environment
4:15pm  On Not Joining the Dots: Land… Earth… Globe… Gaia
5:30pm  The Flint Water Crisis: Keeping the Citizens of Flint Safe
5:30pm  ETH Science Talks – Critical Thinking, Climate Engineering, and Oxygen Homeostasis and Disease
6pm  Lessons from the Dodo: Saving Species and Rebuilding Ecosystems in Mauritius
6pm  Architecture in Northern Landscapes
6pm  TOUR - WIND TECHNOLOGY TESTING CENTER - MASS CLEAN ENERGY CENTER
6pm  Our Future with Bees
6pm  Human Rights and Social Movements in Mexico: A View from the Trenches
6:30pm  Living on the Edge… of Space! Defining Boundaries in a Vacuum
6:30pm  Music + Tech: Save the Date!
6:30pm  Nanotechnology: Exploring the Latest Trends & Developments
6:45pm  Future of Work: Opportunities for the next Industrial Revolution
7pm  Free Webinar: Uncovering the Mysteries of How Dirty Energy Affects Public Health

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Friday, October 21
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Symposium - "Behavioral Ethics: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives" Featuring Peter Singer
9am  Houghton Lecture: Potential and Risks of Carbon Geoengineering
10:30am  Global Health - Millennium Goal #3 Good Health and Wellbeing
3pm  Major Transitions in Political Order
3pm  The Future of Energy: Smart Grid and Beyond
3pm  The Diversity Bargain:  And Other Dilemmas of Race, Admissions, and Meritocracy at Elite Universities
4:15pm  Seminar on Social Exclusion and Inclusion — The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality
5pm  What Respect is Owed to Illusions about Immigration and Culture?
6pm  Building worlds: From gameplay to peacemaking
6pm  Food for All - Kickstarter Launch
7:30pm  Boston Renewable Energy Forum
8pm  White Like Me

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Saturday, October 22
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The Healing Power of Compassion
10am  The Media and the Elections
11am  The Boston Vegetarian Society's The 21st Annual Boston Veg Food Fest
8pm  White Like Me

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Sunday, October 23
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10am  The Boston Vegetarian Society's The 21st Annual Boston Veg Food Fest
1:30pm  Shaun King: Racial Justice in the 21st Century: What the Nonreligious Community 

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Monday, October 24
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Massachusetts Food Day!
12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Jonathan Zehr (UC Santa Cruz)
12pm  Confronting Deep and Persistent Climate Change Uncertainty
12:15pm  Three Scientists Walk into a Barricade…' Expert mobilization in Two Boston-area Social Movements
2:30pm  The Welfare Impact of Consumer Reviews: A Case Study of the Hotel Industry
3pm  Major Transitions in Political Order
3pm  Engaging our Communities in a Dialogue and Action on Racial Justice
3:30pm  James Jennings: Gentrification, Neighborhood Data, and Community Voices
4pm  Distributional Consequences of Changes in Labor Demand: Evidence from a Natural Resource Boom
4:30pm  Imagine Boston 2030 and BuildBPS: Conversation with Young People
5pm  Predicting and Adapting to Increased Hurricane Risk
6pm  Forum: Jose Antonio Vargas
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Viscosity and Polymers
7pm  Doctors Without Borders Recruitment Information Session
7:30pm  ONE Time Film Screening of PURSUING HAPPINESS

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Tuesday, October 25
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10am  Behind the Kitchen Door: The State of Working Conditions in Boston's Growing Restaurant Industry
12pm  Speaker Series: Tim Wu
4pm  Climate Threats and Solutions at the Community Level
5:30pm  Askwith Forums: Assessing the DREAM and 15 years of Congressional Inaction
6pm  Is Democracy in Crisis? Diagnosis & Solutions
6:30pm The Attention Merchants:  The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads
6:30pm  Troubled Waters: Fewer Fish, Increasing Malnutrition
7pm  Chuck Collins, Born on Third Base
7pm  Neighborhood Solar Informational Meeting
7pm  Nuclear Weapons, The Environment and the US Presidential Elections

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

10 Steps of the Confidence Game:  An Election Year Dance
http://www.dailykos.com/stories/2016/10/11/1581155/-10-Steps-of-the-Confidence-Game-An-Election-Year-Dance

The Victorian Internet:  The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century’s On-line Pioneers
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2016/10/the-victorian-internet-remarkable-story.html

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Monday, October 17 – Wednesday, October 19
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Harvard Forum & Nano Course Series on Population Health Equity
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 17 – Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016
WHERE  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Education, Health Sciences, Science, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with generous support of the Aetna Foundation
SPEAKER(S)  Keynote addresses will be delivered by Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, who will address “Hot-Spotting: Using Big Data for Health Equity”; Dr. Kathryn Edin, who will discuss “The New Poverty: Living on Less Than $2/Day in America”; and Dr. Nancy Krieger, who will share her latest research on “Health Equity & The Erroneous Temptation of Making the Causes of Health Sum to 100%: An Ecosocial Analysis.” Two panel discussions featuring national experts will be held as well on Social Network Interventions to Address Health Equity and Housing, Neighborhoods, and Social Mobility.
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9YWG7lGcHn1LnaR
TICKET INFO  Registration Is Free of Charge
CONTACT INFO  E-mail: pophealthequity at hsph.harvard.edu
DETAILS	 You're invited to the 2016 Forum on Population Health Equity, Oct. 18–19 at the Martin Conference Center, in Boston. Registration is free; breakfast & lunch served both days. Participants are invited to register for pre-meeting Nano Courses, on 10/17.
* Info/Agenda: Tinyurl.com/2016PopForumInfo
* E-mail: pophealthequity at hsph.harvard.edu
* Twitter: @PopHealthEquity; #PopHealthEquity
* Facebook: Facebook.com/PopHealthEquity
* YouTube: Tinyurl.com/YouTubePop
* Instagram: Instagram.com/PopHealthEquity
LINK  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/social-and-behavioral-sciences/inaugural-forum-on-population-health-equity-3/

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Monday, October 17
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Agile Project Dynamics for Aerospace and Defense Technologies Plus Lessons for Other Sectors
Monday, October 17
12:00p–1:00p
Webinar at http://sdm.mit.edu/agile-project-dynamics-for-aerospace-and-defense-technologies-and-plus-lessons-for-other-sectors/

Speaker: Firas Glaiel, Corporate Technology Area Director for Information Systems and Computing, Raytheon; SDM alumnus
Abstract:  Commercial software providers have adopted “agile" believing that it will help lower costs, shorten development times, and deliver greater customer satisfaction. Now government contractors are looking at agile methods to help them compete successfully in the aerospace and defense domains. For them, two questions are paramount: Can agile succeed in the large-scale government systems development domain? And if so, how? 

This presentation by SDM alumnus Firas Glaiel, Raytheon’s corporate technology area director for information systems and computing, is designed for government contractors as well as professionals in a wide variety of other domains. Glaiel will: 
1) provide a brief overview of systems thinking; 
2) describe system dynamics - a method for modeling and understanding the dynamic behavior of complex systems; and 
3) define agile practices and outline a framework for better understanding them. 

He will then share research results, including: 
1) the seven agile techniques (seven genes) used by successful project teams, aka the ???genome of the agile???; a 
2) a description of the system dynamics model developed from this research in agile project dynamics 
3) An overview of the structure and time-delayed relationships for capturing the impact of agile genes on emergent system behaviors. 

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

Web site: http://sdm.mit.edu/agile-project-dynamics-for-aerospace-and-defense-technologies-and-plus-lessons-for-other-sectors/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free and open to all 
Tickets: Pre-registration recommended. See url above 
Sponsor(s): MIT System Design & Management
For more information, contact:  Lois Slavin
sdm at mit.edu 

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The Power of Change: Innovation for Development and Deployment of Increasingly Clean Electric Power Technologies
Monday, October 17
12:00AM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Bldg, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Paul Beaton, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Lunch will be provided. 

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series 
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
cepr at hks.harvard.edu
(617) 495 - 8693

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A Very Special Relationship: Germany and Russia in the Era Putin
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 17, 2016, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, S354, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Davis Center for Russian & Eurasian Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Katja Gloger, Journalist and Publicist
CONTACT INFO	617-495-4037 / daviscenter at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The key to the complicated "landscape of the German soul" would rather be found in the eastern terrain, the German historian Karl Schlögel once wrote, trying to explain the very special relationship between Germans and Russians. They were the biggest friends--dreaming of each other--and deepest foes, their relationship was formed by romanticization and fear, by prejudices and fondness, by guilt and atonement. Lasting more than a thousand years, it is an extraordinary relationship, indeed, as intense as ambivalent, crucial for the history of Europe--and for both countries probably even more important than their respective relationship to the United States. In no other European country is the current debate on Russia so agonizing, so emotional as in Germany. In no other European countries are so many people to be found defending the policy of Russian President Vladimir Putin--a man who speaks German fluently. A new terminus was created for them: "Putin-Versteher"--those who understand (and defend) Putin. Now that the Russian President factually threw overboard the Post Cold War European Security Order and tried to establish a new European Order under the label of “Yalta 2.0”--which are the strategic misunderstandings when it comes to Russia? Now that Cold War passions have been unleashed, again--what are the chances of overcoming the growing estrangement and confrontation between Putin's Russia and the West? What would be Germany's role and responsibility in this process--and what would be the role and responsibility of policymakers in the United States?
LINK	http://daviscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events/very-special-relationship-germany-and-russia-era-putin

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Personalized Comfort
Monday, October 17
12:30p–2:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Architecture Lecture: Stefano Schiavon

MIT Architecture Lecture Series

Fall 2016 Architecture Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, Building Technology Program
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

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Robots and Jobs: Evidence from US Labor Markets
Monday, October 17, 2016
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E52-432, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Daron Acemoglu (MIT)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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In the Climate Policy Trenches: Lessons from the British Columbia Carbon Tax and Other Climate Policies
Monday, October 17 
4:00PM TO 6:00PM
Harvard, CGIS Knafel Bldg, Bowie Vernon Room (K262), 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

Mark Jaccard, Simon Fraser University

Canada Program Seminar
http://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/canada_program/event/canada-seminar-4

Free and open to the public. 

Contact Name:  Helen Clayton

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Righting the Record: Conservatism and the Archives
Monday, October 17
4:15 pm
Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://radcliffe-nenmf.formstack.com/forms/righting_the_record

Over the past half-century, grassroots activists and organizations both left and right have focused on women’s roles, family values, homosexuality, and reproductive policy, transforming modern American life. Yet the collections of major public repositories, especially those housed at universities, tend to document only one side of this complicated history: the left side. The Schlesinger Library is hosting a conversation among scholars, intellectuals, and activists—moderated by the New York Times columnist Ross Douthat—to explore the consequences of the current situation and examine possible solutions. “Righting the Record” is part of the library’s multifaceted approach to enhancing the diversity of the documentary record, to ensure that students, researchers, and scholars can write more complete and balanced histories of our times. 
Free and open to the public.
Please register and join us. 
We welcome walk-in attendees on the day of the event whenever space is available. If the event reaches capacity, then the information on this page will be updated. Thank you.
MODERATOR:
Ross Douthat, Op-ed Columnist, New York Times
PANELISTS:
Donald Critchlow, Professor of History and Director of the Center for Political Thought and Leadership, Arizona State University
Jennifer A. Marshall, Vice President, Heritage Foundation
Michelle Nickerson, Associate Professor of History, Loyola University Chicago
Charmaine Yoest, Senior Fellow, American Values

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Bridging the Partisan Divide
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 17, 2016, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South, Tsai Auditorium, S-010, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Herbert C. Kelman Seminar on International Conflict
SPEAKER(S)  Mark Gerzon, Founder & President, Mediators Foundation
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	Donna Hicks, Chair dhicks at wcfia.harvard.edu

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Rally for safe streets in Cambridge
Monday, October 17
4:45 PM - 8 PM
Cambridge, Massachusetts City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Ave, # 202, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.facebook.com/events/318629411826527/

Join local safe streets advocates and community members for a rally in demand of safe streets for people who bike and walk. We are sending a message - loud and clear - to Cambridge City Hall that they are not moving fast enough to protect people who walk and bike from death by motor vehicle. This rally is being held in honor of Amanda Phillips and Bernard ‘Joe’ Lavins, the two people killed by trucks this year in Cambridge.

Please bring your friends, family, bicycles, helmets, noisemakers, and energy to this civil event. Our success depends on your turnout and your insistence that City of Cambridge stop putting parking spaces before human lives.

OUR ASKS - Safer Streets Now, open your purse strings and make known hotspots of peril safe for cyclists, pedestrians and all.

THE SPECIFICS:
Protected bike lanes and intersections. Unprotected bike lanes in the door zone are not acceptable.
Special attention paid to high-volume corridors such as Mass. Ave. and Hampshire St.
Special attention paid to family bike routes to schools and other public destinations.
Lower the speed limit across the city and enforce the new standard.
Restrict semi-trailer operations in dangerous parts of the city both spatially and temporally (where and when they can operate).
Make motorists accountable and have cycling awareness as part of driver education. 

AGENDA:
4:30: Assemble in front of City Hall (we will be seen and heard, but be respectful).
5:00: Various speakers deliver words of empowerment, advocacy and our demands -- MassBike, Livable Streets, Cambridge Bike Safety and BCU
5:20: Rally chant as the City Councilors arrive.
5:30: Bike policy is on the agenda (8 of 14 orders!), sign up and be heard during public comment. Best to sign up in advance
post event casual gathering at Flat Top Johnny’s for a re-cap and cycle banter.

Details and specifics will be shaping up as we move through the weekend, spread the word.

Sign the safe streets petition: http://www.cambridgebikesafety.org/

Link to the city orders on the table for 10/17: http://cambridgema.iqm2.com/Citizens/FileOpen.aspx?Type=1&ID=1667&Inline=True

Link to Flat Tops in Kendall: http://www.flattopjohnnys.com/

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Time Traveling with James Gleick
Monday, October 17
6:00–8:00 pm
MIT, Building 2–190, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

International best-selling author and science historian James Gleick discusses his career, the state of science journalism, and his newest book Time Travel: A History, which delves into the evolution of time travel in literature and science and the thin line between pulp fiction and modern physics. This Communications Forum event will be moderated by author and physicist Alan Lightman, the first professor at MIT to receive a joint appointment in the sciences and the humanities.

Speakers
James Gleick, author of seven books, including Chaos, Genius, and Isaac Newton, all of which were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize.
Moderator: Alan Lightman, Professor of the Practice of the Humanities at MIT and author of 15 books.

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Mass Innovation Nights #91:  Women Founders 
Monday, October 17
6pm-8:30pm  
District Hall Boston, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://mass.innovationnights.com/node/add/rsvp

It's time for our 3rd Annual "Women Founders" event MIN #91 at District Hall. MIN #91 "Women Founders" is kicking off the WEBOS week on MONDAY (yes, MONDAY - we like to keep you on your toes) October 17th 2016. We have 14 original and dynamic products that will be showcased, some great experts and a few surprises! 

Check out the new PRODUCTS and VOTE for your favorites 
Support local innovation -- network and have fun at the same time! 
Don't miss it

More information at http://mass.innovationnights.com/events/mass-innovation-nights-91

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Electric Sector Reforms in Mexico: Goals and Accomplishments
Monday, October 17
6:30 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
MIT, Building 32 Room 155, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
 
César Emiliano Hérnandez Ochoa, J.D., Deputy Secretary for Electricity of Mexico

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Heat Transfer
Monday, October 17
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Margarita Forés, (@MargaritaFores), Cibo RestaurantsThe popular Science and Cooking lecture series returns this fall, offering members of the public the opportunity to embark on a culinary tour of four continents. The lecture series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. This year’s presenters will cover a wide range of topics, including beef made in a lab, the secrets of French cheese caves, and the delicious science of sweet desserts.

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 24
"Viscosity and Polymers"
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Cambridge Forum: NO JUSTICE, NO PEACE: Race and Power in America
Monday, October 17
7:00 PM
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Cambridge Forum welcomes authors TOMMIE SHELBY, KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD, and ELIZABETH HINTON for a facilitated discussion around issues of race and structural injustice, and the steps that citizens and governments can take to find practical solutions to problems such as mass incarceration, extreme poverty in disadvantaged communities, and problematic notions of black criminality. This discussion will be moderated by DANIELLE ALLEN, Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.

This Cambridge Forum event is a collaboration with Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard Book Store, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University Press and Boston Review.

Books will be available for sale at the event. This event will not include a book signing.

About Dark Ghettos
Why do American ghettos persist? Decades after Moynihan’s report on the black family and the Kerner Commission’s investigations of urban disorders, deeply disadvantaged black communities remain a disturbing reality. Scholars and commentators today often identify some factor—such as single motherhood, joblessness, or violent street crime—as the key to solving the problem and recommend policies accordingly. But, Tommie Shelby argues, these attempts to “fix” ghettos or “help” their poor inhabitants ignore fundamental questions of justice and fail to see the urban poor as moral agents responding to injustice.

Drawing on liberal-egalitarian philosophy and informed by leading social science research, Dark Ghettos examines the thorny questions of political morality raised by ghettos. Should government foster integrated neighborhoods? If a “culture of poverty” exists, what interventions are justified? Should single parenthood be avoided or deterred? Is voluntary nonwork or crime an acceptable mode of dissent? How should a criminal justice system treat the oppressed? Shelby offers practical answers, framed in terms of what justice requires of both a government and its citizens, and he views the oppressed as allies in the fight for a society that warrants everyone’s allegiance.

“The ghetto is not ‘their’ problem but ours, privileged and disadvantaged alike,” Shelby writes. The existence of ghettos is evidence that our society is marred by structural injustices that demand immediate rectification. Dark Ghettos advances a social vision and political ethics that calls for putting the abolition of ghettos at the center of reform.

About The Condemnation of Blackness
Lynch mobs, chain gangs, and popular views of black southern criminals that defined the Jim Crow South are well known. We know less about the role of the urban North in shaping views of race and crime in American society.
Following the 1890 census, the first to measure the g
eneration of African Americans born after slavery, crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land of opportunity were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites—liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners—as indisputable proof of blacks’ inferiority. In the heyday of “separate but equal,” what else but pathology could explain black failure in the “land of opportunity”?
The idea of black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America, as were African Americans’ own ideas about race and crime. Chronicling the emergence of deeply embedded notions of black people as a dangerous race of criminals by explicit contrast to working-class whites and European immigrants, this fascinating book reveals the influence such ideas have had on urban development and social policies.
About From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime

In the United States today, one in every thirty-one adults is under some form of penal control, including one in eleven African American men. How did the “land of the free” become the home of the world’s largest prison system? Challenging the belief that America’s prison problem originated with the Reagan administration’s War on Drugs, Elizabeth Hinton traces the rise of mass incarceration to an ironic source: the social welfare programs of Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society at the height of the civil rights era.

Johnson’s War on Poverty policies sought to foster equality and economic opportunity. But these initiatives were also rooted in widely shared assumptions about African Americans’ role in urban disorder, which prompted Johnson to call for a simultaneous War on Crime. The 1965 Law Enforcement Assistance Act empowered the national government to take a direct role in militarizing local police. Federal anticrime funding soon incentivized social service providers to ally with police departments, courts, and prisons. Under Richard Nixon and his successors, welfare programs fell by the wayside while investment in policing and punishment expanded. Anticipating future crime, policymakers urged states to build new prisons and introduced law enforcement measures into urban schools and public housing, turning neighborhoods into targets of police surveillance.

By the 1980s, crime control and incarceration dominated national responses to poverty and inequality. The initiatives of that decade were less a sharp departure than the full realization of the punitive transformation of urban policy implemented by Republicans and Democrats alike since the 1960s.

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A Year Like No Other: Politics and the Press in 2016 
Monday, October 17
7pm 
Tufts, Distler Auditorium, 20 Talbot Avenue, Medford

Part of the Tisch College Distinguished speaker series, this panel hosts Patrick Healy (New York Times), Asma Khalid (NPR), Jake Horowitz (Mic), and is moderated by Tish College Professor of the Practice David Gregory. Join the conversation about this election season, or stream the event live from the Tisch College Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/tischcollege/

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Business + Sustainability: Finding Energy by Saving It
Monday, October 17
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
MIT, Building E51-315, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/business-sustainability-finding-energy-by-saving-it-tickets-28191390207

MBA students and other graduate and professional students have found nearly $1.5 billion in energy savings
through the Environmental Defense Fund Climate Corps program.

Join guest speakers from EDF and MIT for a networking reception on leveraging the power of partnerships to improve energy efficiency.
Casual dress. Refreshments and light fare will be provided. Brief remarks will be followed by Q&A with the presenters.
Free of charge, but space is limited.

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Tuesday, October 18
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Boston TechBreakfast: intermedia mmh, Future Moments, Navitome, GoPapaya
Tuesday, October 18
8:00 AM
Microsoft NERD, Horace Mann Room, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations.
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast:
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Food & Coffee and chit-chat 
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements 
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs! 
intermedia mmh: Mellon - Lorenzo dell'Uva
Future Moments: iOS apps = MicSwap, AudioFix: For Videos, AudioMaster - Gary Levitt
Navitome: - Dylan Murphy
GoPapaya: - Zach Weiss
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words Boston 

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Materials Day & Poster Session
Tuesday, October 18
8:00a–5:30p
MIT, Building W-16, 48 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge
RSVP at https://mpc-www.mit.edu/

Hosted annually by the Materials Processing Center, Materials Day features emerging research applications in materials science & engineering for products and process across the industrial spectrum. 

The theme for this year's symposium is Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage. Topics will include: advanced metal-ion, metal-air and flow batteries for applications ranging from consumer electronics to transportation and grid level energy management. 

Materials Day activities include conference speakers from both MIT and Industry. The student poster session immediately follows the technical symposium and showcases the latest results from the diverse materials research communities in MIT's Schools of Science and Engineering.

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free of charge but registration is required.
Tickets: https://mpc-www.mit.edu/
Sponsor(s): Materials Processing Center
For more information, contact:  Maria Aglietti
617-253-6472
aglietti at mit.edu 

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Kendall Square Construction Community Meeting
Tuesday, October 18
11:45a–12:45p or 6pm
MIT, Building  E25-111, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Michael Owu, MIT Investment Management Company; Alison Crowley, MIT Investment Management Company; Nicole Bernabei, Department of Facilities; Sarah Gallop, Office of Government and Community Relations

Please join us at one of two identical community meetings on Tuesday, October 18 to learn about upcoming construction activities in Kendall Square. The project team will share an overview of the planned work and will be available to respond to any questions you may have about the construction. 

Attend one of two identical sessions: 
11:45 a.m. or 6:00 p.m. 
Light refreshments provided. 

This visionary project will deliver a dynamic blend of uses in the area, including graduate student, market rate, and affordable housing; lab and research space; innovation space; retail and open space; and a new home for the MIT Museum. Following the approval by the City of Cambridge Planning Board in May, utilities and infrastructure work is now underway to prepare the area south of Main Street, between Carleton Street and Wadsworth Street, where new buildings will be sited. 

Construction forecasts available online: 
To review details about the planned activities and to subscribe to construction updates, visit http://courb.co/ksqmit/

Web site: http://www.courbanize.com/projects/mit-kendall-square/updates
Open to: the general public
This event occurs daily at 11:45a - 12:45p through October 18, 2016, and also on October 18, 2016 at 6:00p - 7:00p.
Sponsor(s): Department of Facilities, MITIMCo
For more information, contact:  Alison Crowley
kendallsquare at mit.edu 

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Speaker Series: Amy Walter
Tuesday, October 18
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Amy Walter is the National Editor of The Cook Political Report where she provides analysis of the issues, trends and events that shape the political environment. Her weekly column appears at CookPolitical.com.

Over the past 14 years, Amy Walter has built a reputation as an accurate, objective, and insightful political analyst with unparalleled access to campaign insiders and decision-makers. Known as one of the best political journalists covering Washington, she is the former political director of ABC News. She is also an exclusive panelist on NBC’s Meet the Press and a regular panelist on PBS’ Washington Week with Gwen Ifill and Fox News’ Special Report with Bret Baier. She provides political analysis every Monday evening for the PBS NewsHour.

This is Amy’s second tour of duty with The Cook Political Report. From 1997 to 2007, she served as Senior Editor where she covered the U.S. House.Walter was named one of DC’s “50 Top Journalists” by Washingtonian Magazine in 2009 and honored with the Washington Post’s Crystal Ball award for her spot-on election predictions in 2000. She is a member of the Board of Trustees at Colby College where she graduated summa cum laude.

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Brown Bag: Come Together Right Now: An Introduction to the Open Access Network - with Rebecca Kennison
Tuesday, October 18
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building E53-212, 30 Wadsworth Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Rebecca Kennison

Officially launched just over a year ago, the Open Access Network (OAN) offers a transformative, sustainable, and scalable model of open access (OA) publishing and preservation that encourages partnerships among scholarly societies, research libraries, and other partners (e.g., academic publishers, university presses, collaborative e-archives) who share a common mission to support the creation and distribution of open research and scholarship and to encourage more affordable education, which can be a direct outcome of OA publishing. Our ultimate goal is to develop a collective funding approach that is fair and open and that fully sustains the infrastructure needed to support the full life-cycle for communication of the scholarly record, including new and evolving forms of research output. Simply put, we intend to Make Knowledge Public.

Web site: http://informatics.mit.edu/event/brown-bag-discussion-rebecca-kennison
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries
For more information, contact:  Kelly Hopkins
6172533044
khopkins at mit.edu 

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Plants That Purify: The Natural and Supernatural History of Smudging
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Braun Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion
SPONSOR	Women's Studies in Religion Program
CONTACT	Tracy Wall
DETAILS  WSRP Research Associate Rosalyn LaPier will deliver the talk, "Plants That Purify: The Natural and Supernatural History of Smudging."

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Mass Extinctions, the- Spatial Fossil Record, and How Paleoecology May Help Save the Planet
Tuesday, October 18
2:00PM TO 3:00PM
Harvard, Geo Museum, Haller Hall (102), 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

 Simon Darroch, Vanderbilt University

Paleobiology Seminar
http://eps.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/eps-event-type/geobiology-seminar-serie...

Contact Name:   Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Climate Change, Water Quality and Ocean Acidification for the Coastal Ocean along the US Northeast
Tuesday, October 18
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Scott Doney, Waste Water Discharge, WHOI

Human-driven climate change inherently affects people and theenvironment at regional and local scales. For a variety of reasons,the coastal boundary between the land and the sea will be especially vulnerable to ongoing and future climate change and ocean acidification. Research contributes to identifying and quantifying impacts, targeting and assessing the efficacy of adaptation strategies, and providing a framework for discussing trade-offs among possible solutions with stakeholders. This talk will focus specifically on examples for the coastal waters of Buzzards Bay, MA and adjacent ocean continental shelf off of southern New England. A case study will be presented examining the interplay of climate warming and nitrogen loading on near-shore coastal water quality.

Bio:  My science interests span oceanography, climate and biogeochemistry. Much of my research involves how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change, which may act to either damp or accelerate climate trends. A current focus is on ocean acidification due to the invasion into the ocean of carbon dioxide and other chemicals from fossil fuel burning.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Can the Next Technology Revolution Save the Planet?
Tuesday, October 18
4pm – 5:30pm
MIT, Building  3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker:  Dr. Will Turner, Conservation International Senior Vice President of Global Strategies, and Sandy Andelman, Chief Scientist and Senior VP

ESI People & the Planet Lecture Series 
The Environmental Solutions Initiative 2016 People & the Planet Lecture Series presents individuals and organizations working to advance understanding and action toward a humane and sustainable future.

Join Will Turner and Sandy Andelman of Conservation International for a discussion of how we can track the health of the planet--from ecosystems to agricultural systems to human well-being--and harness science, engineering, analytics, and visualization to better value, monitor, and ultimately manage the ecosystems that people around the world rely on. 

Reception follows.

Web site: https://environmentalsolutions.mit.edu/lecture-series/
Open to: the general public
Cost: free 
Sponsor(s): Environmental Solutions Initiative
For more information, contact:  Hannah Loomis
617-715-4048
esi at mit.edu 

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Looking Up: How coalitions of bottom-up organizations are driving action for sustainable development
Tuesday, October 18
5:00PM TO 7:00PM
Harvard, Emerson Hall, Room 105, 25 Quincy Street, Cambridge

with RACHEL KYTE, CEO of Sustainable Energy for All, and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General.
PANELISTS
William Clark, Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy, and Human Development, Harvard Kennedy School
Henry Lee, Jassim M. Jaidah Family Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Harvard Kennedy School
Michael Mehling, Executive Director, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR), MIT
Moderated by Sheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:  Rachel Kyte is Chief Executive Officer of the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Sustainable Energy for All. Ms. Kyte drives SE4All’s work to mobilize action towards its 2030 goals of ensuring universal access to modern energy services; doubling the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency; and doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix. As Special Representative for the Secretary General she is the point person in the UN for action towards the recently agreed global goal on sustainable energy. Ms Kyte served until December 2015 as World Bank Group Vice President and Special Envoy for Climate Change, leading the Bank Group’s efforts to campaign for an ambitious agreement at the 21st Convention of the Parties of the UNFCCC (COP 21). She was previously World Bank Vice President for Sustainable Development and was the International Finance Corporation Vice President for Business Advisory Services.

Science & Democracy Lecture Series
ABOUT THE SCIENCE & DEMOCRACY SERIES:
Once a semester, the STS Program, with co-sponsorship from other local institutions, hosts an installation in its Science and Democracy Lecture Series. The series aims to spark lively, university-wide discussion of the place and meaning of science and technology, broadly conceived, in democratic societies. We hope to explore both the promised benefits of our era’s most salient scientific and technological breakthroughs and the potentially harmful consequences of developments that are inadequately understood, debated, or managed by politicians, institutions, and lay publics.

Sponsored by the Program on Science, Technology, and Society. Co-sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment; the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and the Graduate School of Design.

Contact Name:  Shana Ashar
Shana_Ashar at hks.harvard.edu

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Creating Language in Man and Machine
Tuesday, October 18
5:15pm 
Harvard, Bolyston Hall, 110 Fong Auditorium, Cambridge

More information at http://stevenpinker.com/event/creating-language-man-and-machine

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Obstacles to Energy Development in Africa: Environment, Economics, and Climate Hegemony
Tuesday, October 18
5:30 - 6:30 PM
MIT, Building E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeQD_JS0LKs8pItKHtYy-CKZXVR_EGba8WgLgTpg5ylV59COQ/viewform?c=0&w=1

Ken Strzepek from the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change will discuss the barriers to sustainable energy development in Africa. Pressures coming from within and beyond Africa will be outlined.  The issues to be discussed will span technology, the natural and managed environment, economics and policy.  Local to global scale issues will be discussed and examples from current policy related research and action with the World Bank, African Development Bank and the UN Economic Commission for Africa will be presented.  Healthy discussion and debate will follow.

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Climate, Water, and the Evolution of Early Societies at the Harvard Museum of Natural History
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Museum of Natural History, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture, Science, Special Events, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Museum of Natural History
SPEAKER(S)  Vernon L. Scarborough, Distinguished University Research Professor and Charles P. Taft Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Cincinnati
COST  Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	hmnh at hmsc.harvard.edu, (617)495-3045
DETAILS  The earliest complex societies found in the Western Hemisphere developed under very different environmental conditions. The Maya, for instance, emerged in the tropical lowlands of the Yucatan Peninsula, a region with high seasonal rainfall and rich biodiversity. The Puebloans, in contrast, developed in the semiarid region of what is today Arizona and New Mexico, an area with limited rainfall and biodiversity. Vernon Scarborough will discuss two important archaeological sites from these different ecological and cultural zones—Tikal in Guatemala and the Chaco Canyon in New Mexico—to illustrate how the availability of water and climate influence the evolution of societies and what we can learn from these historical precedents.
LINK  https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/climate-water-evolution

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The Continuing Challenges Faced by Arab Americans
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
HKS Arab Caucus
Harvard Islamic Society
SPEAKER(S) James Zogby, Co-founder & President, Arab American Institute
Diana L. Eck (Moderator), Professor of Comparative Religion and Indian Studies and Frederic Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society, Harvard University
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum Office
617-495-1380
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/continuing-challenges-faced-arab-americans

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An Evening with Arthur Ganson
Tuesday, October 18
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-arthur-ganson-registration-28290788510

Join us in celebrating the reopening of our popular exhibit Gestural Engineering: The Sculpture of Arthur Ganson. The night will commence in our ground-floor 360 space as celebrated artist and engineer Arthur Ganson joins MIT Museum Director John Durant for a conversation regarding the exhibited pieces. A Q&A period will follow before an unveiling of Arthur's work in our newly renovated gallery. He will be available for individual questions and conversation during this time.
Light refreshments will be served.

Event is free and open to the public but pre-registration is recommended as space is limited for this event. There will be some capacity reserved for our impromptu walk-in guests, but seating is not guaranteed. Please note that unclaimed reserved seating will be released once the event has begun.

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Ava DuVernay’s “The 13th” Film Screening and Discussion
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Film
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard Kennedy School, the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, and the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
DIRECTED BY  Ava DuVernay
WRITTEN BY  Ava DuVernay
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-13th-film-screening-and-discussion-tickets-28257394628
TICKET INFO  Due to space limitations, guests must RSVP to attend
DETAILS  The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard Kennedy School, along with the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, and the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research will host a film Screening and Discussion ofThe 13th with Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School and the Suzanne Young Murray Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study as part of Harvard Kennedy School’s Race and American Politics series.
In collaboration with Netflix this screening is free and open to the public, but due to space limitations guests must RSVP to attend.
The title of Ava DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing documentary refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which reads “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States...” The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass criminalization and the sprawling American prison industry is laid out by DuVernay with bracing lucidity. With a potent mixture of archival footage and testimony from a dazzling array of activists, politicians, historians, and formerly incarcerated women and men, DuVernay creates a work of grand historical synthesis. 
LINK	http://ash.harvard.edu/event/ava-duvernay’s-“-13th”-film-screening-and-discussion

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Moth+Flame and Paracosm at Laugh Boston
Tuesday, October 18
6:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Laugh Boston, 425 Summer Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Boston-Virtual-Reality/events/234129306/

Come see two excellent presenters, Moth & Flame, and Paracosm! No cover charge for this one, free snacks will be provided, and excellent food and drinks are available for purchase. We will also have an array of VR and AR demonstrations with devices like the HTC Vive, the MS Hololens, and more. 

MOTH + FLAME Presents "Remember Remember" 
This VR narrative explores how we process memories and how quickly those memories can be snatched away. Set in a world after an alien invasion, the piece cuts back and forth between the user's life prior to the catastrophe and the user being held prisoner and told their memories aren't real. Users are forced to question what is real and what is invented and question what they know. Remember Remember was developed in partnership with AMD to show off the benchmarking prowess of their top-of-the-line GPUs.  

Our presenter, Courtney Harding will discuss this interesting work of art, and it will be available all night as a Vive Demonstration.   See http://mothandflamevr.com/

PARACOSM  
Amir Rubin, co-founder/CEO of Paracosm will be presenting Paracosm's next generation 3D-mapping technology. Their team of computer vision engineers have spent the past 3.5 years developing hardware + software to capture and digitize real-world environments in a matter of minutes. Large area 3D-mapping will open up entirely new applications for VR + AR in both enterprise and consumer markets. Amir will give examples and  discuss some real-world/enterprise applications of 3D-mapping. 
https://paracosm.io/

SCHEDULE 
6:00pm - Doors open, demos begin, snacks are served.   
7:00 - 7:30   Paracosm's presentation.
7:30 - 8:00  Moth+Flame's presentation.
8:15 - 9:45  Demofest!!   Also, order food and drink as you like. 

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The Center for Green Buildings and Cities (CGBC) hosts its 2nd Annual Lecture featuring Richard Rogers, a founding partner of Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners
Tuesday, October 18
6:30PM
Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, GSD, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

CGBC Annual Lecture: Richard Rogers 
http://harvardcgbc.org/

Situated within the Harvard GSD Lecture Series, the CGBC Annual Lecture intends to expose a large audience of students, faculty and members of the public to the importance of green design and planning by highlighting the work of key leaders within this movement. 

Richard Rogers is a founding partner of Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners. In a career spanning more than fifty years, he and his partners have designed many buildings including Centre Pompidou, Lloyd’s of London, the Bordeaux Law Courts, the Welsh Assembly, the Millennium Dome, the Leadenhall Building, and new terminals at Madrid Barajas and London Heathrow airports.

Free and open to the public. 

Contact Name:  Jeff Fitton
jfitton at gsd.harvard.edu

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Transforming the Renewable Energy and Entrepreneurship Industries in Emerging Economies
Tuesday, October 18
6:30p–8:30p
MIT, Building 2-190, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Sherife AbdelMessih

This year the MIT Egyptian Student Association (ESA) celebrates its 10th year anniversary! And who is better than ESA's original founder to celebrate with! 

Please join us for a talk with Sherife AbdelMessih, MIT Class 2009, CEO, Future Energy Corporation Chairman, SPARK Ventures, and the founder of MIT ESA. 

Sherife is selected by Yahoo! as one of the top 10 social entrepreneurs in Egypt; profiled as one of the 500 most influential people in the Middle East by Arabian Business magazine; and chosen as one of the top 200 economic leaders in Africa by L'Institut Choiseul. Sherife was the youngest on all 3 lists! 

Sherife is regularly invited to speak at industry events hosted by institutions such as Financial Times, Bloomberg, the World Bank, and prestigious universities. 

Come & join the conversation regarding the challenges and opportunities of the renewable energy and entrepreneurship sector in emerging markets. 

http://whereis.mit.edu/?go=2
Web site: https://www.facebook.com/events/1620394294920366/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Egyptian Student Association
For more information, contact:  Amr Suleiman
clubegypt-board at mit.edu 

Editorial Comment:  Certainly this subject is important.  I’ve been very impressed with the members and events of the MIT Egyptian Student Association over the years.

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Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part I
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Law, Special Events
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-juryx-deliberations-for-social-change-interactive-workshop-in-active-registration-27781258492
DETAILS  What is the citizen's role in deciding guilt? Is the loudest juror in the room more entitled to an opinion than the soft-spoken counterpart? And is a "difficult topic" a good enough excuse for a one-sided discussion?
In the first installment of a two-part workshop series, Charles Nesson, Weld Professor of Law at Harvard and founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society (now the Berkman Klein Center), will discuss his research on facilitating meaningful dialogue in the classroom, through the lens of JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, an open online course that Nesson is teaching this year.
Using a mock criminal case on gun law, workshop participants will experience firsthand Nesson's method for processing and approaching a dilemma.
This workshop is part of a two-part series. We encourage you to sign up and attend JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II as well.
LINK	http://edportal.harvard.edu/event/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-part-i

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Maintaining an Aging Nuclear Fleet (New) 
Tuesday, October 18
7:00 pm to 8:00 pm  
MIT, Building 3-333, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Maintaining an Aging Nuclear Fleet: What it takes to keep our largest source of carbon-free energy running at peak performance. Nuclear power is currently the largest source of carbon-free energy in the United States by far, but our fleet of reactors is aging. To keep these plants operating safely and at high performance, it takes highly specialized teams and huge equipment operating in a flurry of activity over a three week refueling outage. Get an inside look at commercial nuclear reactor disassembly, refueling, and inspection with Garrett Harms, Refueling Floor Technical Director and Project Manager from GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy. GE-Hitachi is a leading provider of Boiling Water Reactor design, construction, service, and nuclear fuel, based out of Wilmington, NC. Garrett holds degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic institute, and has traveled the world maintaining GE's fleet of nuclear reactors, completing control rod drive replacement, fuel exchange, reactor hardware modification, and ultrasonic inspection. The seminar is designed to leave twenty minutes for questions. Come hungry, pizza and drinks will be provided!

More information at https://www.facebook.com/MIT-Energy-Club-164288253593384/

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Private Owernship of Wildlife in South Africa: Economics and Conservation
Tuesday, October 18
7–8:30 pm
Harvard, BioLabs Lecture Hall, 16 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

In a guest lecture featuring Professor van Hoven, students will learn about the concept of private ownership of wildlife and the contribution that this can make in Africa towards the conservation of wildlife and habitat. 75% of all wildlife in South Africa belongs to non-state enterprises and requires the attention of vet/vet techs on a regular basis.

After thirty years as a distinguished academic and researcher in Wildlife Management at the University of Pretoria, Prof Wouter van Hoven retired in 2012. Dr. van Hoven served as an Associate Professor at the University of Pretoria since 1989. He is an accomplished scholar in the areas of wildlife management and the African landscape. He is also a founder of the Noah’s Ark Project in Africa, an organization responsible for the repopulation of large animals (i.e. elephants, hippos, and lions) in areas devastated by drought, war, or poachers. In addition to authoring over 100 scientific publications, reports, and chapters, Dr. van Hoven has served as a consultant in community and extension projects in Africa, Europe, and the United States.
 
Sponsored by the Harvard College Conservation Society

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Science Media Expert Panel 
Tuesday, October 18
7-9pm 
Tufts, Lane Hall 100A, 2 North Hill Road, Medford

The Experimental College presents this exciting panel featuring:
Alison Burzek & Cristina Quinn - hosts of Sonic Geologists, a science literacy podcast out of WGBH
Stephen Lacey - a science and environmental communicator for Greentech Media and host of the Energy Gang podcast
Bill Frezza - a print and multimedia science journalist and retired venture capitalist 
Ari Daniel - NOVA, an environmental programming group out of WGBH

More information at https://www.facebook.com/events/215057782244569/

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Meeting the Unique Medical Needs of Migrants and Refugees
October 18
7.30pm
Old South Meeting House,. 310 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.forcedfromhome.com/events/panel-discussion-boston/#tickets

Join Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) for a free panel discussion at the Old South Meeting House in Boston that will take an in-depth look at the unique and often life-threatening health challenges facing the world’s 65 million displaced people.

For decades, Doctors Without Borders has treated displaced people along every stage of their journeys—in their home countries, along the routes they traverse, and in refugee camps and other destinations—paying special attention to the specific health risks in the chaotic, overcrowded, and uncertain circumstances they must endure. But now, when there are more displaced people in the world than there have been since World War II—many of whom arrive with chronic conditions, many who are trying to survive outside of established refugee camp settings—Doctors Without Borders has had to find new ways to address the medical issues of people on the move.

Our panel of experienced aid workers will share their stories of treating people in these precarious circumstances and discuss the particular challenges facing people who have been, through no fault of their own, forced from home.

Presented in collaboration with Old South Meeting House as a Partners in Public Dialogue Program.

A Q&A will follow the discussion.

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Wednesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 20
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Forum on Population Health Equity
Wednesday, October 19 – Thursday, October 20
Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Forum: October 19 - 20
Emerging Population Health Equity Researcher Poster Session: October 18
Pre-Conference Nano Course Series: October 17

The 2016 Forum on Population Health Equity once again will be hosted by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with generous support from the Aetna Foundation.

This year’s Forum will feature keynote talks by Drs. Jeffrey Brenner, Kathryn Edin, and Nancy Krieger, as well as panel discussions on “Social Network Interventions to Address Health Equity” and “Housing, Neighborhoods, and Social Mobility.”

More information at https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/social-and-behavioral-sciences/inaugural-forum-on-population-health-equity-3/

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Wednesday, October 19
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October Boston Sustainability Breakfast
Wednesday, October 19
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM
Pret A Manger, 101 Arch Street, Boston

Join us for the October Sustainability Breakfast - Net Impact Boston's informal breakfast meetup of sustainability professionals together for networking, discussion and moral support. It's important to remind ourselves that we are not the only ones out there in the business world trying to do good! Feel free to drop by any time between 7:30 and 830 am.

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WISE [Women Investing for a Sustainable Economy]-Boston October Breakfast
Wednesday, October 19
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM EDT
Boston Public Market, 100 Hanover Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/wise-boston-october-breakfast-tickets-28483889079

Please join us for our next breakfast on October 19th at our favorite spot, the Boston Public Market.
Whether you are a breakfast regular, or whether you are new to this WISE monthly offering, we hope you can join us for coffee, breakfast treats, and catching up with your fellow WISE members from 8-9am.
See you there!
Best,
Lindsey, Whitney and Nathalie

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Leading in a World of Uncertainty free webinar with Deborah Ancona
Wednesday, October 19
12:00p–1:00p
Webinar

Speaker: Deborah Ancona
Join MIT Sloan Professor Deborah Ancona for a free, live webinar that introduces MIT's unique leadership perspective???a powerful, innovative approach to executive leadership that will help you make your organization more knowledge-driven and more innovative.

Innovation at work webinar series 
Thousands of people globally have registered for the MIT Sloan Executive Education INNOVATION at WORK Webinar Series. During these complimentary, live events attendees hear from MIT Sloan's renowned faculty about a variety of cutting-edge topics, including how the world???s most successful organizations stay on top; how to bridge the gap that exists between IT and business leaders; and how to manage the risks and opportunities of social media in the workplace.

Web site: http://engage.vevent.com/rt/mitsloanexeced~101916?code=mit_homepage
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Tickets: http://engage.vevent.com/rt/mitsloanexeced~101916?code=mit_homepage
Sponsor(s): MIT Sloan Executive Education
For more information, contact:  MIT Sloan Executive Education
617-253-7166
execedstaff at sloan.mit.edu 

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Historical Ecology Meets Critical Anthropology in Chickasaw Territory
Wednesday, October 19 
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Harvard, Tozzer 203, 21 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Charles Cobb

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Cognition is Rhythmic
Wednesday, October 19
12:00 pm 
BU, 24 Cummington Mall, Room. B01, Boston

Earl Miller, Dept. Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT

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Countering Violent Extremism (CVE): The Two-Pyramids Model of Radicalization
Wednesday, October 19
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Clark McCauley (Bryn Mawr)

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu 

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China's Evolving Vulnerability to Climate Change Impacts: A Spatial Analysis of its Infrastructure System
Wednesday, October 19
3:30PM TO 4:45PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Xi (Sisi) HU, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford; visiting fellow, Harvard China Project

China Project Research Seminar
http://chinaproject.harvard.edu/hu161019

Contact Name:  Tiffany Chan
tiffanychan at seas.harvard.edu

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New Challenges in Governing Geoengineering
Wednesday, October 19
3:30PM TO 5:00PM
Harvard, Belfer Case Study Room (5020), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

David Victor, Professor, School of Global Policy and Strategy; Director, Laboratory on International Law and Regulation, UC San Diego

Solar Geoengineering Seminar 
http://wcfia.harvard.edu/Climate-Engineering-Seminar-10-19-16 

Contact Name:  Joshua Horton
Joshua_Horton at hks.harvard.edu

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Energy Access in Remote Communities: A Practitioner’s Experience
Wednesday, October 19
4:00PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard, CGIS Knafel, K050, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

The Harvard South Asia Institute welcomes Anshuman Lath, Co-Founder, Gram Oorja, to give a talk as part of their Science and Technology Series.
Gram Oorja Solutions Private Limited (http://www.gramoorja.inwww.gramoorja.in), founded in 2007, has worked in over 120 remote villages of India, providing electricity, drinking water and cooking fuel to tribal communities. A key feature of the work has been the sustainability of these projects, with local communities taking over the management, tariff collection duties and ownership of these projects. Anshuman, a co-founder of the company, will share his experiences with the company.

More information at http://southasiainstitute.harvard.edu/event/energy-access-in-remote-communities-a-practitioners-experience/

Contact Name:  Meghan Smith
meghansmith at fas.harvard.edu

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The Arab War Against Rape as a Weapon of War
Wednesday, October 19
5:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building 3-370, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Miriam Cooke
The McMillan-Stewart lectures provide a space for scholars, artists, journalists, activists, and other experts to reflect on issues related to women in the developing world, specifically (but not exclusively) in the Middle East and North Africa. Lectures are free and open to the public.

Web site: http://wgs.mit.edu/mcmillanstewart-lecture-series/
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Tickets: none needed
Sponsor(s): Women's and Gender Studies
For more information, contact:  The Friendly WGS Staff
617-253-8844
wgs at mit.edu 

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Askwith Forums: Education and the 2016 Election
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM	Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE  This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  HGSE faculty panel:
David Deming, professor of education and economics
Roberto Gonzales, assistant professor of education
Meira Levinson, professor of education
Martin West, associate professor of education
Moderator: Paul Reville, Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration
A conversation with HGSE faculty about the 2016 election. Why has education been largely absent from the discussion? What are the likely implications for education policy depending on the outcome of the election? Should educators be focusing more on who controls the senate, house, or statehouses rather than who is in the White House?

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Pre-Release Screening & Discussion: Before the Flood
Wednesday, October 19
5:30PM
Harvard, Science Center Hall B, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

From Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Fisher Stevens and Academy Award-winning actor, environmental activist and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio, Before the Flood presents a riveting account of the dramatic changes now occurring around the world due to climate change, as well as the actions we as individuals and as a society can take to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet. The film follows DiCaprio as he travels to five continents and the Arctic speaking to scientists, world leaders, activists and local residents to gain a deeper understanding of this complex issue and investigate concrete solutions to the most pressing environmental challenge of our time.

Film screening is free and open to the public. [Harvard] Students are invited to stay for pizza and discussion with Harvard faculty following the screening (registration required at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdgkosH1GVoasVqMfMjJOB_A0Nh8vqeJbg2CKyOTYK2fbMy4Q/viewform?c=0&w=1 )

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/videos/before-the-flood-trailer/

Contact Name:   Laura Hanrahan
laura_hanrahan at harvard.edu
(617) 495-3039

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Bob Kramer: Patterns of Excellence
Wednesday, October 19
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 6-120, Eastman Lecture Hall, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Bob Kramer
Master bladesmith Bob Kramer will share his relentless quest to forge the perfect knife. Kramer will discuss how his methodically crafted blades combine metallurgy and art effortlessly. Technical discussion of steel alloys, Damascus patterning, and his forging processes will also be covered.

DMSE Metal Arts Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
For more information, contact:  DMSE
617-253-3300

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Trash Talk: The PIA IDEAS Global Challenge for Inclusive Waste Management
Wednesday, October 19
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
D-Lab, MIT Building N51-310, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/trash-talk-the-pia-ideas-global-challenge-for-inclusive-waste-management-tickets-28483833914

Interested in WASTE and submitting a proposal for the IDEAS Global Challenge? Join us for our first “Trash Talk” event as part of the Practical Impact Alliance-sponsored challenge on Inclusive Waste Management, where you can meet other students interested in this topic, learn from past winners in this area, practice pitching your ideas, and have time for networking and discussion. Dinner will be served.

The evening will begin with a short presentation by Sidhant Pai, founder of the social venture Protoprint. Read about his journey in creating the world's first fair-trade filament here. 

We look forward to seeing you there!!

This event is being co-sponsored by  D-Lab, PIA, and the MIT Waste Alliance,

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Climate Congress "Personal Resources" Discussion Group
Wednesday, October 19
6pm – 8pm
Cambridge Citywide Senior Center, 806 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.2laa8501348dg0uqdr53v2444s?authuser=0

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Extinction or Internationalism:  A Lecture and Conversation with Noam Chomsky
Wednesday, October 19
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Old South Church, 645 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/noam-chomsky-extinction-or-internationalism-tickets-27712991303

A Landmark Lecture by the World's Most Important Living Intellectual
This event is free and open to the public - BUT tickets must be reserved online at http://ChomskySpeaks.org

To co-sponsor the event as an organization and request tabling opportunities (limited availability), use the website to reach Paul Shannon.

Special guest, Wallace Shawn will moderate the event and also engage Noam in conversation about the difficult topic.

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Thursday, October 20
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Confronting Deep and Persistent Climate Change Uncertainty
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Regulatory Policy Program at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at the Harvard Kennedy School.
SPEAKER(S)  Gernot Wagner, research associate at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Richard Zeckhauser, Professor of Political Economy at HKS
CONTACT INFO  Lunch will be served, please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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The Challenges of Protecting Unpopular Species: Snakes
Thursday, October 20
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Thomas French       
A core responsibility of state and federal fish and wildlife agencies is to protect and manage native species.  Ecologically, and in the eyes of Massachusetts law, all state-listed Endangered Species should be treated equally, but this is still not the case in the court of public opinion.  Dr. French will discuss the unique case of snakes, a fear of which is share by more American adults than any other fear.  It raises the question of what role, if any, should emotional species bias play in the policies of a science-based agency.  Ecologically, the Bald Eagle is no more or less important than the Timber Rattlesnake, but protecting one is popular, and protecting the other is not.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Smart Cities
Thursday, October 20
12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
Suffolk University, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/smart-cities-tickets-28380041468

This event is going to be about Smart Cities. We are going to address three topics within the subject: transportation, architecture, and technology. This event is going to take place on the 20th of October from 12:00pm until 1:30pm.

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In Search of the Lost Development: Sustainability, Competitiveness and Economic Growth in Brazil
Thursday, October 20
12:00PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S-050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

The DRCLAS Brazil Studies Program welcomes Rogerio Studart, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. This talk will discuss the significant growth of sustainable investments (in energy, transportation, and urban infrastructure) in Brazil. 

Rogério Studart is an economist (Ph.D.) with 30 years of experience as an expert on development, international macroeconomics and sustainable finance. He is currently an Associate Professor of Economics, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institutions; Senior Visiting Fellow and a Distinguished Fellow, Global Federation of Competitiveness Councils. 

http://drclas.harvard.edu/event/brazil-rogerio-studart

Contact Name:   Juliana Deleo
jdeleo at fas.harvard.edu

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Observations and Modeling of Natural Gas Seeps in the Deep Ocean
Thursday, October 20
12:30p–1:30p
MIT, Building 48-316

Speaker: Dr. Scott A. Socolofsky, Texas A & M University
Lunch Seminar 
Natural gas seeps along continental margins are known to produce a large quantity of methane gas, yet it remains difficult to predict the fate of the methane bubbles in the ocean water column. For deep seeps, natural gas hydrates are predicted to form, and natural seep gas flares are observed to rise higher in the ocean water column than predicted by existing gas bubble dissolution models. This talk will present recent observations of two natural gas seep sites in the deep Gulf of Mexico, including analytical chemistry of the free gas, measurements of dissolved gas concentrations in and around the gas bubble flares, acoustic observations of the gas plumes, and imaging using a high-speed, high-resolution stereo camera system. The imaging data show that gas bubbles form a hydrate skin, rise at different velocities depending on their characteristic rise path (helical or zig-zag patterns), and dissolve at rates comparable to dirty bubble mass transfer rates in the laboratory. The formation time for the hydrate shell depends on the initial surface area and the hydrate sub-cooling, and a model incorporating the hydrate formation time agrees well with the bubble flare rise heights observed in the field.

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) 
Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00 
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
6172588685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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Climate Change, the Middle East and North Africa, and Future US Diplomacy
Thursday, October 20
12:30PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, Taubman Building,  Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Robert S. Ford, former U.S. Ambassador to Syria (2011-2014) and Algeria (2006-2008), will discuss the difficulty of directing U.S. foreign policy in a region marked by widespread violence, environmental challenges, and a complex system of alliances

The Future of Diplomacy Project Seminar
http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/7158/luncheon_seminar.html

Contact Name:  Cathryn Cluver
Cathryn_Cluver at hks.harvard.edu

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MIT Talks Fusion on AMA
Thursday, October 20
1:00p–4:00p
Webinar at http://www.psfc.mit.edu/events/2016/mit-talks-fusion-on-ama

Scientists, students, and faculty from the Alcator C-Mod team at MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center will discuss fusion, the pressure record, Alcator C-Mod, and the high-field approach at a Ask Me Anything Session on Reddit (https://www.reddit.com/r/science/) 

Alcator C-Mod is an experimental device called a tokamak: a configuration considered for future fusion reactors. C-Mod is the world's only compact, high-magnetic field, diverted tokamak, allowing it to access unique experimental regimes and influence the direction of the world fusion program. 

Open to everyone! Join the conversation!

Web site: http://www.psfc.mit.edu/events/2016/mit-talks-fusion-on-ama
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Plasma Science and Fusion Center
For more information, contact:  Paul Rivenberg
617-253-8101
rivenberg at psfc.mit.edu 

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Robot Harvest: Agribotics for Farm, Field and Orchard
Thursday, October 20
2:00 PM EDT
RSVP at https://event.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1120353&utm_source=ActiveCampaign&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Agribotics+and+the+Food+We+Eat&utm_campaign=Robot+Harvest+Webcast+Email+2016+10+12

From 7 billion people to 9 billion by 2050!

Three grand challenges face a rapidly-growing world population: decreasing resource availability, increasing demand for nutritionally-sound, globally relevant diets, and the increasing fragility of the global distribution system.

We need to produce 25% more food from the same amount of acreage to feed all 9 billion of us. Can robots, automation and digital farming mitigate the food burden looming on the horizon?

What’s field robotics up to? What technologies are headed toward our farms, fields and orchards today and tomorrow.

It’s an industry on the grow with new tech alliances, fascinating robotics, and new-age farming techniques. It’s an industry also drawing lots of investment interest...and money!

Join us as we journey into the modern technology, equipment and people who are building the farms of the future.

Host:  Tom Green, Editor in Chief, Robotics Business Review
Guest Speaker:  Sara Olson, Senior Research Analyst, Agro Innovation, Lux Research    
Guest Speaker:  Frank Tobe, Publisher, The Robot Report

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Climate Change Displacement: Finding Solutions to an Emerging Crisis
Thursday, October 20
3:00PM TO 5:00PM
Harvard, Milstein West, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Join the Harvard Environmental Law Program Clinic, along with the Immigration and Refugee Program and the International Human Rights Clinic, for a conversation between Mary Robinson and Martha Minow on the topic of climate change, human rights and displacement. Mrs. Robinson is formerly the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights, as well as the former UN Special Envoy on Climate Change. This conversation is part of a three-day conference examining challenges of climate change, human rights, and displacement, and efforts to address this emerging crisis in the wake of the Paris COP 21 agreement.

http://environment.law.harvard.edu/2016/10/save-date-climate-change-displacement-finding-solutions-emerging-crisis/

Contact Name:  Cara Solomon

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Synthesized ecology with ecological networks
Thursday, October 20
4pm
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Speaker: Neo Martinez, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Arizona University

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) 
Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
617-258-8685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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Nudging Toward A Cleaner Future: Behavioral Insights into Energy and Environment
Thursday, October 20 
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Harvard, Room 275, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Discover the cutting edge of research in behavioral science as applied to energy, environment, and climate solutions at a hands-on workshop and panel discussion. Details for each can be found on the website. 

Rachel Zuraw, Director of Analytics at Opower, and Keerthi Reddy, Associate Advisor at the Behavioral Insights Team, will give an overview of cutting edge research in behavioral science as applied to energy demand reduction and other climate solutions. The discussion will be moderated by Harvard Kennedy School Professor Joseph Aldy, who is a visiting fellow at Resources for the Future and previously served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment.

Panelists
Keerthi Reddy, Associate Advisor, Behavioral Insights Team, New York
Keerthi Reddy is an Associate Advisor at BIT North America. Her work focuses on the application of behavioral insights to improve the delivery of municipal services. Through Bloomberg Philanthropies' What Works Cities program, she and her colleagues collaborate with mayor's offices across the US, designing behavioral interventions and the randomized controlled trials to test them, analyzing data, and developing policy suggestions based on the results. Prior to joining BIT, Reddy worked as a lab manager for psychology professors Fiery Cushman and Joshua Greene at Harvard University. During this time, she studied moral thinking and the application of reinforcement learning models to goal setting.

Rachel Zuraw, Director of Analytics, Opower
Rachel Zuraw has over 15 years of analytics experience and leads the Analytics team at Opower, which is now a part of Oracle Utilities Global Business Unit. This team utilizes quantitative techniques to understand the impact of products on customer behavior and enhance the effectiveness of Opower products and programs. Her responsibilities include evaluating results such as self reported outcomes across products and programs, customer segmentation, advanced analytics on smart meter data, and predictive modeling. Zuraw communicates these findings to Opower’s clients, drives optimization of outcomes, and helps deliver valuable interactions to the end utility consumer. Prior to joining Opower, Zuraw led the Web Analytics group at GEICO focused on improving the online experience through site optimization.

Professor Joseph Aldy, Associate Professor of Public Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
Joseph Aldy is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, a Visiting Fellow at Resources for the Future, a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a Senior Adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He is also the Faculty Chair for the Regulatory Policy Program at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government. His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation. In 2009-2010, Aldy served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change at the White House. Aldy was a Fellow at Resources for the Future from 2005 to 2008 and served on the staff of the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 1997 to 2000. He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a BA from Duke University.

Contact Name:  Christina Chang
chang.christina.marie at gmail.com

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On Not Joining the Dots: Land… Earth… Globe… Gaia
Thursday, October 20
4:15pm
Harvard, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

Bruno Latour, Institut d'Etudes Politiques, Paris

Introduction:  Lizabeth Cohen, Dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Respondents
Diane Davis, Charles Dyer Norton Professor of Regional Planning and Urbanism, Graduate School of Design
Peter Galison, Joseph Pellegrino University Professor, Harvard University
Moderator:  Homi Bhabha, Director, Mahindra Humanities Center

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The Flint Water Crisis: Keeping the Citizens of Flint Safe
Thursday, October 20
5:30 pm
Northeastern, Snell Library (Room 90) 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://files.bsces.org/file/BSCESEventRegForm.pdf
Cost:  $20 - $65
Appetizers and beverages will be provided prior to and after the presentation. Register to attend this meeting by October 14th

Emily Garner
Ms. Garner will speak on how the Flint Water Study team at Virginia Tech uncovered the water quality issues in Flint. Emily Garner is currently a PhD student at Virginia Tech studying Environmental and Water Resources Engineering. She is a member of the Flint Water Study team led by Dr. Marc Edwards that worked with citizens of Flint, Michigan to identify unsafe levels of lead in their drinking water and advocate for a resolution. She will present about her team's journey to provide the citizens of Flint with scientific evidence to support their claims that their drinking water was unsafe for consumption.

More information at http://www.bsces.org/events/the-flint-water-crisis-keeping-the-citizens-of-flint-safe-409

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ETH Science Talks – Critical Thinking, Climate Engineering, and Oxygen Homeostasis and Disease*
Thursday, October 20
5:30 pm to 9:00 pm 
swissnex Boston420 Broadway,  Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/eth-science-talks-critical-thinking-climate-engineering-and-oxygen-homeostasis-and-disease-tickets-28287431469
*The event is password protected, if you would like to join please contact Jonas (jonas at swissnexboston.org) to get access to the registration page.

The ETH Zurich Alumni Chapter of New England is celebrating its 6th anniversary and to mark this occasion it is partnering with the ETH Zürich Foundation and swissnex Boston in organizing a night of Science Talks featuring ETH Zurich Rector Sarah Springman and Professors Ulrike Lohmann and Wilhelm Krek, followed by a networking session with ETH Zurich alumni and friends.

Event Program:
5.30 Doors Open
6.00 Science Talks – Critical Thinking, Climate Engineering, and Oxygen Homeostasis and Disease
7.00 Refreshments and Networking
7.50 ETH Delegates Leave for Another Commitment
9.00 Doors Close

Speaker Bios:
Prof. Dr. Sarah Springman, rector of ETH Zurich since January 2015, will talk about Critical Thinking. Before becoming rector, Springman became professor at the Institute for Geotechnical Engineering in 1997 and headed the institute twice (2001-2005, 2007-2009). She studied engineering science at Cambridge University before spending time carrying out geotechnical projects in the design and construction industry in England, Fiji, and Australia before completing her PhD in soil mechanics at Cambridge in 1989 and launching her career as an academic and lecturer.

Prof. Dr. Ulrike Lohmann will talk about Climate Engineering. She is professor for or Experimental Atmospheric Physics in the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science since October 2004. She has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and worked in Germany and Canada, were she received several awards for her research. Lohmann’s current research focusses on  the role of aerosol particles and clouds in the climate system, and she combines laboratory work and field measurements on cloud and aerosol microphysics with the representation of them in different numerical models.

Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Krek, full professor of Cell Biology at ETH Zurich since 2003, will speak on Oxygen Homeostasis and Disease. After studying Chemistry in Austria, he completed his PhD at the Cancer Institute in Lausanne. Before moving to ETH, Krek was a researcher at Harvard Medical School and at the Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research in Basel, focusing his work on the hypoxia signaling in malignant and metabolic disorders and the discovery of genes and small molecule agents interfering with signaling pathway addictions in tumor subtypes. He is co-founder of several institution at ETH (Institute of Molecular Health Sciences, NEXUS Personalized Health Technologies Platform) as well as the ETH spin-off ProteoMediX. Currently, Professor Krek is on sabbatical leave at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT.

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Lessons from the Dodo: Saving Species and Rebuilding Ecosystems in Mauritius
Thursday, October 20
6:00pm 
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge


Carl Jones, Chief Scientist, Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and  Scientific Director, Mauritian Wildlife Foundation
Conservation pioneer Carl Jones, recipient of the 2016 Indianapolis Prize for his efforts to save species on the brink of extinction, will discuss how his decades of work have directly revitalized multiple endangered animal populations and habitats—most famously, perhaps, the Mauritius kestrel. With only four kestrels left on Earth, Jones’ techniques not only changed the fate of those birds, but also ensured a thriving population, now nearing 400. Jones will offer insights into restoring both individual species and the ecosystems of Mauritius. He will highlight his journey to save the Rodrigues fruit bat, pink pigeon, echo parakeet, and others from disappearing forever and describe his innovative approach to rebuilding the Mauritian habitat using ecological replacements for extinct animals.

Lecture presented in collaboration with the Indianapolis Prize.

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Architecture in Northern Landscapes
Thursday, October 20
6:00p–7:30p
MIT, Building 7-429

Todd Saunders

Fall 2016 MIT Architecture Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

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TOUR - WIND TECHNOLOGY TESTING CENTER - MASS CLEAN ENERGY CENTER
Thursday, October 20
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
100 Terminal Street, Building 80, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tour-wind-technology-testing-center-mass-clean-energy-center-tickets-27760603713

THIS EVENT WILL HAVE A LIMITED NUMBER OF SPACES !!!!
Wind turbine blade testing is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and evaluating the latest technological developments in airfoils and materials. Adequate testing will allow wind energy to be more competitive. In addition, blade testing is required as part of turbine certification to meet international design standards including IEC, GL, DNV. Meeting international standards allows developers to mitigate the technical and financial risk of deploying mass-produced wind turbines. 

Blade Testing At WTTC
The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center’s (MassCEC) Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC) offers a full suite of certification tests for turbine blades up to 90 meters in length.  WTTC also offers the latest wind turbine blade testing and prototype development methodologies to help the wind industry deploy the next generation of land-based and offshore wind turbine technologies.

WTTC Experience
The WTTC’s principle technical team includes blade engineers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) trained in blade testing at the current test facility in Colorado.  Expertise and personnel from NREL are playing key roles in commissioning and overseeing the operation of the WTTC. NREL has tested numerous blades ranging in size from 9 to 47 meters over the last 15 years. In addition, WTTC/NREL engineers have previous experience testing blades at leading wind turbine design and manufacturing companies.
Full suite of static and fatigue tests per IEC61400-23 standard
Three test stands and 100-ton overhead bridge crane capacity
Blade material testing
Dual axis static or fatigue testing
Lightning protection testing (pending design)
Prototype development and blade repair capabilities
Research and development partnerships
Hands-on workforce training
Strong commitment to client intellectual property protection
Located on a deepwater port to accept all blade sizes

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Our Future with Bees
Thursday, October 20
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Rabb Hall, Central Library in Copley Square, 700 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/our-future-with-bees-tickets-27046697400

The world’s bees can create economic and ecological sustainability, if only we let them. We know the vital importance of bees, yet we also know that they are dying off. What does the future human condition look like in a world that incorporates bees into our architecture, healthcare, and every day lives?
Presented by Noah Wilson-Rich, Ph.D., Co-Founder & Chief Scientific Officer, The Best Bees Company (www.bestbees.com)

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Human Rights and Social Movements in Mexico: A View from the Trenches
Thursday, October 20
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E51-335, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Amidst the violence of Mexico's drug war--one that has left 150,000 dead and 30,000 disappeared in the past decade--grassroots activists have mounted courageous movements for justice: they have searched relentlessly for missing family members, called for the protection of indigenous rights, struggled to preserve public education, defended labor rights, and issued urgent appeals to end femicides and police massacres. These activists now begin a one-month tour through U.S. cities. Come hear their stories. (In Spanish with English translation)

Web site: http://history.mit.edu/news/human-rights-and-social-movements-mexico-view-trenches
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): History Office, Global Studies and Languages, the Institute Community and Equity Office, the Office of Minority Education, and the HASS Exploration Program
For more information, contact:  Tanalis Padilla
617-324-5134
tanalis at mit.edu 

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Living on the Edge… of Space! Defining Boundaries in a Vacuum
Thursday, October 20
6:30-8:30pm 
Aeronaut Brewery, 14 Tyler Street, Somerville

Researchers from the Center for Space Physics at Boston University

Although we don’t see it that much down on earth, near the edge of space, ionized gases or plasmas, play a major role. These plasmas can affect our society on a number of levels by interfering with our GPS signals to creating beautiful light shows with the aurora borealis. To study this scientists use a number of different tools at their disposal including remote sensors, satellites and large scale simulations to understand these different phenomena.

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/science-by-the-pint/

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Music + Tech: Save the Date!
Thursday, October 20
6:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Workbar Cambridge, 45 Prospect Street, Cambridge

Save the date for the next Music-Tech Meetup, scheduled on Thursday, October 20, 2016, at 6:30 pm, hosted by WorkBar, Cambridge and BerkleeICE.  

The night's theme is still to be determined, so get in touch if you're interested in presenting or have a suggested topic.

Event Overview: 
6:30 - 6:45:  Arrive and snag some hot pizza! 
6:45 - 6:55: Welcome and Introductions
7:00 - 8:30: TBD - Give us your feedback here for future events
8:30 - 9:00: Open Networking

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Nanotechnology: Exploring the Latest Trends & Developments
Thursday, October 20
6:30pm – 9:00pm
Draper, Hill Building, 1 Hampshire Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nanotechnology-exploring-the-latest-trends-developments-tickets-28157214988

This event will delve into The Latest Developments & Trends in Nanotechnology. Guest speakers will present on current research within the industry and provide a look into the recently launched database, Nano.  

IMPORTANT NOTE: Because Draper, our host, is a defense contractor, pre-registration is necessary and attendance is limited to US Citizens and Green Card holders.  We apologize for any inconvenience and will be glad to make follow-up arrangements with anyone who will therefore not be able to attend.   All attendees must bring a government issued photo ID such as a driver’s license, passport, military ID, or original green card. 

Who Should Attend
Researchers, Scientists, Librarians, Research & Development professionals, CEOs, Product Managers who are interested in learning more about the latest developments and insights from experts at Springer Nature.

Brief Agenda
6:30pm - Small Bites, Cocktails, Networking, and a Showcase of Draper Technology
7:00pm – Welcoming remarks from Springer Nature and Draper
Kristen Wallerius, Springer Nature
Betty Edwards, Draper 
7:30pm – Keynote: "Carbon Nanotube Bearings"
Eugene Cook, Research Engineer & Senior Member of the Technical Staff in Draper’s Micro Devices Group
8:00pm – Nano product intro
Robin Padilla, SN Corporate Markets and Databases
8:20pm – 9:00pm – Wrap Up & Networking

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Future of Work: Opportunities for the next Industrial Revolution
Thursday, October 20
6:45 PM – 7:45 PM
CIC, Venture Café (Havana room), 5th Floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/future-of-work-opportunities-for-the-next-industrial-revolution-tickets-27857916779

A new type of hands-on, project-based learning is appearing on the STEM education scene to fill the skills-gap for the next Industrial Revolution. Moderator Sarah Boisvert will explore with training program leaders the opportunities to work in 3D Printing, robotics, lasers, and CAD design. 

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Free Webinar: Uncovering the Mysteries of How Dirty Energy Affects Public Health
Thursday, October 20
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Webinar
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/free-webinar-uncovering-the-mysteries-of-how-dirty-energy-affects-public-health-tickets-28100767151

We all know that power plants emit toxic fumes, which cause undesirable health affects, but there are numerous other sources and effects of pollution that many people are unaware of. Join us for an exciting webinar to uncover the mysteries behind the science in dirty energy. 

About The Speaker
B. D. Erickson II is the CEO of Satic USA and Blue Planet Solar. Having started four successful companies, he's excited and passionate about Satic's product line and business model with plans for growth in American manufacturing. B.D.'s main focus at Satic is to create an advanced line of clean energy devices that are made in the USA. B.D. is also a great speaker who enjoys motivating and educating with live presentations. 

About the Sponsor
CREW Energy is a public benefit corporation that helps its customers get affordable green energy solutions while helping its team members as active stakeholders in its company.

Learn more about CREW's solar energy offerings at http://www.owntheswitch.com/solarinnovators.

To learn about opening your own green energy business with CREW with no upfront investment, visit jointhecrew.com/solarinnovators.

Learn about CREW's selection of "Dirty Electricity" Filters at shop.owntheswitch.com.

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Friday, October 21
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Symposium - "Behavioral Ethics: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives" Featuring Peter Singer
Friday, October 21
Spangler Auditorium, Harvard Business School, Allston

This symposium will integrate psychology and philosophy to explore a goal state for ethical behavior, why we fail to achieve that goal state, and what society can do create more ethical behavior.

9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.  Welcome  Danielle Allen and Max Bazerman
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.  What does the greatest good look like in contemporary society?
Peter Singer, Joshua Greene, and Steven Pinker
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.  Lunch Break
1:15 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.  Why don’t we get there?  Mahzarin Banaji, Fiery Cushman, and Michael Norton
3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.  What can be done to change behavior (nudging and beyond)?
Francesca Gino, Iris Bohnet, and Max Bazerman
4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.  Closing Statement  Max Bazerman

-----------------------

Houghton Lecture: Potential and Risks of Carbon Geoengineering
Friday, October 21
9:00a–10:00a
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Corinne Le Quere, University of East Anglia
Multiple options have been proposed to deliberately enhance the storage of carbon in natural reservoirs, and thus reduce the magnitude of climate change and/or the efforts otherwise needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions directly. These 'Carbon Geoengineering' options range from afforestation to bio-energy with carbon capture and storage to ocean iron fertilisation. But what is their potential (and their costs!), and what are the possible unintended consequences? This lecture will give an overview of the current understanding on this rapidly moving topic. | 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Maglio
cliberty at mit.edu 

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Global Health - Millennium Goal #3 Good Health and Wellbeing
Friday, October 21
10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Stratton Student Center, 84 Massachusetts Avenue, 4th Floor, Cambridge

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WEBos week event: Integrating Boston's entrepreneurial ecosystem
Friday, October 21
12:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT
UMass Club, 1 Beacon Street, 32nd floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/webos-week-event-integrating-bostons-entrepreneurial-ecosystem-tickets-27828001301

This event will bring together entrepreneurs, entrepreneurial support organizations, policy makers, and academics for a discussion of findings from the 2016 Kauffman Foundation supported study examining the opportunities and challenges for women entrepreneurs in Boston. Key findings, a panel discussion, audience Q&A will follow, and we would like to ask your inputs to draft outlines of steps forward. Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by UMass College of Management, Kauffman Foundation, and City of Boston WEBos.

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Major Transitions in Political Order
Monday, October 24
3pm
Tufts, Cohen Auditorium, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford

Simon De Deo runs the Laboratory for Social Minds at Indiana University, where he is a professor of complex systems and cognitive science. He is also on the external faculty of the Santa Fe Institute (SFI). 

Abstract: We present three major transitions that occur on the way to the elaborate and diverse societies of the modern era. Our account links the worlds of social animals such as pigtail macaques and monk parakeets to examples from human history, including 18th Century London and the contemporary online phenomenon of Wikipedia. From the first awareness and use of group-level social facts to the emergence of norms and their self-assembly into normative bundles, each transition represents a new relationship between the individual and the group. At the center of this relationship is the use of coarse-grained information gained via lossy compression. The role of top-down causation in the origin of society parallels that conjectured to occur in the origin and evolution of life itself.

Cognitive Science colloquium (CBS--Cognitive and Brain Science) lecture

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The Future of Energy: Smart Grid and Beyond
Friday, October 21
3:00PM TO 4:00PM
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G125, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

John D. McDonald, GE Energy Connections - Grid Solutions

The purpose of this talk is to familiarize participants with a vision for the future of energy.  The talk starts with a discussion of key industry/societal trends in generation, transmission, distribution and the consumer.  The “smarter grid” will highlight the intelligence that has already been implemented, and the new intelligence being added now.  The Smart Grid technology roadmap will discuss the Smart Grid solutions of Distribution Optimization, Transmission Optimization, Asset Optimization, Demand Optimization, Smart Meters and Communications, and Workforce and Engineering Design Optimization.  Three key visionary concepts to be covered are the greater value of the integration of key technology components and the importance of interoperability, the impact of high penetration of rooftop solar PV on the distribution system, and Intelligent Electronic Device (IED) integration and enterprise data management.  Lessons learned in deploying Smart Grid projects will be discussed.

Electrical Engineering Seminar Series
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/92721

Contact Name:   Gioia Sweetland
gioia at seas.harvard.edu

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The Diversity Bargain:  And Other Dilemmas of Race, Admissions, and Meritocracy at Elite Universities
Friday, October 21
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge,

Harvard Book Store and the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research welcome NATASHA K. WARIKOO, associate professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, for a discussion of her latest book, The Diversity Bargain: And Other Dilemmas of Race, Admissions, and Meritocracy at Elite Universities.
About The Diversity Bargain

We've heard plenty from politicians and experts on affirmative action and higher education, about how universities should intervene—if at all—to ensure a diverse but deserving student population. But what about those for whom these issues matter the most? In this book, Natasha K. Warikoo deeply explores how students themselves think about merit and race at a uniquely pivotal moment: after they have just won the most competitive game of their lives and gained admittance to one of the world’s top universities.
What Warikoo uncovers—talking with both white students and students of color at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford—is absolutely illuminating; and some of it is positively shocking. As she shows, many elite white students understand the value of diversity abstractly, but they ignore the real problems that racial inequality causes and that diversity programs are meant to solve. They stand in fear of being labeled a racist, but they are quick to call foul should a diversity program appear at all to hamper their own chances for advancement. The most troubling result of this ambivalence is what she calls the “diversity bargain,” in which white students reluctantly agree with affirmative action as long as it benefits them by providing a diverse learning environment—racial diversity, in this way, is a commodity, a selling point on a brochure. And as Warikoo shows, universities play a big part in creating these situations. The way they talk about race on campus and the kinds of diversity programs they offer have a huge impact on student attitudes, shaping them either toward ambivalence or, in better cases, toward more productive and considerate understandings of racial difference.

Ultimately, this book demonstrates just how slippery the notions of race, merit, and privilege can be. In doing so, it asks important questions not just about college admissions but what the elite students who have succeeded at it—who will be the world’s future leaders—will do with the social inequalities of the wider world.

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Seminar on Social Exclusion and Inclusion — The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CES, 27 Kirkland Street, Hoffmann Room, Busch Hall, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CES
SPEAKER(S)  Justin Gest
Assistant Professor of Public Policy , George Mason University’s School of Policy, Government and International Affairs
LINK  https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2016/10/the-new-minority-white-working-class-politics-in-an-age-of-immigration-and-inequality

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What Respect is Owed to Illusions about Immigration and Culture?
Friday, October 21 
5:00-6:30pm
Harvard, CGIS, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/politicaltheoryconference/event/harvard-graduate-conference-political-theory

10th Annual Harvard Graduate Conference in Political Theory
Keynote by Jeremy Waldron, University Professor, NYU School of Law

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Building worlds: From gameplay to peacemaking
Friday, October 21
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Deanna Van Buren

MIT Architecture Lecture Series 
Lecture co-presented by the Design and Computation Group, Architecture and City Design and Development Group and Housing and Economic Development Group, Urban Studies and Planning.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, Department of Urban Studies and Planning
For more information, contact:  Irina Chernyakova
617-253-4416

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Food for All - Kickstarter Launch
Friday, October 21
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
Plug Cambridge, 618 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/food-for-all-kickstarter-launch-tickets-28626037248
Cost:  $7

Food for All helps to reduce food waste by allowing you to buy food that restaurants did not sell by the end of the day, up to 80% cheaper than its original price.

Tickets price is $7, which will support the success of our Kickstarter campaign.

Come celebrate with us our Kickstarter launch!
Drinks and appetizers will be offered.

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Boston Renewable Energy Forum
Friday, October 21
7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Patagonia Boston, 346 Newbury Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-renewable-energy-forum-tickets-28475976412

As November approaches, many are thinking about their vote in the upcoming election. But how are we voting every day with our decisions and our dollars? The Boston Renewable Energy Forum, hosted by Patagonia’s eco-team, is an evening dedicated to sharing some proactive ways in which everyone can vote with their dollar for local clean energy solutions here in Massachusetts. 

Presenters from Co-op Power and Mass Energy will speak about community solar, rooftop solar, wind and more, and how we can bring more of the clean energy and jobs we want to the Commonwealth. Alcohol and other refreshments will be served.

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White Like Me
Friday, October 21
8PM
MassArt Tower Auditorium, 621 Huntington Avenie, Boston
RSVP at https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/10116200
Cost:  $15 - $25

Paul Zaloom, created with Lynn Jeffries
A timely response to the current loaded discussion about race in America.
Recommended for adults and teens 13+.

It’s the year 2040, and White Man discovers that he is now an American minority. Join political satirist and puppeteer Paul Zaloom on an outrageous mission to downgrade the status of Planet Caucazoid and blast White Privilege to the far reaches of the galaxy.

ABOUT THE SHOW: Zaloom introduces Mr. Butch Manly, an old school ventriloquist dummy, who has been packed away in a box for 50 years. As he updates the dummy on current affairs – particularly race relations – Butch learns that things are not quite what they seem in 2016. Zaloom is forced to confront his own prejudices, as the wickedly sarcastic doll exposes his self-righteousness, liberal guilt, and hypocrisy.

The show segues into The Adventures of White-Man, a toy theater spectacle about the male Caucasian human. Under orders from God, White-Man leaves his home planet of Caucazoid, arrives on Earth and ''civilizes'' it, becomes the philanthropist Santa Claus, kicks ''aliens'' out of Arizona, and finally realizes with shock that white folks will become a minority in the U.S. in 2040. What will White-Man do?

The puppet cast is drawn from Zaloom’s enormous collection of weird junk, busted dolls, action figures, toy cars, random tchotchkes, and other charming debris. 

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Saturday, October 22
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The Healing Power of Compassion
WHEN  Saturday, Oct. 22, 9 a.m. – Sunday, Oct. 23, 2016, 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Various locations, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Religion
SPONSOR	Buddhist Ministry Initiative, Courage of Care
CONTACT	Julie Barker Gillette
DETAILS  Courage of Care founders John Makransky and Brooke D. Lavelle will lead this two-day, intensive Sustainable Compassion Training (SCT) workshop. SCT is a method designed to help all people who care for others within their family, work, and community realize a power of unconditional care from within that is deeply healing and sustaining, that makes them more fully present to themselves and others, and that empowers a strong, active compassion for persons that is not subject to empathy, fatigue, and burnout.
This event  is open to the public. Space is limited, and registration is required. Current HDS students should contact Julie Barker Gillette for more information and registration. All others should register online at http://courageofcare.org/event/the-healing-power-of-compassion/

CE credits are available.

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The Media and the Elections
Saturday, October 22
10am - 3pm
Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway, Cambridge

For the past year and a half, everyone has been talking about the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. It's what you've been talking about with your friends and family, and it's what the media has been talking about nonstop on air, online and in print. So what kind of impact has the media had on Election 2016? Join Cambridge Community Television for a mini-conference on "The Media and the Election" from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, October 22 at the Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway. Doors open at 9:30 a.m.

Our three panels will cover political reporting from this election cycle, and be filled with local media professionals.

Confirmed panelists to date include:
Jim Braude, host of Greater Boston on WGBH
Lauren Dezenski, reporter for Politico Massachusetts
Chris Faraone, editor at Dig Boston and founder of BINJ, the Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism
Renee Graham, columnist for the Boston Globe
Donna Halper, media critic and Lesley University professor
Dan Kennedy, media commentator for WGBH and Nieman Journalism Lab
Sarah Moawad, co-editor of Muftah's Egypt & North Africa pages
Caitlin O'Connell, media and marketing consultant at Politico States
Dante Ramos, columnist for the Boston Globe

The conference's first two panels will take a look at "Political Reporting: What Happened?" and will delve into issues such as journalistic responsibility, media bias, antagonism in and toward the media, "free" campaign ads, political advertising versus viral social media versus mainstream media coverage, which candidates were promoted and which were vilified, and the media's effects on third-party candidates.

The third and final panel will review the "Lead Up to the Election: What We are Seeing Now," and will explore how the media landscape and tone has changed moving from the primaries to the general election; the influence of national and battleground polls; and how candidates down ballot are impacted by media coverage of the presidential election.

The conference will also include community breakout sessions and lunch for attendees. The event is free and open to the public.

Complete Schedule:
9:30 a.m. Doors open
10:00 a.m. Opening remarks, video
10:15 a.m. First panel: "Political Reporting, What happened? Pt. 1"
11:15 a.m. Second panel: "Political Reporting, What happened? Pt. 2"
12:15 Lunch/break-out discussions
1:15 p.m. Third panel: "Lead Up to the Election: What We are Seeing Now"
2:15 p.m. Closing remarks

Stay tuned for updates.

More information at https://www.cctvcambridge.org/mediaandelections 

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The Boston Vegetarian Society's The 21st Annual Boston Veg Food Fest
Saturday, October 22 11AM* - 6PM - Sunday, October 23 10AM - 4PM
Reggie Lewis Athletic Center, 1350 Tremont Street, Boston

FREE Admission! FREE Parking! FREE Food Sampling!
*Saturday 10 - 11 a.m. Preview Hour. A limited number of tickets ($5) are now on sale here to enter the Exhibitor Room at 10 a.m., before the doors open at 11 a.m. for Free Admission to all.

This Festival brings together an amazing array of vegetarian natural food providers, top national speakers and chefs, and educational exhibitors in a fun and welcoming environment. It is a chance to talk directly to food producers, learn the newest items in the marketplace, taste free food samples, shop at show special discounts, or simply learn what vegetarian foods are available and where you can find them!

Whether you are a longtime vegetarian or vegan, or someone simply wanting to add more delicious plant-based foods to your meal repertoire, or if you are just curious what it's all about, you are welcome here! We offer you free admission, free food sampling, free speaker presentations, free parking and a T stop across the street.

You also can learn of ways to help animals and protect the environment, and enhance your health and well being. There are activities for kids, too!

———————————

White Like Me
Saturday, October 22
8PM
MassArt Tower Auditorium, 621 Huntington Avenie, Boston
RSVP at https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/10116201
Cost:  $15 - $25

Paul Zaloom, created with Lynn Jeffries
A timely response to the current loaded discussion about race in America.
Recommended for adults and teens 13+.

It’s the year 2040, and White Man discovers that he is now an American minority. Join political satirist and puppeteer Paul Zaloom on an outrageous mission to downgrade the status of Planet Caucazoid and blast White Privilege to the far reaches of the galaxy.

ABOUT THE SHOW: Zaloom introduces Mr. Butch Manly, an old school ventriloquist dummy, who has been packed away in a box for 50 years. As he updates the dummy on current affairs – particularly race relations – Butch learns that things are not quite what they seem in 2016. Zaloom is forced to confront his own prejudices, as the wickedly sarcastic doll exposes his self-righteousness, liberal guilt, and hypocrisy.

The show segues into The Adventures of White-Man, a toy theater spectacle about the male Caucasian human. Under orders from God, White-Man leaves his home planet of Caucazoid, arrives on Earth and ''civilizes'' it, becomes the philanthropist Santa Claus, kicks ''aliens'' out of Arizona, and finally realizes with shock that white folks will become a minority in the U.S. in 2040. What will White-Man do?

The puppet cast is drawn from Zaloom’s enormous collection of weird junk, busted dolls, action figures, toy cars, random tchotchkes, and other charming debris. 

——————————  
Sunday, October 23
—————————— 

The Boston Vegetarian Society's The 21st Annual Boston Veg Food Fest
Sunday, October 23 10AM - 4PM
Reggie Lewis Athletic Center, 1350 Tremont Street, Boston

FREE Admission! FREE Parking! FREE Food Sampling!
*Saturday 10 - 11 a.m. Preview Hour. A limited number of tickets ($5) are now on sale here to enter the Exhibitor Room at 10 a.m., before the doors open at 11 a.m. for Free Admission to all.

This Festival brings together an amazing array of vegetarian natural food providers, top national speakers and chefs, and educational exhibitors in a fun and welcoming environment. It is a chance to talk directly to food producers, learn the newest items in the marketplace, taste free food samples, shop at show special discounts, or simply learn what vegetarian foods are available and where you can find them!

Whether you are a longtime vegetarian or vegan, or someone simply wanting to add more delicious plant-based foods to your meal repertoire, or if you are just curious what it's all about, you are welcome here! We offer you free admission, free food sampling, free speaker presentations, free parking and a T stop across the street.

You also can learn of ways to help animals and protect the environment, and enhance your health and well being. There are activities for kids, too!

————————————— 

Shaun King: Racial Justice in the 21st Century: What the Nonreligious Community 
Sunday, October 23
1:30pm
Harvard, Science Center, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/shaun-king-racial-justice-in-the-21st-century-what-the-nonreligious-community-needs-to-know-tickets-27610985200

Join the Humanist Hub as we welcome Shaun King for a conversation about racial justice in the 21st century, and what the nonreligious community needs to know.
Shaun King is the Senior Justice Writer for the New York Daily News. He is widely known as a prominent voice in the Black Lives Matter Movement, and is quickly becoming known as one of the leading voices for social justice in the US today. 

The Humanist Hub is a positive community of atheists, agnostics, and humanists (one of the largest growing groups in the country, especially for the younger population). At the Hub, one of our priorities is to act to make the world better, and one of our goals for this year is to learn more about how the nonreligious community can become a more effective force for social justice.

If you value our work, please consider making a small donation: www.humanisthub.org

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Monday, October 24
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Massachusetts Food Day!
Monday, October 24

Food Day  the nationwide grassroots campaign for healthy, affordable, and sustainably produced food has served as a platform for many around our state to celebrate and educate their community with regards to our local food system. MA organizers have reached out to me to ask if Food Day is still being celebrated and the answer is YES.

Food Day is still being celebrated by many across the Commonwealth, and our country, yet the coordinating office, Center for Science in the Public Interest, based in DC, was not able to secure funding for their staff or materials.

One thing is true, the hundreds of organizers who created events, shared information, taught cooking to old and young alike, advocated for policy change and so much more, did so because they cared about the health and wellbeing of their community!

That said, the 6th Annual FOOD DAY is a month away and you are encouraged to reach out to others in your community, workplace, place of worship, and schools/campuses to host an activity to highlight what is important to you within our local food system.

What do you want to share or teach?
What can you highlight or change regarding your local food system?
How can you and your peers make a fun, easy and informative event/activity that can strengthen community networks as you focus on a healthy and sustainable food system for all of residents in your community?

Across Massachusetts last year, over 600 events were created and hosted by individuals and organizations working to make our food system more sustainable, accessible and healthier. Some events lasted a few hours, some days and a few were month long. Activities were small and large; the key was the education, communication and information-sharing initiated across the state with neighbors, students, families, co-workers and clients.

Listed below are a few Ideas for the activities you could plan:
MA schools will take the “Eat Real” 2015 challenge (over 450 schools did last year!)
Film screenings in your living room, work, local college
“Sourcing local challenge” within your organization
Cooking demonstrations and food education workshops
Host an “Apple Crunch” with community groups or at your office
Farm tours and community activities with your local farmer
Health center staff members and businesses hosting local food potlucks
Food system forums at local community centers
College campus organizing-dozens of campuses participated across MA!

For those of you who “do this every day”, it is an opportunity to broaden your reach, to create larger networks and to build on your current work. You can still visit the national website at www.foodday.org for more information; you can use the logos, materials, etc. for your celebration.
Thank you for all you do on Food Day and every day!

Rose Arruda, Urban Agriculture Coordinator
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources, 251 Causeway Street, Suite 500, Boston
Desk 617-626-1849
Cell:  617-851-3644

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PAOC Colloquium - Jonathan Zehr (UC Santa Cruz)
Monday, October 24
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker:  Jonathan Zehr, UC Santa Cruz
Research in Zehr Laboratory focuses on how microorganisms control the availability of nitrogen, a critical element in all life as we know it. Nitrogen, a major plant nutrient, is transformed from one form to another by microorganisms, and moves between habitats. A large reservoir of nitrogen on Earth resides in the air we breath: 80% of the atmosphere is nitrogen gas. Nitrogen gas, or dinitrogen (2 nitrogen atoms triple bonded together) is unavailable to most organisms, in particular the eukaryotic plants and animals. Many diverse prokaryotic microorganisms have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into a biologically available form. Biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by an enzyme, called nitrogenase. Since most of the microorganisms in the natural environment have yet to be cultivated, we study the microorganisms in the environment that fix nitrogen by looking for the genes and proteins involved in nitrogen fixation.

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. 2016/2017 co-ordinator: Christine Chen (ccy at mit.edu)

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Confronting Deep and Persistent Climate Change Uncertainty
Monday, October 24
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Gernot Wagner, Research Associate, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Lecturer on Environmental Science and Public Policy, and Fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment; and Richard Zeckhauser, Frank P. Ramsey Professor of Political Economy, Harvard Kennedy School Lunch will be provided.

Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  cepr at hks.harvard.edu
617-495-8693

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Three Scientists Walk into a Barricade…' Expert mobilization in Two Boston-area Social Movements
Monday, October 24
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Scott Frickel, Brown University

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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The Welfare Impact of Consumer Reviews: A Case Study of the Hotel Industry
Monday, October 24
2:30p–4:00p
MIT, Building E52-432, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Giorgios Zervas, Boston University

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): IO Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Major Transitions in Political Order
Monday, October 24
3pm
Tufts, Cohen Auditorium, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford

DR Simon De Deo runs the Laboratory for Social Minds at Indiana University, where he is a professor of complex systems and cognitive science. He is also on the external faculty of the Santa Fe Institute (SFI).

Abstract: We present three major transitions that occur on the way to the elaborate and diverse societies of the modern era. Our account links the worlds of social animals such as pigtail macaques and monk parakeets to examples from human history, including 18th Century London and the contemporary online phenomenon of Wikipedia. From the first awareness and use of group-level social facts to the emergence of norms and their self-assembly into normative bundles, each transition represents a new relationship between the individual and the group. At the center of this relationship is the use of coarse-grained information gained via lossy compression. The role of top-down causation in the origin of society parallels that conjectured to occur in the origin and evolution of life itself.

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Engaging our Communities in a Dialogue and Action on Racial Justice
Monday, October 24
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Boston University Photonics Center, 8 Saint Marys Street, Floor 9, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/engaging-our-communities-in-a-dialogue-and-action-on-racial-justice-tickets-28187625948

Join the Boston University School of Social Work Dean’s Office, the BUSSW Equity and Inclusion Committee, and Howard Thurman Center at Boston University for a presentation and discussion on racial justice with Dean Larry E. Davis. 

Dr. Larry E. Davis is the Dean of the Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, where he is the Donald M. Henderson Professor and also the Director of the Center on Race and Social Problems. He has spent his life and career dedicated to issues of race, civil rights, and social justice. He earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Michigan State University and a Masters in social work and a Masters in psychology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Davis then decided to work in the trenches, joining VISTA and spending three years in one of New York City’s poorest neighborhoods. He returned to academia and became the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. from the dual-degree program in social work and psychology at the University of Michigan. 

Dr. Davis has long been recognized as a leading scholar of the narrative about race in America and its role in social justice.  His academic life has been dedicated to the creation of solution-based dialogues that promote a more racially equitable society. 

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James Jennings: Gentrification, Neighborhood Data, and Community Voices
Monday, October 24
3:30 PM – 4:30 PM EDT
City Hall Boston Room 801, City Hall Square, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/james-jennings-gentrification-neighborhood-data-and-community-voices-tickets-28579008584

The presentation is based on study, “Understanding Gentrification and Displacement: Community Voices and Changing Neighborhoods” by James Jennings, Bob Terrell, Kalila Barnett, Ashley Harding and Jen Douglas.  The study was sponsored by the Hyams Foundation.  The rationale for the study was based on growing angst about gentrification and displacement in some neighborhoods; intense real estate development in a context of continuing income and wealth inequality; and, concern in Roxbury that long struggles for a better neighborhood may not accrue to those who fought for improving living conditions.  The methodology was based on analysis of census and business data; literature review about ongoing anti-gentrification initiatives; and meetings and conversations with 23 community actors about their ideas for preventing displacement.

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Distributional Consequences of Changes in Labor Demand: Evidence from a Natural Resource Boom
Monday, October 24
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E52-164, 50 Memorial Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Alex Bartik, MIT

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Imagine Boston 2030 and BuildBPS: Conversation with Young People
Monday, October 24
4:30 PM – 5:30 PM EDT
Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building, 2300 Washington Street, 2nd Floor, Room 2-13A&B, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/imagine-boston-2030-and-buildbps-conversation-with-young-people-tickets-28461643542

Hello Young People and BPS Students!

You are invited to engage in a conversation with Natalia Urtubey, Director of Engagement for the City of Boston and Ben Vainer, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Education Cabinet for the City of Boston around two specific city planning processes.  The event will be held on Monday, October 24th from 4:30-5:30pm at the BPS Bruce Bolling Building, 2300 Washington Street, Room 2-13 A/B on the 2nd floor.

Imagine Boston 2030 is the first citywide planning process in over fifty years. Since last September, we've gathered input from over 12,000 interactions and we're looking for more! The Fall Engagement Team Campaign is designed to get residents’ perspectives on where they would prioritize growth,  teach residents about protecting our land from the impacts of climate change, their take on adding favorite features, and engaging in dialogue around the ways in which Boston is growing.

BPS is comprised of 128 buildings, totaling more than 11 million square feet. Nearly two-thirds of the school buildings were constructed before World War II. The facility needs for modernization and repair exceed the resources available to address them. BuildBPS, the Educational and Facilities Master Plan, will create a new pipeline of capital funding and will provide a strategic framework for construction and renovation projects in Boston Public Schools (BPS) buildings over the next ten years.

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Predicting and Adapting to Increased Hurricane Risk
Monday, October 24
5:00 pm
Radcliffe, Sheerr Room, Fay House, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

Lecture by Kerry A. Emanuel, Professor of Atmospheric Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Introduction by John Huth, Codirector of the science program at the Radcliffe Institute and Donner Professor of Science in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences
This event is free and open to the public. Doors open at 4:45 p.m.; lecture begins at 5 p.m.
Part of the 2016–2017 Oceans Lecture Series. A larger, one-day public symposium on the topic takes place on Friday, October 28, 2016.

Oceans Lecture Series

More information at http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2016-kerry-a-emanuel-lecture

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Forum: Jose Antonio Vargas
Monday, October 24
6:00 p.m. 
Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, Littauer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jose Antonio Vargas is a journalist and filmmaker, and serves as the CEO of Define American and #EmergingUS. Jose was part of The Washington Post team that won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting for coverage of the Virginia Tech shooting. Vargas revealed his undocumented immigration status in an article in The New York Times Magazine. He went on to produce and direct his autobiographical  documentary, Documented, broadcasted by CNN, and later directed MTV’s White People. You can watch a short video of Jose’s story on Define American.

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Viscosity and Polymers
Monday, October 24
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Doctors Without Borders Recruitment Information Session
Monday, October 24 
7:00-8:30PM
Boston Public Library – Central Library, 230 Dartmouth Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.forcedfromhome.com/events/recruitment-information-session-boston-massachusetts/#tickets

Every day, Doctors Without Borders aid workers from around the world provide assistance to people whose survival is threatened by violence, neglect, or catastrophe—treating those most in need regardless of political, religious, or economic interest. Whether an emergency involves armed conflicts or epidemics, malnutrition or natural disasters, Doctors Without Borders is committed to bringing quality medical care to people caught in crisis.

On Monday, October 24th, medical and non-medical professionals are invited to attend an evening presentation to learn more about joining Doctors Without Borders’ pool of dedicated aid workers.

An aid worker and Field Human Resources Officer will discuss requirements and the application process, and you’ll meet experienced Doctors Without Borders aid workers from the area and hear their firsthand stories of “life in the field.”

Please take a moment to review our recruitment requirements before registering for this event:  http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/work-us/work-field/general-requirements

The presentation will last 90 minutes, including Q&A.

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ONE Time Film Screening of PURSUING HAPPINESS
Monday, October 24
7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Regal Fenway Stadium 13, 201 Brookline Avenue, Boston
RSVP at  https://www.tugg.com/events/pursuing-happiness
Cost:  $11

What is happiness? 

"From the beginning of life itself, we have been in a constant pursuit of happiness.But instead of living the actual moment of true joy we are in constant search for something. Filmmakers Adam Shell and Nicholas Kraft set out to find the secret of the happiest people in America."

I had the honor of meeting Adam Shell and he gracious offered me to do a screening of his film at Regal Fenway Stadium 13 in Boston. We need YOUR support - In order to make this screening happen, we need to sell 80 tickets before October 10th! Invite your friends, colleagues, parents and grandparents! 

Please join us for an exclusive, one-night only screening of "Pursuing Happiness". Get your tickets here: https://www.tugg.com/events/pursuing-happiness

After the film, please join Dr. Jen Brownstein for a stimulating discussion. I will provide some tips to increase your well-being. 

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Tuesday, October 25
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Behind the Kitchen Door: The State of Working Conditions in Boston's Growing Restaurant Industry
Tuesday, October 25
10:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Boston Public Market, The Kitchen, 100 Hanover Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/behind-the-kitchen-door-the-state-of-working-conditions-in-bostons-growing-restaurant-industry-tickets-28156728533

"Behind the Kitchen Door" is a groundbreaking report, conducted by the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Boston, which investigates the obstacles and opportunities of creating racial and economic equity for workers in the Boston restaurant industry.
Join us for a Restaurant Industry Summit that will bring together diverse stakeholders —including employers, restaurant workers, advocates and policy makers— to discuss the most recent report on the Boston’s restaurant industry. 

Event will feature remarks from:  Saru Jayaraman, Co-Founder/Co-Director of ROC United and Local restaurant workers, employers and policymakers
Plus a Q&A session tackling the most pressing issues facing Boston's restaurant industry
Lunch will be served immediately after the panel discussion. The event will be catered by local high-road employer and RAISE member, Bon Me! www.bonmetruck.com

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Speaker Series: Tim Wu
Tuesday, October 25
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Tim Wu is an author, policy advocate, and professor at Columbia University, best known for coining the term “net neutrality.” In 2006, Scientific American named him one of 50 leaders in science and technology; in 2007, 01238 magazine listed him as one of Harvard’s 100 most influential graduates; in 2013, National Law Journal included him in “America’s 100 Most Influential Lawyers”; and in 2014 and 2015, he was named to the “Politico 50.” He formerly wrote for Slate, where he won the Lowell Thomas Gold medal for Travel Journalism, and is a contributing writer for The New Yorker. In 2015, he was appointed to the Executive Staff of the Office of New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman as a senior enforcement counsel and special adviser.

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Climate Threats and Solutions at the Community Level
Tuesday, October 25
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Bradley Campbell, President, Conservation Law Foundation

Mr. Campbell will speak on the challenges of communicating climate threats and the need to transform planning and development at the community level, using as example CLF’s recent lawsuit against ExxonMobil for climate deceit and risks to Mystic River communities.

Bio:  Bradley Campbell is President of the Conservation Law Foundation, an organization recognized for bringing innovative, pragmatic solutions to New England’s toughest environmental challenges. As Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (2002-2006), Campbell successfully led major initiatives to protect water resources, reshape development, restore natural resources, and address global climate change. He enforced federal environmental laws as regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Mid-Atlantic region (1999-2001), served in the Clinton administration as associate director of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (1995-1999), and litigated natural resource cases for the U.S. Department of Justice (1990-1995). His many honors and awards include the prestigious John Marshall Award, the highest level of recognition from the Department of Justice.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Askwith Forums: Assessing the DREAM and 15 years of Congressional Inaction
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE	617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE  This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  Speakers:
Julieta Garibay, founding board member and deputy advocacy director, United We Dream 
Donald E. Graham, co-founder, TheDream.US; chairman of the board, Graham Holdings Company; founding chairman, District of Columbia College Access Program
Angela Maria Kelley, executive director, Center for American Progress Action Fund; senior vice president, Center for American Progress
Jose Antonio Vargas, journalist, filmmaker, and founder, Define American
Moderator: Roberto Gonzales, assistant professor of education, HGSE

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the initial introduction of the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act – legislation that would provide undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children a path toward legal status through education or the military. Despite widespread and bipartisan support, the DREAM Act has failed to pass at the federal level, placing the dreams of more than 2 million young people on hold. What lessons have we learned over these last fifteen years? What has been the cost of inaction? And how have communities, institutions and local governments responded in the absence of immigration reform? Join us as we reflect on and contemplate the bill that aimed at creating opportunity for this vital segment of the immigrant community.

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Is Democracy in Crisis? Diagnosis & Solutions
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Jason Brennan, Robert J. and Elizabeth Flanagan Family Chair and Provost's Distinguished Associate Professor of Strategy, Economics, Ethics, and Public Policy, McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University, Contributor, Bleeding Heart Libertarians
Ilya Somin, Professor of Law, George Mason University, Contributor, Washington Post “Volokh Conspiracy”
Melissa Williams, Visiting Scholar, Ash Center, Harvard Kennedy School, Professor of Political Science & Founding Director, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
Christopher Robichaud (Moderator), Lecturer in Ethics and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum
617-495-1380
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/democracy-crisis-diagnosis-solutions

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The Attention Merchants:  The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads
Tuesday, October 25
6:30 PM (Doors at 6:00)
WorkBar, 45 Prospect Street, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Columbia University professor TIM WU—author of The Master Switch and known for coining the term "net neutrality"—for a discussion of his latest book, The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads.
About The Attention Merchants

Attention merchant: an industrial-scale harvester of human attention. A firm whose business model is the mass capture of attention for resale to advertisers.

In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of advertising enticements, branding efforts, sponsored social media, commercials and other efforts to harvest our attention. Over the last century, few times or spaces have remained uncultivated by the "attention merchants," contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times. Tim Wu argues that this is not simply the byproduct of recent inventions but the end result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention. From the pre-Madison Avenue birth of advertising to TV's golden age to our present age of radically individualized choices, the business model of "attention merchants" has always been the same. He describes the revolts that have risen against these relentless attempts to influence our consumption, from the remote control to FDA regulations to Apple's ad-blocking OS. But he makes clear that attention merchants grow ever-new heads, and their means of harvesting our attention have given rise to the defining industries of our time, changing our nature—cognitive, social, and otherwise—in ways unimaginable even a generation ago.

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Troubled Waters: Fewer Fish, Increasing Malnutrition
Tuesday, October 25
6:30 PM
Belmont Media Center, 9 Lexington Street, Belmont

Christopher Golden, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: Associate Director, Planetary Health Alliance, Harvard University Center for the Environment. Dr. Golden is an ecologist and epidemiologist, whose research is concerned with the effects of global environmental trends on human health.

Many developing nations depend on fish as the main source of nutrition, and for centuries those populations were assured of an abundance of fish. In recent years a combination of climate change, massive depletion of fish stocks by commercial fishing fleets, and exploitative trade policies are together creating nutritional crises in many poor nations. Dr. Golden explains the impact of these conditions on the health of millions of people. He also provides important facts about the nutritional differences between wild and farmed fish.

Contemporary Science Issues and Innovations

More information at http://www.scienceforthepublic.org/coming-events/oct-25-troubled-waters-fewer-fish-increasing-malnutrition

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Chuck Collins, Born on Third Base
Tuesday, October 25
7:00pm 
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

As inequality grabs headlines, steals the show in presidential debates, and drives deep divides between the haves and have nots in America, class war brews. On one side, the wealthy wield power and advantage, wittingly or not, to keep the system operating in their favor—all while retreating into enclaves that separate them further and further from the poor and working class. On the other side, those who find it increasingly difficult to keep up or get ahead lash out—waging a rhetorical war against the rich and letting anger and resentment, however justifiable, keep us from seeing new potential solutions.

But can we suspend both class wars long enough to consider a new way forward? Is it really good for anyone that most of society’s wealth is pooling at the very top of the wealth ladder? Does anyone, including the one percent, really want to live in a society plagued by economic apartheid?

It is time to think differently, says longtime inequality expert and activist Chuck Collins. Born into the one percent, Collins gave away his inheritance at 26 and spent the next three decades mobilizing against inequality. He uses his perspective from both sides of the divide to deliver a new narrative.

Collins calls for a ceasefire and invites the wealthy to come back home, investing themselves and their wealth in struggling communities.  And he asks the non-wealthy to build alliances with the one percent and others at the top of the wealth ladder.

Stories told along the way explore the roots of advantage, show how taxpayers subsidize the wealthy, and reveal how charity, used incorrectly, can actually reinforce extreme inequality. Readers meet pioneers who are crossing the divide to work together in new ways, including residents in the author’s own Boston-area neighborhood who have launched some of the most interesting community transition efforts in the nation.

In the end, Collins’s national and local solutions not only challenge inequality but also respond to climate change and offer an unexpected, fresh take on one of our most intransigent problems.

Chuck Collins is a researcher, campaigner, storyteller, and writer based at the Institute for Policy Studies where he co-edits Inequality.org. He has written extensively on wealth inequality in previous books like 99 to 1, Wealth and Our Commonwealth (with Bill Gates Sr.), and Economic Apartheid in America as well as in The Nation, The American Prospect, and numerous other magazines and news outlets. Collins grew up in the 1 percent as the great grandson of meatpacker Oscar Mayer, but at age 26 he gave away his inheritance. He has been working to reduce inequality and strengthen communities since 1982 and in the process has cofounded numerous initiatives, including Wealth for the Common Good (now merged with the Patriotic Millionaires), United for a Fair Economy, and Divest-Invest. He is also a leader in the transition movement, and a co-founder of the Jamaica Plain New Economy Transition and the Jamaica Plain Forum, both in the Boston-area community in which he lives.

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Neighborhood Solar Informational Meeting 
Tuesday October 25
7:00 PM
Arlington Library Community Room, Robbins Public Library, 700 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington

An informational meeting for a time-limited solar offer for the towns of Arlington, Cambridge, Watertown, Belmont, and Somerville, endorsed by Sustainable Arlington, Green Cambridge, and the Watertown Environmental and Energy Efficiency Committee

This solar initiative is designed to be local, fair, and transparent.  Details are available at neighborhoodsolar.org.  The program is open to all residents, businesses, and non-profits.  Any questions or concerns about participation, please contact Jocelyn Tager at info at neighborhoodsolar.org to determine eligibility. If you live in Arlington, please contact David Landskov at landskov at gmail.com. If you live in Cambridge, please contact Quinton Zondervan at solar at greencambridge.org

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Nuclear Weapons, The Environment and the US Presidential Elections
Tuesday, October 25
7:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building 6-120, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Kerry Emanuel, Jim Walsh, R.Scott Kemp
The planet has two existential threats-nuclear weapons and global climate change. The question of how they are handled should be central to the choice of a president. How would a Clinton Whitehouse differ from a Trump Whitehouse? 

Join us for a discussion with two preeminent scholars, James Walsh (nuclear) and Kerry Emanuel (environmental), moderated by Nuclear Science and Engineering Professor, R. Scott Kemp.

Web site: radius.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Cost: n/a
Sponsor(s): Radius/T&C, Nuclear (Weapons) Matter
For more information, contact:  Patricia-Maria Weinmann
617-253-0108
weinmann at mit.edu 

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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, October 26
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Dr. John D. Liu in Cambridge
Wednesday October 26, 2016 
8:30 - 10:00     Morning Meeting, Cambridge Friends Meeting 8 Longfellow Park, Cambridge
10:00 - 12:00     Informal conversation  (Friends Meeting)
12:30 - 3:00       Brown Bag Lunch and small group presentation (Friends Meeting)
3:30  - 5:30      Large group presentation (Friends Meeting)
7:00 – 9:00      Large group presentation at Haller Hall. Harvard Museum of Natural History, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

John Liu, Documentary Videographer and Soil Scientist, will speak at Friends Meeting House during the day on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 and in the evening at Harvard’s Museum of Natural History. He is visiting this country as a guest of  Global Friends and the Asia Society in New York.  Dr. Liu is Director, Environmental Education Media Project (EEMP) Visiting Fellow, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO) Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) Ecosystems Ambassador, Commonland Foundation.

Dr. Liu filmed the transformation of the Loess Plateau in China from totally desertified land into an abundant, productive and carbon sequestering landscape, convincing him to become a soil scientist. He has documented large-scale ecosystem regeneration in many countries and is now introducing the concept of Ecosystem Restoration Cooperatives where people can learn regenerative agriculture skills while helping to restore degraded lands.

Dr. Liu’s work is hopeful and inspirational and his spirit is universal.  

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MA Residential Energy Code - Envelope and Building Science 10/26/16 (Boston...
Wednesday, October 26
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT
Mass DoER building, 118 Cambridge Street, Conference Room A (2nd Floor), Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ma-residential-energy-code-envelope-and-building-science-102616-boston-tickets-28223217403
Cost:  $0 – $20

Based on the new 2015 IECC. Learn best practice strategies for building assemblies to meet the new energy code from foundations through roofs. Using case studies, exercises, and discussion, proven methods will be demonstrated to build cost-effective high performance homes. 
AIA and BPI credits available
***Be very conscious of the location.  There are several streets in Boston named Cambridge Street.  This location is in the same building as the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, near Government Center.

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Mindbugs: The Ordinary Origins of Bias
Wednesday, October 26
10:30a–12:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Calvin Lai, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology (Harvard)
Conscious experience provides an immediate, compelling, and incomplete account of mental life. Much of perception, thinking, and action is shaped by mental activity that occurs outside of conscious awareness or conscious control. Because of that, judgment and action can be unintentionally influenced by factors that we do not recognize, and may not value. 

There will be three parts to the session: (1) demonstrations of perceptual and cognitive illusions illustrating that we don't have complete access to or control over our own minds, (2) examples of how this can translate to social judgment of ourselves and others, and (3) research evidence and implications for diversity and inclusion in teaching. 

Humans use a variety of effective strategies for translating the world outside the mind into a mental representation inside the mind. However, these processes are not direct translations of reality. Experience is a combination of the immediate input and our expectations and theories of how the world operates derived from previous experience. These processes are highly efficient, largely unconscious, and prone to surprising, sometimes amusing, 'errors.' Research in cognition and perception reveals some of the basic processes that occur outside of awareness to manage interpretation and interaction with reality.

Web site: http://calvinklai.weebly.com/research-interests.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Teaching and Learning Laboratory, Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Education
For more information, contact:  Leann Dobranski
617-253-3371
leann at mit.edu 

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Sustainable Urbanization: the Future of Aviation, Buildings and Food
Wednesday, October 26
12:30–1:30 pm
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, FXB G-13, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sustainable-urbanization-the-future-of-aviation-buildings-and-food-tickets-26841812584?aff=erelpanelorg
Limited seats, registration required.

Dr. Aaron Bernstein, Assistant Director, Center for Health and the Global Environment
John Mandyck, Chief Sustainability Officer, United Technologies
This fall, the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment is hosting a Sustainability for Health Leadership Series showcasing trailblazing professionals in the field of sustainability and health. This speaker series will introduce attendees to pressing issues students will explore in the new Sustainability, Health, and the Global Environment Master in Public Health program at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In this program students will learn the latest research techniques, and have opportunities to connect with cutting edge though leaders in global businesses and governments who are focused on the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings.

More information at http://chgeharvard.org/events

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The Haves, the Have Nots and the Health of Everyone: Exploring Connections Between Environmental Equity and Sustainability
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Kresge G-1,  677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Lecture, Science, Sustainability
SPEAKER(S)  Rachel Morello-Frosch Ph.D., M.P.H.
Professor in Environmental Science, Policy and Management University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health
DETAILS  Dr. Rachel Morello-Frosch's research focuses on environmental health and environmental justice. She is particularly interested in addressing the double jeopardy faced by communities of color and the poor who experience high exposures to environmental hazards and who are more vulnerable to the toxic effects of pollution due to poverty, malnutrition, discrimination, and underlying health conditions. How do matters of race and class affect distributions of health risks in the United States? What are the causes and consequences of environmental disparities and health inequalities? How can research create "upstream" opportunities for intervention and prevention? Dr. Morello-Frosch is also interested in evaluating the influence of community participation on environmental health research, science, regulation, and policy-making, as well as in developing methods to foster community-based participatory research.

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Energy Democracy and Gender Diversity in the Renewable Energy Transition: The Value of a More Holistic, Inclusive Approach
Wednesday, October 26
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Tufts, Cabot 702, 167 Holland Street, Somerville

Jennie C. Stephens is the Dean’s Professor of Sustainability Science & Policy at Northeastern’s School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs. Her research, teaching, and community engagement focus on social and political aspects of the renewable energy transition, strengthening resilience, and responses to climate change.

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Greentown Labs' Annual DEMO Day 
Wednesday, October 26
2:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Greentown Labs, 28 Dane Street, Somerville 

Greentown Labs' annual DEMO Day brings together entrepreneurs, investors, strategic partners and VIPs from around the world to view and discuss solutions to our global environmental challenges. 

DEMO Day is a showcase of cutting-edge clean technology and innovation across the clean technology and energy sectors. Attendees will have an opportunity to meet with all of Greentown Labs' awesome member companies, tour our 33,000 sq. ft. headquarters and hear from impressive keynote speakers. 

Contact:  info at greentownlabs.com

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Join us for Cleantech Open Northeast's Innovation Expo and Awards Night!
Thursday, October 27
4:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Boston Properties, 200 Clarendon Street, 29th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cleantech-open-northeast-innovation-expo-awards-night-tickets-27611930026
Cost:  $0 - $25

Join Cleantech Open Northeast and the clean energy startup community for the culmination of our 2016 accelerator program in Boston! Cleantech Open Northeast’s Innovation Expo and Awards Night will be held on October 27th at Boston Properties 200 Clarendon Street from 4:00pm-8:30pm. This year’s class of innovative startups will showcase, and then you’ll get to see who among them will win cash prizes and go on to represent the Northeast at the national competition. Our incredible judges, expert mentors and amazing volunteers will all be there too.

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Subsidies for Succulents: The Welfare Impacts of the Las Vegas Cash for Grass Program
Wednesday, October 26
4:15pm - 5:30pm
Harvard, Littauer Building, Room L-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jonathan Baker, Harvard University

Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

The Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy is run by Robert Stavins and Martin Weitzman. Support from Enel Endowment for Environmental Economics and the Department of Economics is gratefully acknowledged.

Contact Name:  Jason Chapman
617-496-8054

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Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Rethinking the Endless Frontier
Wednesday, October 26
4:30PM TO 6:15PM
Harvard, Land Hall, 4th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
STS Workshop
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/workshops/cycles-of-invention-and-discovery/
The Program on Science, Technology and Society at the Harvard Kennedy School invite you to a book launch and discussion of "Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Rethinking the Endless Frontier" led by authors Venkatesh Narayanamurti, Harvard University, and Toluwalogo Odumosu, University of Virginia.

Book Description: Cycles of Invention and Discovery offers an in-depth look at the real-world practice of science and engineering. It shows how the standard categories of “basic” and “applied” have become a hindrance to the organization of the U.S. science and technology enterprise. Tracing the history of these problematic categories, Venkatesh Narayanamurti and Toluwalogo Odumosu document how historical views of policy makers and scientists have led to the construction of science as a pure ideal on the one hand and of engineering as a practical (and inherently less prestigious) activity on the other. Even today, this erroneous but still widespread distinction forces these two endeavors into separate silos, misdirects billions of dollars, and thwarts progress in science and engineering research. The authors contrast this outmoded perspective with the lived experiences of researchers at major research laboratories. Using such Nobel Prize–winning examples as magnetic resonance imaging, the transistor, and the laser, they explore the daily micro-practices of research, showing how distinctions between the search for knowledge and creative problem solving break down when one pays attention to the ways in which pathbreaking research actually happens. By studying key contemporary research institutions, the authors highlight the importance of integrated research practices, contrasting these with models of research in the classic but still-influential report Science the Endless Frontier. Narayanamurti and Odumosu’s new model of the research ecosystem underscores that discovery and invention are often two sides of the same coin that moves innovation forward.

PANEL:
Evelyn Hu, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
John Krige, Georgia Institute of Technology
Kenneth Oye, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
INTRODUCED BY:
Sheila Jasanoff, Harvard Kennedy School

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Venkatesh Narayanamurti is Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Harvard Kennedy School. Toluwalogo Odumosu is Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society and Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Virginia.

This event is a book launch followed by a reception.

Contact Name:  Shana Ashar
shana_ashar at hks.harvard.edu

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Sexual Collisions: Reflections on Empire, Terror, and Violence
Wednesday, October 26
5:30p–7:30p
MIT, Building E51-095, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Eng-Beng Lim, Gayatri Gopinath, Aisha Beliso-De Jesus and Ben Carrington
In the wake of the mass shootings in Orlando, the police shooting deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, the murder of Jo Cox and the post-Brexit anti-immigrant practices, and the persistence of antiblack, anti-Muslim, and homophobic violence worldwide, we must address the urgent intersection of gender and sexuality with racialized state and non-state terror. This roundtable brings together queer and feminist scholars of race, diaspora, performance, and religion to reflect on these intersections, focusing particular attention on the gendered and sexualized dimensions of contemporary crises within racial capitalism, such as: masculinity and the militarization of policing; gender, race, and incarceration; the gendered criminalization of immigrant and diasporic religions; and queer responses to policing and the "war on terror."

Feminisms Unbound 
This Consortium for Graduate Studies in Gender, Culture, Women, and Sexuality (GCWS) initiative, Feminisms Unbound, is an annual event series featuring debates that focus on feminist concerns, theories, and practices in this contemporary moment. This series is intended to foster conversations and community among Boston-area feminist intellectuals and activists. The series, in its open configuration, endeavors to allow the greatest measure of engagement across multiple disciplinary trajectories, and a full array of feminist investments.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/gcws/news+events/16-17FeminismsUnbound-terror.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies
For more information, contact:  Andrea Sutton
617-324-2085
gcws at mit.edu 

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India's Smart Cities: Transforming Places, Shifting Paradigms
Wednesday, October 26
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 9-255, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Professor Jagan Shah, Director of the National Institute of Urban Affairs. Moderated by Professor Bish Sanyal
This talk will focus on the game changing nature of India's Smart City Mission: 'Mission Transform-Nation'; how the pursuit of livable cities demands a reworking of the techno-financial and theoretical underpinnings of urban development in India, how key agendas like convergence, e-governance, integrated planing and participatory decision-making can shape a more livable and productive Indian city and how the risks related to lack of capacity, lack of finance, lack of real inclusion, vague notions of sustainability and cronyism can work against our intent. A discussion of the necessary capacity-building and the role of the institutional ecosystem will be located in this challenging scenario.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Center for International Studies, International Development Group, MIT India Program
For more information, contact:  Soumya Pasumarthy
soumyap at mit.edu 

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Climate Congress "Political Values" Discussion Group
Wednesday, October 26
6pm – 8pm
Cambridge Citywide Senior Center
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.fq958ijkjjc1bfehra4p8ngq9c?authuser=0

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Founder Roundtable for High Growth Food and Beverage Entrepreneurs
Wednesday, October 26
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
Nutter, 155 Seaport Boulevard, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/founder-roundtable-for-high-growth-food-and-beverage-entrepreneurs-registration-28168833740

A joint event of the Food and Beverage Group at Nutter, KN+S Accounting, Whipstitch Capital, and JPG Resources
Please join us for this exclusive event for founders, senior executives of high growth food and beverage companies, investors, and retailers. This event will combine peer-to-peer networking with a panel discussion focused on the current state of the industry.
6:00 pm- Registration & Product Demo
7:00 pm- Keynote: View from Expo
Carol Ortenberg, Editor, Project NOSH
A look at the latest trends in food and beverage, with a particular eye on what was hot at Summer Fancy Foods and Expo East.
7:30 pm- Flash Report: Deal Trends in CPG Food and Beverage
Nick McCoy, Co-Founder and Managing Director, Whipstitch Capital
A rapid look at the latest deals and deal terms in food and beverage financings and acquisitions.
7:45 pm- Tactical Marketing for Brands
Moderator:
Jeremy Halpern, Partner, Nutter
Panelists: 
John Burns, President, Breakaway
Carrie Forbes, Marketing Director, CabinetM / Founder, Gutsey
Kate Weiler, Co-Founder, Drink Maple
So you've formulated a great product where you think there is a big market. Now how do you communicate about it? How do you engage customers and intermediaries and create pull? How do you optimize your precious dollars? This panel will discuss the tradeoffs and complexity inherent in building a mix across digital, social, traditional PR, in-store demo, trade level marketing and the wild wild west of guerilla marketing.
8:30 pm- Networking

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The Music of Medicine: Tuning the body to light and sound
Wednesday, October 26
7pm - 9pm
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Thursday, October 27
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There and Back Again:  From the bench to the hill and other adventures in science
Thursday, October 27
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Sheril Kirshenbaum

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Racial Regimes, Digital Economies
12:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building 14E-304, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speakers: Feng-Mei Heberer , Michelle Cho, Lilly U. Nguyen
12pm-1pm - Feng-Mei Heberer (MIT): Racial Surplus 2.0 
1:30pm-2:30pm - Michelle Cho (McGill University): "New Breed": Parahumanism, Transnationalism, and Kpop Masculinities 
3pm-4pm - Lilly U. Nguyen (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill): Ethnic Platform and the Failure of Techno-Futurity 

That digital devices and online services are grounded in material infrastructures and the products of living and breathing human subjects is no news anymore. But what about the role of racialized labor -- and capital -- within the nexus of online and offline realities? The one-day symposium Racial Regimes and Digital Economies follows this inquiry, by exploring how the global flows of capital and labor enabling digital economies both shift and reinforce established racial hierarchies. 

See also related event at 5pm in 3-133 (CMS/W colloquium) with Kara Keeling and Lisa Nakamura

Global Studies Forum

Web site: http://mitgsl.mit.edu/news-events/racial-regimes-digital-economies
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676
lhickler at mit.edu 

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'We Have Captured Your Women': Explaining Shifts and Shocks in Jihadist Violence
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Center Library, Littauer-369, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	International Security Program
SPEAKER(S)  Aisha Ahmad, Assistant Professor, University of Toronto
CONTACT INFO	susan_lynch at harvard.edu
LINK	http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/7157/we_have_captured_your_women.html

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Slow Money Entrepreneur Showcase
Thursday, October 27
3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, One Broadway, 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/slow-money-boston-fall-entrepreneur-showcase-tickets-28021274386

Join us on Thursday, October 27th  for the Slow Money Boston Entrepreneur Showcase and Venture Cafe at The Cambridge Innovation Center. 

We will be bringing together investors, sustainable food entrepreneurs and leaders working together to rebuild our local food system. Learn about investment opportunities and how you can participate in rebuilding local economies based on the principles of soil fertility, sense of place, care of the commons and economic, cultural and biological diversity. 

For Investors: The Entrepreneur Showcase will provide access to sustainable food and farming businesses at different stages of development from start-up to expansion of existing businesses. The businesses and initiatives are also seeking different levels of financing — from small loans to major capital. Slow Money Boston encourages investors of all resource levels to attend including institutional, individual, accredited, and unaccredited investors. This showcase event is not an offer to sell securities or a solicitation of an offer to buy securities.

For Entrepreneurs: The Showcase is a tightly produced event. Each entrepreneur will have five minutes and 6 slides to tell their stories, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A from the audience. Presenters will also benefit from the networking opportunity specifically designed to encourage and elevate investor dialog. Throughout the event, your collateral will be available for attendees, and you will be mentioned in all promotional materials for the event.  It is free to apply, but costs $25 to present and take advantage of this exciting opportunity.

The Entrepreneur Showcase offers all the advantages of a traditional venture fair and many more. Because of the shared vision that brings us all together, it is an unparalleled opportunity for you to build relationships with investors and entrepreneurs from all over the region. Even if you are not an investor or presenting entrepreneur, we welcome and encourage your participation in the event!

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Modern ecological lessons from ancient food webs
Thursday, October 27
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jennifer Dunne, VP for Science, Santa Fe Institute
A central goal in ecology is to understand how animal and plant communities arise, change, and respond to disturbances both large and small. Tools from network science allow exploration of the structure and dynamics of ecological networks. This is turn provides a framework for assessing community-level consequences of extinctions as mediated by complex species interactions. I will discuss reconstructions and analyses of ancient food webs, on deep geologic and human timescales, that provide new ways to assess the resilience and stability of modern coupled natural-human systems.

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
617-258-8685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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Allocation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Supply Chains
Thursday, October 27
4:15p–5:15p
MIT, Building E51-315, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Daniel Granot

ORC Fall 2016 Seminar Series 
The OR Center organizes a seminar series each year in which prominent OR professionals from around the world are invited to present topics in operations research. We have been privileged to have speakers from business and industry as well as from academia throughout the years.

Seminar reception immediately following the talk.

Web site: http://orc.mit.edu/seminars-events
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Operations Research Center
For more information, contact:  Lauren Berk, Lennart Baardman, Martin Copenhaver
orc_fallcoordinators at mit.edu 

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Starr Forum: Honor Killings: Why They Won't End
Thursday, October 27
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Rafia Zakaria
Lecture and discussion with Rafia Zakaria J.Dm Columnist DAWN Pakistan,Author of "The Upstairs Wife: An Intimate History of Pakistan" (Beacon 2015), "Veil" (Bloomsbury 2017), Pakistan Country Specialist AIUSA 

More information will be available soon.

CIS Starr Forum 
A public events series on pressing issues in international affairs, sponsored by the MIT Center for International Studies.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cis/index.html
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:
617-253-8306
starrforum at mit.edu 

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Can Conservation Biology Survive the Anthropocene?
Thursday, October 27
5:00PM
Harvard, Northwest B103, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge

This panel brings together world leaders in conservation science to debate how relevant conservation is today given the multiple threats that many species face: habitat loss, overexploitation, and climate change. We’ll begin by reviewing the current extinction crisis, then discuss how the multiple threats of the Anthropocene alter conservation biology---and what that means for how conservation organizations act to conserve and preserve diversity today and in the future.

Panelists:
JON HOEKSTRA, Executive Director, Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust
PETER KARIEVA, Director, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, UCLA; Senior Science Advisor to the President, The Nature Conservancy
M. SANJAYAN, Executive Vice President and Senior Scientist, Conservation International

Moderated by:
ELIZABETH WOLKOVICH, Assistant Professor, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology; Faculty Fellow, Arnold Arboretum

Ecological Systems in the Anthropocene Seminar Series
About the Series:
Since the retreat of glaciers poleward over 10,000 years ago, humans have left an ever increasing fingerprint on ecological systems across the globe. The environment is now dominated by people—approximately 1/3 of land area has been transformed for human use and 1/4 of global productivity diverted to human consumption. While concepts such as wilderness attempt to escape this reality, there is virtually no habitat on earth devoid of some sign of humans influence on the globe—be it chemical, thermal, or a missing or introduced species. Today, this imprint is so pronounced that scientists are actively debating naming a new geological epoch demarcated by the sign of humans on the earth system itself: the Anthropocene.

In the shadow of this debate, the HUCE seminar series "Ecological Systems in the Anthropocene" will examine the future of social-environmental systems in a globe heavily impacted by humans. Each year the series will present a set of speakers and events (e.g., seminars, panels, debates) focused on one perspective under this theme.

Contact Name:  Laura Hanrahan
laura_hanrahan at harvard.edu

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Racial Regimes, Digital Economies
Thursday, October 27
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speakers: Kara Keeling and Lisa Nakamura
5pm: Kara Keeling (University of Southern California) "Black Futures and the Queer Times of Life: Finance, Flesh, and the Imagination" 
Keeling explores the implications of the efficacy of corporate futures scenarios for other modes of speculation, including those speculative cultural forms such as Afrofuturism that might afford creative imaginings of alternative futures. 

6pm: Lisa Nakamura (University of Michigan) "The Fairchild Ladies of Shiprock, New Mexico: A Photographic History of Navajo Women and Early Digital Feminism" 
Nakamura discusses how women of color were incorporated into early discourses about gender in the digital industries. From 1965-1976 the Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation employed almost a thousand Navajo women and men in a state of the art plant on a Navajo reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/kara-keeling-lisa-nakamura-speak-part-racial-regimes-digital-economies-symposium/s
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages, CMS/W colloquium
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676
lhickler at mit.edu 

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"Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment," a panel discussion convened in honor of the publication of Carol and Jordan Steikers’ new book by the same name (Harvard University Press)
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Emerson Hall 210
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Seminar on Violence and Non-Violence at the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Carol S. Steiker (Harvard Law School), Jordan M. Steiker (Texas Law), Lawrence D. Bobo (Harvard University), Charles Fried (Harvard Law School), Gregory Fried (Suffolk University), Elaine Scarry (Harvard University), Homi Bhabha (Harvard University)
COST  Free and open to the public.
TICKET INFO  Seating is limited.
CONTACT INFO  humcentr at fas.harvard.edu
617-495-0738
DETAILS  Click here for more info about the book: http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674737426
LINK  http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/courting-death-supreme-court-and-capital-punishment

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Could the Election be Hacked? Evaluating Threats, Motives & Effects
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
SPEAKER(S)	Dmitri Alperovich, Chief Technology Officer, CrowdStrike
Ben Buchanan, Postdoctoral Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs Cyber Security Project, Harvard Kennedy School
Pamela Smith, President, Verified Voting
Michael Sulmeyer (moderator), Director, Cyber Security Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum
617-495-1380
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/could-election-be-hacked-evaluating-threats-motives-effects

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YUM: Is eating meat healthy or ethical?
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge,
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Health Sciences, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard University Effective Altruism Student Group, Harvard College Effective Altruism, Safra Center for Ethics, The Good Food Institute
SPEAKER(S)  John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods; Bruce Friedrich, head of the Good Food Institute; Harvard Debate Members Danny DeBois and Dhruva Bhat
DETAILS	
Is it okay to eat meat?
The CEO of Whole Foods, John Mackey, and the head of the Good Food Institute, Bruce Friedrich, will argue that eating meat is neither ethical nor healthy. Harvard Debate Members Danny DeBois and Dhruva Bhat will argue the other side. Who will make the better case? You be the judge!
Sponsored by Effective Altruism at Harvard (HCEA and HUEA SG), Harvard's Safra Center for Ethics, and The Good Food Institute.
Harvard ID required.
LINK	https://www.facebook.com/events/1289914787686066/

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Stress in Wild Animals: From the Arctic to the Equator
Thursday, October 27
7:00p–9:00p
New England Aquarium:  Simons IMAX Theater, Aquarium Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=106706&view=Detail

L. Michael Romero
In contrast to stress-related disease in humans, the stress response is vital for helping wild animals survive in their natural habitats. The hormonal and physiological responses to stress are similar in all vertebrates. When these systems are activated at the wrong times for the wrong durations, disease can result. However, these same systems allow wild animals to survive natural stressors such as storms, predation attempts, and starvation. Join professor Michael Romero as he presents highlights from more than 25 years of research on stress in wild animals. Furthermore, he will discuss how understanding the stress response may also show us how animals cope with human-created changes in their habitats. 

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Daniel Clayman: Transitions
Thursday, October 27
7:00p–9:00p
MIT, Building 6-120, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Daniel Clayman will be presenting a lecture on his glass artworks.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
For more information, contact:  DMSE
617-253-3300

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Friday, October 28 and Saturday, October 29
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Standing Rock Protests and Protective Actions
Friday, October 28 and Saturday, October 29
Tufts University

This two-day Teach-In will consider a range of issues related to the Sacred Stone Camp protests and protective actions against Dakota Access Pipeline and in support of the Standing Rock Sioux. Panels and discussions will include: sovereignty and colonial law, sex trafficking and domestic violence, Indigenous knowledges and education, water rights and protection, arts, and historical trauma, among others. Sponsored by the WGSS and Education departments at Tufts.

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Friday, October 28
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Houghton Lecture:  Reaching Net Zero Carbon Balance in the 21st Century
Friday, October 28
9:00a–10:00a
MIT, Building 54-915

Speaker: Corinne Le Quere, University of East Anglia
The Paris Agreement on climate change has an ambition of balancing the global emissions and sinks of greenhouse gases in the second half of this century in order to limit climate change and its impacts. This lecture will explain the scientific understanding behind the links between global temperature change and cumulative carbon emissions, and detail the underlying time scales, amplitude of change, and uncertainties. It will present a range of model projections of climate change this century and discuss their implicit assumptions about future carbon management and future response of the natural carbon cycle to climate change. The lecture will also discuss the risks of large and non-linear responses of the carbon cycle to a changing climate (so-called 'tipping points') and their potential consequences. It will conclude the full lecture series by suggesting ways to support societal responses to climate change that the students might like to pursue throughout their careers.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Maglio
cliberty at mit.edu 

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From Sea to Changing Sea: A Science Symposium about Oceans
Friday, October 28
9 am–5:30 pm
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center,10 Garden Street, Radcliffe Yard
Cambridge
RSVP at https://radcliffe-nenmf.formstack.com/forms/oceans

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Innoskate 2016
Friday, October 28
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building 32-123, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

The Smithsonian's Innoskate program travels the country celebrating inventive creativity in skate culture. In collaboration with the Lemelson-MIT Program, Innoskate 2016 comes to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Lynch Family Skatepark in Cambridge to spark the imagination of skaters and non-skaters of all ages through skate demonstrations, discussions with skaters and inventors, hands-on invention educational activities, and other fun activities. 

Innoskate 2016 begins Friday evening at the MIT Stata Center with a special master class that will explore how the fusion of passion, creativity, and technology pushes the boundaries of art and innovation. Joining this conversation are legendary skateboarder Rodney Mullen; innovative filmmaker/photographer Steven Sebring; Anette (Peko) Hosoi, professor of mechanical engineering at MIT and co-director of STE at M (Sports Technology and Education @ MIT); and Jim Bales, associate director at MIT Edgerton Center.

Web site: http://invention.si.edu/innoskate/p/479-2016-cambridge-ma
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): Lemelson-MIT Program, Smithsonian Institution
For more information, contact:  Stephanie Martinovich
617-253-3352
info-lemelson at mit.edu 

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Saturday, October 29
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Passages:  Music Therapy Conference
Saturday, October 29
9am - 5pm 
Lesley University, 99 Phillips Place, Cambridge

More information at http://www.neramtas.org/passages.php

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How To Make A Superhero
Saturday, October 29
7:00p–10:00p
MIT, Building N51, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://howtomakeasuperhero.eventbrite.com
Cost:  $20

Have you ever wondered what goes into becoming a superhero? What is a super suit made out of and how hard it is to maintain a secret identity? Join us for a evening of "speed geeking" and engaging conversations with super researchers who know a bit about the gadgets, materials, and psyche of superheroes. Ages 21+

Web site: http://mitmuseum.mit.edu/program/how-make-superhero
Open to: the general public
Cost: $20.00 in advance 
Tickets: https://howtomakeasuperhero.eventbrite.com 
Sponsor(s): MIT Museum
For more information, contact:  Faith Dukes 
617-253-5927
museuminfo at mit.edu 

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Sunday, October 30
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Fradreck Mujuru & Erica Azim with MIT's Rambax
Sunday, October 30
3:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building 14W-111, Killian Hall, 

Speaker: Fradreck Mujuru and Erica Azim
3pm: Pre-concert talk 
4pm: Concert 

Zimbabwean master musician Fradreck Mujuru is joined by Erica Azim in playing the healing music of the mbira, used by the Shona to connect the living with the ancestors for more than 1,000 years. Born to the largest extended family of mbira players in Zimbabwe, Mujuru has played mbira since the age of 8, and is now known internationally as an outstanding performer, teacher, and instrument maker, while continuing to play in ceremonies for the ancestors at home. Azim is America's leading proponent of the Shona mbira tradition, who has toured with various Shona mbira masters and taught thousands of Americans to play mbira, and to support the tradition in Zimbabwe. Rambax, MIT's premiere Senegalese drumming ensemble, will also be performing.

MIT Sounding 
The 2016-17 season of innovative annual performance series MIT Sounding continues to blur the boundaries between contemporary and world music. Curated by Evan Ziporyn, Faculty Director of the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology, this season of Sounding integrates the avant-garde sounds of ancient instruments and traditional practices with cutting-edge composition and technology to present various visions of a new, evolving music that defies genre.

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/fradreck-mujuru-erica-azim/#public-events
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: No registration necessary
Sponsor(s): Music and Theater Arts, CAST
For more information, contact:  Leah Talatinian
617.253.5351
leaht at mit.edu 

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Monday, October 31
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PAOC Colloquium - Laura Meredith (UofA)
Monday, October 31,
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Microorganisms have produced dramatic shifts in the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere, and they continue to drive significant exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the land, oceans, and atmosphere. Many microbe-mediated processes have a leading-order impact on climate variability, are themselves susceptible to climate change (potential for feedbacks), and are poorly understood (e.g., CH4, N2O, biological particles). In terrestrial ecosystems, soil microorganisms provide benefits to society (ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling), which depend strongly on land use (urban, rural, agricultural, natural) and land surface type.

In my research, I seek to improve the process-based understanding of the environmental and biological drivers of microbe-mediated trace gas fluxes using an interdisciplinary set of laboratory and observational methods.

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. 2016/2017 co-ordinator: Christine Chen (ccy at mit.edu)

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Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Bridging the Basic –Applied Dichotomy: Implications for redesign of U.S Energy Policy and National Laboratories
Monday, October 31 
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge

Venkatesh Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; and Professor of Physics, Harvard
Lunch will be provided.

Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  cepr at hks.harvard.edu
617-495-8693

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Underground forests, savanna and the relationship between trees and people in southern Africa
Monday, October 31
12:10PM
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Lecture Hall, 1300 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain

Jonathan Davies, McGill University, Canada

Arnold Arboretum Research Talk
http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

Contact Name:  arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu
(617) 524-1718

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Coastal South Asia and the Technologies of Risk
Monday, October 31
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Sunil Amrith (History)
Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Contact Name:  sks at hks.harvard.edu

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Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages? Micro Evidence from Germany
Monday, October 31
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E52-164

Speaker: Andreas Peichl (University of Mannheim)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: [BRECHT]IT: EXIT STAGE LEFT with MARTA KUZMA
Monday, October 31
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, E15-001, The ACT Cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: MARTA KUZMA
ACT MONDAY NIGHT LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS: [BRECHT]IT: EXIT STAGE LEFT WITH MARTA KUZMA, DEAN AND PROFESSOR OF ART AT YALE SCHOOL OF ART

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Department of Architecture, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Emulsions and Foams
Monday, October 31
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
 
Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Spooky Action at a Distance:  The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything
Monday, October 31
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes GEORGE MUSSER, contributing editor for Scientific Americanand author of The Complete Idiot's Guide to String Theory, for the paperback release of his book, Spooky Action at a Distance: The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything.

About Spooky Action at a Distance
What is space? Space is the venue of physics; it's where things exist, where they move and take shape. Yet over the past few decades, physicists have discovered a phenomenon that operates outside the confines of space and time: nonlocality—the ability of two particles to act in harmony no matter how far apart they may be. If space isn't what we thought it was, then what is it?

In Spooky Action at a Distance, the award-winning journalist George Musser sets out to answer that question. He guides us on an epic journey into the lives of experimental physicists observing particles acting in tandem, astronomers finding galaxies that look statistically identical, and cosmologists hoping to unravel the paradoxes surrounding the big bang. He traces the contentious debates over nonlocality through major discoveries and disruptions of the twentieth century and shows how scientists faced with the same undisputed experimental evidence develop wildly different explanations for that evidence. Their conclusions challenge our understanding of the origins of the universe—and they suggest a new grand unified theory of physics.

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Tuesday, November 1
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Boston TechBreakfast: Smartick Method, and More!
Tuesday, November 1, 2016
8:00 AM
Microsoft NERD - Horace Mann Room, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Boston-TechBreakfast/events/226656155/

Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations. 
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them :) 

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast: 
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Food & Coffee and chit-chat 
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements 
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs! 
 Smartick Method - Conchi Ruiz
*** OPEN ***
*** OPEN ***
*** OPEN ***
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words  

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Green Eelgrass, Blue Carbon
November 1
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Juliet Simpson, Coastal Ecologist, MIT Sea Grant

Eelgrass meadows are critical coastal ecosystems, helping to tie down sediments, improving water clarity and providing a habitat for marine animals like fish, scallops, crabs and lobsters. Julie Simpson is working with several partners to conduct a study to quantify the carbon storage of eelgrass beds in Massachusetts. By understanding the role that eelgrass ecosystems play in preparing for and mitigating the effects of climate change we can better make the case for securing protection and restoration resources.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Lecture by Christian Bok: The Poetics of Protein 13: The Writing of Genetic Sonnets
Tuesday, November 1
5:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building 3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Christian Bok is a bestselling author and one of the earliest founders of Conceptual Literature, a poetic school of avant-garde writing. Bok is on the verge of finishing his current project, The Xenotext, an example of living poetry.

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/christian-bok/#public-events
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Tickets: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/christian-bok/#public-events
Sponsor(s): MIT CAST (Center for Art, Science & Technology), Arts at MIT
For more information, contact:  Leah Talatinian
617.252.1888

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Whose Vote Matters?
Tuesday, November 1
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building 32-123, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Charles Stewart III, Ariel White, Rahsaan Maxwell

A discussion of race, election access, and voting rights with Charles Stewart III (MIT), Ariel White (MIT), and Rahsaan Maxwell (UNC Chapel Hill). 

Co-sponsored by MIT Political Science, Boston Review, and MIT SHASS. This event is free and open to the general public. 

Light refreshments will be served.

Web site: bostonreview.net/events
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Political Science, SHASS Dean's Office, Boston Review
For more information, contact:  Anne
617-324-1360
anne at bostonreview.net 

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A Conversation with Chuck Hagel
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
SPEAKER(S)  Chuck Hagel, Joint Visiting Fellow, Institute of Politics and Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
United States Secretary of Defense (2013 - 2015), United States Senator from Nebraska (1997 -2009)
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum
617-495-1380
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/conversation-honorable-chuck-hagel

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HIGHLIGHTS FROM NAEM'S 2016 EHS MANAGEMENT FORUM
Tuesday, November 1
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 1 Broadway, 5th Foor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/highlights-from-naems-2016-ehs-management-forum-tickets-28317017963
Cost:  $8 - $12

BASG and the National Association for Environmental Management (NAEM) partner to bring you highlights from NAEM's 2016 EHS Management Forum being held in Denver in late October. NAEM’s EHS Management Forum is the largest annual gathering for environment, health and safety (EHS) and sustainability decision-makers. For 24 years, NAEM's annual conference has been the premiere event dedicated to best practice-sharing for those developing and integrating strategic environmental, health and safety programs within companies. Join Johanna Jobin and Frank Marino as they bring fresh content from Denver to share with us live here in Cambridge.

Johanna Jobin is Director, Global EHS & Sustainability at Biogen. Johanna works to promote the company’s culture and vision on corporate citizenship by helping to implement global sustainability programs and initiatives, such as energy improvements to waste reductions, as well as driving employee and stakeholder engagement. She is also responsible for the corporate citizenship reporting and carbon neutrality strategy.

As the former Head of Corporate Responsibility & Community Affairs of EMD Millipore, the life science business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Ms. Jobin led their corporate responsibility efforts, including the vision and strategic direction for environmental and social responsibility. Her responsibilities centered around strengthening the organization’s business performance by embedding sustainability into key business practices and overall culture. Key programs she managed and supported included greenhouse gas management and energy, Design for Sustainability, community engagement, and access to health and shared value initiatives.

She received her Master of Environmental Management degree, with a certificate in Energy and Environment, from Duke University and is also an ISO 14001 trained auditor.

She is involved in a number of sustainability related organizations, and is currently a Board member of the National Association for EHS & Sustainability Management (NAEM), Board member of the USGBC Massachusetts Chapter, Co-Chair of the Association Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) Sustainability Roundtable, and on the Advisory Board for the Center for Sustainability in Business at WPI and Advisory Committee Member for the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Marine Safety and Environmental Protection. She also serves on the City of Cambridge Climate Protection Action Committee and is a Board member of “e” inc., an organization focused on environmental and STEM education for children.

Frank Marino is a Senior Corporate Environmental, Health, Safety and Sustainability Manager at Raytheon Company, where he works on a variety of EHSS challenges including auditing, corporate social responsibility reporting, sustainability, injury prevention, OSHA VPP, zero waste, installing electric vehicle charging stations, and enterprise e-waste management.

He has more than 30 years of experience in industrial EHS management, including auditing manufacturing plants in a variety of settings including computers, appliances, military hardware and aircraft. Frank co-leads Raytheon’s Environmental and Sustainability Teams and he is a Zero Waste Business Associate with the USZWBC.

Frank holds a master's degree in environmental engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell.

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Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Law, Special Events
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-juryx-deliberations-for-social-change-interactive-workshop-in-active-registration-27783709824
DETAILS  What is the citizen's role in deciding guilt? Is the loudest juror in the room more entitled to an opinion than the soft-spoken counterpart? And is a "difficult topic" a good enough excuse for a one-sided discussion?
In the first installment of a two-part workshop series, Charles Nesson, Weld Professor of Law at Harvard and founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society (now the Berkman Klein Center), will discuss his research on facilitating meaningful dialogue in the classroom, through the lens of JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, an open online course that Nesson is teaching this year.
Using a mock criminal case on gun law, workshop participants will experience firsthand Nesson's method for processing and approaching a dilemma.
This workshop is part of a two-part series. We encourage you to sign up and attend JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II as well.
LINK  http://edportal.harvard.edu/event/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-part-ii


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Opportunity
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Effective Altruism MIT Sloan Meetup Group
http://www.meetup.com/effective-altruism-mit-sloan/

Want to make the world the best place it can be? 
Effective Altruism is a worldwide movement that uses rational thinking and science to have the best possible impact. Effective Altruism MIT Sloan is bringing together people from all over the area to share experiences and be more effective by working together. 
To learn more about effective altruism, read the introduction on the international EA website (https://www.effectivealtruism.org) or watch Peter Singer's TED talk.

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Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian at cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
http://www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit
@cambenergy 
http://facebook.com/cambridgeenergyalliance

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 27 and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 12 PM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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