[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - October 23, 2016

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Oct 23 10:43:14 PDT 2016


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Index
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Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.  Keep scrolling, please.

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Monday, October 24
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Massachusetts Food Day!
10am  Nuclear Issues in the Presidential Campaign and Beyond: A Discussion with Rebecca Hersman
12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Jonathan Zehr (UC Santa Cruz)
12pm  Perturbing Coccolithophores: The Past and Future of Earth’s Stabilizers
12pm  Confronting Deep and Persistent Climate Change Uncertainty
12:15pm  Three Scientists Walk into a Barricade…' Expert mobilization in Two Boston-area Social Movements
2pm  Bioinspired Robots and Mechanisms: Embracing the Environment
2:30pm  The Welfare Impact of Consumer Reviews: A Case Study of the Hotel Industry
3pm  Major Transitions in Political Order
3pm  Engaging our Communities in a Dialogue and Action on Racial Justice
3:30pm  James Jennings: Gentrification, Neighborhood Data, and Community Voices
4pm  Distributional Consequences of Changes in Labor Demand: Evidence from a Natural Resource Boom
4:30pm  Imagine Boston 2030 and BuildBPS: Conversation with Young People
5pm  Predicting and Adapting to Increased Hurricane Risk
6pm  Forum: Jose Antonio Vargas
6pm  Driving the Inclusion Agenda for Local Government: A Conversation with Boston Mayor Marty Walsh
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Viscosity and Polymers
7pm  Doctors Without Borders Recruitment Information Session
7:30pm  ONE Time Film Screening of PURSUING HAPPINESS

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Tuesday, October 25
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10am  Behind the Kitchen Door: The State of Working Conditions in Boston's Growing Restaurant Industry
12pm  Speaker Series: Tim Wu
12:30pm  Bipartisan Leadership: A Conversation With Trent Lott
4pm  Climate Threats and Solutions at the Community Level
5:30pm  D-Lab's Biomass Fuels and Cookstoves group
5:30pm  Askwith Forums: Assessing the DREAM and 15 years of Congressional Inaction
6pm  Is Democracy in Crisis? Diagnosis & Solutions
6pm  Boston SCORE Workshop: Starting a Specialty Food Business 
6:30pm The Attention Merchants:  The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads
6:30pm  Troubled Waters: Fewer Fish, Increasing Malnutrition
7pm  Chuck Collins, Born on Third Base
7pm  Neighborhood Solar Informational Meeting
7pm  Nuclear Weapons, The Environment and the US Presidential Elections

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Wednesday, October 26
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Healthy Materials Summit
Dr. John D. Liu in Cambridge
9am  MAPC [Metropolitan Area Planning Council] Fall Council Meeting with Keynote Speaker Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito
9am  MA Residential Energy Code - Envelope and Building Science
10:30am  Mindbugs: The Ordinary Origins of Bias
12:30pm  Sustainable Urbanization: the Future of Aviation, Buildings and Food
12:30pm  The Haves, the Have Nots and the Health of Everyone: Exploring Connections Between Environmental Equity and Sustainability
12:30pm  Energy Democracy and Gender Diversity in the Renewable Energy Transition: The Value of a More Holistic, Inclusive Approach
1pm  Self-Improving Microvascular Materials
2pm  Greentown Labs' Annual DEMO Day 
4:15pm  Subsidies for Succulents: The Welfare Impacts of the Las Vegas Cash for Grass Program
4:30pm  Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Rethinking the Endless Frontier
4:45pm  The Future of Energy Supply -- Hitting the Right Balance
5:30pm  Sexual Collisions: Reflections on Empire, Terror, and Violence
6pm  The Barefoot Designer: A Passion for Radical Design and Community
6pm  Climate Congress "Political Values" Discussion Group
6pm  Founder Roundtable for High Growth Food and Beverage Entrepreneurs
6pm  Visioning the Mystic
7pm  The Art of Healing the Earth
7pm  The Music of Medicine: Tuning the body to light and sound

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Thursday, October 27
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11:30am  Peace through Entrepreneurship
12pm  There and Back Again:  From the bench to the hill and other adventures in science
12pm  Racial Regimes, Digital Economies
12:15pm  'We Have Captured Your Women': Explaining Shifts and Shocks in Jihadist Violence
12:30pm  The Digital Trade Imbalance: Digital Trade, Digital Protectionism, and Digital Rights
3pm  Slow Money Entrepreneur Showcase
4pm  Modern ecological lessons from ancient food webs
4pm  What Should We Do with a Small Quantum Computer?
4pm  Join us for Cleantech Open Northeast's Innovation Expo and Awards Night!
4:15pm  Allocation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Supply Chains
4:30pm  Starr Forum: Honor Killings: Why They Won't End
5pm  Can Conservation Biology Survive the Anthropocene?
5pm  Racial Regimes, Digital Economies
5:30pm  Savory Success Stories – A Discussion About Boston Food Startups
6pm  Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment
6pm  Could the Election be Hacked? Evaluating Threats, Motives & Effects
6pm  Housing for All? Conversation 2: What have been the successes and failures of affordable housing planning & activism?
6pm  Getting to Solutions
6:30pm  YUM: Is eating meat healthy or ethical?
6:30pm  TCN Upstart Food Night with: Adam Salomone (The Food Loft) & Bob Stringer (Edible Ventures/Crimson Seed Capital)
6:30pm  Rouse Visiting Artist Lecture: Christo, “The Floating Piers, Lake Iseo, Italy, 2014-16, and Two Works In Progress”
7pm  Stress in Wild Animals: From the Arctic to the Equator
7pm  Daniel Clayman: Transitions

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Friday, October 28 and Saturday, October 29
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Standing Rock Protests and Protective Actions

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Friday, October 28
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9am  Houghton Lecture:  Reaching Net Zero Carbon Balance in the 21st Century
9am  From Sea to Changing Sea: A Science Symposium about Oceans
12pm  How waste streams flow through MIT
1pm  Turkey and Democracy: The Road Ahead
3pm  Cycles of Invention and Discovery:  Rethinking the Endless Frontier
5:30pm  Innoskate 2016
5:30pm  Spotlight: A Screening of the Academy Award Winning Film and a Panel Discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-Winning Spotlight Team Reporters
6pm  Energy Democracy - Germany's Energiewende to Renewables, Public discussion

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Saturday, October 29
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Passages:  Music Therapy Conference
1pm  Trees: Intimate Portraits
7pm  How To Make A Superhero

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Sunday, October 30
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1pm  Create the Change Day 2016
3pm  Fradreck Mujuru & Erica Azim with MIT's Rambax

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Monday, October 31
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12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Laura Meredith (UofA)
12pm  Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Bridging the Basic –Applied Dichotomy: Implications for redesign of U.S Energy Policy and National Laboratories
12:10pm  Underground forests, savanna and the relationship between trees and people in southern Africa
12:15pm  Coastal South Asia and the Technologies of Risk
2pm  Thesis Defense:  Fundamental Aerosol-Cloud Interactions and their Influence on the Aerosol Indirect Effect on Climate
4pm  Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages? Micro Evidence from Germany
5:15pm  Safe Streets Petition Delivery Party
6pm  ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: [BRECHT]IT: EXIT STAGE LEFT with MARTA KUZMA
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Emulsions and Foams
7pm  Spooky Action at a Distance:  The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything

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Tuesday, November 1
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8am  Boston TechBreakfast: Smartick Method, and More!
12pm  Wearable and Bedside Biophotonics: technologies at the intersection between personalized medicine and personal health
12pm  Public Interest Data Science: The Data for Justice Project
4pm  Green Eelgrass, Blue Carbon
4pm  The Challenge of Protecting the Public and Promoting Innovation
4:30pm  How to Improve Presidential Elections
4:30pm  Lecture by Christian Bok: The Poetics of Protein 13: The Writing of Genetic Sonnets
5:30pm  Whose Vote Matters?
5:30pm  The Future of Nature: Conservation's Next Generation
6pm  A Conversation with Chuck Hagel
6pm  HIGHLIGHTS FROM NAEM'S 2016 EHS MANAGEMENT FORUM
6:30pm  Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II
7pm  Waging War:  The Clash Between Presidents and Congress, 1776 to ISIS

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

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Monday, October 24
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Massachusetts Food Day!
Monday, October 24

Food Day  the nationwide grassroots campaign for healthy, affordable, and sustainably produced food has served as a platform for many around our state to celebrate and educate their community with regards to our local food system. MA organizers have reached out to me to ask if Food Day is still being celebrated and the answer is YES.

Food Day is still being celebrated by many across the Commonwealth, and our country, yet the coordinating office, Center for Science in the Public Interest, based in DC, was not able to secure funding for their staff or materials.

One thing is true, the hundreds of organizers who created events, shared information, taught cooking to old and young alike, advocated for policy change and so much more, did so because they cared about the health and wellbeing of their community!

That said, the 6th Annual FOOD DAY is a month away and you are encouraged to reach out to others in your community, workplace, place of worship, and schools/campuses to host an activity to highlight what is important to you within our local food system.

What do you want to share or teach?
What can you highlight or change regarding your local food system?
How can you and your peers make a fun, easy and informative event/activity that can strengthen community networks as you focus on a healthy and sustainable food system for all of residents in your community?

Across Massachusetts last year, over 600 events were created and hosted by individuals and organizations working to make our food system more sustainable, accessible and healthier. Some events lasted a few hours, some days and a few were month long. Activities were small and large; the key was the education, communication and information-sharing initiated across the state with neighbors, students, families, co-workers and clients.

Listed below are a few Ideas for the activities you could plan:
MA schools will take the “Eat Real” 2015 challenge (over 450 schools did last year!)
Film screenings in your living room, work, local college
“Sourcing local challenge” within your organization
Cooking demonstrations and food education workshops
Host an “Apple Crunch” with community groups or at your office
Farm tours and community activities with your local farmer
Health center staff members and businesses hosting local food potlucks
Food system forums at local community centers
College campus organizing-dozens of campuses participated across MA!

For those of you who “do this every day”, it is an opportunity to broaden your reach, to create larger networks and to build on your current work. You can still visit the national website at http://www.foodday.org for more information; you can use the logos, materials, etc. for your celebration.
Thank you for all you do on Food Day and every day!

Rose Arruda, Urban Agriculture Coordinator
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources, 251 Causeway Street, Suite 500, Boston
Desk 617-626-1849
Cell:  617-851-3644

More information at https://fooddayma.wordpress.com and https://www.facebook.com/FoodDayMA/

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Nuclear Issues in the Presidential Campaign and Beyond: A Discussion with Rebecca Hersman
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, 10 – 11 a.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Rubenstein Building, Carr Conference Room (R-219), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
SPEAKER(S)  Rebecca Hersman
DETAILS  Join CSIS's Rebecca Hersman for this round table discussion on "Nuclear Issues in the Presidential Campaign." Open to Harvard University students and fellows.
Rebecca Hersman is director of the Project on Nuclear Issues and senior adviser for the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Ms. Hersman joined CSIS in April 2015 from the Department of Defense, where since 2009 she served as deputy assistant secretary of defense for countering weapons of mass destruction. She holds an M.A. in Arab studies from Georgetown University and a B.A. from Duke University.

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PAOC Colloquium - Jonathan Zehr (UC Santa Cruz)
Monday, October 24
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker:  Jonathan Zehr, UC Santa Cruz
Research in Zehr Laboratory focuses on how microorganisms control the availability of nitrogen, a critical element in all life as we know it. Nitrogen, a major plant nutrient, is transformed from one form to another by microorganisms, and moves between habitats. A large reservoir of nitrogen on Earth resides in the air we breath: 80% of the atmosphere is nitrogen gas. Nitrogen gas, or dinitrogen (2 nitrogen atoms triple bonded together) is unavailable to most organisms, in particular the eukaryotic plants and animals. Many diverse prokaryotic microorganisms have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into a biologically available form. Biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by an enzyme, called nitrogenase. Since most of the microorganisms in the natural environment have yet to be cultivated, we study the microorganisms in the environment that fix nitrogen by looking for the genes and proteins involved in nitrogen fixation.

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. 2016/2017 co-ordinator: Christine Chen (ccy at mit.edu)

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Perturbing Coccolithophores: The Past and Future of Earth’s Stabilizers
Monday, October 24
12:00PM
Harvard, Geo Museum, Haller Hall (102), 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Rosalind Rickaby, University of Oxford. 
Lunch is provided and will be served at 11:45am.

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/event/department-colloquium-series-14

Contact Name:  Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Confronting Deep and Persistent Climate Change Uncertainty
Monday, October 24
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Gernot Wagner, Research Associate, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Lecturer on Environmental Science and Public Policy, and Fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment; and Richard Zeckhauser, Frank P. Ramsey Professor of Political Economy, Harvard Kennedy School Lunch will be provided.

Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  cepr at hks.harvard.edu
617-495-8693

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Three Scientists Walk into a Barricade…' Expert mobilization in Two Boston-area Social Movements
Monday, October 24
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Scott Frickel, Brown University

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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Bioinspired Robots and Mechanisms: Embracing the Environment
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, 2 – 3 p.m.
WHERE  Wyss Institute, Room 330, 60 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Research study, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering
SPEAKER(S)Mark R. Cutkosky, Ph.D., Fletcher Jones Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	Events at wyss.harvard.edu
DETAILS  As we bring robots out of the laboratory and into the world at large, one of the most important lessons we learn from nature goes beyond
how to tolerate, to also include how to exploit interactions with materials and surfaces in the environment.  Nature offers many examples of structures and functional materials that help to manage these interactions.

Investigations of surface interactions allow us to discover new opportunities for synergy when combining multiple locomotion modes. Examples of robots that need to take advantage of surface interactions include multimodal flying/climbing robots, microtugs, and free-flying robots that grasp objects using gecko-inspired adhesives.
Exploring parallels in nature, Dr. Cutkosky’s research activities include robotic manipulation and tactile sensing and the design and fabrication of biologically inspired robots.

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The Welfare Impact of Consumer Reviews: A Case Study of the Hotel Industry
Monday, October 24
2:30p–4:00p
MIT, Building E52-432, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Giorgios Zervas, Boston University

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): IO Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Major Transitions in Political Order
Monday, October 24
3pm
Tufts, Cohen Auditorium, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford

DR Simon De Deo runs the Laboratory for Social Minds at Indiana University, where he is a professor of complex systems and cognitive science. He is also on the external faculty of the Santa Fe Institute (SFI).

Abstract: We present three major transitions that occur on the way to the elaborate and diverse societies of the modern era. Our account links the worlds of social animals such as pigtail macaques and monk parakeets to examples from human history, including 18th Century London and the contemporary online phenomenon of Wikipedia. From the first awareness and use of group-level social facts to the emergence of norms and their self-assembly into normative bundles, each transition represents a new relationship between the individual and the group. At the center of this relationship is the use of coarse-grained information gained via lossy compression. The role of top-down causation in the origin of society parallels that conjectured to occur in the origin and evolution of life itself.

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Engaging our Communities in a Dialogue and Action on Racial Justice
Monday, October 24
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Boston University Photonics Center, 8 Saint Marys Street, Floor 9, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/engaging-our-communities-in-a-dialogue-and-action-on-racial-justice-tickets-28187625948

Join the Boston University School of Social Work Dean’s Office, the BUSSW Equity and Inclusion Committee, and Howard Thurman Center at Boston University for a presentation and discussion on racial justice with Dean Larry E. Davis. 

Dr. Larry E. Davis is the Dean of the Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, where he is the Donald M. Henderson Professor and also the Director of the Center on Race and Social Problems. He has spent his life and career dedicated to issues of race, civil rights, and social justice. He earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Michigan State University and a Masters in social work and a Masters in psychology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Davis then decided to work in the trenches, joining VISTA and spending three years in one of New York City’s poorest neighborhoods. He returned to academia and became the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. from the dual-degree program in social work and psychology at the University of Michigan. 

Dr. Davis has long been recognized as a leading scholar of the narrative about race in America and its role in social justice.  His academic life has been dedicated to the creation of solution-based dialogues that promote a more racially equitable society. 

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James Jennings: Gentrification, Neighborhood Data, and Community Voices
Monday, October 24
3:30 PM – 4:30 PM EDT
City Hall Boston Room 801, City Hall Square, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/james-jennings-gentrification-neighborhood-data-and-community-voices-tickets-28579008584

The presentation is based on study, “Understanding Gentrification and Displacement: Community Voices and Changing Neighborhoods” by James Jennings, Bob Terrell, Kalila Barnett, Ashley Harding and Jen Douglas.  The study was sponsored by the Hyams Foundation.  The rationale for the study was based on growing angst about gentrification and displacement in some neighborhoods; intense real estate development in a context of continuing income and wealth inequality; and, concern in Roxbury that long struggles for a better neighborhood may not accrue to those who fought for improving living conditions.  The methodology was based on analysis of census and business data; literature review about ongoing anti-gentrification initiatives; and meetings and conversations with 23 community actors about their ideas for preventing displacement.

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Distributional Consequences of Changes in Labor Demand: Evidence from a Natural Resource Boom
Monday, October 24
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E52-164, 50 Memorial Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Alex Bartik, MIT

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Imagine Boston 2030 and BuildBPS: Conversation with Young People
Monday, October 24
4:30 PM – 5:30 PM EDT
Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building, 2300 Washington Street, 2nd Floor, Room 2-13A&B, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/imagine-boston-2030-and-buildbps-conversation-with-young-people-tickets-28461643542

Hello Young People and BPS Students!

You are invited to engage in a conversation with Natalia Urtubey, Director of Engagement for the City of Boston and Ben Vainer, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Education Cabinet for the City of Boston around two specific city planning processes.  The event will be held on Monday, October 24th from 4:30-5:30pm at the BPS Bruce Bolling Building, 2300 Washington Street, Room 2-13 A/B on the 2nd floor.

Imagine Boston 2030 is the first citywide planning process in over fifty years. Since last September, we've gathered input from over 12,000 interactions and we're looking for more! The Fall Engagement Team Campaign is designed to get residents’ perspectives on where they would prioritize growth,  teach residents about protecting our land from the impacts of climate change, their take on adding favorite features, and engaging in dialogue around the ways in which Boston is growing.

BPS is comprised of 128 buildings, totaling more than 11 million square feet. Nearly two-thirds of the school buildings were constructed before World War II. The facility needs for modernization and repair exceed the resources available to address them. BuildBPS, the Educational and Facilities Master Plan, will create a new pipeline of capital funding and will provide a strategic framework for construction and renovation projects in Boston Public Schools (BPS) buildings over the next ten years.

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Predicting and Adapting to Increased Hurricane Risk
Monday, October 24
5:00 pm
Radcliffe, Sheerr Room, Fay House, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

Lecture by Kerry A. Emanuel, Professor of Atmospheric Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Introduction by John Huth, Codirector of the science program at the Radcliffe Institute and Donner Professor of Science in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences
This event is free and open to the public. Doors open at 4:45 p.m.; lecture begins at 5 p.m.
Part of the 2016–2017 Oceans Lecture Series. A larger, one-day public symposium on the topic takes place on Friday, October 28, 2016.

Oceans Lecture Series

More information at http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2016-kerry-a-emanuel-lecture

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Forum: Jose Antonio Vargas
Monday, October 24
6:00 p.m. 
Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, Littauer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jose Antonio Vargas is a journalist and filmmaker, and serves as the CEO of Define American and #EmergingUS. Jose was part of The Washington Post team that won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting for coverage of the Virginia Tech shooting. Vargas revealed his undocumented immigration status in an article in The New York Times Magazine. He went on to produce and direct his autobiographical  documentary, Documented, broadcasted by CNN, and later directed MTV’s White People. You can watch a short video of Jose’s story on Define American.

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Driving the Inclusion Agenda for Local Government: A Conversation with Boston Mayor Marty Walsh
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Starr Auditorium, B200, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Center for Public Leadership
Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Boston Mayor Marty Walsh
Moderated by Patricia Bellinger, CPL Executive Director and Adjunct Lecturer, HKS

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Viscosity and Polymers
Monday, October 24
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Bill Yosses, (@billyosses), former White House executive pastry chef, author of “Desserts for Dummies” and “The Perfect Finish”
Vayu Maini Rekdal, (@youngNYchefs), co-founder of the Young Chefs Program, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Oct. 31
“Emulsions and Foams”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Doctors Without Borders Recruitment Information Session
Monday, October 24 
7:00-8:30PM
Boston Public Library – Central Library, 230 Dartmouth Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.forcedfromhome.com/events/recruitment-information-session-boston-massachusetts/#tickets

Every day, Doctors Without Borders aid workers from around the world provide assistance to people whose survival is threatened by violence, neglect, or catastrophe—treating those most in need regardless of political, religious, or economic interest. Whether an emergency involves armed conflicts or epidemics, malnutrition or natural disasters, Doctors Without Borders is committed to bringing quality medical care to people caught in crisis.

On Monday, October 24th, medical and non-medical professionals are invited to attend an evening presentation to learn more about joining Doctors Without Borders’ pool of dedicated aid workers.

An aid worker and Field Human Resources Officer will discuss requirements and the application process, and you’ll meet experienced Doctors Without Borders aid workers from the area and hear their firsthand stories of “life in the field.”

Please take a moment to review our recruitment requirements before registering for this event:  http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/work-us/work-field/general-requirements

The presentation will last 90 minutes, including Q&A.

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ONE Time Film Screening of PURSUING HAPPINESS
Monday, October 24
7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Regal Fenway Stadium 13, 201 Brookline Avenue, Boston
RSVP at  https://www.tugg.com/events/pursuing-happiness
Cost:  $11

What is happiness? 

"From the beginning of life itself, we have been in a constant pursuit of happiness.But instead of living the actual moment of true joy we are in constant search for something. Filmmakers Adam Shell and Nicholas Kraft set out to find the secret of the happiest people in America."

I had the honor of meeting Adam Shell and he gracious offered me to do a screening of his film at Regal Fenway Stadium 13 in Boston. We need YOUR support - In order to make this screening happen, we need to sell 80 tickets before October 10th! Invite your friends, colleagues, parents and grandparents! 

Please join us for an exclusive, one-night only screening of "Pursuing Happiness". Get your tickets here: https://www.tugg.com/events/pursuing-happiness

After the film, please join Dr. Jen Brownstein for a stimulating discussion. I will provide some tips to increase your well-being. 

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Tuesday, October 25
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Behind the Kitchen Door: The State of Working Conditions in Boston's Growing Restaurant Industry
Tuesday, October 25
10:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Boston Public Market, The Kitchen, 100 Hanover Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/behind-the-kitchen-door-the-state-of-working-conditions-in-bostons-growing-restaurant-industry-tickets-28156728533

"Behind the Kitchen Door" is a groundbreaking report, conducted by the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Boston, which investigates the obstacles and opportunities of creating racial and economic equity for workers in the Boston restaurant industry.
Join us for a Restaurant Industry Summit that will bring together diverse stakeholders —including employers, restaurant workers, advocates and policy makers— to discuss the most recent report on the Boston’s restaurant industry. 

Event will feature remarks from:  Saru Jayaraman, Co-Founder/Co-Director of ROC United and Local restaurant workers, employers and policymakers
Plus a Q&A session tackling the most pressing issues facing Boston's restaurant industry
Lunch will be served immediately after the panel discussion. The event will be catered by local high-road employer and RAISE member, Bon Me! www.bonmetruck.com

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Speaker Series: Tim Wu
Tuesday, October 25
12:00-1:00 p.m. 
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Tim Wu is an author, policy advocate, and professor at Columbia University, best known for coining the term “net neutrality.” In 2006, Scientific American named him one of 50 leaders in science and technology; in 2007, 01238 magazine listed him as one of Harvard’s 100 most influential graduates; in 2013, National Law Journal included him in “America’s 100 Most Influential Lawyers”; and in 2014 and 2015, he was named to the “Politico 50.” He formerly wrote for Slate, where he won the Lowell Thomas Gold medal for Travel Journalism, and is a contributing writer for The New Yorker. In 2015, he was appointed to the Executive Staff of the Office of New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman as a senior enforcement counsel and special adviser.

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Bipartisan Leadership: A Conversation With Trent Lott
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, 12:30 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/voices/events/lott/
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Voices in Leadership - Division of Policy Translation and Leadership Development, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
SPEAKER(S)  Trent Lott, former U.S. Senator from Mississippi and Senate Majority Leader
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/voices/events/lott/
TICKET INFO  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/voices/events/lott/
CONTACT INFO	voices at hsph.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Attend or Watch Online
The live webcast is free and open to the public for online viewing, 12:30-1:00pm, at www.hsph.harvard.edu
Those with Harvard ID are invited to RSVP to attend in person from 12:30-1:30pm: www.hsph.harvard.edu…
Senator Trent Lott represented the people of Mississippi in Congress for 35 years and is one of a handful of officials to have held elected leadership positions in both the House of Representatives and Senate. During his 16 years in the House and 19 years in the Senate, he worked closely with seven presidential administrations and was regarded as a savvy coalition builder and dealmaker. He was the former Senate Majority Leader, Senate Republican Whip and House Republican Whip.
Senator Lott joined the House in 1973, representing Mississippi’s Fifth Congressional District. From 1981 to 1989 he served as House Minority Whip and forged a bipartisan alliance that enacted economic recovery programs and national security initiatives. He became the Senate’s 16th Majority Leader in 1996 and was instrumental in the passing the welfare reform bill and the budget and tax cut agreement that limited federal spending while stimulating the economic growth, helping to balance the federal budget for the first time since 1968. In 2006 Senator Lott was elected Senate Republican Whip, giving him the distinction of being the only person to hold that position in both the House and Senate.
Today Senator Lott co-chairs the Public Policy practice and provides strategic advice at Squire Patton Boggs, consulting and lobbying clients on a wide range of public policy matters, including defense and homeland security, tax and financial services, energy, transportation and communications. Senator Lott and fellow former Senator John Breaux founded the Breaux-Lott Leadership Group, a bipartisan public policy firm that quickly became one of the 20 largest government relations firms in Washington.
LINK  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/voices/events/lott/

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Climate Threats and Solutions at the Community Level
Tuesday, October 25
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Bradley Campbell, President, Conservation Law Foundation

Mr. Campbell will speak on the challenges of communicating climate threats and the need to transform planning and development at the community level, using as example CLF’s recent lawsuit against ExxonMobil for climate deceit and risks to Mystic River communities.

Bio:  Bradley Campbell is President of the Conservation Law Foundation, an organization recognized for bringing innovative, pragmatic solutions to New England’s toughest environmental challenges. As Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (2002-2006), Campbell successfully led major initiatives to protect water resources, reshape development, restore natural resources, and address global climate change. He enforced federal environmental laws as regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Mid-Atlantic region (1999-2001), served in the Clinton administration as associate director of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (1995-1999), and litigated natural resource cases for the U.S. Department of Justice (1990-1995). His many honors and awards include the prestigious John Marshall Award, the highest level of recognition from the Department of Justice.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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D-Lab's Biomass Fuels and Cookstoves group
Tuesday, October 25 
5:30 - 6:30 PM
MIT, Building E-19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScM0-VoVMJEvg5twSUPmYKqcrDVxUuszH3AiSkXgdWo95g-Ug/viewform?c=0&w=1&usp=send_form

Dan Sweeney will provide a sample of some of the ingredients that are baked into their work including direct support to alternative cooking fuel businesses in East Africa, hands-on design training to promote innovation in the cooking sector, and methods for uncovering clues about adoption and behavior change associated with improved cookstoves.  Bring along your appetite for knowledge (and food). The team looks forward to tasteful discussion and input from attendees.

Please, if you plan on coming to this presentation, RSVP so that we can provide enough dinner for all attendees.

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Askwith Forums: Assessing the DREAM and 15 years of Congressional Inaction
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE	617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE  This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  Speakers:
Julieta Garibay, founding board member and deputy advocacy director, United We Dream 
Donald E. Graham, co-founder, TheDream.US; chairman of the board, Graham Holdings Company; founding chairman, District of Columbia College Access Program
Angela Maria Kelley, executive director, Center for American Progress Action Fund; senior vice president, Center for American Progress
Jose Antonio Vargas, journalist, filmmaker, and founder, Define American
Moderator: Roberto Gonzales, assistant professor of education, HGSE

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the initial introduction of the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act – legislation that would provide undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children a path toward legal status through education or the military. Despite widespread and bipartisan support, the DREAM Act has failed to pass at the federal level, placing the dreams of more than 2 million young people on hold. What lessons have we learned over these last fifteen years? What has been the cost of inaction? And how have communities, institutions and local governments responded in the absence of immigration reform? Join us as we reflect on and contemplate the bill that aimed at creating opportunity for this vital segment of the immigrant community.

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Is Democracy in Crisis? Diagnosis & Solutions
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Jason Brennan, Robert J. and Elizabeth Flanagan Family Chair and Provost's Distinguished Associate Professor of Strategy, Economics, Ethics, and Public Policy, McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University, Contributor, Bleeding Heart Libertarians
Ilya Somin, Professor of Law, George Mason University, Contributor, Washington Post “Volokh Conspiracy”
Melissa Williams, Visiting Scholar, Ash Center, Harvard Kennedy School, Professor of Political Science & Founding Director, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
Christopher Robichaud (Moderator), Lecturer in Ethics and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum
617-495-1380
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/democracy-crisis-diagnosis-solutions

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Boston SCORE Workshop: Starting a Specialty Food Business 
Tuesday October 25
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM 
Boston Public Library, Kirstein Business Library, 700 Boylston Street, Commonwealth Salon, Boston 

Have you thought about marketing the secret family barbecue sauce as a specialty food product? Are you considering turning your love of baking into a catering business? Are you flirting with the idea of owning a food truck? 

Many of us love to cook, but developing and growing a food business requires a lot more than culinary skills.

This workshop will help you consider the many factors that go into a successful food business, and will also acquaint you with some of the valuable resources in Massachusetts that are available for manufacturing, packaging, and selling specialty food products. 

Note: this workshop is NOT geared for people considering opening a restaurant, which is even MORE complicated!

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Boston Chapter of SCORE and the Kirstein Business Library at the Boston Public Library.  

The workshop is presented by SCORE Mentor Fred DeFinis.  Mr. DeFinis is the Founder and CEO of Component Solutions, Inc. a supplier of playground components, and has held senior marketing and sales management positions in a number of startup and early stage manufacturing companies.

617-565-5591 
workshops at scoreboston.org 

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The Attention Merchants:  The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads
Tuesday, October 25
6:30 PM (Doors at 6:00)
WorkBar, 45 Prospect Street, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Columbia University professor TIM WU—author of The Master Switch and known for coining the term "net neutrality"—for a discussion of his latest book, The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads.
About The Attention Merchants

Attention merchant: an industrial-scale harvester of human attention. A firm whose business model is the mass capture of attention for resale to advertisers.

In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of advertising enticements, branding efforts, sponsored social media, commercials and other efforts to harvest our attention. Over the last century, few times or spaces have remained uncultivated by the "attention merchants," contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times. Tim Wu argues that this is not simply the byproduct of recent inventions but the end result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention. From the pre-Madison Avenue birth of advertising to TV's golden age to our present age of radically individualized choices, the business model of "attention merchants" has always been the same. He describes the revolts that have risen against these relentless attempts to influence our consumption, from the remote control to FDA regulations to Apple's ad-blocking OS. But he makes clear that attention merchants grow ever-new heads, and their means of harvesting our attention have given rise to the defining industries of our time, changing our nature—cognitive, social, and otherwise—in ways unimaginable even a generation ago.

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Troubled Waters: Fewer Fish, Increasing Malnutrition
Tuesday, October 25
6:30 PM
Belmont Media Center, 9 Lexington Street, Belmont

Christopher Golden, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: Associate Director, Planetary Health Alliance, Harvard University Center for the Environment. Dr. Golden is an ecologist and epidemiologist, whose research is concerned with the effects of global environmental trends on human health.

Many developing nations depend on fish as the main source of nutrition, and for centuries those populations were assured of an abundance of fish. In recent years a combination of climate change, massive depletion of fish stocks by commercial fishing fleets, and exploitative trade policies are together creating nutritional crises in many poor nations. Dr. Golden explains the impact of these conditions on the health of millions of people. He also provides important facts about the nutritional differences between wild and farmed fish.

Contemporary Science Issues and Innovations

More information at http://www.scienceforthepublic.org/coming-events/oct-25-troubled-waters-fewer-fish-increasing-malnutrition

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Chuck Collins, Born on Third Base
Tuesday, October 25
7:00pm 
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

As inequality grabs headlines, steals the show in presidential debates, and drives deep divides between the haves and have nots in America, class war brews. On one side, the wealthy wield power and advantage, wittingly or not, to keep the system operating in their favor—all while retreating into enclaves that separate them further and further from the poor and working class. On the other side, those who find it increasingly difficult to keep up or get ahead lash out—waging a rhetorical war against the rich and letting anger and resentment, however justifiable, keep us from seeing new potential solutions.

But can we suspend both class wars long enough to consider a new way forward? Is it really good for anyone that most of society’s wealth is pooling at the very top of the wealth ladder? Does anyone, including the one percent, really want to live in a society plagued by economic apartheid?

It is time to think differently, says longtime inequality expert and activist Chuck Collins. Born into the one percent, Collins gave away his inheritance at 26 and spent the next three decades mobilizing against inequality. He uses his perspective from both sides of the divide to deliver a new narrative.

Collins calls for a ceasefire and invites the wealthy to come back home, investing themselves and their wealth in struggling communities.  And he asks the non-wealthy to build alliances with the one percent and others at the top of the wealth ladder.

Stories told along the way explore the roots of advantage, show how taxpayers subsidize the wealthy, and reveal how charity, used incorrectly, can actually reinforce extreme inequality. Readers meet pioneers who are crossing the divide to work together in new ways, including residents in the author’s own Boston-area neighborhood who have launched some of the most interesting community transition efforts in the nation.

In the end, Collins’s national and local solutions not only challenge inequality but also respond to climate change and offer an unexpected, fresh take on one of our most intransigent problems.

Chuck Collins is a researcher, campaigner, storyteller, and writer based at the Institute for Policy Studies where he co-edits Inequality.org. He has written extensively on wealth inequality in previous books like 99 to 1, Wealth and Our Commonwealth (with Bill Gates Sr.), and Economic Apartheid in America as well as in The Nation, The American Prospect, and numerous other magazines and news outlets. Collins grew up in the 1 percent as the great grandson of meatpacker Oscar Mayer, but at age 26 he gave away his inheritance. He has been working to reduce inequality and strengthen communities since 1982 and in the process has cofounded numerous initiatives, including Wealth for the Common Good (now merged with the Patriotic Millionaires), United for a Fair Economy, and Divest-Invest. He is also a leader in the transition movement, and a co-founder of the Jamaica Plain New Economy Transition and the Jamaica Plain Forum, both in the Boston-area community in which he lives.

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Neighborhood Solar Informational Meeting 
Tuesday October 25
7:00 PM
Arlington Library Community Room, Robbins Public Library, 700 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington

An informational meeting for a time-limited solar offer for the towns of Arlington, Cambridge, Watertown, Belmont, and Somerville, endorsed by Sustainable Arlington, Green Cambridge, and the Watertown Environmental and Energy Efficiency Committee

This solar initiative is designed to be local, fair, and transparent.  Details are available at neighborhoodsolar.org.  The program is open to all residents, businesses, and non-profits.  Any questions or concerns about participation, please contact Jocelyn Tager at info at neighborhoodsolar.org to determine eligibility. If you live in Arlington, please contact David Landskov at landskov at gmail.com. If you live in Cambridge, please contact Quinton Zondervan at solar at greencambridge.org

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Nuclear Weapons, The Environment and the US Presidential Elections
Tuesday, October 25
7:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building 6-120, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Kerry Emanuel, Jim Walsh, R.Scott Kemp
The planet has two existential threats-nuclear weapons and global climate change. The question of how they are handled should be central to the choice of a president. How would a Clinton Whitehouse differ from a Trump Whitehouse? 

Join us for a discussion with two preeminent scholars, James Walsh (nuclear) and Kerry Emanuel (environmental), moderated by Nuclear Science and Engineering Professor, R. Scott Kemp.

Web site: radius.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Cost: n/a
Sponsor(s): Radius/T&C, Nuclear (Weapons) Matter
For more information, contact:  Patricia-Maria Weinmann
617-253-0108
weinmann at mit.edu 

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Wednesday, October 26
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Healthy Materials Summit
Wednesday, October 26
8:00 AM – 8:00 PM
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM - Summit
1:00 PM - 5:00PM - Workshop
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM - Reception
Google, 5 Cambridge Center, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/healthy-materials-summit-tickets-26545539423
Cost:  $0 – $100

Morning Session 8:00AM - 12:00PM
A professional gathering, hosted by Google at their Kendall Square headquarters.
Are your clients concerned about the materials in their buildings? Of course they should be. You can help them stay on top of the subject. Come for this deep dive into the health implications of building materials and finishes.
Learn from industry champions and leaders about how they are leveraging health product declarations (HPDs) and environmental product declarations (EPDs) to create buildings that improve the quality of life for their occupants and build their corporate brand.
The goal of this summit is to inspire and empower institutional and commercial leaders, designers and builders, and manufacturers and product vendors to increase their supply and dempand of transparent, healthy building materials and products.

Speakers:
Gregory Norris - ILFI
Doug Brown - BASF
Rebecca Callahan Klein - Global Health Exchange
Monica Nakielski - Partners Healthcare
Brent Ehrlich - Building Green
Barbra Batshalom - SPI (Silver Sponsor)
Denny Daragh - Forbo (Gold Sponsor)

Components:
Supply And Demand Hackathons
Healthy Materials 101

Afternoon Add-On: Living Building Challenge Materials Petal Workshop

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Dr. John D. Liu in Cambridge
Wednesday October 26
8:30 - 10:00     Morning Meeting, Cambridge Friends Meeting 8 Longfellow Park, Cambridge
10:00 - 12:00     Informal conversation  (Friends Meeting)
12:30 - 3:00       Brown Bag Lunch and small group presentation (Friends Meeting)
3:30  - 5:30      Large group presentation (Friends Meeting)
7:00 – 9:00      Large group presentation at Haller Hall. Harvard Museum of Natural History, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

John Liu, Documentary Videographer and Soil Scientist, will speak at Friends Meeting House during the day on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 and in the evening at Harvard’s Museum of Natural History. He is visiting this country as a guest of  Global Friends and the Asia Society in New York.  Dr. Liu is Director, Environmental Education Media Project (EEMP) Visiting Fellow, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO) Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) Ecosystems Ambassador, Commonland Foundation.

Dr. Liu filmed the transformation of the Loess Plateau in China from totally desertified land into an abundant, productive and carbon sequestering landscape, convincing him to become a soil scientist. He has documented large-scale ecosystem regeneration in many countries and is now introducing the concept of Ecosystem Restoration Cooperatives where people can learn regenerative agriculture skills while helping to restore degraded lands.

Dr. Liu’s work is hopeful and inspirational and his spirit is universal.  

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MAPC [Metropolitan Area Planning Council] Fall Council Meeting with Keynote Speaker Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito
Wednesday October 26
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM EDT
Boston Marriott Quincy Hotel, 1000 Marriott Drive, Quincy
The Marriott runs a shuttle every half hour from the MBTA Station to the hotel. Buses will pick up at 7:30 a.m., 8 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. from bus berth #5 at Quincy Adams Station. Please look for buses showing a "Marriott/Office Park Shuttle" sign.
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07edaqn54laf6c45a3&oseq=&c=b77caa50-eace-11e3-83bf-d4ae529a7ac4&ch=b78312f0-eace-11e3-83bf-d4ae529a7ac4

MAPC is honored to announce that Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito will be the keynote speaker at our Fall Council Meeting on Wednesday, October 26. Please join us!
 
In addition to the Lieutenant Governor's remarks and the 2016 MPO elections, we will feature information on five critical new municipal tools that can assist cities and towns in their local planning. Come learn how you can:
Invest in clean energy while helping commercial property owners save money; 
Collaborate with neighboring communities, save money, and more efficiently deliver services;
Use money from your parking meters to promote economic development;
Zone for more workforce housing and attract young families to your city; and
Make busy streets safer by lowering speed limits.
Come find out how these new tools will affect your city or town and get an opportunity to speak with MAPC staff experts in all five issue areas!

Contact:  Tom Hauenstein, Metropolitan Area Planning Council
thauenstein at mapc.org
617.933.0700

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MA Residential Energy Code - Envelope and Building Science
Wednesday, October 26
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT
Mass DoER building, 118 Cambridge Street, Conference Room A (2nd Floor), Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ma-residential-energy-code-envelope-and-building-science-102616-boston-tickets-28223217403
Cost:  $0 – $20

Based on the new 2015 IECC. Learn best practice strategies for building assemblies to meet the new energy code from foundations through roofs. Using case studies, exercises, and discussion, proven methods will be demonstrated to build cost-effective high performance homes. 
AIA and BPI credits available
***Be very conscious of the location.  There are several streets in Boston named Cambridge Street.  This location is in the same building as the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, near Government Center.

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Mindbugs: The Ordinary Origins of Bias
Wednesday, October 26
10:30a–12:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Calvin Lai, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology (Harvard)
Conscious experience provides an immediate, compelling, and incomplete account of mental life. Much of perception, thinking, and action is shaped by mental activity that occurs outside of conscious awareness or conscious control. Because of that, judgment and action can be unintentionally influenced by factors that we do not recognize, and may not value. 

There will be three parts to the session: (1) demonstrations of perceptual and cognitive illusions illustrating that we don't have complete access to or control over our own minds, (2) examples of how this can translate to social judgment of ourselves and others, and (3) research evidence and implications for diversity and inclusion in teaching. 

Humans use a variety of effective strategies for translating the world outside the mind into a mental representation inside the mind. However, these processes are not direct translations of reality. Experience is a combination of the immediate input and our expectations and theories of how the world operates derived from previous experience. These processes are highly efficient, largely unconscious, and prone to surprising, sometimes amusing, 'errors.' Research in cognition and perception reveals some of the basic processes that occur outside of awareness to manage interpretation and interaction with reality.

Web site: http://calvinklai.weebly.com/research-interests.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Teaching and Learning Laboratory, Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Education
For more information, contact:  Leann Dobranski
617-253-3371
leann at mit.edu 

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Sustainable Urbanization: the Future of Aviation, Buildings and Food
Wednesday, October 26
12:30–1:30 pm
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, FXB G-13, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sustainable-urbanization-the-future-of-aviation-buildings-and-food-tickets-26841812584?aff=erelpanelorg
Limited seats, registration required.

Dr. Aaron Bernstein, Assistant Director, Center for Health and the Global Environment
John Mandyck, Chief Sustainability Officer, United Technologies
This fall, the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment is hosting a Sustainability for Health Leadership Series showcasing trailblazing professionals in the field of sustainability and health. This speaker series will introduce attendees to pressing issues students will explore in the new Sustainability, Health, and the Global Environment Master in Public Health program at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In this program students will learn the latest research techniques, and have opportunities to connect with cutting edge though leaders in global businesses and governments who are focused on the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings.

More information at http://chgeharvard.org/events

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The Haves, the Have Nots and the Health of Everyone: Exploring Connections Between Environmental Equity and Sustainability
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Kresge G-1,  677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Lecture, Science, Sustainability
SPEAKER(S)  Rachel Morello-Frosch Ph.D., M.P.H.
Professor in Environmental Science, Policy and Management University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health
DETAILS  Dr. Rachel Morello-Frosch's research focuses on environmental health and environmental justice. She is particularly interested in addressing the double jeopardy faced by communities of color and the poor who experience high exposures to environmental hazards and who are more vulnerable to the toxic effects of pollution due to poverty, malnutrition, discrimination, and underlying health conditions. How do matters of race and class affect distributions of health risks in the United States? What are the causes and consequences of environmental disparities and health inequalities? How can research create "upstream" opportunities for intervention and prevention? Dr. Morello-Frosch is also interested in evaluating the influence of community participation on environmental health research, science, regulation, and policy-making, as well as in developing methods to foster community-based participatory research.

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Energy Democracy and Gender Diversity in the Renewable Energy Transition: The Value of a More Holistic, Inclusive Approach
Wednesday, October 26
12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Tufts, Cabot 702, 167 Holland Street, Medford

Jennie C. Stephens is the Dean’s Professor of Sustainability Science & Policy at Northeastern’s School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs. Her research, teaching, and community engagement focus on social and political aspects of the renewable energy transition, strengthening resilience, and responses to climate change.

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Self-Improving Microvascular Materials
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, 1 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Wyss Institute (Longwood), Room 521, 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Wyss Institute
SPEAKER(S)  Aaron Esser-Kahn, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Chemistry University of California, Irvine
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	Events at wyss.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The unique structures and functions of biological materials arise from the unique processes of patterning and rearrangement they employ - namely morphogenesis. Esser-Kahn seeks to mimic the structures formed by biological systems by mimicking the process which forms them. He will detail his initial efforts to develop a simple synthetic morphogenetic system that repatterns microvascular materials using dynamic covalent chemistry of siloxanes.
One hallmark of morphogenetic systems is adaptation and improvement of the materials properties. Esser-Kahn will demonstrate that his synthetic system improves the function of materials by altering microstructure.

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Greentown Labs' Annual DEMO Day 
Wednesday, October 26
2:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Greentown Labs, 28 Dane Street, Somerville 

Greentown Labs' annual DEMO Day brings together entrepreneurs, investors, strategic partners and VIPs from around the world to view and discuss solutions to our global environmental challenges. 

DEMO Day is a showcase of cutting-edge clean technology and innovation across the clean technology and energy sectors. Attendees will have an opportunity to meet with all of Greentown Labs' awesome member companies, tour our 33,000 sq. ft. headquarters and hear from impressive keynote speakers. 

Contact:  info at greentownlabs.com

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Subsidies for Succulents: The Welfare Impacts of the Las Vegas Cash for Grass Program
Wednesday, October 26
4:15pm - 5:30pm
Harvard, Littauer Building, Room L-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jonathan Baker, Harvard University

Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

The Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy is run by Robert Stavins and Martin Weitzman. Support from Enel Endowment for Environmental Economics and the Department of Economics is gratefully acknowledged.

Contact Name:  Jason Chapman
617-496-8054

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Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Rethinking the Endless Frontier
Wednesday, October 26
4:30PM TO 6:15PM
Harvard, Land Hall, 4th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
STS Workshop
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/workshops/cycles-of-invention-and-discovery/
The Program on Science, Technology and Society at the Harvard Kennedy School invite you to a book launch and discussion of "Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Rethinking the Endless Frontier" led by authors Venkatesh Narayanamurti, Harvard University, and Toluwalogo Odumosu, University of Virginia.

Book Description: Cycles of Invention and Discovery offers an in-depth look at the real-world practice of science and engineering. It shows how the standard categories of “basic” and “applied” have become a hindrance to the organization of the U.S. science and technology enterprise. Tracing the history of these problematic categories, Venkatesh Narayanamurti and Toluwalogo Odumosu document how historical views of policy makers and scientists have led to the construction of science as a pure ideal on the one hand and of engineering as a practical (and inherently less prestigious) activity on the other. Even today, this erroneous but still widespread distinction forces these two endeavors into separate silos, misdirects billions of dollars, and thwarts progress in science and engineering research. The authors contrast this outmoded perspective with the lived experiences of researchers at major research laboratories. Using such Nobel Prize–winning examples as magnetic resonance imaging, the transistor, and the laser, they explore the daily micro-practices of research, showing how distinctions between the search for knowledge and creative problem solving break down when one pays attention to the ways in which pathbreaking research actually happens. By studying key contemporary research institutions, the authors highlight the importance of integrated research practices, contrasting these with models of research in the classic but still-influential report Science the Endless Frontier. Narayanamurti and Odumosu’s new model of the research ecosystem underscores that discovery and invention are often two sides of the same coin that moves innovation forward.

PANEL:
Evelyn Hu, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
John Krige, Georgia Institute of Technology
Kenneth Oye, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
INTRODUCED BY:
Sheila Jasanoff, Harvard Kennedy School

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Venkatesh Narayanamurti is Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Harvard Kennedy School. Toluwalogo Odumosu is Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society and Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Virginia.

This event is a book launch followed by a reception.

Contact Name:  Shana Ashar
shana_ashar at hks.harvard.edu

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The Future of Energy Supply -- Hitting the Right Balance
Wednesday, October 26
4:45p–6:30p
MIT, Building E52-6th Floor, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Roberto Casula
The key to human development is energy and having reliable access to energy is a factor in determining how much development is possible. Many of the areas most afflicted by lack of energy access actually have enormous energy resources--both fossil and biomass, but also renewable resources. The challenge in addressing such a blunt paradox is to find a balance where everyone on the planet has energy access, while the planet confronts its gravest issue--climate change. 

About the speaker: 
Roberto Casula has been Eni's Chief Development, Operations and Technology Officer since July 2014. He is in charge of the Italian energy multinational's global operations, development activities and technological research. His previous roles have taken him all over the world but his main focus was Africa where he spent a great deal of his career. He is a graduate of mining engineering from his hometown University of Cagliari on the island of Sardinia.

Web site: http://energy.mit.edu/event/mit-energy-initiative-colloquium/
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0 
Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mitei-fall-colloquium-the-future-of-energy-supply-hitting-the-right-balance-by-enis-roberto-casula-tickets-28396532794 
Sponsor(s): MIT Energy Initiative
For more information, contact:  MIT Energy Initiative
miteievents at mit.edu 

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Sexual Collisions: Reflections on Empire, Terror, and Violence
Wednesday, October 26
5:30p–7:30p
MIT, Building E51-095, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Eng-Beng Lim, Gayatri Gopinath, Aisha Beliso-De Jesus and Ben Carrington
In the wake of the mass shootings in Orlando, the police shooting deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, the murder of Jo Cox and the post-Brexit anti-immigrant practices, and the persistence of antiblack, anti-Muslim, and homophobic violence worldwide, we must address the urgent intersection of gender and sexuality with racialized state and non-state terror. This roundtable brings together queer and feminist scholars of race, diaspora, performance, and religion to reflect on these intersections, focusing particular attention on the gendered and sexualized dimensions of contemporary crises within racial capitalism, such as: masculinity and the militarization of policing; gender, race, and incarceration; the gendered criminalization of immigrant and diasporic religions; and queer responses to policing and the "war on terror."

Feminisms Unbound 
This Consortium for Graduate Studies in Gender, Culture, Women, and Sexuality (GCWS) initiative, Feminisms Unbound, is an annual event series featuring debates that focus on feminist concerns, theories, and practices in this contemporary moment. This series is intended to foster conversations and community among Boston-area feminist intellectuals and activists. The series, in its open configuration, endeavors to allow the greatest measure of engagement across multiple disciplinary trajectories, and a full array of feminist investments.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/gcws/news+events/16-17FeminismsUnbound-terror.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies
For more information, contact:  Andrea Sutton
617-324-2085
gcws at mit.edu 

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The Barefoot Designer: A Passion for Radical Design and Community
Wednesday, October 26
6pm to 7:30pm
MIT, Building E15-001, "the Cube”, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge, MA


Carla Fernández discusses her approach to design and social empowerment.
Carla is a Mexican fashion designer and cultural historian who is documenting, preserving, revitalizing and bringing to contemporary relevance the rich textile heritage of Mexico's indigenous communities. Combining her passion for fashion and a deep respect for the artisans and communities who produce traditional textiles, she founded an ethical and sustainable business that includes a fashion label and a unique mobile design studio.
 
She has been celebrated for creating stunning contemporary fashions by collaborating and adapting traditional techniques and styles; for empowering communities, especially women, by channeling their knowledge and skills into modern design; for reinvigorating Mexico's indigenous textile traditions and establishing a detailed archive as a lasting legacy for future generations; for devising an ethical production model that fully respects the intellectual property rights of indigenous individuals and communities; and for demonstrating the important cultural, social and economic role of textiles and design for a country and community.
 
We hope you will join us for a presentation by an artist who says, "the future is handmade."

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Climate Congress "Political Values" Discussion Group
Wednesday, October 26
6pm – 8pm
Cambridge Citywide Senior Center
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.fq958ijkjjc1bfehra4p8ngq9c?authuser=0

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Founder Roundtable for High Growth Food and Beverage Entrepreneurs
Wednesday, October 26
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
Nutter, 155 Seaport Boulevard, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/founder-roundtable-for-high-growth-food-and-beverage-entrepreneurs-registration-28168833740

A joint event of the Food and Beverage Group at Nutter, KN+S Accounting, Whipstitch Capital, and JPG Resources
Please join us for this exclusive event for founders, senior executives of high growth food and beverage companies, investors, and retailers. This event will combine peer-to-peer networking with a panel discussion focused on the current state of the industry.
6:00 pm- Registration & Product Demo
7:00 pm- Keynote: View from Expo
Carol Ortenberg, Editor, Project NOSH
A look at the latest trends in food and beverage, with a particular eye on what was hot at Summer Fancy Foods and Expo East.
7:30 pm- Flash Report: Deal Trends in CPG Food and Beverage
Nick McCoy, Co-Founder and Managing Director, Whipstitch Capital
A rapid look at the latest deals and deal terms in food and beverage financings and acquisitions.
7:45 pm- Tactical Marketing for Brands
Moderator:
Jeremy Halpern, Partner, Nutter
Panelists: 
John Burns, President, Breakaway
Carrie Forbes, Marketing Director, CabinetM / Founder, Gutsey
Kate Weiler, Co-Founder, Drink Maple
So you've formulated a great product where you think there is a big market. Now how do you communicate about it? How do you engage customers and intermediaries and create pull? How do you optimize your precious dollars? This panel will discuss the tradeoffs and complexity inherent in building a mix across digital, social, traditional PR, in-store demo, trade level marketing and the wild wild west of guerilla marketing.
8:30 pm- Networking

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Visioning the Mystic
Wednesday, October 26
6:00 p.m. -  appetizers & mingling 
7:00 p.m. - presentation begins
Tufts, Breed Memorial Hall, 51 Winthrop Street, Medford
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/visioning-the-mystic-tickets-28256321418

What's your vision for the Mystic River Watershed? 
Join Patrick Herron, the Mystic River Watershed Association's (MyRWA's) new Executive Director, to hear about his vision and get a chance to share your own vision. At the event MyRWA will also honor our key volunteers who make improvements to our River every day, elect the 2016-2017 Board of Directors, and provide an update on finances. Current MyRWA members are eligible to vote - a membership table will be at the event.
More information & RSVP.

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The Art of Healing the Earth
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, 7 – 9 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard University Museum of Natural History, Haller Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Biodiversity for a Livable Climate
SPEAKER(S)  John D. Liu, Documentary Videographer and Soil Scientist, Director of the Environmental Education Media Project (EEMP), Visiting Fellow at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO), Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Ecosystems Ambassador for the Commonland Foundation.
TICKET INFO Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	Paula Phipps, Education Associate and Outreach Coordinator, Biodiversity for a Livable Climate: paula.c.phipps at gmail.com
DETAILS  Dr. John D. Liu filmed the transformation of the Loess Plateau in China from totally desertified land into an abundant, productive and carbon sequestering landscape, convincing him to become a soil scientist. He will discuss his experience documenting large-scale ecosystem regeneration in many countries and his efforts to introduce the concept of Ecosystem Restoration Cooperatives where people can learn regenerative agriculture skills while helping to restore degraded lands.

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The Music of Medicine: Tuning the body to light and sound
Wednesday, October 26
7pm - 9pm
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Thursday, October 27
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Peace through Entrepreneurship
Thursday, October 27
11:30a–12:45p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

A conversation with Steven Koltai, author of Peace through Entrepreneurship on opportunities for promoting peace through technology and entrepreneurship.

Web site: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/peace-through-entrepreneurship-with-steven-koltai-tickets-28578882206
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MISTI, Legatum Center for Development and Entrepreneurship, Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, MISTI MIT PeaceTech Initiaitve
For more information, contact:  Julia D. Turnbull 
jturnbul at mit.edu 

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There and Back Again:  From the bench to the hill and other adventures in science
Thursday, October 27
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Sheril Kirshenbaum

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Racial Regimes, Digital Economies
12:00p–4:00p
Thursday, October 27
MIT, Building 14E-304, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speakers: Feng-Mei Heberer , Michelle Cho, Lilly U. Nguyen
12pm-1pm - Feng-Mei Heberer (MIT): Racial Surplus 2.0 
1:30pm-2:30pm - Michelle Cho (McGill University): "New Breed": Parahumanism, Transnationalism, and Kpop Masculinities 
3pm-4pm - Lilly U. Nguyen (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill): Ethnic Platform and the Failure of Techno-Futurity 

That digital devices and online services are grounded in material infrastructures and the products of living and breathing human subjects is no news anymore. But what about the role of racialized labor -- and capital -- within the nexus of online and offline realities? The one-day symposium Racial Regimes and Digital Economies follows this inquiry, by exploring how the global flows of capital and labor enabling digital economies both shift and reinforce established racial hierarchies. 

See also related event at 5pm in 3-133 (CMS/W colloquium) with Kara Keeling and Lisa Nakamura

Global Studies Forum

Web site: http://mitgsl.mit.edu/news-events/racial-regimes-digital-economies
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676
lhickler at mit.edu 

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'We Have Captured Your Women': Explaining Shifts and Shocks in Jihadist Violence
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Center Library, Littauer-369, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	International Security Program
SPEAKER(S)  Aisha Ahmad, Assistant Professor, University of Toronto
CONTACT INFO	susan_lynch at harvard.edu
LINK	http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/7157/we_have_captured_your_women.html

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The Digital Trade Imbalance: Digital Trade, Digital Protectionism, and Digital Rights
Thursday, October 27
12:30 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, 23 Everett Street, Second Floor conference room, Cambridge
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2016/10/Aaronson#RSVP
Event will be live webcast at 12:30 pm AT https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2016/10/Aaronson

with Susan Ariel Aaronson, Research Professor of International Affairs and GWU Cross-Disciplinary Fellow at the George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs 
In this talk Aaronson will discuss how the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) governs information flows, how its rules could affect internet governance, digital rights, and the open internet, and how to better link policies to promote digital trade with policies to advance digital rights. 

Aaronson will also discuss the rise in digital protectionism and its troubling potential costs to innovation, human rights, and governance.

About Susan
Susan Ariel Aaronson is Research Professor of International Affairs and GWU Cross-Disciplinary Fellow at the George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs. She is currently the Carvalho Fellow at the Government Accountability Project and was the former Minerva Chair at the National War College. Aaronson’s research examines the relationship between economic change and human rights. She is currently directing projects on digital trade and protectionism, repression and civil conflict; transparency as a tool to promote labor rights and good governance; trade liberalization and public health; and whistleblowers at international organizations such as the UN and WIPO. Her work has been funded by major international foundations including MacArthur, Ford, and Rockefeller; governments such as the Netherlands, U.S., and Canada; the UN, ILO, and World Bank, and U.S. corporations including Ford Motor and Levi Strauss. Dr. Aaronson is a frequent speaker on public understanding of globalization issues and international economic developments. She regularly comments on international economics on "Marketplace" and was a monthly commentator on "All Things Considered," and "Morning Edition." She has also appeared on CNN, the BBC, and PBS to discuss trade and globalization issues. Aaronson was a Guest Scholar in Economics at the Brookings Institution (1995–1999); and a Research Fellow at the World Trade Institute 2008-2012.

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Slow Money Entrepreneur Showcase
Thursday, October 27
3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, One Broadway, 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/slow-money-boston-fall-entrepreneur-showcase-tickets-28021274386

Join us on Thursday, October 27th  for the Slow Money Boston Entrepreneur Showcase and Venture Cafe at The Cambridge Innovation Center. 

We will be bringing together investors, sustainable food entrepreneurs and leaders working together to rebuild our local food system. Learn about investment opportunities and how you can participate in rebuilding local economies based on the principles of soil fertility, sense of place, care of the commons and economic, cultural and biological diversity. 

For Investors: The Entrepreneur Showcase will provide access to sustainable food and farming businesses at different stages of development from start-up to expansion of existing businesses. The businesses and initiatives are also seeking different levels of financing — from small loans to major capital. Slow Money Boston encourages investors of all resource levels to attend including institutional, individual, accredited, and unaccredited investors. This showcase event is not an offer to sell securities or a solicitation of an offer to buy securities.

For Entrepreneurs: The Showcase is a tightly produced event. Each entrepreneur will have five minutes and 6 slides to tell their stories, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A from the audience. Presenters will also benefit from the networking opportunity specifically designed to encourage and elevate investor dialog. Throughout the event, your collateral will be available for attendees, and you will be mentioned in all promotional materials for the event.  It is free to apply, but costs $25 to present and take advantage of this exciting opportunity.

The Entrepreneur Showcase offers all the advantages of a traditional venture fair and many more. Because of the shared vision that brings us all together, it is an unparalleled opportunity for you to build relationships with investors and entrepreneurs from all over the region. Even if you are not an investor or presenting entrepreneur, we welcome and encourage your participation in the event!

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Modern ecological lessons from ancient food webs
Thursday, October 27
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jennifer Dunne, VP for Science, Santa Fe Institute
A central goal in ecology is to understand how animal and plant communities arise, change, and respond to disturbances both large and small. Tools from network science allow exploration of the structure and dynamics of ecological networks. This is turn provides a framework for assessing community-level consequences of extinctions as mediated by complex species interactions. I will discuss reconstructions and analyses of ancient food webs, on deep geologic and human timescales, that provide new ways to assess the resilience and stability of modern coupled natural-human systems.

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
617-258-8685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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What Should We Do with a Small Quantum Computer?
Thursday, October 27
4:00 pm
MIT, Building 10-250, 77 Massachusetts Avenue
Refreshments @ 3:30 pm in 4-349 (Pappalardo Community Room)

Aram Harrow, MIT
A large-scale quantum computer would be able to solve problems that existing classical computers would take much longer than the age of the universe to solve.  This would have dramatic implications for cryptography, chemistry, material science, nuclear physics and probably other areas that are still unknown.  But what about quantum computers that will be available in the next few years?  Experimentalists working with ion traps and superconducting qubits have plans to build quantum computers with 50-100 qubits capable of performing some thousands of quantum gates.  The company D-Wave is already selling devices with over 1000 qubits, although they can only run a single algorithm (the adiabatic algorithm) and they suffer high rates of noise.  An important milestone for these early quantum computers would be to demonstrate "quantum supremacy"; that is, solving a computational problem that could not be solved using classical computers without an astronomical amount of time.

In this talk, I will analyze two algorithms that can be run on current and near-term quantum computers.  First I will look at the adiabatic algorithm, which has shown promise in its ability to use quantum tunneling to solve optimization problems more efficiently than classical local search.  Here I will show that a different classical algorithm (using ideas from condensed-matter theory) can simulate the adiabatic algorithm in these cases.  This fast simulation suggests that adiabatic tunneling does not outperform classical computing and thus is not a promising approach to quantum supremacy.  Second, I will discuss simple variational quantum algorithms that try to approximately minimize some objective function.  I will describe methods of running these algorithms efficiently and will show that conjectures from complexity theory imply that these algorithms cannot in general be simulated by classical computers.

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Join us for Cleantech Open Northeast's Innovation Expo and Awards Night!
Thursday, October 27
4:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Boston Properties, 200 Clarendon Street, 29th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cleantech-open-northeast-innovation-expo-awards-night-tickets-27611930026
Cost:  $0 - $25

Join Cleantech Open Northeast and the clean energy startup community for the culmination of our 2016 accelerator program in Boston! Cleantech Open Northeast’s Innovation Expo and Awards Night will be held on October 27th at Boston Properties 200 Clarendon Street from 4:00pm-8:30pm. This year’s class of innovative startups will showcase, and then you’ll get to see who among them will win cash prizes and go on to represent the Northeast at the national competition. Our incredible judges, expert mentors and amazing volunteers will all be there too.

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Allocation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Supply Chains
Thursday, October 27
4:15p–5:15p
MIT, Building E51-315, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Daniel Granot

ORC Fall 2016 Seminar Series 
The OR Center organizes a seminar series each year in which prominent OR professionals from around the world are invited to present topics in operations research. We have been privileged to have speakers from business and industry as well as from academia throughout the years.

Seminar reception immediately following the talk.

Web site: http://orc.mit.edu/seminars-events
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Operations Research Center
For more information, contact:  Lauren Berk, Lennart Baardman, Martin Copenhaver
orc_fallcoordinators at mit.edu 

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Starr Forum: Honor Killings: Why They Won't End
Thursday, October 27
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Rafia Zakaria
Lecture and discussion with Rafia Zakaria J.Dm Columnist DAWN Pakistan,Author of "The Upstairs Wife: An Intimate History of Pakistan" (Beacon 2015), "Veil" (Bloomsbury 2017), Pakistan Country Specialist AIUSA 

More information will be available soon.

CIS Starr Forum 
A public events series on pressing issues in international affairs, sponsored by the MIT Center for International Studies.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cis/index.html
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:
617-253-8306
starrforum at mit.edu 

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Can Conservation Biology Survive the Anthropocene?
Thursday, October 27
5:00PM
Harvard, Northwest B103, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge

This panel brings together world leaders in conservation science to debate how relevant conservation is today given the multiple threats that many species face: habitat loss, overexploitation, and climate change. We’ll begin by reviewing the current extinction crisis, then discuss how the multiple threats of the Anthropocene alter conservation biology---and what that means for how conservation organizations act to conserve and preserve diversity today and in the future.

Panelists:
JON HOEKSTRA, Executive Director, Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust
PETER KARIEVA, Director, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, UCLA; Senior Science Advisor to the President, The Nature Conservancy
M. SANJAYAN, Executive Vice President and Senior Scientist, Conservation International

Moderated by:
ELIZABETH WOLKOVICH, Assistant Professor, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology; Faculty Fellow, Arnold Arboretum

Ecological Systems in the Anthropocene Seminar Series
About the Series:
Since the retreat of glaciers poleward over 10,000 years ago, humans have left an ever increasing fingerprint on ecological systems across the globe. The environment is now dominated by people—approximately 1/3 of land area has been transformed for human use and 1/4 of global productivity diverted to human consumption. While concepts such as wilderness attempt to escape this reality, there is virtually no habitat on earth devoid of some sign of humans influence on the globe—be it chemical, thermal, or a missing or introduced species. Today, this imprint is so pronounced that scientists are actively debating naming a new geological epoch demarcated by the sign of humans on the earth system itself: the Anthropocene.

In the shadow of this debate, the HUCE seminar series "Ecological Systems in the Anthropocene" will examine the future of social-environmental systems in a globe heavily impacted by humans. Each year the series will present a set of speakers and events (e.g., seminars, panels, debates) focused on one perspective under this theme.

Contact Name:  Laura Hanrahan
laura_hanrahan at harvard.edu

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Racial Regimes, Digital Economies
Thursday, October 27
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speakers: Kara Keeling and Lisa Nakamura
5pm: Kara Keeling (University of Southern California) "Black Futures and the Queer Times of Life: Finance, Flesh, and the Imagination" 
Keeling explores the implications of the efficacy of corporate futures scenarios for other modes of speculation, including those speculative cultural forms such as Afrofuturism that might afford creative imaginings of alternative futures. 

6pm: Lisa Nakamura (University of Michigan) "The Fairchild Ladies of Shiprock, New Mexico: A Photographic History of Navajo Women and Early Digital Feminism" 
Nakamura discusses how women of color were incorporated into early discourses about gender in the digital industries. From 1965-1976 the Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation employed almost a thousand Navajo women and men in a state of the art plant on a Navajo reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/kara-keeling-lisa-nakamura-speak-part-racial-regimes-digital-economies-symposium/s
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages, CMS/W colloquium
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676
lhickler at mit.edu 

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Savory Success Stories – A Discussion About Boston Food Startups
Thursday, October 27 
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Venture Cafe at Cambridge Innovation Center, 5th floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge

Join us for a forum to discuss how food companies navigate the market selection decisions and understand what it takes to build a brand. This energetic panel focused on the Boston Food Startup market will cover:
Market Trends
Success Stories
General Advice for Food Focused Startup

Panelists:
Lauren Abda
Emily Gouillart
Ciaran Nagle
Moderator:  Blonde Beauchamp

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Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment, a panel discussion convened in honor of the publication of Carol and Jordan Steikers’ new book by the same name (Harvard University Press)
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Emerson Hall 210
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Seminar on Violence and Non-Violence at the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Carol S. Steiker (Harvard Law School), Jordan M. Steiker (Texas Law), Lawrence D. Bobo (Harvard University), Charles Fried (Harvard Law School), Gregory Fried (Suffolk University), Elaine Scarry (Harvard University), Homi Bhabha (Harvard University)
COST  Free and open to the public.
TICKET INFO  Seating is limited.
CONTACT INFO  humcentr at fas.harvard.edu
617-495-0738
DETAILS  Click here for more info about the book: http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674737426
LINK  http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/courting-death-supreme-court-and-capital-punishment

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Could the Election be Hacked? Evaluating Threats, Motives & Effects
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
SPEAKER(S)	Dmitri Alperovich, Chief Technology Officer, CrowdStrike
Ben Buchanan, Postdoctoral Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs Cyber Security Project, Harvard Kennedy School
Pamela Smith, President, Verified Voting
Michael Sulmeyer (moderator), Director, Cyber Security Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum
617-495-1380
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/could-election-be-hacked-evaluating-threats-motives-effects

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Housing for All? Conversation 2: What have been the successes and failures of affordable housing planning & activism?
Thursday, October 27
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Cambridge Community Center, 5 Callender Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/housing-for-all-conversation-2-what-have-been-the-successes-and-failures-of-affordable-housing-tickets-26631720192

Cambridge Historical Society presents a 3-part symposium about the past, present and future of affordable housing in Cambridge.
Conversation 2, 'What have been the successes & failures of affordable housing planning & activism?,' focuses on the past and present of this issue.
Speakers:  Chris Arnold, Correspondent, National Public Radio, Moderator
Cheryl-Ann Pizza-Zeoli, Officer, Alliance of Cambridge Tenants
Gregory Russ, Executive Director, Cambridge Housing Authority
Jim Stockard, Retired Curator, Loeb Fellowship, Harvard Graduate School of Design

In the second of three 'Housing for All?' conversations, we will explore the current state of affordable housing in Cambridge, and the “we” in our 2016 theme, “Are We Home?” We will hear about what's been tried, where we have succeeded and failed. We'll ask what success looks like? The goal is to inspire dialogue with an emphasis on curiosity and question-asking. Participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences, questions and open-mindedness.

This 3-part symposium is supported by Mass Humanities, whose grants inspire considered thought, conversation, and action through the humanities. We’re happy to participate in their mission to improve civic life in Massachusetts. See more about what Mass Humanities does here: http://masshumanities.org/

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Getting to Solutions
Thursday, October 27
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM
MassArt Design and Media Center, 621 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Boston-Design-Thinking-Meetup/events/234927175/

In our last Meetup we worked with Community Servings and Blue Cross Blue Shield MA to better understand what is most important to younger professionals, when it comes to how they spend their time and money, and it's impact on charitable giving. We will continue this exploration, as we look into creating solutions through ideation, concept-building and prototyping.

If you missed the last one PLEASE SHOW UP FOR THIS ONE!!!

We will be hosted at one of my favorite places in Boston... the stunning new Design and Media Center at MassArt!! Join us for, what promises to be, an amazing night of food, drink and putting your mind to work for a great cause.

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YUM: Is eating meat healthy or ethical?
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge,
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Health Sciences, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard University Effective Altruism Student Group, Harvard College Effective Altruism, Safra Center for Ethics, The Good Food Institute
SPEAKER(S)  John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods; Bruce Friedrich, head of the Good Food Institute; Harvard Debate Members Danny DeBois and Dhruva Bhat
DETAILS	
Is it okay to eat meat?
The CEO of Whole Foods, John Mackey, and the head of the Good Food Institute, Bruce Friedrich, will argue that eating meat is neither ethical nor healthy. Harvard Debate Members Danny DeBois and Dhruva Bhat will argue the other side. Who will make the better case? You be the judge!
Sponsored by Effective Altruism at Harvard (HCEA and HUEA SG), Harvard's Safra Center for Ethics, and The Good Food Institute.
Harvard ID required.
LINK	https://www.facebook.com/events/1289914787686066/

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TCN Upstart Food Night with: Adam Salomone (The Food Loft) & Bob Stringer (Edible Ventures/Crimson Seed Capital)
Thursday, October 27 
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Venture Cafe at Cambridge Innovation Center, 5th floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge

Adam Salomone is an experienced business leader in the fields of foodtech, investing, publishing, content development, and marketing. Currently Adam serves as the co-founder & CEO of The Food Loft, a Boston-based co-working space for food and tech entrepreneurs. The Food Loft is at the center of a growing ecosystem for food innovation in Boston, and is a model in Boston and beyond for ways to connect entrepreneurs, investors, innovators and others in food-related businesses.

For the past 5 years Adam has been deeply involved in the world of foodtech innovation, connecting with food startups and entrepreneurs to help them build and grow their companies through investment, strategic advisement and partnership development opportunities. Through his work with The Food Loft, he has identified, evaluated and helped make investments in Yummly, an intelligent recipe search engine that learns your taste preferences the more you use it, Caviar (trycaviar.com), a curated restaurant delivery service, Crowdly, a social brand management platform, and Alchemista, a corporate foodservice delivery provider that works with large clients. Square acquired Caviar in 2014. Adam had nearly a decade of experience working in food media at The Harvard Common Press, a Boston-based publisher of award-winning cookbooks, which was acquired by Quarto Publishing Group USA in 2016.

Bob Stringer is a member of Edible Ventures, an angel group focused on high growth food and beverage companies.
He also is the founder of Crimson Seed Capital, an angel investment vehicle based in Boston, MA. CSC currently has a portfolio of over two-dozen small health and wellness companies including a stress management company, two organic baby food ventures, a gluten-free food company, a fast growing hard cider company, and a coconut smoothie venture.

He was also a founding General Partner of Sherbrooke Capital LLC, a venture capital firm specializing in providing growth capital to companies in the health and wellness industry. SherCap has successfully managed a $101 million portfolio of investments and has supervised significant liquidity events in such companies as Izze Beverages, Oregon Chai, and Immaculate Baking.

Pete McDonald is the Relationship Manager the Emerging Technology Practice at Silicon Valley Bank.
Pete has over 20 years of experience working with startups and works primarily with early stage Technology and Life Science companies. Pete moderates The Capital Network’s Upstart program which is a series of fireside chats with entrepreneurs held at the Venture Cafe (CIC Cambridge) once a month.

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Rouse Visiting Artist Lecture: Christo, “The Floating Piers, Lake Iseo, Italy, 2014-16, and Two Works In Progress”
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Design.
Cosponsored by the Harvard University Committee on the Arts.
SPEAKER(S)  Christo
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	(617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
DETAILS  Christo and Jeanne-Claude met in Paris in 1958, not long after their education at the National Academy of Art in Bulgaria and the University of Tunis, respectively. Their first project was Stacked Oil Barrels and Dockside Packages (1961) in Cologne Harbor, but perhaps their most renowned project was Wrapped Reichstag (1995) in Berlin, which swathed the iconic capital building in fabric for fourteen days. Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s overt, site-specific landscape interventions have evolved from Christo’s early works. Smaller sculptural pieces that are key to his portfolio, such as wrapped cans, bottles, crates, suggestive forms, and indoor installations reveal an interest in concealment, but also in the dimensional qualities of shapes in an environment and in the process itself. It is no surprise that in a caption to a chronological list of projects on their website, the artists refer to “software” and “hardware” periods: preparation and imagination on the one hand, physical execution on the other. The Floating Piers, Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s most recent finished work, was conceived in 1970 yet came to fruition only in the summer of 2016. The 16-meter-wide shimmering walkways of this project, constructed on Lake Iseo, Italy, were open and free for the public to traverse. Christo will discuss this work in his lecture, along with two upcoming projects: Over the River, for the Arkansas River in Colorado, and The Mastaba, for the United Arab Emirates. Both were planned with his wife and partner Jeanne-Claude. Notwithstanding her death in 2009, Christo continues to fundamentally credit Jeanne-Claude in his projects.
LINK	http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/christo-the-floating-piers/

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Stress in Wild Animals: From the Arctic to the Equator
Thursday, October 27
7:00p–9:00p
New England Aquarium:  Simons IMAX Theater, Aquarium Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=106706&view=Detail

L. Michael Romero
In contrast to stress-related disease in humans, the stress response is vital for helping wild animals survive in their natural habitats. The hormonal and physiological responses to stress are similar in all vertebrates. When these systems are activated at the wrong times for the wrong durations, disease can result. However, these same systems allow wild animals to survive natural stressors such as storms, predation attempts, and starvation. Join professor Michael Romero as he presents highlights from more than 25 years of research on stress in wild animals. Furthermore, he will discuss how understanding the stress response may also show us how animals cope with human-created changes in their habitats. 

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Daniel Clayman: Transitions
Thursday, October 27
7:00p–9:00p
MIT, Building 6-120, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Daniel Clayman will be presenting a lecture on his glass artworks.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
For more information, contact:  DMSE
617-253-3300

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Friday, October 28 and Saturday, October 29
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Standing Rock Protests and Protective Actions
Friday, October 28 and Saturday, October 29
Tufts University

This two-day Teach-In will consider a range of issues related to the Sacred Stone Camp protests and protective actions against Dakota Access Pipeline and in support of the Standing Rock Sioux. Panels and discussions will include: sovereignty and colonial law, sex trafficking and domestic violence, Indigenous knowledges and education, water rights and protection, arts, and historical trauma, among others. Sponsored by the WGSS and Education departments at Tufts.

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Friday, October 28
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Houghton Lecture:  Reaching Net Zero Carbon Balance in the 21st Century
Friday, October 28
9:00a–10:00a
MIT, Building 54-915

Speaker: Corinne Le Quere, University of East Anglia
The Paris Agreement on climate change has an ambition of balancing the global emissions and sinks of greenhouse gases in the second half of this century in order to limit climate change and its impacts. This lecture will explain the scientific understanding behind the links between global temperature change and cumulative carbon emissions, and detail the underlying time scales, amplitude of change, and uncertainties. It will present a range of model projections of climate change this century and discuss their implicit assumptions about future carbon management and future response of the natural carbon cycle to climate change. The lecture will also discuss the risks of large and non-linear responses of the carbon cycle to a changing climate (so-called 'tipping points') and their potential consequences. It will conclude the full lecture series by suggesting ways to support societal responses to climate change that the students might like to pursue throughout their careers.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Christine Maglio
cliberty at mit.edu 

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From Sea to Changing Sea: A Science Symposium about Oceans
Friday, October 28
9 am–5:30 pm
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center,10 Garden Street, Radcliffe Yard
Cambridge
RSVP at https://radcliffe-nenmf.formstack.com/forms/oceans

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How waste streams flow through MIT
Friday, October 28
12-1.30 PM
MIT, Building 66-160, 25 Ames Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwsCANpl0VIfno-zPr5mAICdFUGJnqunMBJjNA-yogGpiiaA/viewform?c=0&w=1

Come hear Recycling Manager Ruth Davis talk about the variety of wastes that the MIT community generates every day. How much is there and how does it get from one point to another? From electronics to pallets the recycling crew handles the non-regulated waste that passes through MIT.

Ruth’s recycling career at MIT started when she found 21 pallets filled with old course catalogs that needed to be disposed of. Along the way she has been the Manager of Communications in the Department of Facilities, co-chair of the Working Green Committee, and one of the founders of the monthly Choose to Reuse events.

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Turkey and Democracy: The Road Ahead
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 28, 2016, 1 – 2:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, 160 Conference Room, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Middle East Initiative
SPEAKER(S)  Amanda Sloat
DETAILS  Join Dr. Amanda Sloat, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Southern Europe and Eastern Mediterranean Affairs at the State Department for a discussion on the state of democracy in Turkey today and its prospects for the future. Tarek Masoud, Sultan of Oman Professor of International Relations at HKS will moderate.
This event is cosponsored by the Middle East Initative.

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Cycles of Invention and Discovery:  Rethinking the Endless Frontier
Friday, October 28, 2016
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes the Harvard Kennedy School's VENKATESH NARAYANAMURTI and University of Virginia's TOLUWALOGO ODUMOSU for a discussion of their book, Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Rethinking the Endless Frontier. Professors Narayanamurti and Odumosu will be introduced by Harvard Kennedy School's HENRY LEE, Director of the Environment and Natural Resources Program. 
About Cycles of Invention and Discovery

Cycles of Invention and Discovery offers an in-depth look at the real-world practice of science and engineering. It shows how the standard categories of “basic” and “applied” have become a hindrance to the organization of the U.S. science and technology enterprise. Tracing the history of these problematic categories, Venkatesh Narayanamurti and Toluwalogo Odumosu document how historical views of policy makers and scientists have led to the construction of science as a pure ideal on the one hand and of engineering as a practical (and inherently less prestigious) activity on the other. Even today, this erroneous but still widespread distinction forces these two endeavors into separate silos, misdirects billions of dollars, and thwarts progress in science and engineering research.
The authors contrast this outmoded perspective with the lived experiences of researchers at major research laboratories. Using such Nobel Prize–winning examples as magnetic resonance imaging, the transistor, and the laser, they explore the daily micro-practices of research, showing how distinctions between the search for knowledge and creative problem solving break down when one pays attention to the ways in which pathbreaking research actually happens. By studying key contemporary research institutions, the authors highlight the importance of integrated research practices, contrasting these with models of research in the classic but still-influential report Science the Endless Frontier. Narayanamurti and Odumosu’s new model of the research ecosystem underscores that discovery and invention are often two sides of the same coin that propels innovation forward.

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Innoskate 2016
Friday, October 28
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building 32-123, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

The Smithsonian's Innoskate program travels the country celebrating inventive creativity in skate culture. In collaboration with the Lemelson-MIT Program, Innoskate 2016 comes to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Lynch Family Skatepark in Cambridge to spark the imagination of skaters and non-skaters of all ages through skate demonstrations, discussions with skaters and inventors, hands-on invention educational activities, and other fun activities. 

Innoskate 2016 begins Friday evening at the MIT Stata Center with a special master class that will explore how the fusion of passion, creativity, and technology pushes the boundaries of art and innovation. Joining this conversation are legendary skateboarder Rodney Mullen; innovative filmmaker/photographer Steven Sebring; Anette (Peko) Hosoi, professor of mechanical engineering at MIT and co-director of STE at M (Sports Technology and Education @ MIT); and Jim Bales, associate director at MIT Edgerton Center.

Web site: http://invention.si.edu/innoskate/p/479-2016-cambridge-ma
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): Lemelson-MIT Program, Smithsonian Institution
For more information, contact:  Stephanie Martinovich
617-253-3352
info-lemelson at mit.edu 

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Spotlight: A Screening of the Academy Award Winning Film and a Panel Discussion with the Pulitzer Prize-Winning Spotlight Team Reporters
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 28, 2016, 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Science Center, Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Film, Law, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Master's Degree Program in Journalism at Harvard Extension School, and the Harvard Writers at Work Lecture Series
SPEAKER(S)  Panelists: Sacha Pfeiffer, Matt Carroll, Ben Bradlee Jr.
Moderated by Jenifer McKim, Senior Investigative Reporter at the New England Center for Investigative Reporting
DIRECTED BY  Tom McCarthy
COST  Open to the Harvard Community
DETAILS  The Master's Degree Program in Journalism at the Harvard Extension School and the Harvard Writers at Work Lecture Series present a screening of the film "Spotlight," winner of the 2016 Academy Award for Best Picture. The film tells the story of the Boston Globe reporters who in 2003 earned the Pulitzer Prize for their investigation of pedophile priests in the Boston archdiocese and the Catholic Church's practice of covering up their crimes. A panel discussion with Boston Globe Spotlight reporters Sacha Pfeiffer, Matt Carroll, and Ben Bradlee Jr. will follow the screening.
The event is free and open to the Harvard community. No tickets or pre-registration required. Seating is first come, first served.

Editorial Comment:  These journalists did heroic work.

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Energy Democracy - Germany's Energiewende to Renewables, Public discussion
Friday, October 28
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Goethe-Institut Boston, 170 Beacon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/energy-democracy-germanys-energiewende-to-renewables-public-discussion-tickets-28689012609

Lots of countries are beginning to make the transition to incorporate renewables into their energy mix. But Germany may be the only one where the switch to renewables is a switch to energy democracy. The Energiewende enabled communities to invest massively in local wind farms, biogas and solar. Big German utilities made up only a tiny share of investments in renewables. So how did the Germans get their government to pass laws that empowered citizens? What role can citizens play in the decarbonization of the energy sector? Can it happen in the United States?

Arne Jungjohann will address these questions and provide insights on the Energiewende's history – from the Power Rebels of Schönau to Angela Merkel’s decision to shut down nuclear power for good after Fukushima. He will explain why the transition to renewables is a one-time opportunity to strengthen communities, democratize the energy sector and accelerate the transition to a low-carbon economy. The presentation will be followed by a lively panel discussion with representation from the business and citizen energy perspectives.
Welcome Note: Marte Kessler, Scientific Affairs, German Consulate General     
Speaker: Arne Jungjohann is an energy analyst and political scientist. He served as a strategic advisor for the Minister President of Baden-Württemberg, for the Green Party in the Deutscher Bundestag and the Heinrich Böll Foundation. Based in Washington DC for several years, he fostered transatlantic dialogue on climate and energy matters. Together with Craig Morris he authored Energy Democracy: Germany's Energiewende to Renewables, the first history in any language on Germany's energy transition. It is available at www.EnergiewendeBook.de. 

This event has been made possible with the support of the Transatlantic Climate Bridge.

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Saturday, October 29
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Passages:  Music Therapy Conference
Saturday, October 29
9am - 5pm 
Lesley University, 99 Phillips Place, Cambridge

More information at http://www.neramtas.org/passages.php

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Trees: Intimate Portraits
Saturday, October 29
1:00PM TO 3:00PM
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Bldg, 25 Arborway, Jamaica Plain

Scars, burls, peeling bark, lichen, insect and animal markings—come explore the intimate, fascinating, up close world of tree bark as seen through the lens and sensibilities of photographer Jennifer Weigel. This Arboretum exhibition of Weigel’s photographic series, illuminates the often overlooked beauty found in the bark of trees and shrubs. As an artist, Weigel is particularly drawn to details in nature and the unique individuality of each tree. Through her images, she portrays each plant’s history within the beauty, as well as the bruises, of its outer surfaces.

Jennifer Weigel has a BFA in Studio Arts from Webster University in St. Louis, and has participated in a wide variety and number of solo, group, and small format exhibitions. In April of 2017, the Arboretum show, Trees: Intimate Portraits will travel to the Grand Opera House in Wilmington, DE.

Free and open to the public.

https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1562&DayPlannerDate=10/29/...
Artist Jennifer Weigel sheds light on the often overlooked details of trees in this new exhibition of photographs coming to the Hunnewell Building.

Contact Name:  (617) 524-1718
arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu

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How To Make A Superhero
Saturday, October 29
7:00p–10:00p
MIT, Building N51, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://howtomakeasuperhero.eventbrite.com
Cost:  $20

Have you ever wondered what goes into becoming a superhero? What is a super suit made out of and how hard it is to maintain a secret identity? Join us for a evening of "speed geeking" and engaging conversations with super researchers who know a bit about the gadgets, materials, and psyche of superheroes. Ages 21+

Web site: http://mitmuseum.mit.edu/program/how-make-superhero
Open to: the general public
Cost: $20.00 in advance 
Tickets: https://howtomakeasuperhero.eventbrite.com 
Sponsor(s): MIT Museum
For more information, contact:  Faith Dukes 
617-253-5927
museuminfo at mit.edu 

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Sunday, October 30
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Create the Change Day 2016
Sunday, October 30
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM EDT
Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center, 1350 Tremont Street, Roxbur Crossing
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/create-the-change-day-2016-tickets-27485091649
Cost:  $0 – $20

Join us to #CreateTheChangeBoston!
Project Giving Kids invites you to our first ever Create the Change Day on Sunday, October 30th from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. at the Reggie Lewis Athletic Center in Boston where we will have fun and make a difference all in the same afternoon. Join us to pack toiletry kits for the homeless, make "Get Well" jars for those visiting Boston for life-saving medical treatment, craft cards for the elderly and so much more. Perfect for little kids and big kids alike, help us spread messages of hope and leave with a lot of ideas for how you can Create the Change every day in your own backyard. Not to mention, there will be live music, crafts, food, and raffle prizes to keep the excitement going all afternoon! Halloween costumes welcome (but certainly not required).

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Fradreck Mujuru & Erica Azim with MIT's Rambax
Sunday, October 30
3:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building 14W-111, Killian Hall, 

Speaker: Fradreck Mujuru and Erica Azim
3pm: Pre-concert talk 
4pm: Concert 

Zimbabwean master musician Fradreck Mujuru is joined by Erica Azim in playing the healing music of the mbira, used by the Shona to connect the living with the ancestors for more than 1,000 years. Born to the largest extended family of mbira players in Zimbabwe, Mujuru has played mbira since the age of 8, and is now known internationally as an outstanding performer, teacher, and instrument maker, while continuing to play in ceremonies for the ancestors at home. Azim is America's leading proponent of the Shona mbira tradition, who has toured with various Shona mbira masters and taught thousands of Americans to play mbira, and to support the tradition in Zimbabwe. Rambax, MIT's premiere Senegalese drumming ensemble, will also be performing.

MIT Sounding 
The 2016-17 season of innovative annual performance series MIT Sounding continues to blur the boundaries between contemporary and world music. Curated by Evan Ziporyn, Faculty Director of the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology, this season of Sounding integrates the avant-garde sounds of ancient instruments and traditional practices with cutting-edge composition and technology to present various visions of a new, evolving music that defies genre.

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/fradreck-mujuru-erica-azim/#public-events
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: No registration necessary
Sponsor(s): Music and Theater Arts, CAST
For more information, contact:  Leah Talatinian
617.253.5351
leaht at mit.edu 

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Monday, October 31
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PAOC Colloquium - Laura Meredith (UofA)
Monday, October 31,
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Microorganisms have produced dramatic shifts in the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere, and they continue to drive significant exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the land, oceans, and atmosphere. Many microbe-mediated processes have a leading-order impact on climate variability, are themselves susceptible to climate change (potential for feedbacks), and are poorly understood (e.g., CH4, N2O, biological particles). In terrestrial ecosystems, soil microorganisms provide benefits to society (ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling), which depend strongly on land use (urban, rural, agricultural, natural) and land surface type.

In my research, I seek to improve the process-based understanding of the environmental and biological drivers of microbe-mediated trace gas fluxes using an interdisciplinary set of laboratory and observational methods.

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. 2016/2017 co-ordinator: Christine Chen (ccy at mit.edu)

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Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Bridging the Basic –Applied Dichotomy: Implications for redesign of U.S Energy Policy and National Laboratories
Monday, October 31 
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge

Venkatesh Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; and Professor of Physics, Harvard
Lunch will be provided.

Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  cepr at hks.harvard.edu
617-495-8693

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Underground forests, savanna and the relationship between trees and people in southern Africa
Monday, October 31
12:10PM
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Lecture Hall, 1300 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain

Jonathan Davies, McGill University, Canada

Arnold Arboretum Research Talk
http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

Contact Name:  arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu
(617) 524-1718

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Coastal South Asia and the Technologies of Risk
Monday, October 31
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Sunil Amrith (History)
Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Contact Name:  sks at hks.harvard.edu

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Thesis Defense:  Fundamental Aerosol-Cloud Interactions and their Influence on the Aerosol Indirect Effect on Climate
Monday, October 31
2:00p–3:00p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Daniel Rothenberg, EAPS

CHAIR OF DEFENSE: Prof. Daniel Cziczo, MIT, EAPS 
THESIS COMMITTEE: 
Dr. Chien Wang, MIT, EAPS, Advisor 
Prof. Paul O'Gorman, MIT, EAPS 
Dr. Steven Ghan, PNNL 

Copies of the thesis may be obtained from the EAPS Education Office (54-912). All interested faculty, staff and students are invited to attend. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Roberta F Allard
allard at mit.edu 

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Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages? Micro Evidence from Germany
Monday, October 31
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E52-164

Speaker: Andreas Peichl (University of Mannheim)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Safe Streets Petition Delivery Party
Monday, October 31 
5:15 PM - 8 PM
Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

We will be delivering the Petition for Safe Streets on Monday, October 31st to the Cambridge City Council.

** SIGN THE PETITON **
http://cambridgebikesafety.org/

Tentative schedule:
5:15pm: Gather & chant
5:30pm: Council meeting starts, we will deliver signatures. We want to show up in force!
5:45pm: celebrate at a nearby bar!

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: [BRECHT]IT: EXIT STAGE LEFT with MARTA KUZMA
Monday, October 31
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, E15-001, The ACT Cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: MARTA KUZMA
ACT MONDAY NIGHT LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS: [BRECHT]IT: EXIT STAGE LEFT WITH MARTA KUZMA, DEAN AND PROFESSOR OF ART AT YALE SCHOOL OF ART

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Department of Architecture, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Emulsions and Foams
Monday, October 31
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Spooky Action at a Distance:  The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything
Monday, October 31
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes GEORGE MUSSER, contributing editor for Scientific Americanand author of The Complete Idiot's Guide to String Theory, for the paperback release of his book, Spooky Action at a Distance: The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything.

About Spooky Action at a Distance
What is space? Space is the venue of physics; it's where things exist, where they move and take shape. Yet over the past few decades, physicists have discovered a phenomenon that operates outside the confines of space and time: nonlocality—the ability of two particles to act in harmony no matter how far apart they may be. If space isn't what we thought it was, then what is it?

In Spooky Action at a Distance, the award-winning journalist George Musser sets out to answer that question. He guides us on an epic journey into the lives of experimental physicists observing particles acting in tandem, astronomers finding galaxies that look statistically identical, and cosmologists hoping to unravel the paradoxes surrounding the big bang. He traces the contentious debates over nonlocality through major discoveries and disruptions of the twentieth century and shows how scientists faced with the same undisputed experimental evidence develop wildly different explanations for that evidence. Their conclusions challenge our understanding of the origins of the universe—and they suggest a new grand unified theory of physics.

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Tuesday, November 1
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Boston TechBreakfast: Smartick Method, and More!
Tuesday, November 1, 2016
8:00 AM
Microsoft NERD - Horace Mann Room, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Boston-TechBreakfast/events/226656155/

Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations. 
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them :) 

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast: 
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Food & Coffee and chit-chat 
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements 
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs! 
Smartick Method - Conchi Ruiz
*** OPEN ***
*** OPEN ***
*** OPEN ***
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words  

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Wearable and Bedside Biophotonics: technologies at the intersection between personalized medicine and personal health
Tuesday, November 1
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 34-401, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Prof. Bruce Tromberg, University of California, Irvine

CONTACT:  Christine Brooks
cbrooks at mit.edu2016 MOS Dasari Lecture Title: ""

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Public Interest Data Science: The Data for Justice Project
Tuesday, November 1
12:00 pm
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/11/Villarreal#RSVP
Event will be live webcast at 12:00 pm at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/11/Villarreal

The Data for Justice project is an initiative that aims to make (open) data actionable empowering lawyers, advocates, community organizers, journalists, activists and the general public by developing the tools and frameworks that digest complex databases without losing sight of the ultimate goal: to tell a story that can effect social change and justice.

This project is the product of the work of Paola Villarreal, a Berkman Klein Center Fellow as a Data Scientist at the ACLU of Massachusetts and as a 2015 Ford and Mozilla Foundations Open Web Fellow.

About Paola
Paola Villarreal is a self taught systems programmer/data scientist that works with the ACLU of Massachusetts on social justice projects that heavily rely on open technology and data. While at the Center, she will focus on The Data for Justice project which aims to strengthen access to justice and reduce inequality by developing data tools that inform the work of advocates, activists, community organizers, lawyers, and journalists and their communities.

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Green Eelgrass, Blue Carbon
Tuesday, November 1
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Juliet Simpson, Coastal Ecologist, MIT Sea Grant

Eelgrass meadows are critical coastal ecosystems, helping to tie down sediments, improving water clarity and providing a habitat for marine animals like fish, scallops, crabs and lobsters. Julie Simpson is working with several partners to conduct a study to quantify the carbon storage of eelgrass beds in Massachusetts. By understanding the role that eelgrass ecosystems play in preparing for and mitigating the effects of climate change we can better make the case for securing protection and restoration resources.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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The Challenge of Protecting the Public and Promoting Innovation
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Taubman Building, Malkin Penthouse, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Kennedy School Healthcare Policy Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, and the Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)	Dr. Robert Califf, Commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Moderated by Amitabh Chandra, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

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How to Improve Presidential Elections
Tuesday, November 1
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 2-190, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Eric Maskin, Harvard
Our speaker, Professor Eric Maskin was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 2007 (jointly with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger Myerson) for "having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory". 
Professor Maskin has a close connection to our department: he was a faculty member here from 1977 to 1985 and a Visiting Professor in 
1999-2000. 

Eric Maskin will speak about different electoral rules and how the mechanism design theory can help to improve the democratic process of presidential elections.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Economics Special Events
For more information, contact:  Eva Konomi
evako at mit.edu 

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Lecture by Christian Bok: The Poetics of Protein 13: The Writing of Genetic Sonnets
Tuesday, November 1
5:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building 3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Christian Bok is a bestselling author and one of the earliest founders of Conceptual Literature, a poetic school of avant-garde writing. Bok is on the verge of finishing his current project, The Xenotext, an example of living poetry.

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/christian-bok/#public-events
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Tickets: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/christian-bok/#public-events
Sponsor(s): MIT CAST (Center for Art, Science & Technology), Arts at MIT
For more information, contact:  Leah Talatinian
617.252.1888

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Whose Vote Matters?
Tuesday, November 1
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building 32-123, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Charles Stewart III, Ariel White, Rahsaan Maxwell

A discussion of race, election access, and voting rights with Charles Stewart III (MIT), Ariel White (MIT), and Rahsaan Maxwell (UNC Chapel Hill). 

Co-sponsored by MIT Political Science, Boston Review, and MIT SHASS. This event is free and open to the general public. 

Light refreshments will be served.

Web site: bostonreview.net/events
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Political Science, SHASS Dean's Office, Boston Review
For more information, contact:  Anne
617-324-1360
anne at bostonreview.net 

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The Future of Nature: Conservation's Next Generation
Tuesday, November 1
5:30PM - 8PM
Microsoft New England Research and Development Center (NERD), 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/massachusetts/explore/ma-future-of-nature.xml?src=r.future
Cost:  $10 – includes sustainable hors d’oeuvres and drink  We’ll kick off the event with a reception featuring sustainable, local refreshments from Chive Sustainable Events!

With profound environmental challenges on the horizon, where will the leaders of conservation’s next generation come from, and what will they do? The Nature Conservancy invites you to a dynamic panel discussion exploring these questions and more.

Networking reception 5:30 p.m., Talk 6:30–8 p.m.

PANEL INCLUDES:
Victor Medina, park ranger, National Park Service
Charles Orgbon III, founder and CEO, Greening Forward

MODERATOR:  Shannon Dooling, reporter, WBUR

Contact Name:  Cameron Bruns
cameron.bruns at tnc.org

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A Conversation with Chuck Hagel
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
SPEAKER(S)  Chuck Hagel, Joint Visiting Fellow, Institute of Politics and Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
United States Secretary of Defense (2013 - 2015), United States Senator from Nebraska (1997 -2009)
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum
617-495-1380
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/conversation-honorable-chuck-hagel

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HIGHLIGHTS FROM NAEM'S 2016 EHS MANAGEMENT FORUM
Tuesday, November 1
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 1 Broadway, 5th Foor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/highlights-from-naems-2016-ehs-management-forum-tickets-28317017963
Cost:  $8 - $12

BASG and the National Association for Environmental Management (NAEM) partner to bring you highlights from NAEM's 2016 EHS Management Forum being held in Denver in late October. NAEM’s EHS Management Forum is the largest annual gathering for environment, health and safety (EHS) and sustainability decision-makers. For 24 years, NAEM's annual conference has been the premiere event dedicated to best practice-sharing for those developing and integrating strategic environmental, health and safety programs within companies. Join Johanna Jobin and Frank Marino as they bring fresh content from Denver to share with us live here in Cambridge.

Johanna Jobin is Director, Global EHS & Sustainability at Biogen. Johanna works to promote the company’s culture and vision on corporate citizenship by helping to implement global sustainability programs and initiatives, such as energy improvements to waste reductions, as well as driving employee and stakeholder engagement. She is also responsible for the corporate citizenship reporting and carbon neutrality strategy.

As the former Head of Corporate Responsibility & Community Affairs of EMD Millipore, the life science business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Ms. Jobin led their corporate responsibility efforts, including the vision and strategic direction for environmental and social responsibility. Her responsibilities centered around strengthening the organization’s business performance by embedding sustainability into key business practices and overall culture. Key programs she managed and supported included greenhouse gas management and energy, Design for Sustainability, community engagement, and access to health and shared value initiatives.

She received her Master of Environmental Management degree, with a certificate in Energy and Environment, from Duke University and is also an ISO 14001 trained auditor.

She is involved in a number of sustainability related organizations, and is currently a Board member of the National Association for EHS & Sustainability Management (NAEM), Board member of the USGBC Massachusetts Chapter, Co-Chair of the Association Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) Sustainability Roundtable, and on the Advisory Board for the Center for Sustainability in Business at WPI and Advisory Committee Member for the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Marine Safety and Environmental Protection. She also serves on the City of Cambridge Climate Protection Action Committee and is a Board member of “e” inc., an organization focused on environmental and STEM education for children.

Frank Marino is a Senior Corporate Environmental, Health, Safety and Sustainability Manager at Raytheon Company, where he works on a variety of EHSS challenges including auditing, corporate social responsibility reporting, sustainability, injury prevention, OSHA VPP, zero waste, installing electric vehicle charging stations, and enterprise e-waste management.

He has more than 30 years of experience in industrial EHS management, including auditing manufacturing plants in a variety of settings including computers, appliances, military hardware and aircraft. Frank co-leads Raytheon’s Environmental and Sustainability Teams and he is a Zero Waste Business Associate with the USZWBC.

Frank holds a master's degree in environmental engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell.

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Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Law, Special Events
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-juryx-deliberations-for-social-change-interactive-workshop-in-active-registration-27783709824
DETAILS  What is the citizen's role in deciding guilt? Is the loudest juror in the room more entitled to an opinion than the soft-spoken counterpart? And is a "difficult topic" a good enough excuse for a one-sided discussion?
In the first installment of a two-part workshop series, Charles Nesson, Weld Professor of Law at Harvard and founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society (now the Berkman Klein Center), will discuss his research on facilitating meaningful dialogue in the classroom, through the lens of JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, an open online course that Nesson is teaching this year.
Using a mock criminal case on gun law, workshop participants will experience firsthand Nesson's method for processing and approaching a dilemma.
This workshop is part of a two-part series. We encourage you to sign up and attend JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II as well.
LINK  http://edportal.harvard.edu/event/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-part-ii

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Waging War:  The Clash Between Presidents and Congress, 1776 to ISIS
Tuesday, November 1
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge,

Harvard Book Store welcomes author DAVID J. BARRON—United States Circuit Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and former S. William Green Professor of Public Law at Harvard Law School—for a discussion of his book, Waging War: The Clash Between Presidents and Congress, 1776 to ISIS.
About Waging War

A timely account of a raging debate: The history of the ongoing struggle between the presidents and Congress over who has the power to declare and wage war.

The Constitution states that it is Congress that declares war, but it is the presidents who have more often taken us to war and decided how to wage it. In Waging War, David J. Barron opens with an account of George Washington and the Continental Congress over Washington’s plan to burn New York City before the British invasion. Congress ordered him not to, and he obeyed. Barron takes us through all the wars that followed: 1812, the Mexican War, the Civil War, the Spanish-American war, World Wars One and Two, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and now, most spectacularly, the War on Terror. Congress has criticized George W. Bush for being too aggressive and Barack Obama for not being aggressive enough, but it avoids a vote on the matter. By recounting how our presidents have declared and waged wars, Barron shows that these executives have had to get their way without openly defying Congress.

Waging War shows us our country’s revered and colorful presidents at their most trying times—Washington, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Johnson, both Bushes, and Obama. Their wars have made heroes of some and victims of others, but most have proved adept at getting their way over reluctant or hostile Congresses. The next president will face this challenge immediately—and the Constitution and its fragile system of checks and balances will once again be at the forefront of the national debate.

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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, November 2
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When Do Leaders Free-Ride? The Case of Military Alliances
Wednesday, November 2
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu 

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Book Talk: The Dictator's Dilemma: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy For Survival
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, S020, Belfer Case Study Room, Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Critical Issues Confronting China Seminar Series; co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Harvard University Asia Center
SPEAKER(S)  Professor Bruce J. Dickson, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University
LINK	http://asiaevents.harvard.edu/event/book-talk-dictator’s-dilemma-chinese-communist-party’s-strategy-survival

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Rare Earth: Shades of Grey
Wednesday, November 2
3:30PM TO 4:45PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Hongqiao Liu, Consultant, China Water Risk

Sponsored by the China Project, Harvard Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

China Project Seminar 
http://chinaproject.harvard.edu/liu161102

Contact Name:  Tiffany Chan
tiffanychan at seas.harvard.edu

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Harvard Climate Seminar
Wednesday, November 2
4:00pm
Harvard, Haller Hall, Geology Museum 102, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Peter de Menocal, Lamont, Columbia University,

More information at http://eps.harvard.edu/event/harvard-climate-seminar-2

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Cooking up Ideas: a conversation with Mugaritz. Screening of documentary Off-Road and forum discussion on Creativity with MIT faculty
Wednesday, November 2
4:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building 10-250, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

What is the process by which we generate ideas? How do we select the best ones? This event will focus on creativity and the creative process. 

We will be screening Off-Road; a philosophical and ethological documentary about Mugaritz, one of the best restaurants in the world, located in the hills of the Basque Country. Prior to the screening, a multidisciplinary panel of MIT faculty (engineering, physics, mathematics, architecture and music), together with Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz, will discuss their own perspective of creativity in research in their respective fields. After the screening, this same panel will converse with the audience for a forum discussion. 
Participants: 
Andoni Luis Aduriz, Mugaritz Chef and Founder 
John Bush, Professor of Applied Mathematics and Associate Department Head 
Ben Houge, Associate Professor of Electronic Production and Design, Berklee College of Music 
Gareth McKinley, Professor of Teaching Innovation, School of Engineering 
Chef Dani Lasa, Mugaritz Creativity Team 
Pedro Miguel Reis, Gilbert W. Winslow Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Gigliola Staffilani, Abby Rockefeller Mauze Professor, Department of Mathematics 
J. Meejin Yoon, Professor and Head of the Department of Architecture 
Evan Ziporyn, Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Music and Faculty Director, MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology 

This will be the US premiere of Off-Road

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/mugaritz/#schedule
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Tickets: Open to the public, no reservation necessary 
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT CAST (Center for Art, Science & Technology), Arts at MIT
For more information, contact:  Pedro Reis
preis at mit.edu 

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Compliance Technology and Self-Enforcing Agreements
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Room Littauer-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	
Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
Harvard Environmental Economics Program
SPEAKER(S)  Bard Harstad, University of Oslo
LINK  https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

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"Investing" in Climate Justice Solutions
Wednesday, November 2
5:30 PM – 7:00 PM EDT
Zevin Asset Management, LLC, 11 Beacon Street #1125, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/investing-in-climate-justice-solutions-tickets-28195801401

Join us on November 2nd to learn about and discuss an innovative approach to transforming our society from an extractive economy to a regenerative, local, living economy. Chung-Wha Hong and Sara Mersha of Grassroots International will be joined by special guest Robert Zevin, Chairman and Founder of Zevin Asset Management LLC, to explore Climate Justice Solutions, a different kind of investment that advances a sustainable food system and develops resilient communities.

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Askwith Forums: Where Are All the Teachers of Color?
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	HGSE
SPEAKER(S)  Speakers:
Nathan Gibbs-Bowling, 2016 National Teacher of the Year finalist; 2016 Washington State Teacher of the Year; teacher, Lincoln High School, Tacoma, Washington
Emily Kalejs Qazilbash, Ed.M.’97, Ed.D.’09, assistant superintendent of human capital, Boston Public Schools
Estefania Rodriguez, Ed.M.’16, K-8 Social Studies, district instructional coach, Cambridge Public Schools, Massachusetts
Eric Shed, lecturer on education and director, Harvard Teacher Fellows Program, HGSE
Moderator: Irvin Scott, Ed.M.’07, Ed.D.’11, senior lecturer on education, HGSE; former deputy director for K-12 Education, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
COST  This event is free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Despite the majority of public school students becoming increasingly nonwhite (50 percent), the majority of public school teachers – 80 percent – are white. Decades of initiatives to recruit minority teachers into the profession have struggled to keep them in schools. According to Ed Magazine, an estimated 47,600 minorities became teachers in 2003–04 but by the end of the school year, more than 56,000 minority teachers overall had left the profession. Join us as we discuss the significant role of minority teachers in the school system, student lives, and education policy, as well as the challenges in recruiting and retaining these teachers.
LINK	http://www.gse.harvard.edu/calendar?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D120807997

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Climate Congress "Climate Action and Activism" Discussion Group
Wednesday, November 2
6pm – 8pm
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.0n6pf2df7d03r263snv77ej2no?authuser=0

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Understanding Suicide Risk: How language, emotion, and pain influence self-harm
Wednesday, November 2
7pm - 9pm 
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Screening & Discussion: City of Trees
Wednesday, November 2
7:30PM TO 8:45PM
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain

https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1578&DayPlannerDate=11/2/2...
The Arnold Arboretum invites you to a film screening and discussion of City of Trees, a deeply personal story about the struggle for good jobs and environmental justice in our cities.

Since 1990, nonprofit Washington Parks & People has tried to reduce poverty and violence in Washington, D.C. neighborhoods by improving parks. At the height of the recession, the organization received a stimulus grant to create a "green" job-training program in communities hardest hit. They had two years to help unemployed people find jobs and care for parks in their neighborhoods.

Steve Coleman, a grassroots environmental activist who directs the organization, must hire 150 unemployed residents to plant several thousand trees and provide training in the soft skills required to get a job. For Charles Holcomb, the paycheck offers a chance to give his newborn daughter the life he never had. For Michael Samuels, the job training is a first step forward after a drug conviction marred his employment record. For James Magruder, the program offers a chance to prove that his neighborhood roots position him as an unsung leader. 

What sounds like a simple goal — putting people back to work by planting trees — becomes complicated by a community’s distrust of outsiders and a fast-approaching deadline before the grant money runs out. Filmed in an unflinching and compelling verité approach over the course of more than two years, City of Trees thrusts viewers into the inspiring but messy world of job training and the paradoxes change-makers face in urban communities every day. Discussion will follow. Fee $10. Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

76 min, USA, directed by Brandon Kramer, produced by Lance Kramer a film by Meridian Hill Pictures, in association with Kartemquin Films and Magic Labs Media. City of Trees had its world premiere at the 2015 American Conservation Film Festival and was the Audience Choice Award Winner.

arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu
(617) 524-1718

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Lo and Behold, Reveries of a Connected World (FREE admission/popcorn)
Wednesday, November 2
8:00p
MIT, Building 26-100, 60 Vassar Street, Cambridge

From the brilliant mind of Oscar-nominated Werner Herzog (Cave of Forgotten Dreams, Grizzly Man) comes his newest investigation: a playful and at times chilling chronicle of the virtual world, from its origins to its outermost reaches. Herzog explores the digital landscape with the same curiosity and imagination he previously trained on earthly destinations like the Amazon, Sahara, South Pole and Australian outback. Beginning with the fathers of internet technology, Herzog speaks to everyone from Elon Musk of SpaceX, and cutting edge engineers and hackers, to hermits who fear radiation from cell phone towers, victims of cyber bullying, and beyond. Herzog touches upon every facet of virtual life, and posits how it might change the way future generations connect.

Web site: http://lsc.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): LSC, MIT Anthropology Program
For more information, contact:  MIT Lecture Series Committee
617-253-3791
lsc at mit.edu 

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Thursday, November 3
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Planning Sustainable Cities Conference
Thursday, November 3, 2016 (ALL DAY) TO Friday, November 4, 2016 (ALL DAY)
Piper Auditorium, GSD, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/planning-sustainable-cities-conference-registration-26849540699?aff=PSC

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/planning-sustainable-cities-conference-registration-...
The Zofnass Program for Sustainable Infrastructure is pleased to host the Planning Sustainable Cities Conference. The conference aims to present an infrastructure-based approach to city planning, an analytical framework for urban sustainability, focusing on the services and performance of infrastructure systems. This conference will serve as the launch of the latest Zofnass Program publication ‘Planning Sustainable Cities. An Infrastructure-based Approach,’ directed and edited by Prof. Spiro Pollalis.

Infrastructure is understood as a series of systems that function in synergy, directly linked to urban planning.  The conference aims to decode in different sessions the key infrastructure systems of Energy, Landscape, Transportation, Waste, Water, Information and Food, to explore their synergies through land use planning, engineering, economics and policy. The conference sessions are modeled according to the key infrastructure systems delineated in the Planning Sustainable Cities book.

This event will convene city planners, leaders in infrastructure development, designers, engineers, experts, academics, and public officials to share perspectives on sustainable city planning as well as to discuss the proposed infrastructure-based planning approach for sustainable cities.

RSVP required. See website for further details at http://zofnass.gsd.harvard.edu/planning/ 

Contact Name:  Judith Rodriguez
jirodrig at gsd.harvard.edu

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Sustainability Innovations In Fashion and Apparel
Thursday, November 3
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Ariel Kraten  

What is the relationship between our clothes and our environment? Because of many factors such as population growth, the proliferation of appearance-obsessed social media, and the explosion of fast fashion, this relationship is growing more and more contentious.Through the lens of items we all have in our closets, this presentation will look at the environmental impact of clothing manufacture, and share some of the cutting edge innovations from science and technology that are leading to breakthroughs in more sustainable production.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Environmental public interest litigation in China
Thursday, November 3
12:00 PM
East Asian Legal Studies Seminar
Harvard, Morgan Courtroom, Austin Hall 308, 1515 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Barbara FINAMORE, Senior Attorney and Asia Director, China Program, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)

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Litigating Free Speech Cases in the African Regional Courts
Thursday, November 3
12:00 pm
Harvard Law School campus, Hauser Hall, Room 102, Cambridge
Brown-bag luncheon

featuring Berkman Klein Fellow, Nani Jansen Reventlow 
Please join us for a discussion with Nani Jansen Reventlow, Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and Associate Tenant at Doughty Street Chambers, on the topic of regional courts in Africa and freedom of expression cases in particular. As the head of the Media Legal Defence Initiative’s global litigation practice, Reventlow led litigation that resulted in the first freedom of expression judgments at the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the East African Court of Justice. She has also led cases before the European Court of Human Rights, the UN Human Rights Committee, the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, and several African regional courts.
 
About Nani
Nani Jansen Reventlow is an Associate Tenant at Doughty Street Chambers and a 2016-2017 Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. She is a recognised international lawyer and expert in human rights litigation responsible for groundbreaking freedom of expression cases across several national and international jurisdictions. At the Berkman Klein Center, Nani's work focuses on cross-disciplinary collaboration in litigation that challenges barriers to free speech online.
Between 2011 and 2016, Nani has overseen the litigation practice of the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI) globally, leading or advising on cases before the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the UN Human Rights Committee, the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention and several African regional forums. Nani obtained the first freedom of expression judgment from the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (Konaté v. Burkina Faso) and the East African Court of Justice (Burundi Journalists’ Union v. Burundi), and appeared before the Supreme Court of Rwanda to argue international and comparative law standards on freedom of expression and the right to a fair trial.

A Dutch-qualified attorney, Nani graduated in civil law and public international law from the University of Amsterdam and specialised in human rights at Columbia Law School and the European University Institute. She has developed and delivered training sessions on freedom of expression and human rights litigation to dozens of lawyers from several diverse jurisdictions, including India, Russia, Cambodia, Hungary, Botswana and Croatia.

Nani is a member of the project board of the Public Interest Litigation Project and strategic adviser to GQUAL, campaign for gender parity in international representation. Nani speaks English, Dutch, French and Italian.


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Spiritually Resilient Leadership in the Midst of Adaptive Problems: A Conversation with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake
WHEN  Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
SPONSOR	HDS Office of Ministry Studies
CONTACT	Leslie MacPherson Artinian
DETAILS  Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will discuss the challenges of leading a city in today's turbulent racial and political climate. Lunch will be provided. Overflow viewing will be located in the Braun Room of Andover Hall.

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Building energy efficiency in China
Thursday, November 3
4:00 
China Project Research Seminar
Harvard, HUCE, Room 440 of Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Barbara FINAMORE, Senior Attorney and Asia Director, China Program, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)

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Dark Matters of Graphene
Thursday, November 3
4:00 pm
MIT, Building 10-250, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Refreshments @ 3:30 pm in 4-349 (Pappalardo Community Room)

MARIANGELA LISANTI, Princeton University
Dark matter remains one of the principal motivators for new physics beyond the Standard Model.  Although it comprises the vast majority of the matter in the Universe, its properties continue to elude us. For decades, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) have served as the primary theoretical paradigm for dark matter. However, as a wide variety of experiments put such models to the test with no definitive detections, we are challenged to reevaluate this canonical scenario.  I will discuss the theoretical motivations and experimental prospects for moving beyond the WIMP paradigm.  The focus will be on direct detection experiments, which aim to discover dark matter via its scattering off targets located deep underground.  I will present a new proposal to use two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, as targets for dark matter that is lighter than a WIMP.  This proposal provides the first opportunity for directional detection down to MeV masses, and can be implemented by the PTOLEMY experiment.

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Patterns of defaunation and consequences for ecosystems and humans
Thursday, November 3
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Rodolfo Dirzo, School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University
In this presentation I will argue that Anthropogenic impact on wildlife (defaunation) is a massive, widespread phenomenon, and I will illustrate how the loss or decline of wildlife unleashes cascading consequences on ecosystem processes and services of relevance to humans. This research shows that animal life is not only a wonderful decoration of our planet, but that it provides important services to society. I argue that we can attenuate the Anthropocene???s defaunation trajectory through our collective appreciation of the value of animal biodiversity, and via global efforts directed to stop habitat destruction and animal over-exploitation as soon as possible.

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00 
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
6172588685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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A Conversation with singer-pianist Dena Derose
WHEN  Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Holden Chapel, Harvard Yard, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION  Lecture, Music
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Learning from Performers
SPEAKER(S)  Moderated by Callie Crossley, host of "Under the Radar" on WGBH-FM,
COST  Free
DETAILS  A conversation moderated by Callie Crossley, host of "Under the Radar" on WGBH-FM, Holden Chapel, Harvard Yard, Cambridge. Presented by the OFA Learning From Performers program. Admission free (tickets or RSVPs not required); seating first-come, first served, subject to venue capacity.
LINK	http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/event/conversation-singer-pianist-dena-derose

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The 1979 Hostage Crisis: Reflections on Iran -- Then and Now
WHEN  Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Exhibitions, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The WCFIA/CMES Middle East Seminar
SPEAKER(S)  Randy H. Goodman, Photojournalist
CONTACT INFO	elizabethflanagan at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Please visit Randy Goodman's photography exhibit in the CGIS Knafel Concourse: bit.ly….
LINK	http://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/1979-hostage-crisis-reflections-iran-then-and-now

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Illuminating 2016: Using Social Listening Tools to Understand the Presidential Campaign
Thursday, November 3
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

The 2016 presidential election has been historic for the ways that social media has been used to drive the news agenda and rally supporters to the cause. Jennifer Stromer-Galley will describe the large scale collection and machine learning techniques she and her team have used for the Illuminating 2017 project to study the ways the presidential candidates and the public have used social media. She will provide some of the major trends they've seen this election cycle, and talk about why this matters for journalism and for social media practitioners more broadly. 

Stromer-Galley is a professor in Syracuse University's School of Information Studies and Director for the Center for Computational and Data Sciences, and she is President of the Association of Internet Researchers. She has been studying "social media" since before it was called social media, studying online interaction and influence in a variety of contexts, including political forums and online games. Her award-winning book Presidential Campaigning in the Internet Age provides a history of presidential campaigns as they have adopted and adapted to digital communication technologies.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/stromer-galley-illuminating-2016-presidential-campaign/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

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EnergyBar!
Thursday, November 3
5:30 
Greentown Labs, 28 Dane Street, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/energybar-tickets-21458386612

EnergyBar is Greentown Labs' monthly networking event devoted to helping people in clean technology meet and discuss innovations in energy technology. Entrepreneurs, investors, students, and ‘friends of cleantech,’ are invited to attend, meet colleagues, and expand our growing regional clean technology community. 

Our attendees typically span a variety of disciplines within energy, efficiency, and renewables. In general, if you're looking for a job in cleantech or energy, trying to expand your network, or perhaps thinking about starting your own energy-related company this is the event for you. Expect to have conversations about issues facing advanced and renewable energy technologies and ways to solve our most pressing energy problems. 

Light appetizers and drinks will be served starting at 5:30 pm. Suggested dress is shop floor casual. Parking is incredibly limited at Greentown Labs and we encourage attendees to consider taking advantage of public transportation. 
Hope to see you there! 

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Photography, Fashion and the Legacy of Irving Penn
Thursday, November 3
7:00 PM
Marran Theater, 34 Mellen Street, Cambridge

Join Lesley University and the College of Art and Design for a panel discussion focused on the life and work of renowned American photographer Irving Penn. The discussion will feature three industry experts celebrated in fashion and editorial photography, among others.

Moderator
Writer and Curator Charlotte Cotton
Cotton most recently served as curator-in-residence at the International Center of Photography. Previously, she held positions as curator of photographs at the Victoria and Albert Museum, head of programming at The Photographers’ Gallery in London, and curator and head of the Wallis Annenberg Department of Photography at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Cotton is also the author of Imperfect Beauty (2000), Then Things Went Quiet (2003), The Photograph as Contemporary Art (2004), and Photography is Magic (2015).

Panelists
Director, Art Director, and Editor Fabien Baron
Baron is the Founder and Chief Creative Officer of Baron & Baron, a boutique advertising agency specializing in fashion, fragrance, and cosmetics luxury brands. Over three decades, he spearheaded the creative reinvention of Interview, French Vogue, and Harper’s Bazaar magazines. Baron also created brand images for fashion companies such as Calvin Klein, Burberry, Giorgio Armani, and Balenciaga. In 1992, he directed a music video and documentary featuring Madonna and has directed numerous commercials including Calvin Klein’s first Super Bowl ad.

Photographer Raymond Meier
Raymond Meier is a Swiss-American photographer whose work has explored still life, fashion, and architectural photography over a nearly 30-year career. He is a contributing photographer to the American and International editions of Vogue and The New York Times. Meier’s work with major fashion, jewelry, and cosmetic brands have shaped their visual identifies. Vogue Editor in Chief Anna Wintour describes Meier’s work as “In the traditional of great Swiss visual geniuses…whose visual precision was always richly evident in work both artistic and commercial….it soars beautifully.”

Executive Arts Editor, WGBH Jared Bowen
Bowen is the Emmy-award-winning host of the television series, Open Studio with Jared Bowen. He also contributes to WGBH’s nightly news program, Greater Boston and covers the latest happenings in the arts in New England for WGBH’s Morning Edition and for Boston Public Radio. Bowen also contributes to the PBS NewsHour and Art New England magazine. He has produced five news documentaries for WGBH and is the recipient of the 2013 Commonwealth Award. Bowen began his career at Dateline NBC in New York.

For more information about the exhibition and other events, please visit lesley.edu/penn

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Friday, November 4
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Looking Around the Arctic: What You Can Learn through Autonomous Spectroscopic Measurements of Gases and Particles
Friday, November 4 
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Bill Simpson, UAlaska-Fairbanks. 

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/88521

Contact Name:  Lu Hu
luhu at g.harvard.edu

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Making Data Matter: Visualization as Communication Medium 
Friday, November 4 
12:30pm to 2:00pm
Harvard SEAS, Maxwell Dworkin G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge
Lunch 12:30pm; Talk 1pm

Fernanda Viegas & Martin Wattenberg, Google 
Data is ubiquitous in our lives. It describes our neighborhoods, our cities, weather patterns, it helps track illnesses and contextualize social patterns. In an increasingly data-rich society, there’s a critical need for tools to help people understand and reason about complex information. Our research seeks to make data visualization accessible to everyone: from lay users to data experts. We will present work that exposes kids to complex data, explores the artistic expressiveness of data, uncovers the underworld of cyber crime and augments our knowledge of scientific fields such as machine learning. This approach to visualization as an inclusive communication medium points the way to a future where every citizen can more fully participate in a data-driven society.
 
Speaker Bio:  Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg are the leaders of Google's “Big Picture” data visualization research group, which invents new ways for people to understand and explore data. They are well known for their contributions to social and collaborative visualization, and the systems they’ve created are used daily by millions of people.
Viégas holds a Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab; Wattenberg has a Ph.D. in mathematics from U.C. Berkeley. Their visualization-based artwork has been exhibited worldwide, and is part of the permanent collection of Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Host: Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS)
Contact: Natasha Baker
Phone: 617-496-2623
Email: nrbaker at seas.harvard.edu

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Saturday, November 5
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Incube
Saturday, November 5
4:00p–8:00p
E40, Martin Trust Center for Entrepreneurship, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge
This event occurs on Saturdays through December 17

We're a community of creators who share one simple desire: to collaborate on our passions with amazing people. We pitch ideas and ongoing projects, make teams, and build the bleeding edge together. With a strong focus on technology, our projects vary as widely as our personalities, from software to hardware, zany to industrial, local to global, and beyond. 

We all meet up once a week to create our projects, share ideas, and enjoy good food. People freely come and go from our collaborative group space. Our community members' involvement ranges from just building a couple hours per week at meetups, to dropping out of MIT to pursue the full-time creation of our ventures, with most of us somewhere in between.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Incube, a16z
For more information, contact:  Laser Nite

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Monday, November 7
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An Alternative Path for the Evolution of Biological Nitrogen Fixation
Monday, November 7
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge 

Eric Boyd, Montana State University

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/event/department-colloquium-series-16

Contact Name:  Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Energy and Climate: Vision for the Future
Monday, November 7
12pm – 1:30 pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Michael McElroy, Gilbert Butler Professor of Environmental Studies, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

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Radiation and Restoration: The Politics of Ecological Care
Monday, November 7
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Laura Martin, HUCE

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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The 2016 Presidential Election: What's at Stake?
WHEN  Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Case Study Room (S020), Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  Michael Dukakis, Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Northeastern University; Democratic Party Nominee for the President of the United States (1988); and Governor of Massachusetts (1975-79; 1983-91)
Moderated by Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics and Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK	http://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/calendar/upcoming

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True Listening: An Evening with Acoustic Ecologist Gordon Hempton
WHEN  Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, 5 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion, Special Events
SPONSOR	Office of Student Life 
CONTACT	studentlife at hds.harvard.edu 
DETAILS  Join internationally acclaimed acoustic ecologist, Gordon Hempton, as we listen to sunrise circle the globe, hear snow melt and whales sing, and discover that the Earth is music, clear enough to hum all day. And let’s re-examine our widely held belief that the human ear evolved to hear human speech. We will listen to nature sounds that fit neatly into our peak hearing sensitivity (2 kHz-5 kHz) and speculate about the evolutionary consequences of detecting these sounds over great distances. During modern times with our global environmental crises, is it enough to hear ourselves or must we, as a species still subject to the laws of survival, once again listen to what the Earth is telling us? This audio presentation will change the way you listen to the natural world around you.
  
Acoustic ecologist Gordon Hempton has circled the globe three times in pursuit of the Earth’s rarest natural sounds. His sound portraits which record quickly vanishing natural soundscapes have been featured in People magazine and a national PBS television documentary, Vanishing Dawn Chorus, which earned him an Emmy. Hempton provides professional audio services to media producers, including Microsoft, Smithsonian, National Geographic, and Discovery Channel. Recipient of awards from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Rolex Awards for Enterprise, he is coauthor of One Square Inch of Silence: One Man’s Quest to Preserve Quiet (Free Press/Simon & Schuster, 2010). Gordon Hempton speaks widely on the importance of listening.

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Digital Colonialism?: Thoughts on the Ethics of Digital Recreations of Threatened Cultural Heritage Sites in the Middle East
Monday, November 7
6:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambrudge

Speaker: Erin Thompson

"CULTURES OF UPHEAVAL"
FALL 2016 AGA KHAN PROGRAM LECTURES

Web site: http://akpia.mit.edu/fall-2016-lectures-events-cultures-upheaval
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE
Sponsor(s): Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture
For more information, contact:  Jose Luis Arguello
617-253-1400
akpiarch at mit.edu 

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Speaker Series: John Thompson, Chairman of Microsoft
Monday, November 7
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM EST
District Hall, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/speaker-series-john-thompson-chairman-of-microsoft-tickets-28694380665

Microsoft Chairman, John Thompson is joining Epicenter CEO Paul Krasinski for an informal fireside to discuss technology, innovation, leadership and his Boston roots.  Mr. Thompson will speak to the creative and innovative minds to both inspire concept creation, as he understands the power of the creative economy where ideas are currency.  John and Paul will discuss the creative process, development of successful products and building a collaborative culture.  Epicenter is honored that John Thompson will spend his evening with Boston, the City he credits with the launch of his career.

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Dividuum with Gerald Raunig
Monday, November 7
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building e15-001, The ACT Cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Gerald Raunig
ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Dividuum with Gerald Raunig

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Department of Architecture, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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Boston New Technology November 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT71
Monday, November 7
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
MassChallenge Space, 23 Drydock Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Boston_New_Technology/events/234904042/

Free event! Come learn about 7 innovative and exciting technology products and network with the Boston/Cambridge startup community!


Please enter at 23 Drydock Ave and take an elevator to the 6th Floor. Look for our check-in table. Type the first few letters of your name on the screen and tap your name to print your name tag.

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France
Monday, November 7
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
 
Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Tuesday, November 8
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A community-based approach to planning for the effects of climate change on shellfishing in Wellfleet Harbor
Tuesday, November 8
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA

Speaker: Seth Tuler, Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary and Global Studies, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Shellfish play a vital role in the ecology of Wellfleet Harbor andrable to climate  fish stocks in the northeastern US. Climate change is predicated to cause changes in sea levels, air and water temperatures, intensity and frequency of precipitation, and water chemistry. In this presentation we will share the process and outcomes of the Working Group on Climate Change impacts on shellfishing in Wellfleet Harbor. The Working Group is a community-based group with broad representation from the shellfish industry and the Town, whose purpose was to identify: threats to shellfishing in Wellfleet Harbor from climate change, the role of shellfish in mitigating impacts from climate change and other environmental hazards in Wellfleet Harbor, and strategies to increase the resilience of Wellfleet and its shellfishery in a time of climate change. A community-based approach empowered local stakeholders to take a more active role in planning for climate change and provides . The Working Group produced reports, a website, and a systems dynamics model to characterize the risks and vulnerabilities for the shellfish fishery and local community due to a changing climate – both today and into the future.

Bio: Seth Tuler is an Associate Teaching Professor in his research interests more generally are concerned with public participation and developing tools to inform planning about social impacts and vulnerabilities to risk events. He is interested in applying insights emerging from research to practical applications in a wide range of policy arenas, including climate change adaptation planning and marine fisheries management.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Opportunity
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Effective Altruism MIT Sloan Meetup Group
http://www.meetup.com/effective-altruism-mit-sloan/

Want to make the world the best place it can be? 
Effective Altruism is a worldwide movement that uses rational thinking and science to have the best possible impact. Effective Altruism MIT Sloan is bringing together people from all over the area to share experiences and be more effective by working together. 
To learn more about effective altruism, read the introduction on the international EA website (https://www.effectivealtruism.org) or watch Peter Singer's TED talk.

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Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian at cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
http://www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit
@cambenergy 
http://facebook.com/cambridgeenergyalliance

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 27 and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 12 PM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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