[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - October 30, 2016

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Oct 30 10:15:28 PDT 2016


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Index - Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.  Keep scrolling, please.
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Monday, October 31
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12pm  Microbe-mediated trace gas fluxes—linking ecosystem genomics to atmospheric composition
12pm  Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Bridging the Basic –Applied Dichotomy: Implications for redesign of U.S Energy Policy and National Laboratories
12:10pm  Underground forests, savanna and the relationship between trees and people in southern Africa
12:15pm  Coastal South Asia and the Technologies of Risk
1pm  Politics Mondays with the Institute of Politics Fellows & Guests
2pm  Thesis Defense:  Fundamental Aerosol-Cloud Interactions and their Influence on the Aerosol Indirect Effect on Climate
4pm  Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages? Micro Evidence from Germany
5pm  REPRESENTING INFORMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN TRANSPORTATION NETWORK PLANNING
5:15pm  Safe Streets Petition Delivery Party
6pm  ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: [BRECHT]IT: EXIT STAGE LEFT with MARTA KUZMA
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Emulsions and Foams
7pm  Spooky Action at a Distance:  The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything

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Tuesday, November 1
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8am  Boston TechBreakfast: Smartick Method, and More!
12pm  Wearable and Bedside Biophotonics: technologies at the intersection between personalized medicine and personal health
12pm  Sissela Bok: Secrets and Lies in Politics and Elections
12pm  Visual Urban Sensing
12pm  Public Interest Data Science: The Data for Justice Project
12pm  Attorney General Maura Healey & Chris Herren Discuss Overcoming Addiction & the Opioid Crisis
12pm  Latin American Seminar Series: Commodities vs Forests? Subnational Variation in Forest Protection in the Chaco
1pm  Boston Startup & Tech Expo
2:45p–4:00p  Pirates of Somalia: Crime and Deterrence on the High Seas
4pm  Green Eelgrass, Blue Carbon
4pm  The Challenge of Protecting the Public and Promoting Innovation
4:30pm  How to Improve Presidential Elections
4:30pm  State DAPA? And Other Thoughts on U.S. Immigration Policy in the New Administration
4:30pm  Lecture by Christian Bok: The Poetics of Protein 13: The Writing of Genetic Sonnets
5:30pm  The Indian Coal Industry and the the State of Development in India
5:30pm  Whose Vote Matters?
5:30pm  The Future of Nature: Conservation's Next Generation
6pm  Sustainable Planning: Following Doxiadis's Legacy
6pm  A Conversation with Chuck Hagel
6pm  Zero Waste, EHS Regulations & Other Updates from NAEM 2016 EHS Management Forum
6:30pm  Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II
7pm  Waging War:  The Clash Between Presidents and Congress, 1776 to ISIS

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Wednesday, November 2
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12pm  When Do Leaders Free-Ride? The Case of Military Alliances
12:30pm  Digital Globe visits Fletcher
12:30pm  Book Talk: The Dictator's Dilemma: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy For Survival
1:15pm  Developing a Public Relations Plan for Your Non-Profit: Who, What, Where, and Why, a Communications Workshop
3pm  The Science (and Pseudoscience) of Winning Elections
3pm  xTalk with Deb Roy - Playful Words: Literacy Learning Networks
3:30pm   Rare Earths in China: Changing Landscape Points to an Uncertain Future for Global Green Growth
3:30pm  Engineering Interfacial Properties with Polymer Brushes and Nano-patterns
4pm  Climate and the Peopling of the World
4pm  Advanced Carbon Nanotube Surfaces for Manufacturing of Printed Electronics
4pm  Sustainable Community Development Projects in Nicaragua
4pm  Cooking up Ideas: a conversation with Mugaritz. Screening of documentary Off-Road and forum discussion on Creativity with MIT faculty
4pm  IBM Watson Analytics Innovation Summit
4:15pm  Compliance Technology and Self-Enforcing Agreements
4:30pm  Unveiling Money: Counterfeits, Arbitrage and Finance across the Arabian Sea
5:30pm  "Investing" in Climate Justice Solutions
5:30pm  Askwith Forums: Where Are All the Teachers of Color?
6pm  Climate Congress "Climate Action and Activism" Discussion Group
6pm  Designing the Lab of the Future
6pm  SOLUTIONS with/in/sight: Masterclass with Michael Yaffe
7pm  Understanding Suicide Risk: How language, emotion, and pain influence self-harm
7:30pm  Screening & Discussion: City of Trees
8pm  Lo and Behold, Reveries of a Connected World (FREE admission/popcorn)

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Thursday, November 3
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Planning Sustainable Cities Conference
12pm  Sustainability Innovations In Fashion and Apparel
12pm  Environmental public interest litigation in China
12pm  Litigating Free Speech Cases in the African Regional Courts
12pm  A Conversation with Musicology & Copyright Expert Michael Harrington
12pm  Spiritually Resilient Leadership in the Midst of Adaptive Problems: A Conversation with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake
2pm  Humidity-Cloud-Precipitation Feedbacks and Convective Organization
4pm  Building energy efficiency in China
4pm  Dark Matters of Graphene
4pm  Patterns of defaunation and consequences for ecosystems and humans
4pm  A Conversation with singer-pianist Dena Derose
4pm  The 1979 Hostage Crisis: Reflections on Iran -- Then and Now
5pm  Illuminating 2016: Using Social Listening Tools to Understand the Presidential Campaign
5:30pm  EnergyBar!
6:30pm  BRING YOUR IDEAS TO LIFE WITH CROWDFUNDING: AN EVENING WITH INDIEGOGO
7pm  Photography, Fashion and the Legacy of Irving Penn

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Friday, November 4
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9:30am  Crowdsourcing, Prizes, Moonshots, and More: Bringing New Ideas and Tech into Government
12pm  Looking Around the Arctic: What You Can Learn through Autonomous Spectroscopic Measurements of Gases and Particles
12:30pm  Making Data Matter: Visualization as Communication Medium 
4pm  Microfluidic Genetic Transformation for the Next Generation of Synthetic Biology
4pm  Preparing for the Future of Artificial Intelligence

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Saturday, November 5
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9am  CIVIC TECH CHALLENGE 2016 HACKATHON CHALLENGE
11am  2nd Annual Barnes & Noble Mini Maker Faire, Day 1
4pm  Win or Lose Beyond Question 2
4pm  Incube

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Monday, November 7
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12pm  An Alternative Path for the Evolution of Biological Nitrogen Fixation
12pm  Energy and Climate: Vision for the Future
12:15pm  Radiation and Restoration: The Politics of Ecological Care
12:30pm  The 2016 Presidential Election: What's at Stake?
2:15pm  The More We Die, the More We Sell? A Simple Test of the Home Market Effect
4pm  Discussion with Gustavo Dudamel
4pm  Harvard Origins of Life Second Annual Prize Lecture
5pm  True Listening: An Evening with Acoustic Ecologist Gordon Hempton
5:30pm  Defining and Measuring Gentrification
6pm  Digital Colonialism?: Thoughts on the Ethics of Digital Recreations of Threatened Cultural Heritage Sites in the Middle East
6pm  Speaker Series: John Thompson, Chairman of Microsoft
6pm  Digital Colonialism?: Thoughts on the Ethics of Digital Recreations of Threatened Cultural Heritage Sites in the Middle East
6pm  ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Dividuum with Gerald Raunig
6pm  Boston New Technology November 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT71
7pm  2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France

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Tuesday, November 8
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12pm  Anything but Barren:  Fungal biodiversity in the Pine Barrens
2:30pm  Challenges of Change: An Experiment Training Women to Manage in the Bangladeshi Garment Sector
4pm  A community-based approach to planning for the effects of climate change on shellfishing in Wellfleet Harbor
4pm  Narratives of Hope: Science, Theology and Environmental Public Policy
6:30pm  Passive House Massachusetts

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

City Agriculture 
http://cityag.blogspot.com

The Cult of Information
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2016/10/the-cult-of-information-neo-luddite.html

Making a Spectacle of Himself:  Trump’s Objectification and Commodification
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/10/28/1587765/-Making-a-Spectacle-of-Himself:Trumps-Objectification-and-Commodification

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Monday, October 31
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Microbe-mediated trace gas fluxes—linking ecosystem genomics to atmospheric composition
Monday, October 31
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

PAOC Colloquium - Laura Meredith (UofA)
Microorganisms have produced dramatic shifts in the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere, and they continue to drive significant exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the land, oceans, and atmosphere. Many microbe-mediated processes have a leading-order impact on climate variability, are themselves susceptible to climate change (potential for feedbacks), and are poorly understood (e.g., CH4, N2O, biological particles). In terrestrial ecosystems, soil microorganisms provide benefits to society (ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling), which depend strongly on land use (urban, rural, agricultural, natural) and land surface type.

In my research, I seek to improve the process-based understanding of the environmental and biological drivers of microbe-mediated trace gas fluxes using an interdisciplinary set of laboratory and observational methods.

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided after the seminars to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. 2016/2017 co-ordinator: Christine Chen (ccy at mit.edu)

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Cycles of Invention and Discovery: Bridging the Basic –Applied Dichotomy: Implications for redesign of U.S Energy Policy and National Laboratories
Monday, October 31 
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge

Venkatesh Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; and Professor of Physics, Harvard
Lunch will be provided.

Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  cepr at hks.harvard.edu
617-495-8693

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Underground forests, savanna and the relationship between trees and people in southern Africa
Monday, October 31
12:10PM
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Lecture Hall, 1300 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain

Jonathan Davies, McGill University, Canada

Arnold Arboretum Research Talk
http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

Contact Name:  arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu
(617) 524-1718

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Coastal South Asia and the Technologies of Risk
Monday, October 31
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Sunil Amrith (History)
Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Contact Name:  sks at hks.harvard.edu

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Politics Mondays with the Institute of Politics Fellows & Guests
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 31, 2016, 1 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Littauer 166, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  IOP Fellows & Various Guests
COST  Free and Open to the Public
DETAILS  Join the IOP Fellows and their weekly guests for an intimate discussion on the state of politics and the current election at 1pm in Littauer 166!

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Thesis Defense:  Fundamental Aerosol-Cloud Interactions and their Influence on the Aerosol Indirect Effect on Climate
Monday, October 31
2:00p–3:00p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge

Speaker: Daniel Rothenberg, EAPS

CHAIR OF DEFENSE: Prof. Daniel Cziczo, MIT, EAPS 
THESIS COMMITTEE: 
Dr. Chien Wang, MIT, EAPS, Advisor 
Prof. Paul O'Gorman, MIT, EAPS 
Dr. Steven Ghan, PNNL 

Copies of the thesis may be obtained from the EAPS Education Office (54-912). All interested faculty, staff and students are invited to attend. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Roberta F Allard
allard at mit.edu 

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Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages? Micro Evidence from Germany
Monday, October 31
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E52-164

Speaker: Andreas Peichl (University of Mannheim)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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REPRESENTING INFORMATION AND ADAPTIVITY IN TRANSPORTATION NETWORK PLANNING
Monday, October 31
5:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building 1-190, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Professor S. Travis Waller, Advisian Professor of Transport Innovation, Director of the Research Centre for Integrated Transport Innovation (rCITI) in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Transportation systems can be characterized as complex networks with thousands of decision-makers interacting in real-time. Historically, basic network equilibrium approaches were employed by cities and regions worldwide as a means of quantifying transportation system behavior to support long-term planning. With advances in information and communication technologies, many traditional modeling assumptions grow increasingly problematic. However, there remains key gaps in terms of advanced methods that are deployable at large-scale for societal planning. We have developed a range of network-based approaches that incorporate key aspects of adaptive behavior as well as improved representation of volatility. Such models require a synthesis of domains ranging from new graph theoretical insights to behavioral validity via experimental economics and simulation.

CEE-DSS: C.C. Mei Distinguished Speaker Series 
The C.C. Mei Distinguished Speaker Series, based in CEE, brings exciting speakers from around the world to the MIT community at large. For the full list of events, see: https://sites.google.com/site/mitcedss/cee-dss

Web site: http://cee.mit.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/CEE_SpeakerSeries_Waller2016_Poster.pdf
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Carol Burke
617-324-7780

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Safe Streets Petition Delivery Party
Monday, October 31 
5:15 PM - 8 PM
Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

We will be delivering the Petition for Safe Streets on Monday, October 31st to the Cambridge City Council.

** SIGN THE PETITON **
http://cambridgebikesafety.org/

Tentative schedule:
5:15pm: Gather & chant
5:30pm: Council meeting starts, we will deliver signatures. We want to show up in force!
5:45pm: celebrate at a nearby bar!

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: [BRECHT]IT: EXIT STAGE LEFT with MARTA KUZMA
Monday, October 31
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, E15-001, The ACT Cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: MARTA KUZMA
ACT MONDAY NIGHT LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS: [BRECHT]IT: EXIT STAGE LEFT WITH MARTA KUZMA, DEAN AND PROFESSOR OF ART AT YALE SCHOOL OF ART

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Department of Architecture, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Emulsions and Foams
Monday, October 31
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Angel Leon, (@chefdelmar), Restaurant Aponiente

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Nov. 7
“Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France”
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Spooky Action at a Distance:  The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything
Monday, October 31
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes GEORGE MUSSER, contributing editor for Scientific Americanand author of The Complete Idiot's Guide to String Theory, for the paperback release of his book, Spooky Action at a Distance: The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything.

About Spooky Action at a Distance
What is space? Space is the venue of physics; it's where things exist, where they move and take shape. Yet over the past few decades, physicists have discovered a phenomenon that operates outside the confines of space and time: nonlocality—the ability of two particles to act in harmony no matter how far apart they may be. If space isn't what we thought it was, then what is it?

In Spooky Action at a Distance, the award-winning journalist George Musser sets out to answer that question. He guides us on an epic journey into the lives of experimental physicists observing particles acting in tandem, astronomers finding galaxies that look statistically identical, and cosmologists hoping to unravel the paradoxes surrounding the big bang. He traces the contentious debates over nonlocality through major discoveries and disruptions of the twentieth century and shows how scientists faced with the same undisputed experimental evidence develop wildly different explanations for that evidence. Their conclusions challenge our understanding of the origins of the universe—and they suggest a new grand unified theory of physics.

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Tuesday, November 1
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Boston TechBreakfast: Smartick Method, and More!
Tuesday, November 1, 2016
8:00 AM
Microsoft NERD - Horace Mann Room, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Boston-TechBreakfast/events/226656155/

Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations. 
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them :) 

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast: 
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Food & Coffee and chit-chat 
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements 
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs! 
Smartick Method - Conchi Ruiz
*** OPEN ***
*** OPEN ***
*** OPEN ***
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words  

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Wearable and Bedside Biophotonics: technologies at the intersection between personalized medicine and personal health
Tuesday, November 1
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 34-401, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Prof. Bruce Tromberg, University of California, Irvine

CONTACT:  Christine Brooks
cbrooks at mit.edu2016 MOS Dasari Lecture

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Sissela Bok: Secrets and Lies in Politics and Elections
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Humanities, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Sissela Bok, writer and philosopher; Senior Visiting Fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
CONTACT INFO	tim_bailey at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Sissela Bok is a writer and philosopher, and a senior visiting Fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She received her B.A. and M.A. in psychology at the George Washington University in 1957 and 1958, and her Ph.D. in philosophy at Harvard University in 1970. She was formerly a Professor of Philosophy at Brandeis University. The third edition of her book “Lying: Moral Choice in Private and Public Life” (1978) was reissued in 1999 with a new preface. Other books include “Secrets: On the Ethics of Concealment and Revelation” (1982, 1989); “A Strategy for Peace: Human Values and the Threat of War” (1989); “Alva Myrdal: A Daughter’s Memoir” (1991); “Common Values” (1996, reissued in 2002 with a new preface); and “Mayhem: Violence as Public Entertainment” (1998). With John Behnke, Bok has co-edited “The Dilemmas of Euthanasia” (1975) and, with Daniel Callahan, “Ethics Teaching in Higher Education” (1980). With Gerald Dworkin and R. G. Frey, she has co-authored “Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide” (1998).
LINK	http://shorensteincenter.org/sissela-bok/

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Visual Urban Sensing
Tuesday, November 1
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
MIT, Building 32-D507, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Nikhil Naik, MIT Media Lab (http://web.mit.edu/naik/www/)
Abstract:  Social scientists are extremely interested in understanding (i) the relationship between urban appearance and the behavior and health of urban residents; and (ii) the relationship between urban change and socioeconomic composition, as well as government policies. Thus far, studying these questions has proved challenging due to the fact that researchers need to conduct expensive and time-consuming field surveys to evaluate urban appearance. 

I will introduce two computer vision algorithms that harness Street View imagery to computationally evaluate urban appearance. The first algorithm, Streetscore, is able to quantify the appearance of a street block from its Street View image by measuring attributes such as perceived safety, wealth, and beauty. The second algorithm is able to compute an "urban change coefficient" which quantifies the growth or decay of a location from time-series Street View images obtained over several years. This approach allows us to generate cross-sectional and longitudinal data on urban appearance at street block-level resolution and global scale, massively scaling up the size and scope of research in this area. 

Related Material: http://web.mit.edu/naik/www/research.html

Contact: Katherine Bouman, klbouman at csail.mit.edu

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Public Interest Data Science: The Data for Justice Project
Tuesday, November 1
12:00 pm
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/11/Villalrreal#RSVP
Event will be live webcast at 12:00 pm at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/11/Villarreal

The Data for Justice project is an initiative that aims to make (open) data actionable empowering lawyers, advocates, community organizers, journalists, activists and the general public by developing the tools and frameworks that digest complex databases without losing sight of the ultimate goal: to tell a story that can effect social change and justice.

This project is the product of the work of Paola Villarreal, a Berkman Klein Center Fellow as a Data Scientist at the ACLU of Massachusetts and as a 2015 Ford and Mozilla Foundations Open Web Fellow.

About Paola
Paola Villarreal is a self taught systems programmer/data scientist that works with the ACLU of Massachusetts on social justice projects that heavily rely on open technology and data. While at the Center, she will focus on The Data for Justice project which aims to strengthen access to justice and reduce inequality by developing data tools that inform the work of advocates, activists, community organizers, lawyers, and journalists and their communities.

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Attorney General Maura Healey & Chris Herren Discuss Overcoming Addiction & the Opioid Crisis
Tuesday, November 1
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT
T3 Advisors, 1 Marina Park Drive, 3d Floor / Suite 315, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/attorney-general-maura-healey-chris-herren-discuss-overcoming-addiction-the-opioid-crisis-tickets-28490095643?aff=es2

In 2014, more than 1,200 deaths were attributed to opioid overdoses in Massachusetts alone. Recent figures put annual prescription painkiller overdoses at 28,000 nationally and heroin overdoses at more than 10,000, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.  
Unfortunately, the opioid epidemic has touched nearly all of us here in the Commonwealth; the more we can learn and share, the better chance we have to make a difference.  Please join Paul Krasinski as he facilitates a conversation and Q&A with former Boston Celtics player Chris Herren and Attorney General Maura Healey as they tackle this critical issue.  

**This talk will take place in the lovely offices of T3 Advisors, 1 Marina Park Drive, 3d Floor, Suite 315, in Boston's Seaport District (Across Northern Avenue from Gather). Please arrive by 11:40 so you have enough time to check in and make your way to the event.

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Latin American Seminar Series: Commodities vs Forests? Subnational Variation in Forest Protection in the Chaco
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 12 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard. CGIS South, S-250, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Candelaria Garay, Associate Professor of Public Policy, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
CONTACT INFO	Isade Salcedo (isalcedo at fas.harvard.edu)
DETAILS  Candelaria Garay is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government. Her research focuses on social policy, collective action, and party politics in Latin America. She received a Ph.D. and M.A. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley, and holds a B.A. in Sociology from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her book, Social Policy Expansion in Latin America (forthcoming with Cambridge University Press in 2016) characterizes and explains the recent expansion and variation in social programs for populations historically excluded from social protection in the region.
LINK	http://drclas.harvard.edu/event/tuesday-candelaria-garay

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Boston Startup & Tech Expo
Tuesday, November 1
1:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Innovation and Design Building, 25 Drydock Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-startup-tech-expo-tickets-27385867868

We are thrilled to announce TechBreakfast's Boston Startup & Tech Expo on Tuesday, Nov 1 at the Innovation and Design Building. There will be thousands of attendees representing tech companies, influencers, press, investors, and some of the best startups in the region. Sign up for one of the FREE tickets if you are interested in attending, or getting one of the super-discounted Tables now available for Startups, Employers, and Premium service providers.

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Pirates of Somalia: Crime and Deterrence on the High Seas
Tuesday, November 1
2:45p–4:00p
Harvard, Harvard Hall 104, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

Speaker: Quy-Toan Do (World Bank)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Development Economics Seminar
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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Green Eelgrass, Blue Carbon
Tuesday, November 1
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Juliet Simpson, Coastal Ecologist, MIT Sea Grant

Eelgrass meadows are critical coastal ecosystems, helping to tie down sediments, improving water clarity and providing a habitat for marine animals like fish, scallops, crabs and lobsters. Julie Simpson is working with several partners to conduct a study to quantify the carbon storage of eelgrass beds in Massachusetts. By understanding the role that eelgrass ecosystems play in preparing for and mitigating the effects of climate change we can better make the case for securing protection and restoration resources.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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The Challenge of Protecting the Public and Promoting Innovation
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Taubman Building, Malkin Penthouse, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Kennedy School Healthcare Policy Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, and the Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  Dr. Robert Califf, Commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Moderated by Amitabh Chandra, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

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How to Improve Presidential Elections
Tuesday, November 1
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 2-190, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Eric Maskin, Harvard
Our speaker, Professor Eric Maskin was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 2007 (jointly with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger Myerson) for "having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory". 
Professor Maskin has a close connection to our department: he was a faculty member here from 1977 to 1985 and a Visiting Professor in 
1999-2000. 

Eric Maskin will speak about different electoral rules and how the mechanism design theory can help to improve the democratic process of presidential elections.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Economics Special Events
For more information, contact:  Eva Konomi
evako at mit.edu 

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State DAPA? And Other Thoughts on U.S. Immigration Policy in the New Administration
Tuesday, November 1
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Michael J. Wishnie, Deputy Dean for Experiential Education,Yale Law School

A session of the Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, Inter-University Committee on International Migration
For more information, contact:  Phiona Lovett
617-253-3848
phiona at mit.edu 

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Lecture by Christian Bok: The Poetics of Protein 13: The Writing of Genetic Sonnets
Tuesday, November 1
5:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building 3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Christian Bok is a bestselling author and one of the earliest founders of Conceptual Literature, a poetic school of avant-garde writing. Bok is on the verge of finishing his current project, The Xenotext, an example of living poetry.

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/christian-bok/#public-events
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Tickets: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/christian-bok/#public-events
Sponsor(s): MIT CAST (Center for Art, Science & Technology), Arts at MIT
For more information, contact:  Leah Talatinian
617.252.1888

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The Indian Coal Industry and the the State of Development in India
Tuesday, November 1 
5:30 - 6:30 PM 
MIT, Building E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSemLpfG0h6D7jwYRBU0IatrAAE78ynBJsVNx-SlNuFlA1ApLg/viewform?c=0&w=1

Rohit Chandra from the Harvard Kennedy School will be providing a historical primer on the Indian coal industry which has significant implications on the state of development in India.  If you plan on attending, please RSVP for dinner. An abstract of the presentation is below.

Coal has been the main fuel of the Indian power system since Independence in 1947, and will likely remain so for the next few decades. If this is true, it is important to understand the evolution of the industry, and its important role in India's political economy. In this talk, I will cover the most important historical aspects of the industry from 1959 to present: state intervention and nationalization, technological evolution towards opencast/pit mining, change in financial structure, and industry's importance to national and state politics. Ultimately, the Indian coal industry is a good example of adaptive state capitalism: how India's state-owned enterprises changed over half a century to meet the nation's developmental goals.

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Whose Vote Matters?
Tuesday, November 1
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building 32-123, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Charles Stewart III, Ariel White, Rahsaan Maxwell

A discussion of race, election access, and voting rights with Charles Stewart III (MIT), Ariel White (MIT), and Rahsaan Maxwell (UNC Chapel Hill). 

Co-sponsored by MIT Political Science, Boston Review, and MIT SHASS. This event is free and open to the general public. 

Light refreshments will be served.

Web site: bostonreview.net/events
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Political Science, SHASS Dean's Office, Boston Review
For more information, contact:  Anne
617-324-1360
anne at bostonreview.net 

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The Future of Nature: Conservation's Next Generation
Tuesday, November 1
5:30PM - 8PM
Microsoft New England Research and Development Center (NERD), 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/massachusetts/explore/ma-future-of-nature.xml?src=r.future
Cost:  $10 – includes sustainable hors d’oeuvres and drink  We’ll kick off the event with a reception featuring sustainable, local refreshments from Chive Sustainable Events!

With profound environmental challenges on the horizon, where will the leaders of conservation’s next generation come from, and what will they do? The Nature Conservancy invites you to a dynamic panel discussion exploring these questions and more.

Networking reception 5:30 p.m., Talk 6:30–8 p.m.

PANEL INCLUDES:
Victor Medina, park ranger, National Park Service
Charles Orgbon III, founder and CEO, Greening Forward
MODERATOR:  Shannon Dooling, reporter, WBUR

Contact Name:  Cameron Bruns
cameron.bruns at tnc.org

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Sustainable Planning: Following Doxiadis's Legacy
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Room S020, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Environmental Sciences, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mahindra Humanities Center, Seminar on Modern Greek Literature and Culture
SPEAKER(S)  Prof. Spiro Pollalis, Harvard University
CONTACT INFO	Prof. P. Roilos (roilos at fas.harvard.edu)
DETAILS  Constantinos Doxiadis’ Ekistics theory, the science dealing with human settlements and drawing on the research and experience of professionals in various fields, proposes an integrated approach, consistent with the contemporary notion of sustainability. Ekistics and its masterpiece application in planning Islamabad will be presented, leading to the most recent master planning of the Defense Housing Authority’s City Karachi, a city for 600,000 people under construction, and the master planning for the development of the former Athens airport.

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A Conversation with Chuck Hagel
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 6 – 7:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
SPEAKER(S)  Chuck Hagel, Joint Visiting Fellow, Institute of Politics and Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
United States Secretary of Defense (2013 - 2015), United States Senator from Nebraska (1997 -2009)
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum
617-495-1380
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/conversation-honorable-chuck-hagel

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Zero Waste, EHS Regulations & Other Updates from NAEM 2016 EHS Management Forum
Tuesday, November 1
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 1 Broadway, 5th Foor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/highlights-from-naems-2016-ehs-management-forum-tickets-28317017963
Cost:  $8 - $12

BASG and the National Association for Environmental Management (NAEM) partner to bring you highlights from NAEM's 2016 EHS Management Forum being held in Denver in late October. NAEM’s EHS Management Forum is the largest annual gathering for environment, health and safety (EHS) and sustainability decision-makers. For 24 years, NAEM's annual conference has been the premiere event dedicated to best practice-sharing for those developing and integrating strategic environmental, health and safety programs within companies. Join Johanna Jobin and Frank Marino as they bring fresh content from Denver to share with us live here in Cambridge.

Johanna Jobin is Director, Global EHS & Sustainability at Biogen. Johanna works to promote the company’s culture and vision on corporate citizenship by helping to implement global sustainability programs and initiatives, such as energy improvements to waste reductions, as well as driving employee and stakeholder engagement. She is also responsible for the corporate citizenship reporting and carbon neutrality strategy.

As the former Head of Corporate Responsibility & Community Affairs of EMD Millipore, the life science business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Ms. Jobin led their corporate responsibility efforts, including the vision and strategic direction for environmental and social responsibility. Her responsibilities centered around strengthening the organization’s business performance by embedding sustainability into key business practices and overall culture. Key programs she managed and supported included greenhouse gas management and energy, Design for Sustainability, community engagement, and access to health and shared value initiatives.

She received her Master of Environmental Management degree, with a certificate in Energy and Environment, from Duke University and is also an ISO 14001 trained auditor.

She is involved in a number of sustainability related organizations, and is currently a Board member of the National Association for EHS & Sustainability Management (NAEM), Board member of the USGBC Massachusetts Chapter, Co-Chair of the Association Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) Sustainability Roundtable, and on the Advisory Board for the Center for Sustainability in Business at WPI and Advisory Committee Member for the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Marine Safety and Environmental Protection. She also serves on the City of Cambridge Climate Protection Action Committee and is a Board member of “e” inc., an organization focused on environmental and STEM education for children.

Frank Marino is a Senior Corporate Environmental, Health, Safety and Sustainability Manager at Raytheon Company, where he works on a variety of EHSS challenges including auditing, corporate social responsibility reporting, sustainability, injury prevention, OSHA VPP, zero waste, installing electric vehicle charging stations, and enterprise e-waste management.

He has more than 30 years of experience in industrial EHS management, including auditing manufacturing plants in a variety of settings including computers, appliances, military hardware and aircraft. Frank co-leads Raytheon’s Environmental and Sustainability Teams and he is a Zero Waste Business Associate with the USZWBC.

Frank holds a master's degree in environmental engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell.

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Faculty Speaker: Charles Nesson JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Law, Special Events
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-juryx-deliberations-for-social-change-interactive-workshop-in-active-registration-27783709824
DETAILS  What is the citizen's role in deciding guilt? Is the loudest juror in the room more entitled to an opinion than the soft-spoken counterpart? And is a "difficult topic" a good enough excuse for a one-sided discussion?
In the first installment of a two-part workshop series, Charles Nesson, Weld Professor of Law at Harvard and founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society (now the Berkman Klein Center), will discuss his research on facilitating meaningful dialogue in the classroom, through the lens of JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, an open online course that Nesson is teaching this year.
Using a mock criminal case on gun law, workshop participants will experience firsthand Nesson's method for processing and approaching a dilemma.
This workshop is part of a two-part series. We encourage you to sign up and attend JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change, Interactive Workshop in Active Citizenship Part II as well.
LINK  http://edportal.harvard.edu/event/faculty-speaker-charles-nesson-part-ii

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Waging War:  The Clash Between Presidents and Congress, 1776 to ISIS
Tuesday, November 1
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge,

Harvard Book Store welcomes author DAVID J. BARRON—United States Circuit Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and former S. William Green Professor of Public Law at Harvard Law School—for a discussion of his book, Waging War: The Clash Between Presidents and Congress, 1776 to ISIS.
About Waging War

A timely account of a raging debate: The history of the ongoing struggle between the presidents and Congress over who has the power to declare and wage war.

The Constitution states that it is Congress that declares war, but it is the presidents who have more often taken us to war and decided how to wage it. In Waging War, David J. Barron opens with an account of George Washington and the Continental Congress over Washington’s plan to burn New York City before the British invasion. Congress ordered him not to, and he obeyed. Barron takes us through all the wars that followed: 1812, the Mexican War, the Civil War, the Spanish-American war, World Wars One and Two, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and now, most spectacularly, the War on Terror. Congress has criticized George W. Bush for being too aggressive and Barack Obama for not being aggressive enough, but it avoids a vote on the matter. By recounting how our presidents have declared and waged wars, Barron shows that these executives have had to get their way without openly defying Congress.

Waging War shows us our country’s revered and colorful presidents at their most trying times—Washington, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Johnson, both Bushes, and Obama. Their wars have made heroes of some and victims of others, but most have proved adept at getting their way over reluctant or hostile Congresses. The next president will face this challenge immediately—and the Constitution and its fragile system of checks and balances will once again be at the forefront of the national debate.

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Wednesday, November 2
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When Do Leaders Free-Ride? The Case of Military Alliances
Wednesday, November 2
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah at mit.edu 

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Digital Globe visits Fletcher
Wednesday, November 2
12:30 PM – 1:30 PM EDT
Tufts, The Fletcher School, room M231, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford

Join Tech at Fletcher and Rhiannan Price, Senior Manager at Digital Globe, on November 2nd to learn about Digital Globe, the world's leading satellite imagery provider.
Topics discussed will include the role of geospatial imagery in international affairs, Digital Globe's geospatial imagery grants to students, and career and internship opportunities.

This session will be of interest for first and second years interested in working in technology, GIS, or development (among other areas). It will be a great opportunity for Fletcher students to learn more about the world of geospatial imaging, and build the relationship between the school and a private sector leader!

About Digital Globe:
http://www.digitalglobe.com
Digital Globe is the world's leading vendor of geospatial imagery. Based in Denver, CO, its clients include NASA, the USAID Innovation Lab, and Google. The company is also heavily involved in promoting the use of satellite imagery to address global problems through the Digital Globe Foundation.

About Rhiannan Price:
Rhiannan Price is the senior manager at Digital Globe's Seeing a Better World Program. She is a graduate of the Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, a former Peace Corps volunteer, and a Boren fellow.

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Book Talk: The Dictator's Dilemma: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy For Survival
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 12:30 - 1:45pm
WHERE  Harvard, S020, Belfer Case Study Room, Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Critical Issues Confronting China Seminar Series; co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Harvard University Asia Center
SPEAKER(S)  Professor Bruce J. Dickson, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University
LINK	http://asiaevents.harvard.edu/event/book-talk-dictator’s-dilemma-chinese-communist-party’s-strategy-survival

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Developing a Public Relations Plan for Your Non-Profit: Who, What, Where, and Why, a Communications Workshop with John Guilfoil, Adjunct Professor of Journalism, Northeastern University, Principal, John Guilfoil Public Relations
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 1:15 – 2:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Fainsod Room, Littauer Building, Rm. 324, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Kennedy School Communications Program
SPEAKER(S)  John Guilfoil, Adjunct Professor of Journalism, Northeastern University, Principal, John Guilfoil Public Relations
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	Alison_kommer at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  John Guilfoil, Principal of John Guilfoil PR, will demonstrate how to turn your idea into a reality check.
LINK	www.hkscommprog.org

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The Science (and Pseudoscience) of Winning Elections
Wednesday, November 2
3:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building 54-100, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Donald Green (Columbia University)

J-PAL - MIT Economics Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Economics Special Events
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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xTalk with Deb Roy - Playful Words: Literacy Learning Networks
Wednesday, November 2
3:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building E51-325, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Prof Deb Roy
TALK ABSTRACT 
While there are many literacy learning technologies designed for individuals, the role of social --or networked-- literacy learning is less explored. We believe that literacy skills are best learned within a supportive community network including peers, teachers and parents. By developing an approach that is child-driven and machine-mediated, we hope to establish human learning networks that support development while enhancing personal, creative, and expressive interactions within communities. I will highlight projects in this area underway at the Lab for Social Machines including SpeechBlocks, designed to support learning letter-to-sound mappings through play, and StoryBlocks, designed to support self-expression through story telling and story remixing. 

Joint work with Ivan Sysoev, Anneli Hershman, Mina Soltangheis, Eric Chu, Juliana Nazare, and Sneha Makini. 

Roy is Director of the Laboratory for Social Machines, Co-founder and Co-chair of SocialEmergence.org, Associate Professor at MIT, and Chief Media Scientist of Twitter.

xTalks: Digital Discourses 
The xTalks series provides a forum to facilitate awareness, deep understanding and transference of educational innovations at MIT and elsewhere. We hope to foster a community of educators, researchers, and technologists engaged in developing and supporting effective learning experiences through online learning environments and other digital technologies.

Web site: Deb Roy - Nov 2
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): xTalks: Digital Discourses, Office of Digital Learning
For more information, contact:  Molly Ruggles
617-324-9185
xtalks-info at mit.edu 

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Rare Earths in China: Changing Landscape Points to an Uncertain Future for Global Green Growth
Wednesday, November 2
3:30PM TO 4:45PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Hongqiao Liu, Consultant, China Water Risk

Sponsored by the China Project, Harvard Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

China Project Seminar 
http://chinaproject.harvard.edu/liu161102

Contact Name:  Tiffany Chan
tiffanychan at seas.harvard.edu

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Engineering Interfacial Properties with Polymer Brushes and Nano-patterns
Wednesday, November 2
3:30p–4:45p
MIT, Building 56-114

Speaker: Prof. Padma Gopalan, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering University of Wisconsin/Madison

Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM) Seminar Series 
PPSM sponsors a series of seminars covering a broad range of topics of general interest to the polymer community, featuring speakers from both on and off campus.

SEMINAR 3:30 PM REFRESHMENTS 3:00 PM

Web site: http://polymerscience.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM)
For more information, contact:  Gregory Sands
(617) 253-0949
ppsm-www at mit.edu 

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Climate and the Peopling of the World
Wednesday, November 2
4:00pm
Harvard, Haller Hall, Geology Museum 102, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Peter de Menocal, Dean of Science, Director of the Center for Climate & Life, and Thomas Alva Edison/ConEd Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University

One of the most puzzling questions in modern human origins has been why the dispersal of modern Homo sapiens out of Africa was so delayed after their first appearance in East African fossil record near  ~200 ka (ka, thousands of years ago). Fossil, archaeological, and genetic evidence indicate that early migrations into the Levant and Arabian Peninsula occurred around 120-90 ka, but the global dispersal of our kind did not occur until after 70-60 ka. New paleoclimate records and coupled climate-vegetation-population modeling constrain this narrative, highlighting the central importance of high- and low-latitude climate interactions in regulating the flows of humanity out of Africa that populated the world. 

Reception to follow. Free and open to the public.

Contact Name:   Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu
More information at http://eps.harvard.edu/event/harvard-climate-seminar-2

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Advanced Carbon Nanotube Surfaces for Manufacturing of Printed Electronics
Wednesday, November 2
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Dr. Sanha Kim
Synthesis and modification of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provides new opportunities to design materials with novel mechanical behavior and multifunctional performance. I will discuss the design and fabrication of CNT surfaces with tailored geometry and mechanics, and their applications in advanced printing processes. First, I will present how CNT forests can be engineered as nanoporous stamps for flexographic printing of electronically functional inks, which enables combination of high resolution (0.1 m/s) that far surpasses existing printing processes. The CNT microstructures are highly porous (>90 %) and can be infiltrated by colloidal inks, and are used to transfer a thin layer to a target substrate upon brief mechanical contact. Diverse micron-scale patterns of a variety of functional nanoparticle inks, including Ag, ZnO, WO3, and CdSe/ZnS, have been printed onto both rigid and compliant substrates. The printed patterns have highly uniform nanoscale thickness (5-50 nm), and match the stamp features with high fidelity (edge roughness ~0.2 ??m). Conditions for uniform printing are derived based on nanoscale contact mechanics. Second, I show that CNT forests with thin conformal dielectric coatings can be configured as electrically switchable dry adhesives, for potential applications in pick-and-place micro-assembly of electronics.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MechE Seminar Series
For more information, contact:  Tony Pulsone

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Sustainable Community Development Projects in Nicaragua
Wednesday, November 2
4:00 PM to 5:45 PM (EDT)
University Hall Room 2-150, Porter Campus, Lesley University , 1815 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sustainable-community-development-projects-in-nicaragua-tickets-28795125997

Presenters:  Rebecca Hervieux, Board Member FNE International and Horticulturalist, and Kelvin Ramirez, Assistant Professor of Art Therapy at Lesley
Description:  Sustainable projects require multifaceted partnerships grounded in a spirit of collaboration. Please join us for a presentation and discussion that explore the challenges and rewards of sustainable community development and the benefit for institutions of higher education. Examples and models for community development presented will include housing, eco-stoves, community health, education, gardens, and agriculture based in rural communities of Nicaragua.

About the Presenters:
Rebecca Hervieux has an MPS from Cornell University in Horticulture and has been living in living and working in Nicaragua for the last four years developing sustainable projects in Nicaragua. She is a Board Member of FNE International, a 501(c)(3) non-profit based in Boston, MA. 
Kelvin A. Ramirez, Ph.D., ATR-BC, LCAT, is also a Board Member of FNE International and collaborates with educators, community leaders and mental health professionals in Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic and India incorporating creative therapeutic frameworks within educational systems to enhance student’s personal and academic growth.  Dr. Ramirez is an Assistant Professor of Art Therapy in the Expresive Therapies division of the Graduate School of Arts and Social Sciences at Lesley University.

Please RSVP, but walk-ins are welcome!
Any questions, please contact Beth Chambers Tallett at etallett at lesley.edu

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Cooking up Ideas: a conversation with Mugaritz. Screening of documentary Off-Road and forum discussion on Creativity with MIT faculty
Wednesday, November 2
4:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building 10-250, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

What is the process by which we generate ideas? How do we select the best ones? This event will focus on creativity and the creative process. 

We will be screening Off-Road; a philosophical and ethological documentary about Mugaritz, one of the best restaurants in the world, located in the hills of the Basque Country. Prior to the screening, a multidisciplinary panel of MIT faculty (engineering, physics, mathematics, architecture and music), together with Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz, will discuss their own perspective of creativity in research in their respective fields. After the screening, this same panel will converse with the audience for a forum discussion. 
Participants: 
Andoni Luis Aduriz, Mugaritz Chef and Founder 
John Bush, Professor of Applied Mathematics and Associate Department Head 
Ben Houge, Associate Professor of Electronic Production and Design, Berklee College of Music 
Gareth McKinley, Professor of Teaching Innovation, School of Engineering 
Chef Dani Lasa, Mugaritz Creativity Team 
Pedro Miguel Reis, Gilbert W. Winslow Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Gigliola Staffilani, Abby Rockefeller Mauze Professor, Department of Mathematics 
J. Meejin Yoon, Professor and Head of the Department of Architecture 
Evan Ziporyn, Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Music and Faculty Director, MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology 

This will be the US premiere of Off-Road

Web site: http://arts.mit.edu/artists/mugaritz/#schedule
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Tickets: Open to the public, no reservation necessary 
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT CAST (Center for Art, Science & Technology), Arts at MIT
For more information, contact:  Pedro Reis
preis at mit.edu 

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IBM Watson Analytics Innovation Summit
Wednesday, November 2
4pm - 6pm
Harpoon Brewery, 306 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www-01.ibm.com/events/wwe/grp/grp004.nsf/v17_agenda?openform&seminar=8Q3MUEES&locale=en_US

Please join us for our Watson Analytics Innovation Summit on November 2nd at Harpoon Brewery as we bring together the innovative brains of the start-up community with the institutional and financial brawn of our world class city. We expect attendees to develop new ideas, collaborate on new opportunities, and see first-hand the power of Watson Analytics. 

IBM Watson Analytics is a cloud based smart data discovery solution that allows users to become independent and agile in their ability to explore and model data, uncover hidden correlations, and visualize outcomes with dynamic impact. By incorporating the ability to source and analyze social and web data from over 30M websites, Watson Analytics users get a complete understanding of their organization both internally and externally. 

Join us to see the finalists present their Start Ups using Watson Analytics and cast your vote to help us select our first annual Watson Analytics Innovator Award.  

We look forward to seeing you there!

Agenda
Time	Description
4:00 pm - 4:30 pm	Registration, Welcome, and Introduction
4:30pm - 5:15 pm	Interactive Demonstration of the Power of Watson Analytics
5:15 pm - 6:00 pm	Networking, refreshments, tasting, and tour

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Compliance Technology and Self-Enforcing Agreements
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Room Littauer-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	
Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
Harvard Environmental Economics Program
SPEAKER(S)  Bard Harstad, University of Oslo
LINK  https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/16492

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Unveiling Money: Counterfeits, Arbitrage and Finance across the Arabian Sea
Wednesday, November 2
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building E51-275, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Johan Mathew, Assistant Professor of History, Rutgers University

World History Seminar

Web site: http://history.mit.edu/lectures-and-seminars/world-history-seminar
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): History Office
For more information, contact:  Margo Collett
617-253-4965
history-info at mit.edu 

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"Investing" in Climate Justice Solutions
Wednesday, November 2
5:30 PM – 7:00 PM EDT
Zevin Asset Management, LLC, 11 Beacon Street #1125, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/investing-in-climate-justice-solutions-tickets-28195801401

Join us on November 2nd to learn about and discuss an innovative approach to transforming our society from an extractive economy to a regenerative, local, living economy. Chung-Wha Hong and Sara Mersha of Grassroots International will be joined by special guest Robert Zevin, Chairman and Founder of Zevin Asset Management LLC, to explore Climate Justice Solutions, a different kind of investment that advances a sustainable food system and develops resilient communities.

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Askwith Forums: Where Are All the Teachers of Color?
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	HGSE
SPEAKER(S)  Speakers:
Nathan Gibbs-Bowling, 2016 National Teacher of the Year finalist; 2016 Washington State Teacher of the Year; teacher, Lincoln High School, Tacoma, Washington
Emily Kalejs Qazilbash, Ed.M.’97, Ed.D.’09, assistant superintendent of human capital, Boston Public Schools
Estefania Rodriguez, Ed.M.’16, K-8 Social Studies, district instructional coach, Cambridge Public Schools, Massachusetts
Eric Shed, lecturer on education and director, Harvard Teacher Fellows Program, HGSE
Moderator: Irvin Scott, Ed.M.’07, Ed.D.’11, senior lecturer on education, HGSE; former deputy director for K-12 Education, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
COST  This event is free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Despite the majority of public school students becoming increasingly nonwhite (50 percent), the majority of public school teachers – 80 percent – are white. Decades of initiatives to recruit minority teachers into the profession have struggled to keep them in schools. According to Ed Magazine, an estimated 47,600 minorities became teachers in 2003–04 but by the end of the school year, more than 56,000 minority teachers overall had left the profession. Join us as we discuss the significant role of minority teachers in the school system, student lives, and education policy, as well as the challenges in recruiting and retaining these teachers.
LINK	http://www.gse.harvard.edu/calendar?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D120807997

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Climate Congress "Climate Action and Activism" Discussion Group
Wednesday, November 2
6pm – 8pm
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.0n6pf2df7d03r263snv77ej2no?authuser=0

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Designing the Lab of the Future
Wednesday, November 2
6pm - 8pm
Shepley Bulfinch, 2 Seaport Lane, Boston
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Cambridge-Life-sciences-Data-Management-Meetup/events/234811476/

Ever wonder what goes into designing and building today's most innovative lab spaces? Want to connect with other lab tech enthusiasts? Join us for the inaugural Lab of the Future meetup!

Agenda:
6.00pm: Arrival, check in, pizza, drinks
6.30pm: A word from our sponsor: TetraScience
6.40pm: Presentation #1: Luke Voiland, Principal at Shepley Bulfinch, will give us the inside scoop on the new Harvard Life Lab. PLUS an exclusive VR (virtual reality) walk through of the space http://i-lab.harvard.edu/launch/life-lab/
6:55pm: Presentation #2: Dennis Grimard, associate director of MIT.nano, will give us a sneak peek of yet another best-in-class research lab coming our way soon  
http://news.mit.edu/2015/juggler-dennis-grimard-mit-nano-0306
7:10pm: More discussion, mingling and networking 
8.00pm: Kick you out!

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SOLUTIONS with/in/sight: Masterclass with Michael Yaffe
Wednesday, November 2
6:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building 76-156, Koch Institute Public Galleries, 500 Main Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Michael Yaffe
What is personalized medicine? KI faculty member Michael Yaffe delivers a masterclass presentation entitled "Using Systems Biology to Improve Cancer Treatment." His insights will take us inside the secret lives of cancer cells to explore how small changes in signaling pathways can lead to big changes in tumor development and therapeutic response. In keeping with one of the recommendations in the recent Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, this evening networking event will explore intercellular communication and the activation of cellular "backup" systems that promote chemotherapy resistance. Join us to discover how we can improve patient care through treatment that is precise, predictive, and personal.

Web site: http://ki.mit.edu/news/events/withinsight/november-2016
Open to: the general public
Cost: free with pre-registration 
Tickets: https://withinsight-nov2016.eventbrite.com/?aff=mitevents 
Sponsor(s): Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research
For more information, contact:  Wendy Brown
617-324-2169
webrown at mit.edu 

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Understanding Suicide Risk: How language, emotion, and pain influence self-harm
Wednesday, November 2
7pm - 9pm 
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Screening & Discussion: City of Trees
Wednesday, November 2
7:30PM TO 8:45PM
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain

https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1578&DayPlannerDate=11/2/2...
The Arnold Arboretum invites you to a film screening and discussion of City of Trees, a deeply personal story about the struggle for good jobs and environmental justice in our cities.

Since 1990, nonprofit Washington Parks & People has tried to reduce poverty and violence in Washington, D.C. neighborhoods by improving parks. At the height of the recession, the organization received a stimulus grant to create a "green" job-training program in communities hardest hit. They had two years to help unemployed people find jobs and care for parks in their neighborhoods.

Steve Coleman, a grassroots environmental activist who directs the organization, must hire 150 unemployed residents to plant several thousand trees and provide training in the soft skills required to get a job. For Charles Holcomb, the paycheck offers a chance to give his newborn daughter the life he never had. For Michael Samuels, the job training is a first step forward after a drug conviction marred his employment record. For James Magruder, the program offers a chance to prove that his neighborhood roots position him as an unsung leader. 

What sounds like a simple goal — putting people back to work by planting trees — becomes complicated by a community’s distrust of outsiders and a fast-approaching deadline before the grant money runs out. Filmed in an unflinching and compelling verité approach over the course of more than two years, City of Trees thrusts viewers into the inspiring but messy world of job training and the paradoxes change-makers face in urban communities every day. Discussion will follow. Fee $10. Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

76 min, USA, directed by Brandon Kramer, produced by Lance Kramer a film by Meridian Hill Pictures, in association with Kartemquin Films and Magic Labs Media. City of Trees had its world premiere at the 2015 American Conservation Film Festival and was the Audience Choice Award Winner.

arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu
(617) 524-1718

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Lo and Behold, Reveries of a Connected World (FREE admission/popcorn)
Wednesday, November 2
8:00p
MIT, Building 26-100, 60 Vassar Street, Cambridge

From the brilliant mind of Oscar-nominated Werner Herzog (Cave of Forgotten Dreams, Grizzly Man) comes his newest investigation: a playful and at times chilling chronicle of the virtual world, from its origins to its outermost reaches. Herzog explores the digital landscape with the same curiosity and imagination he previously trained on earthly destinations like the Amazon, Sahara, South Pole and Australian outback. Beginning with the fathers of internet technology, Herzog speaks to everyone from Elon Musk of SpaceX, and cutting edge engineers and hackers, to hermits who fear radiation from cell phone towers, victims of cyber bullying, and beyond. Herzog touches upon every facet of virtual life, and posits how it might change the way future generations connect.

Web site: http://lsc.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): LSC, MIT Anthropology Program
For more information, contact:  MIT Lecture Series Committee
617-253-3791
lsc at mit.edu 

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Thursday, November 3
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Planning Sustainable Cities Conference
Thursday, November 3, 2016 (ALL DAY) TO Friday, November 4, 2016 (ALL DAY)
Piper Auditorium, GSD, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/planning-sustainable-cities-conference-registration-26849540699?aff=PSC

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/planning-sustainable-cities-conference-registration-...
The Zofnass Program for Sustainable Infrastructure is pleased to host the Planning Sustainable Cities Conference. The conference aims to present an infrastructure-based approach to city planning, an analytical framework for urban sustainability, focusing on the services and performance of infrastructure systems. This conference will serve as the launch of the latest Zofnass Program publication ‘Planning Sustainable Cities. An Infrastructure-based Approach,’ directed and edited by Prof. Spiro Pollalis.

Infrastructure is understood as a series of systems that function in synergy, directly linked to urban planning.  The conference aims to decode in different sessions the key infrastructure systems of Energy, Landscape, Transportation, Waste, Water, Information and Food, to explore their synergies through land use planning, engineering, economics and policy. The conference sessions are modeled according to the key infrastructure systems delineated in the Planning Sustainable Cities book.

This event will convene city planners, leaders in infrastructure development, designers, engineers, experts, academics, and public officials to share perspectives on sustainable city planning as well as to discuss the proposed infrastructure-based planning approach for sustainable cities.

RSVP required. See website for further details at http://zofnass.gsd.harvard.edu/planning/ 

Contact Name:  Judith Rodriguez
jirodrig at gsd.harvard.edu

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Sustainability Innovations In Fashion and Apparel
Thursday, November 3
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Ariel Kraten  

What is the relationship between our clothes and our environment? Because of many factors such as population growth, the proliferation of appearance-obsessed social media, and the explosion of fast fashion, this relationship is growing more and more contentious.Through the lens of items we all have in our closets, this presentation will look at the environmental impact of clothing manufacture, and share some of the cutting edge innovations from science and technology that are leading to breakthroughs in more sustainable production.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Environmental public interest litigation in China
Thursday, November 3
12:00 PM
East Asian Legal Studies Seminar
Harvard, Morgan Courtroom, Austin Hall 308, 1515 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Barbara FINAMORE, Senior Attorney and Asia Director, China Program, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)

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Litigating Free Speech Cases in the African Regional Courts
Thursday, November 3
12:00 pm
Harvard Law School campus, Hauser Hall, Room 102, Cambridge
Brown-bag luncheon

featuring Berkman Klein Fellow, Nani Jansen Reventlow 
Please join us for a discussion with Nani Jansen Reventlow, Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and Associate Tenant at Doughty Street Chambers, on the topic of regional courts in Africa and freedom of expression cases in particular. As the head of the Media Legal Defence Initiative’s global litigation practice, Reventlow led litigation that resulted in the first freedom of expression judgments at the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the East African Court of Justice. She has also led cases before the European Court of Human Rights, the UN Human Rights Committee, the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, and several African regional courts.

About Nani
Nani Jansen Reventlow is an Associate Tenant at Doughty Street Chambers and a 2016-2017 Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. She is a recognised international lawyer and expert in human rights litigation responsible for groundbreaking freedom of expression cases across several national and international jurisdictions. At the Berkman Klein Center, Nani's work focuses on cross-disciplinary collaboration in litigation that challenges barriers to free speech online.
Between 2011 and 2016, Nani has overseen the litigation practice of the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI) globally, leading or advising on cases before the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the UN Human Rights Committee, the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention and several African regional forums. Nani obtained the first freedom of expression judgment from the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (Konaté v. Burkina Faso) and the East African Court of Justice (Burundi Journalists’ Union v. Burundi), and appeared before the Supreme Court of Rwanda to argue international and comparative law standards on freedom of expression and the right to a fair trial.

A Dutch-qualified attorney, Nani graduated in civil law and public international law from the University of Amsterdam and specialised in human rights at Columbia Law School and the European University Institute. She has developed and delivered training sessions on freedom of expression and human rights litigation to dozens of lawyers from several diverse jurisdictions, including India, Russia, Cambodia, Hungary, Botswana and Croatia.

Nani is a member of the project board of the Public Interest Litigation Project and strategic adviser to GQUAL, campaign for gender parity in international representation. Nani speaks English, Dutch, French and Italian.

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A Conversation with Musicology & Copyright Expert Michael Harrington
WHEN  Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Pound Hall 101, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Business, Humanities, Information Technology, Law, Lecture, Music
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Law School's Recording Artists Project
SPEAKER(S)  Dr. E. Michael Harrington teaches at Berklee Online, is Music Business Program Chair at SAE Nashville, on the Advisory Board of the Future of Music Coalition, a member of Leadership Music and owner of E Michael Music.com (www.emichaelmusic.com).
CONTACT INFO	hlsrap at gmail.com
DETAILS  Please join RAP and Dr. Michael Harrington to learn from his plethora of experience as a musicology expert witness in high profile copyright lawsuits! Dr. Harrington will provide an exciting presentation which will include a discussion of the Blurred Lines case between Marvin Gaye and Robin Thicke, as well as his current involvement in the "This Land Is Your Land" and "We Shall Overcome" cases.
Don't miss this ultimate insider exclusive into complex copyright litigation!
LUNCH SERVED!!
LINK	https://www.facebook.com/events/1068262613272498/

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Spiritually Resilient Leadership in the Midst of Adaptive Problems: A Conversation with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake
WHEN  Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
SPONSOR	HDS Office of Ministry Studies
CONTACT	Leslie MacPherson Artinian
DETAILS  Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will discuss the challenges of leading a city in today's turbulent racial and political climate. Lunch will be provided. Overflow viewing will be located in the Braun Room of Andover Hall.

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Humidity-Cloud-Precipitation Feedbacks and Convective Organization
Thursday, November 3
2:00p–3:00p
MIT, Building 54-915, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Chris Bretherton, University of Washington
Large cloud-resolving simulations with 10^8 or more grid points are a powerful tool for modeling multiscale interactions between cumulus and boundary-layer clouds and atmospheric circulations. These multiscale interactions are important for tropical weather and global climate and they are challenging to parameterize in climate models. Near-global aquaplanet simulations with 4 km horizontal resolution will be used to explore mechanisms of tropical convective aggregation and cloud feedbacks, especially feedbacks between radiation, humidity, clouds and convection. Finally, early results will be presented from a new global modeling strategy, ultraparameterization, that resolves boundary layer clouds and turbulence. | EVENT WEBSITE

Houghton Lecture Series: Insights from Large-Scale Cloud-Resolving Modeling of Convection and Clouds

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Faith Zhang
fhzhang at mit.edu 

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Building energy efficiency in China
Thursday, November 3
4:00 
China Project Research Seminar
Harvard, HUCE, Room 440 of Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Barbara FINAMORE, Senior Attorney and Asia Director, China Program, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)

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Dark Matters of Graphene
Thursday, November 3
4:00 pm
MIT, Building 10-250, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Refreshments @ 3:30 pm in 4-349 (Pappalardo Community Room)

MARIANGELA LISANTI, Princeton University
Dark matter remains one of the principal motivators for new physics beyond the Standard Model.  Although it comprises the vast majority of the matter in the Universe, its properties continue to elude us. For decades, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) have served as the primary theoretical paradigm for dark matter. However, as a wide variety of experiments put such models to the test with no definitive detections, we are challenged to reevaluate this canonical scenario.  I will discuss the theoretical motivations and experimental prospects for moving beyond the WIMP paradigm.  The focus will be on direct detection experiments, which aim to discover dark matter via its scattering off targets located deep underground.  I will present a new proposal to use two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, as targets for dark matter that is lighter than a WIMP.  This proposal provides the first opportunity for directional detection down to MeV masses, and can be implemented by the PTOLEMY experiment.

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Patterns of defaunation and consequences for ecosystems and humans
Thursday, November 3
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Rodolfo Dirzo, School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University
In this presentation I will argue that Anthropogenic impact on wildlife (defaunation) is a massive, widespread phenomenon, and I will illustrate how the loss or decline of wildlife unleashes cascading consequences on ecosystem processes and services of relevance to humans. This research shows that animal life is not only a wonderful decoration of our planet, but that it provides important services to society. I argue that we can attenuate the Anthropocene???s defaunation trajectory through our collective appreciation of the value of animal biodiversity, and via global efforts directed to stop habitat destruction and animal over-exploitation as soon as possible.

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00 
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
6172588685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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A Conversation with singer-pianist Dena Derose
WHEN  Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Holden Chapel, Harvard Yard, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION  Lecture, Music
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Learning from Performers
SPEAKER(S)  Moderated by Callie Crossley, host of "Under the Radar" on WGBH-FM,
COST  Free
DETAILS  A conversation moderated by Callie Crossley, host of "Under the Radar" on WGBH-FM, Holden Chapel, Harvard Yard, Cambridge. Presented by the OFA Learning From Performers program. Admission free (tickets or RSVPs not required); seating first-come, first served, subject to venue capacity.
LINK	http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/event/conversation-singer-pianist-dena-derose

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The 1979 Hostage Crisis: Reflections on Iran -- Then and Now
WHEN  Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Exhibitions, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The WCFIA/CMES Middle East Seminar
SPEAKER(S)  Randy H. Goodman, Photojournalist
CONTACT INFO	elizabethflanagan at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Please visit Randy Goodman's photography exhibit in the CGIS Knafel Concourse: bit.ly….
LINK	http://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/1979-hostage-crisis-reflections-iran-then-and-now

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Illuminating 2016: Using Social Listening Tools to Understand the Presidential Campaign
Thursday, November 3
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

The 2016 presidential election has been historic for the ways that social media has been used to drive the news agenda and rally supporters to the cause. Jennifer Stromer-Galley will describe the large scale collection and machine learning techniques she and her team have used for the Illuminating 2017 project to study the ways the presidential candidates and the public have used social media. She will provide some of the major trends they've seen this election cycle, and talk about why this matters for journalism and for social media practitioners more broadly. 

Stromer-Galley is a professor in Syracuse University's School of Information Studies and Director for the Center for Computational and Data Sciences, and she is President of the Association of Internet Researchers. She has been studying "social media" since before it was called social media, studying online interaction and influence in a variety of contexts, including political forums and online games. Her award-winning book Presidential Campaigning in the Internet Age provides a history of presidential campaigns as they have adopted and adapted to digital communication technologies.

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/stromer-galley-illuminating-2016-presidential-campaign/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw at mit.edu 

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EnergyBar!
Thursday, November 3
5:30pm
Greentown Labs, 28 Dane Street, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/energybar-tickets-21458386612

EnergyBar is Greentown Labs' monthly networking event devoted to helping people in clean technology meet and discuss innovations in energy technology. Entrepreneurs, investors, students, and ‘friends of cleantech,’ are invited to attend, meet colleagues, and expand our growing regional clean technology community. 

Our attendees typically span a variety of disciplines within energy, efficiency, and renewables. In general, if you're looking for a job in cleantech or energy, trying to expand your network, or perhaps thinking about starting your own energy-related company this is the event for you. Expect to have conversations about issues facing advanced and renewable energy technologies and ways to solve our most pressing energy problems. 

Light appetizers and drinks will be served starting at 5:30 pm. Suggested dress is shop floor casual. Parking is incredibly limited at Greentown Labs and we encourage attendees to consider taking advantage of public transportation. 
Hope to see you there! 

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BRING YOUR IDEAS TO LIFE WITH CROWDFUNDING: AN EVENING WITH INDIEGOGO
Thursday, 3 November
6:30 – 8:30 pm EDT
GA Boston, 51 Melcher Street, Boston 
RSVP at https://generalassemb.ly/education/bring-your-ideas-to-life-with-crowdfunding-an-evening-with-indiegogo/boston/30252

Emily Cunningham, Co-Founder & COO, MoringaConnect
Michael Burtov, Founder & CEO , GeoOrbital

About This Event
More entrepreneurs than ever are turning to crowdfunding to bring their product ideas to life. Why? Because, beyond the hope of running a blockbuster campaign like DIY bee Flow Hive, they know that crowdfunding is about more than just raising capital. A successful campaign can build community, highlight feasibility, and create partnerships to drive business success even after its initial launch.
Think crowdfunding might be right for your idea? Join us on Thursday, 3 November, when we team up with crowdfunding platform Indiegogo for an evening of expert insights. You’ll explore the business of crowdfunding through real-world examples to learn:
How to determine if your idea is ready to fund — and if crowdfunding is the right path to pursue.
Insider tips for planning and executing a successful crowdfunding campaign.
How to keep building your project after your crowdfunding campaign has wrapped.
Please note that by RSVPing for this event you are agreeing to receive communications from Indiegogo

About the Instructors
Emily Cunningham, Co-Founder & COO, MoringaConnect
Emily is the co-founder and COO of MoringaConnect, a social enterprise leveraging the incredible moringa tree to end poverty and malnutrition. Through their award-winning clean beauty brand, True Moringa, and their superfood brand Minga Foods, MoringaConnect links 1600 small farming families in Ghana to the conscious consumers of natural products worldwide, providing agricultural support and farmer training, increasing farmer incomes by 10x, and cold-pressing their oils in-country to create jobs locally. To date, they have planted 250,000 trees and are in the process of creating the largest organic certified moringa farm in Africa. They successfully crowdfunded $25,000 in 2013 to begin their journey. Follow them on instagram.

Michael Burtov, Founder & CEO, GeoOrbital
Although Michael Burtov has 15 years experience in starting-up and seeing companies thought their lifecycle, with GeoOrbital, he went out on a limb. Powered by a complete lack of knowledge of engineering he defied years of conventional thought and engineering convention. Inspired by a motorcycle in the movie "TRON," he came up with an idea for an electric wheel that could easily be attached to almost any bicycle, he built the first prototype in his kitchen. The crazy idea became a massive success. Before GeoOrbital Michael had a number of different jobs, was the Founder and CEO of 3 companies (2 failed, 1 thrived) and is very proud of having served over 2 years as a Peace Corps volunteer. 
Michael and his work have been featured in hundreds of publications world wide - ranging from Forbes to Time Magazine. He was also named “One of the top Inventors of 2016" and one of the "most dynamic and creative people shaping business today” by the Upstart Business Journal.
About Our Partners

Indiegogo
Indiegogo is the place for entrepreneurial projects to move quickly from concept to market, amplified by a community of backers who believe the world benefits when every idea gets an equal shot at success. Indiegogo empowers people to unite around the ideas that matter to them and together make those ideas come to life. As the world’s first crowdfunding platform, campaigns have launched from almost every country around the world with millions of dollars being distributed every week due to contributions made by the Indiegogo community. The company was launched in 2008 and is headquartered in San Francisco, with offices in Los Angeles and New York. For more information, visit Indiegogo.com and follow us at Twitter.com/indiegogo and Facebook.com/indiegogo.

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Photography, Fashion and the Legacy of Irving Penn
Thursday, November 3
7:00 PM
Marran Theater, 34 Mellen Street, Cambridge

Join Lesley University and the College of Art and Design for a panel discussion focused on the life and work of renowned American photographer Irving Penn. The discussion will feature three industry experts celebrated in fashion and editorial photography, among others.

Moderator
Writer and Curator Charlotte Cotton
Cotton most recently served as curator-in-residence at the International Center of Photography. Previously, she held positions as curator of photographs at the Victoria and Albert Museum, head of programming at The Photographers’ Gallery in London, and curator and head of the Wallis Annenberg Department of Photography at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Cotton is also the author of Imperfect Beauty (2000), Then Things Went Quiet (2003), The Photograph as Contemporary Art (2004), and Photography is Magic (2015).

Panelists
Director, Art Director, and Editor Fabien Baron
Baron is the Founder and Chief Creative Officer of Baron & Baron, a boutique advertising agency specializing in fashion, fragrance, and cosmetics luxury brands. Over three decades, he spearheaded the creative reinvention of Interview, French Vogue, and Harper’s Bazaar magazines. Baron also created brand images for fashion companies such as Calvin Klein, Burberry, Giorgio Armani, and Balenciaga. In 1992, he directed a music video and documentary featuring Madonna and has directed numerous commercials including Calvin Klein’s first Super Bowl ad.

Photographer Raymond Meier
Raymond Meier is a Swiss-American photographer whose work has explored still life, fashion, and architectural photography over a nearly 30-year career. He is a contributing photographer to the American and International editions of Vogue and The New York Times. Meier’s work with major fashion, jewelry, and cosmetic brands have shaped their visual identifies. Vogue Editor in Chief Anna Wintour describes Meier’s work as “In the traditional of great Swiss visual geniuses…whose visual precision was always richly evident in work both artistic and commercial….it soars beautifully.”

Executive Arts Editor, WGBH Jared Bowen
Bowen is the Emmy-award-winning host of the television series, Open Studio with Jared Bowen. He also contributes to WGBH’s nightly news program, Greater Boston and covers the latest happenings in the arts in New England for WGBH’s Morning Edition and for Boston Public Radio. Bowen also contributes to the PBS NewsHour and Art New England magazine. He has produced five news documentaries for WGBH and is the recipient of the 2013 Commonwealth Award. Bowen began his career at Dateline NBC in New York.

For more information about the exhibition and other events, please visit lesley.edu/penn

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Friday, November 4
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Crowdsourcing, Prizes, Moonshots, and More: Bringing New Ideas and Tech into Government
Friday, November 4
9:30-11:30 a.m. 
Harvard, Littauer 166 (IOP Conference Room), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Panelists:
Chris Nelson, White House, Assistant Director of Open Innovation
Jenn Gustetic, NASA, Small Business Innovation Research Program Executive
Sandeep Patel, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Open Innovation Manager
Wendy Taylor, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Director of the Center for Accelerating Innovation and Impact
Nick Sinai, HKS Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy and Former U.S. Deputy CTO (moderator)
Using incentive prizes, grand challenges, crowdsourcing, citizen-science, and non-traditional procurement, the Obama Administration has made a concerted effort to uncover new ideas, new solutions, and non-traditional teams to address America’s thorniest problems.

Looking back at the last 8 years of the Obama Administration, which of these initiatives and common platforms (like Challenge.gov and CitizenScience.gov) have been successful, and where have efforts fallen short?  What can governments and organizations of all sizes learn from these historic open innovation efforts?   How should a new presidential administration make sure the federal government harnesses the ingenuity of the American people?

Come hear from pioneers and experts from the White House, NASA, USAID, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services! Light breakfast and coffee will be served.

Co-sponsored by the Harvard Institute of Politics.

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Looking Around the Arctic: What You Can Learn through Autonomous Spectroscopic Measurements of Gases and Particles
Friday, November 4 
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Bill Simpson, UAlaska-Fairbanks. 

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/88521

Contact Name:  Lu Hu
luhu at g.harvard.edu

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Making Data Matter: Visualization as Communication Medium 
Friday, November 4 
12:30pm to 2:00pm
Harvard SEAS, Maxwell Dworkin G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge
Lunch 12:30pm; Talk 1pm

Fernanda Viegas & Martin Wattenberg, Google 
Data is ubiquitous in our lives. It describes our neighborhoods, our cities, weather patterns, it helps track illnesses and contextualize social patterns. In an increasingly data-rich society, there’s a critical need for tools to help people understand and reason about complex information. Our research seeks to make data visualization accessible to everyone: from lay users to data experts. We will present work that exposes kids to complex data, explores the artistic expressiveness of data, uncovers the underworld of cyber crime and augments our knowledge of scientific fields such as machine learning. This approach to visualization as an inclusive communication medium points the way to a future where every citizen can more fully participate in a data-driven society.

Speaker Bio:  Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg are the leaders of Google's “Big Picture” data visualization research group, which invents new ways for people to understand and explore data. They are well known for their contributions to social and collaborative visualization, and the systems they’ve created are used daily by millions of people.
Viégas holds a Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab; Wattenberg has a Ph.D. in mathematics from U.C. Berkeley. Their visualization-based artwork has been exhibited worldwide, and is part of the permanent collection of Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Host: Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS)
Contact: Natasha Baker
Phone: 617-496-2623
Email: nrbaker at seas.harvard.edu

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Microfluidic Genetic Transformation for the Next Generation of Synthetic Biology
Friday, November 4
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building  3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Prof. Cullen Buie, MIT MechE
One major limitation of synthetic biology is the inability to incorporate genetic material into many bacteria due to the challenge of permeating the cell envelope while maintaining high cell viability. There are millions of species of bacterial species on the planet, yet we can only genetically engineer several dozen. New technologies are needed to unlock the bacterial kingdom???s potential to impact many challenges of interest to mankind. In this presentation we will show recent work utilizing novel microfluidic approaches to enable electroporation-based genetic transformation for applications in synthetic biology. In electroporation, high electric fields disrupt the cell envelope to introduce foreign nucleic acids. We have developed a rapid microfluidic assay to quantitatively measure the electric field conditions required to open pores in bacteria using electroporation. Our rapid microfluidic electroporation assay can evaluate a range of electroporation conditions in a fraction of a second, a process that previously took hours or even days. Further, we have recently devised a microfluidic platform for high throughput electroporation that can enable genetic transformation 103 104 times faster than conventional systems. Results of this work will broaden the scope of bacteria available for applications ranging from biofuel production to human microbiome based therapeutics.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MechE Seminar Series
For more information, contact:  Tony Pulsone

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Preparing for the Future of Artificial Intelligence
WHEN  Friday, Nov. 4, 2016, 4 – 5:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
JFK Jr. Forum
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
The Future Society at HKS, AI Initiative
SPEAKER(S)  Ed Felten, Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
David Kenny, General Manager, IBM Watson
David C. Parkes, George F. Colony Professor of Computer Science, Harvard College
Rosalind Picard, Founder and Director, Affective Computing Research Group, MIT Media Lab
Mustafa Suleyman, Co-founder, Google DeepMind (via Skype)
Juliette Kayyem (Moderator), Belfer Lecturer in International Security, Harvard Kennedy School
CONTACT INFO	JFK Jr. Forum Office
617-495-1380
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/preparing-future-artificial-intelligence

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Saturday, November 5
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CIVIC TECH CHALLENGE 2016 HACKATHON CHALLENGE
Saturday, November 5
9am-6pm
Microsoft, 1 Cambridge Center, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeNeXSaaK5ZSS2q7yaEcvAJHnnLa_PH8xF7d54ktwZfkDW7hQ/viewform

At Generation Citizen’s third annual Greater Boston Civic Tech Challenge, we’re bringing together top Greater Boston tech innovators with passionate middle school students for a day-long hackathon that will create solutions for Greater Boston’s toughest problems. Young people from the Generation Citizen action civics program connect with developers, digital marketers, graphic designers and data analysts to build civic tech innovations that accelerate their ability to advance change on local issues.

Our awards reception will highlight each team’s work, as they present their ideas to 250+ local innovators, event honoree Diane Hessan, and a judging panel of Greater Boston’s top civic leaders.

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2nd Annual Barnes & Noble Mini Maker Faire, Day 1
Saturday, November 5
11:00 AM – 6:00 PM EDT
Barnes & Noble Booksellers Prudential Center, 800 Boylston Street,  #179, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2nd-annual-barnes-noble-mini-maker-faire-day-1-tickets-28897723870?aff=es2

The Mini Maker Faire at Barnes & Noble brings together tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, engineers, science club members, students, entrepreneurs, hobbyists and Makers of all kinds to learn from each other, get craft ideas and science fair project ideas, hear the experts, and work on projects.(barnesandnoble.com/h/makerfaire)


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH 
1:00 PM Meet the Maker Byranne Lemming from Jumpstart Inc
Code and play with STEAM. Jumpstart Inc. builds products that combine physical activity with STEAM education to expose children ages 6 to 12 to coding in a fun, engaging and memorable way. Children ages 6 to 12 can play active games, music instruments, light shows, and dance games on their feet by running to and jumping on the tiles spread across a room. (jumpsmartlearn.com/)
1:30 PM Meet the Maker Gary Garber
Deilab | LEGO Mindstorms and VEXIQ
LEGO Mindstorms, participants to write code and play with a hands-on, LEGO based activity, our DELILAB rapid proto-typing lab, build a small battlebot which will do battle against patrons. Participants will also demo the VEXIQ robotics kit. The VEXIQ robots will be remote control driven. 
2:00 PM Meet the Maker The Clubhouse Network Make it Sing!
Make it Sing: Programmable Musical Creations. Create your own music-making drawing using a pencil sketch and other conductive materials connected to a MaKey MaKey board. Learn about the Clubhouse Network, an international community of over 100 creative learning environments for teens, including the Flagship location at the Museum of Science, Boston in collaboration with the MIT Media Lab.
2:00 PM Meet the Maker/Author Alisha Panjwani
Alisha Panjwani is a designer and educator interested in exploring experiential and experimental ways of integrating storytelling, craft, wellness, play and interactive technologies to create participatory learning practices. Her practice centers on nurturing children's creative confidence with new technologies and encouraging their involvement in creative acts within their communities. 
3:00 PM Meet the Maker - Mike Festa VR Tech Demo
Mike Festa leads Wayfair's research and development team, Wayfair Next, where he spearheads developments in augmented reality, virtual reality and 3D scanning.

Check out the complete schedule and our Maker Collection at http://barnesandnoble.com/h/makerfaire 

Interested in creating a Maker Space at your school or library? Send us a message or reach our Community Manager at (617) 247-1914.

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Win or Lose Beyond Question 2
Saturday, November 5
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM EDT
Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building, 2300 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/win-or-lose-beyond-question-2-tickets-28373847943

After Ballot Question #2, no matter who loses, OUR CHILDREN MUST BE  WINNERS.
You are invited to join CPLAN (The Collaborative Parent Leadership Action Network and RDM (the Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan Parent Coalition) to move beyond the political Question 2 debate  and gather with other like-minded parents who want to inform and influence what happens beyond the elections. 
As parents, let us not stand by and wait for the results. Let us come together and discuss how we will move forward and begin the journey towards quality education for all our children. Join us as we work together to prepare for the decision… No matter what the outcome, our KIDS must WIN.
Please join the dialogue and help lead this conversation forward. Childcare and refreshments provided. PLEASE RSVP- space is limited. 
For questions please contact:
CPLAN - Julia Mejia at 617-658-3331 or via email jmcasting1 at gmail.com
RDM- Natasha Maughan at 857-237-8289 or via email at nmaughan59 at gmail.com

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Incube
Saturday, November 5
4:00p–8:00p
E40, Martin Trust Center for Entrepreneurship, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge
This event occurs on Saturdays through December 17

We're a community of creators who share one simple desire: to collaborate on our passions with amazing people. We pitch ideas and ongoing projects, make teams, and build the bleeding edge together. With a strong focus on technology, our projects vary as widely as our personalities, from software to hardware, zany to industrial, local to global, and beyond. 

We all meet up once a week to create our projects, share ideas, and enjoy good food. People freely come and go from our collaborative group space. Our community members' involvement ranges from just building a couple hours per week at meetups, to dropping out of MIT to pursue the full-time creation of our ventures, with most of us somewhere in between.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Incube, a16z
For more information, contact:  Laser Nite

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Monday, November 7
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An Alternative Path for the Evolution of Biological Nitrogen Fixation
Monday, November 7
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge 

Eric Boyd, Montana State University

EPS Colloquium Series
http://eps.harvard.edu/event/department-colloquium-series-16

Contact Name:  Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Energy and Climate: Vision for the Future
Monday, November 7
12pm – 1:30 pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Michael McElroy, Gilbert Butler Professor of Environmental Studies, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Contact Name:  cepr at hks.harvard.edu
617-495-8693
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

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Radiation and Restoration: The Politics of Ecological Care
Monday, November 7
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Laura Martin, HUCE

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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The 2016 Presidential Election: What's at Stake?
WHEN  Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Case Study Room (S020), Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  Michael Dukakis, Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Northeastern University; Democratic Party Nominee for the President of the United States (1988); and Governor of Massachusetts (1975-79; 1983-91)
Moderated by Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics and Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK	http://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/calendar/upcoming

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The More We Die, the More We Sell? A Simple Test of the Home Market Effect
Monday, November 7
2:15p–4:00p
MIT, Building E52-324

Speaker: Heidi Williams (MIT)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu

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Discussion with Gustavo Dudamel
WHEN  Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Learning From Performers
COST  Admission free withÊtickets required, limit two tickets per person. Available beginning November 1 for Harvard students and affiliates in person or by phone, 617.496.2222; and November 3 for the general public in person, by phone, or online (phone and online orders subject to service fees) through the Harvard Box Office at Farkas Hall, 10-12 Holyoke St., Cambridge.
TICKET WEB LINK  http://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu
TICKET INFO  The Harvard Box Office 617-496-2222

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Harvard Origins of Life Second Annual Prize Lecture
WHEN  Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Emerson Hall, Room 105, 19 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Origins of Life Initiative 
SPEAKER(S)  Dr. John Grotzinger, Chair of the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences at California Institute of Technology.
Dr. Grotzinger was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2002.  For his great contributions to understanding the co-evolution of life and environment on early Earth, Grotzinger received the Charles Doolittle Walcott Medal from the National Academy of Sciences – awarded once every five years. For his work in the geology and geochemistry of hydrocarbon exploration, he was honored with the 2012 Halbouty Award of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.
CONTACT INFO	Kelly Colbourn Moreno, Coordinator of Academic Programs, Outreach and Events
kelly.moreno at cfa.harvard.edu
DETAILS  We are honored to announce Dr. John Grotzinger, Chair of the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences at California Institute of Technology, as The Origins of Life Initiative's second annual Prize Lecturer.
4:00PM Lecture    Emerson Hall 105, 19 Quincy Street
5:30PM Reception   Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street

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True Listening: An Evening with Acoustic Ecologist Gordon Hempton
WHEN  Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, 5 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Religion, Special Events
SPONSOR	Office of Student Life 
CONTACT	studentlife at hds.harvard.edu 
DETAILS  Join internationally acclaimed acoustic ecologist, Gordon Hempton, as we listen to sunrise circle the globe, hear snow melt and whales sing, and discover that the Earth is music, clear enough to hum all day. And let’s re-examine our widely held belief that the human ear evolved to hear human speech. We will listen to nature sounds that fit neatly into our peak hearing sensitivity (2 kHz-5 kHz) and speculate about the evolutionary consequences of detecting these sounds over great distances. During modern times with our global environmental crises, is it enough to hear ourselves or must we, as a species still subject to the laws of survival, once again listen to what the Earth is telling us? This audio presentation will change the way you listen to the natural world around you.

Acoustic ecologist Gordon Hempton has circled the globe three times in pursuit of the Earth’s rarest natural sounds. His sound portraits which record quickly vanishing natural soundscapes have been featured in People magazine and a national PBS television documentary, Vanishing Dawn Chorus, which earned him an Emmy. Hempton provides professional audio services to media producers, including Microsoft, Smithsonian, National Geographic, and Discovery Channel. Recipient of awards from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Rolex Awards for Enterprise, he is coauthor of One Square Inch of Silence: One Man’s Quest to Preserve Quiet (Free Press/Simon & Schuster, 2010). Gordon Hempton speaks widely on the importance of listening.

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Defining and Measuring Gentrification
WHEN  Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Building, Starr Auditorium, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Ingrid Gould Ellen and Daniel T. O’Brien
DETAILS  Gentrification is a common and controversial topic in urban planning, but do we have a consensus on what the term actually means? Do we have accepted standards by which we can track it?
Join us for a discussion with Ingrid Gould Ellen, Visiting Professor, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, MIT, Paulette Goddard Professor of Urban Policy and Planning at NYU Wagner, and Faculty Director of the NYU Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy; and Daniel T. O’Brien, Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and Criminology and Criminal Justice, Northeastern University and Co-Director, Boston Area Research Initiative.
Cosponsored by the Boston Area Research Initiative, the Harvard-Mellon Urban Initiative, the GSD Department of Urban Planning and Design, and the GSD Loeb Fellowship.
LINK	http://jchs.harvard.edu/event/defining-and-measuring-gentrification

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Digital Colonialism?: Thoughts on the Ethics of Digital Recreations of Threatened Cultural Heritage Sites in the Middle East
Monday, November 7
6:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambrudge

Speaker: Erin Thompson

"CULTURES OF UPHEAVAL"
FALL 2016 AGA KHAN PROGRAM LECTURES

Web site: http://akpia.mit.edu/fall-2016-lectures-events-cultures-upheaval
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE
Sponsor(s): Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture
For more information, contact:  Jose Luis Arguello
617-253-1400
akpiarch at mit.edu 

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Speaker Series: John Thompson, Chairman of Microsoft
Monday, November 7
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM EST
District Hall, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/speaker-series-john-thompson-chairman-of-microsoft-tickets-28694380665

Microsoft Chairman, John Thompson is joining Epicenter CEO Paul Krasinski for an informal fireside to discuss technology, innovation, leadership and his Boston roots.  Mr. Thompson will speak to the creative and innovative minds to both inspire concept creation, as he understands the power of the creative economy where ideas are currency.  John and Paul will discuss the creative process, development of successful products and building a collaborative culture.  Epicenter is honored that John Thompson will spend his evening with Boston, the City he credits with the launch of his career.

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Digital Colonialism?: Thoughts on the Ethics of Digital Recreations of Threatened Cultural Heritage Sites in the Middle East
Monday, November 7
6:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Erin Thompson

"CULTURES OF UPHEAVAL”
FALL 2016 AGA KHAN PROGRAM LECTURES

Web site: http://akpia.mit.edu/fall-2016-lectures-events-cultures-upheaval
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture, School of Architecture and Planning, Department of Architecture
For more information, contact:   Jose Luis Arguello
617-253-1400
akpiarch at mit.edu 

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ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Dividuum with Gerald Raunig
Monday, November 7
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building e15-001, The ACT Cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Gerald Raunig
ACT Monday Night Lecture Series presents: Dividuum with Gerald Raunig

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology, Department of Architecture, Council for the Arts at MIT (CAMIT), swissnex, Goethe Institut
For more information, contact:  Marion Cunningham
617-253-5229

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Boston New Technology November 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT71
Monday, November 7
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
MassChallenge Space, 23 Drydock Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Boston_New_Technology/events/234904042/

Free event! Come learn about 7 innovative and exciting technology products and network with the Boston/Cambridge startup community!


Please enter at 23 Drydock Ave and take an elevator to the 6th Floor. Look for our check-in table. Type the first few letters of your name on the screen and tap your name to print your name tag.

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2016 Science and Cooking Public Lecture Series: Delicious Decomposition: Tales from the Cheese Caves of France
Monday, November 7
7 p.m.
Harvard, Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Sister Noella Marcellino, Abbey of Regina Laudis, subject of PBS documentary “The Cheese Nun”

Now in its seventh year, the series is organized by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).
The public lectures are based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but do not replicate course content.
All talks will take place in the Harvard Science Center (1 Oxford St., Cambridge, Mass., Hall C) and begin at 7 p.m., unless otherwise noted
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course
Seating for all lectures is first come, first seated
If you have questions regarding the public lecture series, please contact science_cooking at seas.harvard.edu.

2016 Chef Lecture Dates
Monday, Nov. 21
Title TBA
Science Center Lecture Hall C, 7 p.m.
Nathan Myhrvold, (@ModernCuisine), former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft, co-founder of Intellectual Ventures, author of “Modernist Cuisine”
The Harvard College Course
The Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Alícia Foundation developed the General Education science course, “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” which debuted in the fall of 2010. The course uses food and cooking to explicate fundamental principles in applied physics and engineering. (Watch a video about the course.)
While limited to currently enrolled Harvard undergraduates, the class, which  brings together eminent Harvard researchers and world-class chefs, is available to others on-campus through the Harvard Extension School and online through the HarvardX platform (details below).
Instructors
Michael Brenner, Glover Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics; Harvard College Professor
Pia Sörensen, Preceptor in Science and Cooking
David Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Lab Design/Implementation
Pere Castells, Unitat UB-Bullipèdia
Science and Cooking at Harvard Extension School
A version of “Science and Cooking” will be offered for credit through the Harvard Extension School in Spring 2017. Registered students will have access to the expertise and support of Harvard teaching staff, and will participate in an on-campus weekend in our cooking lab.
An online version of the course is also available as a HarvardX course.

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Tuesday, November 8
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Anything but Barren:  Fungal biodiversity in the Pine Barrens
Tuesday, November 8
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, HUH Seminar Room (125), 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Ning Zhang, Rutgers University

Herbaria Seminar Series
http://huh.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/news/herbaria

HUH seminars are free and open to the public. 

Contact Name:  Barbara Hanrahan
bhanrahan at oeb.harvard.edu

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Challenges of Change: An Experiment Training Women to Manage in the Bangladeshi Garment Sector
Tuesday, November 8
2:30p–4:00p
MIT, Building E62-650, 100 Main Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Chris Woodruff (Oxford)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Organizational Economics
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal at mit.edu 

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A community-based approach to planning for the effects of climate change on shellfishing in Wellfleet Harbor
Tuesday, November 8
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA

Speaker: Seth Tuler, Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary and Global Studies, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Shellfish play a vital role in the ecology of Wellfleet Harbor andrable to climate  fish stocks in the northeastern US. Climate change is predicated to cause changes in sea levels, air and water temperatures, intensity and frequency of precipitation, and water chemistry. In this presentation we will share the process and outcomes of the Working Group on Climate Change impacts on shellfishing in Wellfleet Harbor. The Working Group is a community-based group with broad representation from the shellfish industry and the Town, whose purpose was to identify: threats to shellfishing in Wellfleet Harbor from climate change, the role of shellfish in mitigating impacts from climate change and other environmental hazards in Wellfleet Harbor, and strategies to increase the resilience of Wellfleet and its shellfishery in a time of climate change. A community-based approach empowered local stakeholders to take a more active role in planning for climate change and provides . The Working Group produced reports, a website, and a systems dynamics model to characterize the risks and vulnerabilities for the shellfish fishery and local community due to a changing climate – both today and into the future.

Bio: Seth Tuler is an Associate Teaching Professor in his research interests more generally are concerned with public participation and developing tools to inform planning about social impacts and vulnerabilities to risk events. He is interested in applying insights emerging from research to practical applications in a wide range of policy arenas, including climate change adaptation planning and marine fisheries management.

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Narratives of Hope: Science, Theology and Environmental Public Policy
Tuesday, November 8
4:00PM TO 6:00PM
Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room 429, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

The Program on Science, Technology and Society at the Harvard Kennedy School invite you for a discussion with Tom McLeish, Durham University, with introduction by Sheila Jasanoff, HKS. Light refreshments will be served.

Recent analyses of public debates on nanotechnology, GMOs and other environmental impasses have unearthed powerful, yet submerged, driving ‘narratives of despair.  Their religious resonances (e.g. ‘Pandora’s Box’, ‘Sacred Nature’) suggest a search for countering ‘narratives of hope’ within theological sources. A close reading of the ancient Book of Job, alert to resonances with natural philosophy, recasts ‘science’ as a deeply human, social and ancient. Jobhas spawned a rich literature of environmental commentary; we attempt to shape a deeper story of purpose in engaging nature, through classical, patristic, medieval, and early modern sources into a framework for late modern technologies. The resulting reconciliatory ‘Theology of Science’ meets the narratives of despair head-on.  It suggests a transformation of the way political discussions of 'troubled technologies' are framed, and pathway to mobilising religious communities in support of a healthier public debate

Contact Name:  Shana Ashar
shana_ashar at hks.harvard.edu
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/workshops/narratives-of-hope/

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Passive House Massachusetts
Tuesday, November 8
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
BSA Space, 290 Congress Street, Suite 200, Boston
RSVP to mduclos at deapgroup.com  Subject:  Passive House MA 11/8
Price: This meeting is free and open to all

Residential Ventilation - new requirements, new systems, new issues
Until recently, residential ventilation has consisted mainly of installing bath fans and kitchen exhaust hoods, but that has changed with the new code requirements for testing, and with tighter houses driving the need for balanced ventilation. Learn why something as simple as a bath exhaust fan may not deliver anything close to the specified air flow, and why. New homes in Massachusetts. must have ventilation flows measured by an approved 3rd party that meet a written specification – or no Certificate of Occupancy. See data from exhaust only and balanced ventilation systems that graphically depict a surprising difference in CO2 levels. Learn what ‘commissioning’ means, and why both Passive House and ENERGY STAR require verification of ventilation system airflows.
To learn more about Passive House Massachusetts, visit http://architects.org/committees/passive-house-massachusetts

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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, November 9
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Microelectromechancial Systems Based on Biological and Biodegradable Materials
Wednesday, November 9
11:30a–1:00p
MIT, Building 34-401, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Mark Allen, University of Pennsylvania

MTL Seminar Series 
MTL seminar speakers for the series are selected on the basis of their knowledge and competence in the areas of microelectronics research, manufacturing, or policy. This series is held during the academic year on Wednesdays at noon. The seminars are open to the public. Lunch is served at 11:30am

Starts a half-hour earlier than usual. Lunch begins at 11am.

Web site: https://www-mtl.mit.edu/mtlseminar/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): Microsystems Technology Laboratories
For more information, contact:  Shereece Beckford
617-253-0086
beckford at mit.edu 

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Local Sustainability: Climate and Health at Harvard and in Boston
Wednesday, November 9
12:30–1:30 pm
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, FXB G-13, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/local-sustainability-climate-and-health-at-harvard-and-in-boston-tickets-26841970055

Dr. Aaron Bernstein, Assistant Director, Center for Health and the Global Environment
Heather Henriksen, Director, Harvard University Office of Sustainability
Austin Blackmon, Chief of the Environment Energy and Open Spaces, City of Boston 
Limited seats, registration required.

The environments in which we live are changing fast. To keep people healthy and alive, we must prevent diseases caused by turbulent weather, pollution, and increasingly crowded cities.

Hear from Heather Henriksen, Director of Harvard University Office of Sustainable, and Austin Blackmon, Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space, City of Boston, and learn about our new Master of Public Health in Sustainability and the Global Environment.

This speaker series will celebrate the Center for Health and the Global Environment’s 20th year, and introduce you to pressing issues students will explore in the Sustainability, Health, and the Global Environment program at the Harvard School of Public Health. In this program students will learn the latest research techniques, and have opportunities to connect with leading edge thinkers in global businesses and governments who are focused on the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings. We are accepting applications beginning Fall 2016. 

Join us to learn from leading global health experts, and talk with faculty members actively working to solve some of the greatest public health challenges facing us today. To learn about other topics in the series visit http://www.chgeharvard.org/events.

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China's National Cap-and-Trade Program: The Promise and the Reality
Wednesday, November 9
3:30PM TO 4:45PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Wang Pu, Fellow at the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, HKS.

Co-sponsored by the China Project, SEAS, and the Environment and Natural Resources Program, HKS.

China Project Seminar Series
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/92611

Contact Name:  Tiffany Chan
tiffanychan at seas.harvard.edu

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Polymeric Tools to Manipulate Innate Immunity: Probing a Code Without a Key
Wednesday, November 9
3:30p–4:45p
MIT, Building 56-114, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Prof. Aaron Esser-Kahn, School of Physical Sciences, U. California/Irvine
Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM) Seminar Series 
PPSM sponsors a series of seminars covering a broad range of topics of general interest to the polymer community, featuring speakers from both on and off campus.

SEMINAR 3:30 PM REFRESHMENTS 3:00 PM

Web site: http://polymerscience.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE 
Sponsor(s): MIT Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM)
For more information, contact:  Gregory Sands
(617) 253-0949
ppsm-www at mit.edu 

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Artificial Intelligence: A DARPA Perspective
Wednesday, November 9
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Refreshments: 3:30 PM
MIT, Building 32-D463 (Star), 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
 
Speaker: John Launchbury, Director, Information Innovation Office (I2O) , DARPA 
Abstract: Recent, powerful technology developments in artificial intelligence (AI) are being harnessed to support many different applications, yet fundamental limitations still exist. This talk will explore this powerful technology that DARPA has catalyzed for decades and that is now poised to move in surprising new directions.

Bio: Dr. John Launchbury is the Director of the Information Innovation Office (I2O) at DARPA. In this role he develops strategy and works with I2O program managers to develop new programs and transition program products.

Before joining DARPA, Dr. Launchbury was chief scientist of Galois, Inc., which he founded in 1999 to address challenges in information assurance through the application of functional programming and formal methods. Under his leadership, the company experienced strong growth and was recognized for thought leadership in high-assurance technology development.

Prior to founding Galois, Dr. Launchbury was a full professor at the OGI School of Science and Engineering at OHSU (Oregon). He earned awards for outstanding teaching and gained international recognition for his work on the analysis and semantics of programming languages, the Haskell programming language in particular.

Dr. Launchbury received first-class honors in mathematics from Oxford University, holds a Ph.D. in computing science from the University of Glasgow and won the British Computer Society's distinguished dissertation prize. In 2010, Dr. Launchbury was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).


Contact: Lauralyn M. Smith, 617-253-0145, lauralyn at csail.mit.edu

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Electricity Market Design: Political Economy and the Clean Energy Transition
Wednesday, November 9
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM EST
MIT, Building 66-110, 25 Ames Street, Cambridge

Bill Hogan, Harvard

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Education and Transformative Justice: A Community Conversation about Connections, Questions, and Action
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Askwith Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE)
DETAILS  As a part of the Transformative Justice Series, Kaia Stern, lecturer on education at HGSE and co-founder of the Prison Studies Project, will be moderating a panel and discussion on these important questions. How do we understand justice? What are the connections between under-resourced schools, trauma, and mass incarceration? From cradle to prison cell, how do we give educators the tools needed to work for justice that transforms individuals, relationships, and communities?
The panelists include Ernesto “Eroc” Arroyo-Montano, Educator at United For a Fair Economy; Melissa W. Bartholomew, Racial Justice and Healing Practitioner; Mariam Durrani, Postdoctoral Fellow in Education at HGSE; David J. Harris, Director of The Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School; and Autumn White Eyes, Ed.M. Candidate at HGSE. A special announcement will also be given by Tracie Jones, Assistant Director for Diversity and Inclusion Programs at HGSE.
This event is co-sponsored by Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice at Harvard Law School, Harvard Memorial Church, Philips Brooks House Association, Prison Studies Project, and Harvard Divinity School.

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The Blessed and the Damned: The Solovetsky Islands from Monastery to Gulag
Wednesday, November 9
5:30p–7:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Roy Robson
Roy Robson is Division Head, Arts and Humanities, Professor of History, Penn State Abington. He has twice served as the expert-in-residence on the National Geographic Expeditions tour of the Trans-Siberian Railroad. 
A professor and author of more than sixty books, articles, and reviews, including "Solovki: The Story of Russia Told Through Its Most Remarkable Islands" (2004), which the New Yorker called "an epic drama of spiritualism and savagery." 
Robson has studied Russian history for 25 years and has traveled extensively in Russia as a Fulbright scholar. His newest book, "Exploring the Sacred World", will appear in 2016.

ussia @ MIT 
Part of the Focus On Russia lecture series and the Architecture at the End of the Earth exhibition series.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MISTI MIT-Russia Program, MISTI, History Office
For more information, contact:  Ekaterina Zabrovskaya
617- 324-2793
zabroves at mit.edu 

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SheDemos 2016
Wednesday, November 9
5:30 PM to 8:30 PM 
C Space, 290 Congress Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/shedemos-2016-tickets-27032100741

#SheDemos is a collaboration between SheStarts and Babson’s WIN Lab built to highlight high-growth female founders and their startups in the city of Boston. The night will begin with over a dozen startups showcasing their products to the public, followed by the top five teams pitching their products to a panel of esteemed judges. At the end of the pitch sessions, one winner will be announced and awarded thousands of dollars worth of in-kind prizes. Those not in the final five still have a chance to bring home prizes as the "fan-favorite", determined by the company that garners the most public votes.  
Interested in showcasing your company? Startups with at least one woman founder are eligible to apply. Applications are open until October 22 and can be found here.

Up to ten will be selected to showcase and up to an additional 5 teams will be selected to demo live at the event.  Selected teams will be notified by October 31.
The demo event will be held on November 9, 2015 at C-Space.  The winner of the demo competition will be selected and announced at the event by a panel of judges.
Our esteemed panel of judges will include:
David Chang, Entrepreneur & Angel Investor
Shereen Shermak, Director, Good Growth Capital
Galen Moore, Editor in Chief, Streetwise Media
Deb Kemper, Golden Seeds Angel Investment Group
Payal Agrawal Divakaran, .406 Ventures

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Dark and Stormy: Reflections on the Election
WHEN  Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Emerson Hall 105, 19 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Humanities, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Danielle Allen (Director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard University)
David Laibson (Robert I. Goldman Professor of Economics, Harvard University)
Jill Lepore (David Woods Kemper '41 Professor of American History, Harvard University)
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	humcentr at fas.harvard.edu
617-495-0738
DETAILS  Seating is limited.
LINK	http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/dark-and-stormy-reflections-election

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Small World, Big Data: From online dating to the emergency room
Wednesday, November 9
7pm - 9pm
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

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Celebrating Randy Weston’s Archive at Harvard
WHEN	Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, 7 – 9 p.m.
WHERE	Horner room at Agassiz Theatre, 5 James Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Concerts, Lecture, Music
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Hutchins Jazz Research Initiative, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard Office for the Arts, and Harvard College Library
SPEAKER(S)  Randy Weston, Robin D. G. Kelly, and Professor Ingrid Monson
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/boxoffice
TICKET INFO  Tickets available Oct. 26th, first come, first served. limit 2 per person
DETAILS  Randy Weston in conversation with Robin D. G. Kelly
Highlights of the collection with Ingrid Monson, and
A performance by Randy Weston’s African Rhythms Quintet
LINK  http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/november-9-2016-700pm/celebrating-randy-weston’s-archive-harvard

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Thursday, November 10
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Boston TechBreakfast: Smartick Method, and More!
Tuesday, November 1, 2016
8:00 AM
Microsoft NERD, Horace Mann Room, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Boston-TechBreakfast/events/226656155/

Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations.
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them :)

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast:
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Food & Coffee and chit-chat 
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements 
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs! 
Smartick Method - Conchi Ruiz
*** OPEN ***
*** OPEN ***
*** OPEN ***
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words Boston 

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HOME ENERGY LABELING INFORMATION EXCHANGE (HELIX) SUMMIT
Thursday, November 10
8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
MA Department of Energy Resources, 2nd floor, 100 Cambridge street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/home-energy-labeling-information-exchange-helix-summit-tickets-28365997462

This November, HELIX is hosting it's inaugural free, full day event where attendees will learn and help shape the first-of-its-kind effort to automate the transfer of home energy data to Multiple Listing Services (MLS) across the Northeast region. Providing real estate professionals with access to verified, independent home energy information will enable sellers to better market their properties, empower buyers to make better informed investments, and promote wiser use of energy by homes in our region – all while being completely voluntary and avoiding the privacy concerns of disclosing actual tenant energy usage.

This inaugural summit will include the latest updates from the project team as well as interactive breakout sessions that will directly influence the development of HELIX. Because input and support from across the industry is critical to the long-term success of this project, this event is free for anyone interested to attend.

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Building Waste Ventures in Emerging Markets: A Panel Discussion
Thursday, November 10
11:30a–1:30p
MIT, Building 32-144, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP required: http://bit.ly/2epan1D 

Speaker: Panel discussion featuring Wecyclers, Protoprint, GreenChar, and Fruiti-Cycle

Contact information: trashiscash at mit dot edu 
Lunch will be served! 

Waste management is often an under-appreciated sector, yet entrepreneurial opportunities abound, especially in emerging markets. 

In the context of the new Inclusive Waste Management Prize this year, the MIT Waste Alliance, together with Sloan Entrepreneurs for International Development (SEID) and MIT IDEAS Global Challenge / D-Lab / PIA, will be hosting a panel discussion featuring the following waste-sector entrepreneurs: 
Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola from Wecylers (Nigeria) 
Sidhant Pai from Protoprint (India) 
Tom Osborn from GreenChar (Kenya) 
Ben Wokorach from Fruiti-Cycle (Uganda) 

If you have any specific questions, please feel free to submit them in advance to trashiscash at mit dot edu

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Waste Alliance, Graduate Student Life Grants, MIT Sloan Entrepreneurs for International Development
For more information, contact:  trashiscash at mit.edu 

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The CLUC Study: Chickens living in urban coops
Thursday, November 10
12pm - 1pm
Tufts, Rabb room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Marieke Rosenbaum
Ownership of backyard chickens is increasing in urban areas across the nation, and the greater Boston area is no exception. Interactions between family members and chickens are frequent as these birds are often considered pets as well as egg producers. However, little attention is given to public health and bio security concerns that may be associated with backyard chicken ownership. In this study we use a One Health approach, integrating veterinary medicine and environmental health epidemiology, to understand public health risks such as exposure to lead and Salmonella that may be associated with urban poultry ownership in the greater Boston area.

Watch most talks live at https://tufts.webex.com/mw3100/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=tufts&service=1&main_url=%2Fmc3100%2Fmeetingcenter%2Fdefault.do%3Fsiteurl%3Dtufts%26rnd%3D2534427961%26main_url%3D%252Ftufts%252Fj.php%253Fsiteurl%253Dtufts%2526errET%253Dmc%2526MTID%253Dm67c61a87cdb5cfefee82fbc7955c0aa8

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Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
Thursday, November 10
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Michael Puma, Columbia University. Title TBA.

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/88526

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Arab World: Human Rights and Democracy vs Stability?
Thursday, November 10
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, Pye Conference Room, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Lecture by Prof. Mona Makram-Ebeid, CIS Wilhelm Fellow 
Expertise:  Democratic Transition Middle East and North Africa Egypt 
Former Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center; Distinguished Lecturer, American University, Cairo; and former Member of Parliament and Senator, Egypt

Web site: http://cis.mit.edu/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MIT-Arab World Program
For more information, contact: 617- 253-8306
lkerwin at mit.edu 

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xTalks: 'Playful Rehearsal' - Designing Practice Spaces for Teachers
Thursday, November 10
3:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building 3-442, MIT Campus

Speaker: Justin Reich
EVENT DESCRIPTION 
Every great teacher knows that skill development requires deliberate practice; ironically, teachers themselves have limited opportunities to practice important teaching strategies and moves in low-stakes settings. 

In this presentation, Justin Reich, Executive Director of the MIT Teaching Systems Lab, will describe the ideas underlying this research and showcase prototypes of games and simulations that help teachers rehearse for and reflect upon important decisions in teaching.

xTalks: Digital Discourses 
A forum to facilitate awareness, deep understanding and transference of educational innovations at MIT and elsewhere, xTalks is fostering a community of educators, researchers, and technologists engaged in developing and supporting effective learning experiences through online learning environments and other digital technologies.

Web site: Justin Reich - 11/10
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): xTalks: Digital Discourses, Office of Digital Learning
For more information, contact:  Molly Ruggles
617-324-9185
xtalks-info at mit.edu 

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Ants, Plants, and Bacteria: Symbiosis as a driver of evolutionary diversification
Thursday, November 10
4:00PM TO 5:00PM
Harvard, BioLabs Lecture Hall 1080, 16 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Corrie Moreau, Field Museum of Natural History

OEB Seminar Series
http://oeb.harvard.edu/event/oeb-seminar-series-4

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Natural and anthropogenic contributions to stratospheric aerosols
Thursday, November 10
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Daniel Murphy, NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division
"A combination of global modeling and PALMS aerosol composition measurements show a stunning contribution of the stratosphere to the aerosol direct effect. Updated PALMS data continue to show a large contribution by organic carbon to aerosol mass in the lowermost stratosphere. A global model that matches the PALMS and other data shows that organics contribute over 30% of the stratospheric aerosol column, with the organics almost entirely below 20 km. Model simulations also show that the non-volcanic stratospheric aerosol has almost doubled since the pre-industrial era. Most of the modeled increase is due to sulfate transported into the stratosphere with a smaller but still significant contribution from emissions of primary organic aerosol. The increase in stratospheric aerosol contributes over 20% of the direct aerosol radiative forcing. The percentage is so high partly because black carbon in the stratosphere does not offset much of the cooling from sulfate the way it does in the troposphere. PALMS data also show that there are still some unsolved puzzles in the chemistry of stratospheric aerosols."

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series 
Hosted by: Otto Cordero (ottox at mit.edu) 
Serguei Saavedra (sersaa at mit.edu)

Web site: ttps://sites.google.com/site/sergueisaavedra/seminar
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0.00
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Denise Mulcahy
6172588685
dstewart at mit.edu 

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Active Matter: From Colloids to Living Cells
Thursday, November 10
4:00 pm
MIT, Building 10-250, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Refreshments @ 3:30 pm in 4-349 (Pappalardo Community Room)

M. CRISTINA MARCHETTI, Syracuse University
Collections of self-propelled entities, from living cells to engineered microswimmers, organize in a rich variety of active fluid and solid states, with novel rheological and mechanical properties. In this talk I will describe the behavior of such “active materials”, focusing on two examples of liquid-solid transitions driven by active processes. The first is the spontaneous assembly of active colloids in coherent mesoscale structures with life-like properties. I will describe a minimal model of purely repulsive active particles that exhibits motility-induced phase separation into gas and dense liquid phases and jams at high density when crowding overcomes activity. This athermal phase separation has all the characteristic of a liquid-gas spinodal and captures aggregation of the surface-dwelling bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The second example is motivated by the experimental observation of glassy dynamics in confluent epithelial cell monolayers, where there are no gaps between cells and the packing fraction is always unity. I will present a new theoretical model that captures this behavior by predicting a liquid-solid transition that occurs at constant density as a function of cell properties, such as motility, contractility, and cell-cell adhesion.

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Dipesh Chakrabarty, The Human Condition in the Anthropocene
WHEN  Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, 4:15 p.m.
WHERE  Thompson Room, Barker Center 110, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard's Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Seminar on Violence and Non-Violence and the the Joint Center for History and Economics
SPEAKER(S)  Dipesh Chakrabarty, Lawrence A. Kimpton Distinguished Service Professor of History, University of Chicago
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	617-495-0738, humcentr at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Free and open to the public. Seating is limited.
LINK  http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/human-condition-anthropocene

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Nature is Never Finished: Land Art Conservation in the 21st Century 
Thursday, November 10
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EST
MIT List Visual Arts Center, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lavine-lecture-nature-is-never-finished-tickets-28562277541

In 1972, the American artist Robert Smithson wrote, “I am for an art that takes into account the direct effect of the elements as they exist from day to day apart from representation. …Nature does not proceed in a straight line, it is rather a sprawling development. Nature is never finished.” Today, Smithson’s massive work of entropic land art on the Great Salt Lake, Spiral Jetty (1970), changes color and texture in relation to changing water levels and sediment deposits, while art world ambassadors have advocated against nearby oil drilling on the basis that it would disrupt the formal composition of the work. 

How have earth works of the 1960s and 1970s transformed as a result of the “never-finished” progression of nature, and how do we understand the limits of human intervention in this process? How do curators, conservators, historians and activists interpret and care for earth art within evolving critical frameworks for preservation and ecology?

The 2016 Lavine Lecture presents a discussion between Francesca Esmay and James Nisbet, tackling the complex matter of eroding land forms within the cultural context of shifting categories of nature and culture. 

About the Speakers
Francesca Esmay is a conservator whose work focuses on long-term preservation and conservation of minimalist, post-minimalist, and conceptual artworks. From 2001 to 2006, Esmay worked as the first conservator at the Chinati Foundation, a contemporary art museum in Marfa, TX. In 2006, Esmay became the first staff conservator at the Dia Art Foundation, where she worked until joining the Guggenheim Museum in 2010 as the Panza Conservator.

James Nisbet is Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Director of Graduate Studies for the Ph.D. Program in Visual Studies at the University of California, Irvine. He works on modern and contemporary art, theory, and criticism, with special interests in environmental history, the history of photography, and media studies. Nisbet’s book Ecologies, Environments, and Energy Systems in Art of the 1960s and 1970s was published by MIT Press in 2014.

About the Lavine Lecture Series
The Leroy and Dorothy Lavine Lecture Series was established to honor the Lavines, two prominent Boston art patrons and longtime supporters of the MIT List Visual Arts Center. The Leroy and Dorothy Lavine Lectures bring to the Boston community distinguished art world figures for talks on modern and contemporary art.
This program is being offered in connection with the HTC course “Landscape Experience: Seminar in Land/Art” co-taught by Caroline A. Jones and Rebecca Uchill in Fall, 2016. Support for the course has been provided by the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) and the MIT Alumni Class Funds.

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#FuturePub Boston
Thursday, November 10
6:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Digital Science Office, 1 Canal Park, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/futurepub-9-new-developments-in-scientific-collaboration-tech-boston-tickets-28463405813

Free Pizza, Beer and Wine!
Join us for an evening exploring exciting new ideas and technologies in science & publishing! This is the 2nd FuturePub event in the US - typically held in London where it has "already become such a staple of the London science tech/publishing scene" . :-)
So for everyone new to the event, here's how it works:
A selection of quick-fire talks cover a range of new and exciting developments in science & publishing tech.
These all fit into a one hour slot (from 7-8pm), to keep the evening fast paced and fun!
The rest of the evening is then open for discussions and conversations over drinks – we expect a great mixture of attendees from the research, publishing and start-up communities.
After the event, groups usually continue their discussions at a nearby pub -- this time it's even easier as we're running the whole evening – presentations, drinks, pizza, music and all - at the Digital Science Office at 1 Canal Park!  
The evenings are designed to be fun and informal - we aim to give those working on new ideas and innovations a chance to present and get feedback on their ideas. And did we mention the free pizza?

Speakers & Talks
We have a great selection of speakers lined up, including:
RedLink - Kent Anderson 
See What You're Missing
Peerus - Philippe Chuzel
Being aware of mutations in your research field is essential to being efficient - discover how to monitor your field quickly when facing a tremendous amount of information
Kudos - Rebecca Shumbata    
Actionable Insight - Letting the Data Work for You   
Kynplex - Grace Xiao
Transforming scientific communication
TetraScience – Alok Tayi 
The Connected Lab - How Internet-of-Things and cloud technology are speeding the path to scientific discovery

Doors open at 6:00pm with free pizza and drinks - the talks will kick off at 7pm. Space at the venue is limited, so please register for your free tickets now to reserve your place!

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Sustainability Collaborative
Thursday, November 10 
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Venture Cafe at Cambridge Innovation Center, 5th floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge, MA 02142 United States
Join us each month for the Coalesce Sustainability Collaborative. Come back for more info on this month's guest as we get closer and email Sierra Flanigan at (sierra at coalesce.earth) for more info.

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Marcel Zaes in concert
Swiss composer Marcel Zaes is coming to Boston with a string quartet and a solo performance for a double-concert at swissnex Boston. Join us for a night of experimental music, presented in collaboration with Non-Event with musicians Kate Outterbridge, Josie Davis, Ashley Frith and Laura Cetilia.

November 10
7:15 pm to 10:00 pm 
swissnex Boston420 Broadway,  Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/marcel-zaes-in-concert-tickets-28556138178
Cost:  $10 

On November 10, Swiss composer and sound artist Marcel Zaes will be in Boston for a double-concert at swissnex Boston. Join us for a night of experimental music, presented in collaboration with Non-Event and with musicians Kate Outterbridge, Josie Davis, Ashley Frith, and Laura Cetilia. 

Marcel Zaes (born 1984 in Bern, Switzerland) belongs to a generation of young Swiss composers, who combine technology-based medial approaches and instrumental music writing, thereby radically extending the concept of “composing.

Currently pursuing his PhD in Computer Music and Multimedia at Brown University, the experimental Swiss composer will be at swissnex for a “double concerto” night on November 10, showcasing the two contrasting aspects of his oeuvre in the U.S. The String Quartet No. 1 “Isomorph” shows a rather manual ability of composing in acoustic music and is a soft, durational, minimalist position. Isomorph is inspired by electronic pure sounds and treats the quartet as if it was a synthesizer. On the contrary, with, his solo-performance “Pulse Geometries” Marcel Zaes himself enters the stage in the role of a performer and creates experimental soundscapes and beats at the intersection of old analogue apparatus and digital technology.

Members of the String Quartet
Kate Outterbridge, violin
Kate Outterbridge recently earned her Masters of Music and Masters of ChamberMusic from the University of Michigan, where she studied with Aaron Berofsky. Prior to that, she earned her Bachelors of Music degree at Boston University, where she studied with Bayla Keyes. Kate enjoys learning and performing a variety of musical styles, including early baroque performance practice, exploring sounds and experimentation with newly composed music, keeping up with her Irish fiddling, and most recently learning Indian Carnatic violin.

Josie Davis, violin
Josie Davis began her musical studies at the age of six with Janet Ciano and Gilda Joffe. She received her undergraduate degrees in violin and sociology at Oberlin College and Conservatory where she was a student of David Bowlin. Josie is currently participating in a two-year fellowship program at Community MusicWorks in Rhode Island where she performs regularly and teaches a full studio of students.
 
Ashley Frith, viola
Ashley Frith was recently pursuing her masters degree from The Boston Conservatory, where she studied with Lila Brown. She is currently a viola fellow with Community MusicWorks in Providence, RI.

Laura Cetilia, cello
Laura Cetilia, cellist, is a resident musician at Community MusicWorks teaching cello, media lab, and curating the Ars Subtilior concert series which focuses on subtlety in experimental music. She performs avant garde music in her duo Suna No Onna with violist Robin Streb and electroacoustic improvisation with her partner, Mark Cetilia, in their group Mem1. Mem1 has held artist residencies and performed throughout the U.S., Italy, Norway, Israel, England, and the Netherlands.

Event Agenda
7:15 PM Doors open
7:45 PM Opening remarks & concert
String Quartet No. 1 “Isomorph”
Solo Performance “Pulse Geometries”
Followed by networking reception
10:00 PM Doors close

 Please note: Tickets can be refunded up to 48 hours in advance. No refunds after. 

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Roxbury Community College - A Green Urban Campus 
Thursday, November 10  ‘
Doors open at 7:00 p.m.; Presentation begins at 7:30 p.m  
First Parish in Cambridge Unitarian Universalist;  3 Church Street, Harvard Square, Cambridge

Ameresco and the Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) Approach 
There is a fascinating solar power project underway at Roxbury Community College. Nearly 3,000 panels strong (approx. 1 MW capacity), this solar canopy will cover a parking lot adjacent to the school. Below the parking lot, a geothermal heat pump system (115 wells, approx. 400 ton capacity) will provide heating and cooling to the campus.

Ameresco, Inc., of Framingham, MA, has partnered with the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAMM) in an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) to deliver the project by year-end 2017, predicted to save the school nearly $860,000 annually in energy costs. LED lighting and a complete upgrade of the Energy Management System are included in the ESPC. Funding comes from a mix of grants, bonds, incentives and the Clean Energy Investment Program, plus savings from energy generation.

As the first of its kind in Massachusetts, and highly visible to the public (inbound Columbus Avenue, approaching Roxbury Crossing), this project should serve as a shining example of the potential for on-site renewable energy to integrate successfully and upgrade existing facilities toward sustainability goals. 

Jim Walker, of Ameresco, will be on hand to introduce the project and answer our questions.
Jim Walker is Vice President, Solar PV for Ameresco, where he is responsible for leading and building Ameresco's solar PV business in the East Region. Jim brings 40 years of diverse energy experience focused on energy efficiency projects, energy supply management contracts and strategies, and solar PV project development for large manufacturing corporations and municipalities. Jim's early career was a Corporate Energy Manager for GTE Corporation. Following GTE, Jim started the Corporate Supply Management Services business unit for XENERGY, Inc.

As a volunteer, Jim created and co-founded the Ignite Clean Energy Business Plan Competition for the MIT Enterprise Forum. He was a Board Member of the MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge for six years. MIT awarded Jim two honors, including a 2006 Presidential Citation.

Jim earned an MBA from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Sloan School of Management and a BS in mechanical engineering degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

About Roxbury Community College
Founded in 1973, Roxbury Community College (RCC) is a comprehensive, multicultural, urban, student-centered, open-access community college.  An Achieving the Dream college, RCC offers associates degree and certificate programs, online courses, corporate community education programs, and lifelong learning programs. The 16-acre, 6 building campus houses classrooms, specialized science and computer laboratories, the Library and Learning Center, the Reggie Lewis Track & Athletic Center and the Media Arts Center.  For more information, visit  
http://www.rcc.edu/

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Friday, November 11 - Sunday, November 13
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The MIT Energy Hackathon is a weekend long event running from November 11th to November 13th at the MIT campus, and we need you to make it a success!
 
Companies from different areas of the energy industry come together to propose challenges for hackers to solve in teams. Last year, we had over 200 hackers solving challenges ranging from building energy usage to innovative ways to recreate certain energy cycles. During the weekend, hackers find and present solutions to real-world energy problems in front a panel of judges from various companies. 

This event is the perfect opportunity to network with employers, get involved in the energy industry, and push ideas towards future events such as the spring Clean Energy Prize.
 
Not interested in hacking? We also need volunteers to help man the event!
 
Plenty of food, drinks, and free swag will be available for all involved :)
 
Sign up to volunteer or register at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdd4P0Edr40c3HPy-YyULOHsLR5o4Xz8Rw6LI6YuCptLRmWkg/viewform
 
Find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/events/1781185602135337/ and follow on Instagram (@EnergyHackathon) or Twitter (@EnergyHackMIT) for updates and cute photos :)
 
Feel free to reach out to us at ops-mitenergyhackathon at mit.edu with any questions! See you in November!

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Friday, November 11
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From Jazz to Hip Hop: Radio as a Turnstile between White and African-American Cultures
WHEN  Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, 6 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Science Center, Lecture Hall D, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Museum of Natural History
SPEAKER(S)  Susan J. Douglas, Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies, The University of Michigan
COST  Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO  617-496-1027, hmnh at hmsc.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Since the 1920s, radio has brought African-American music, voices, and humor into American homes. African-American culture, through radio, helped shape the tastes, cultural practices—indeed the very identities—of many white people, especially youth. Susan Douglas will review this history and argue that despite segregationist employment practices within the industry and racist depictions on the air, radio was the most desegregated of all mass media in the twentieth century. As a medium that denied sight to its audience, radio played a key role in breaking down racial barriers in the United States.
LINK  http://hmsc.harvard.edu/event/jazz-hip-hop-radio-turnstile-between-white-and-african-american-cultures

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Saturday, November 12
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Permablitz in Tim's Yard - cob oven, herb spiral, fruit trees and more
Saturday, November 12
9:00 AM to 3:00 PM
90 Congreve Street, Roslindale
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Boston-Permaculture/events/234626124/

Amirah Mitchell will lead us in a permablitz of Tim's yard  
Visit an amazing yard - the yard is totally worth the visit. Learn to build a cob oven, and herb spiral. 

BRING YOUR OWN LUNCH and/or BRING FOOD FOR POTLUCK TO SHARE

Garden Raisings are like old-fashioned barn raising, where friend and neighbors descen upon a yard and leave behind a newly installed permaculture garden.

This will be the third Garden Raising (aka permablitz) of our growing network of neighbors from around the greater Boston area. The first one happened in Aida and Nelida's yard in Egleston Square, the second in Kim and Susan's yard in Jamaica Plain, and now in Tim and Kathleen's yard in Roslindale.

So many good people to learn with and from about tips for your garden, permaculture techniques and when you come to help you get to ask others to come to your yard next. Fill out the intake form for Spring 2017 on http://www.bostonfoodforest.org/forest-garden-raising/

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Climate Congress Closing Plenary
Saturday, November 12
9am – 4pm
RSVP at https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/calendar/ZTNvbXRscWs5cjNqYm5lbjhxcmduY2V0dmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQ.8tk5euj92jf98d62j987hpcl54?authuser=0

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Holiday BINJ 2 [Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism]:  Journalistic Boogaloo
Saturday, November 12 
12 PM - 5 PM
Aeronaut Brewing Company, 14 Tyler Street, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/holiday-binj-2-journalistic-boogaloo-tickets-28545802263
Cost:  $0 - $30

A Family-Friendly Fundraiser Featuring Beer, Food, and Silent Auction plus
Pop-Up Performances and Original Carnival Games with Prizes

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TechII Forum 2016 (Tech Invention & Innovation Forum)
Saturday, November 12
1:00 PM – 6:00 PM EST
Harvard University campus, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/techii-forum-2016-tech-invention-innovation-forum-tickets-24524422207
Cost:  $9 – $15

Join us and explore the new discoveries in technology and science!
TechII Forum features industrial pioneers and researchers from selected sectors. The Forum discusses tech invention and innovation that will make the foremost impact on our future.
TechII of the Year 2016 will also be announced at the TechII Forum. 
To participate, click here to vote for your TechII of the Year and win a TechII Pass!
We welcome you to join our discussion in Cambridge, Massachusetts ! 
For group tickets or any other inquires, please contact us at: info at techii.org

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Monday, November 14
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Making Decisions in a World Awash in Data: We’re going to need a different boat
Monday, November 14, 2016
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building E25-401, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Anthony Scriffignano
In this session, Dr. Anthony Scriffignano, SVP/Chief Data Scientist at Dun and Bradstreet will explore some of the ways in which the massive availability of data is changing and the types of questions we must ask in the context of making business decisions. Truth be told, nearly all organizations struggle to make sense out of the mounting data already within the enterprise. At the same time, businesses, individuals, and governments continue to try to outpace one another, often in ways that are informed by newly-available data and technology, but just as often using that data and technology in alarmingly inappropriate or incomplete ways. Multiple “solutions" exist to take data that is poorly understood, promising to derive meaning that is often transient at best. A tremendous amount of “dark" innovation continues in the space of fraud and other bad behavior (e.g. cyber crime, cyber terrorism), highlighting that there are very real risks to taking a fast-follower strategy in making sense out of the ever-increasing amount of data available. Tools and technologies can be very helpful or, as Scriffignano puts it, "they can accelerate the speed with which we hit the wall."

Web site: http://informatics.mit.edu/event/brown-bag-anthony-scriffignano
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries
For more information, contact:  Kelly Hopkins
6172533044
khopkins at mit.edu 

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Which Social Cost of Carbon?
Monday, November 14
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Matthew Kotchen, Professor of Economics, Yale University

Lunch will be provided.

Energy Policy Seminar Series
https://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  cepr at hks.harvard.edu
617-495-8693

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Ruderal Ecologies: Re-Thinking Urban Infrastructure in a World of Rubble
Monday, November 14
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Bettina Stoetzer (MIT, Global Studies and Languages)

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts at hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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The Geography of Separate and Unequal: Modern-day Segregation in Boston
Monday,  November 14
3:30 PM – 4:30 PM EST
City Hall-The Hearing Room 801, City Hall Square, 8th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-geography-of-separate-and-unequal-modern-day-segregation-in-boston-tickets-28946999254

Dr. Marcos Luna is a Professor of Geography and the Graduate Program Director for the Geo-Information Sciences program at Salem State University.  His research focus is on environmental justice and applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the analysis of social and environmental inequities.  In addition to academic research, Dr. Luna has worked with community groups throughout the greater Boston region on issues ranging from transportation equity to voter outreach and climate change adaptation.  He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in GIS, as well as courses on environmental justice, energy and the environment, and weather and climate. He received his Ph.D. in Urban Affairs and Public Policy from the University of Delaware, with a focus on Technology, Environment, and Society.  He lives in East Boston. 

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1989 in Global Perspective and the Rise of Neoliberalism
WHEN  Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Basement Seminar Room, Robinson Hall, 35 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	New Directions in European History
SPEAKER(S)  Philipp Ther, Professor of Central European History, University of Vienna
CONTACT INFO	Alison Frank Johnson  afrank at fas.harvard.edu
James McSpadden   jmcspadden at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The talk deals with the intellectual history, the political practice and the social consequences of neoliberalism. The main pillars of this ideology are an idealization of unrestrained free markets, in the belief that they create an equilibrium for all sorts of market imbalances, an irrational faith in the rationality of market agents, and a libertarian antipathy toward the state, as expressed in the myth of “big government.” It also includes some elements of traditional laissez-faire capitalism such as the concept of the “hidden hand”, adding a metaphysical dimension whereby the market is regarded as a last judgment over all commodities. On the practical side, neoliberalism is based upon a standard economic recipe consisting of austerity, privatization, liberalization and deregulation that was codified in the “Washington Consensus” in 1989.
LINK	https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2016/11/1989-in-global-perspective-and-the-rise-of-neoliberalism

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Artfare: How Art Makes Sense of Cultural Upheaval
Monday, November 14, 2016
6:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Kirsten Scheid

"CULTURES OF UPHEAVAL"
FALL 2016 AGA KHAN PROGRAM LECTURES

Web site: http://akpia.mit.edu/fall-2016-lectures-events-cultures-upheaval
Open to: the general public
Cost: FREE
Sponsor(s): School of Architecture and Planning, Department of Architecture, Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture
For more information, contact:  Jose Luis Arguello
617-253-1400
akpiarch at mit.edu 

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Cambridge Mothers Out Front Community Meeting
Monday, November 14 
6-8pm
Community Room, Cambridge Main Library, 429 Broadway, Cambridge

All are welcome and encouraged to come!
Updating our gas leaks campaign's next steps, preparing for statewide summit
Aiming high in 2017!  Brainstorming goals, strategies, pathways to success! 

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Is Equality Fair?
Monday, November 14
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Old South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street, Boston

Yaron Brook (Ayn Rand Institute) & Jonathan Haughton (Beacon Hill Institute)

More information at http://www.fordhallforum.org/category/upcoming-forums

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A Shot in the Dark (Matter)
Monday, November 14
7pm
The Burren, Davis Sq, 247 Elm Street, Somerville 

Doug Finkbeiner  

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/science-by-the-pint/

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Tuesday, November 15 to Thursday, November 17
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ABX 2016 
Tuesday, November 15 to Thursday, November 17
RSVP at http://abexpo.com/register

Explore the showroom floor at ABX from November 15 to 17, 2016 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. Over 400 exhibitors, new products, live demonstrations, and installations will be featured. The exhibit hall presents a great opportunity to network and learn more about what is new in the building industry.

ABX connects architects, developers, project managers, contractors, landscape designers, builders, and other AEC professionals.

Register now for free admission to the exhibit hall!

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Tuesday, November 15
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Fire, Mammal Browsers, and the Origins of African Savanna
Tuesday, November 15
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, HUH Seminar Room, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Jonathan Davies, HUH Visiting Researcher, Associate Professor, McGill

Herbaria Seminar Series
http://huh.harvard.edu/event/johnathan-davies

Contact Name:  Barbara Hanrahan
bhanrahan at oeb.harvard.edu

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The End of Ownership
Tuesday, November 15
12:00 pm
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/11/Perzanowski#RSVP
Event will be live webcast at 12:00 pm at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/11/Perzanowski

Recent shifts in technology, intellectual property and contract law, and marketplace behavior threaten to undermine the system of personal property that has structured our relationships with the objects we own for centuries. Ownership entails the rights to use, modify, lend, resell, and repair. But across a range of industries and products, manufacturers and retailers have deployed strategies that erode these basic expectations of ownership. Understanding these various tactics, how they depart from the traditional property paradigm, and why some have been embraced by consumers are all crucial in developing strategies to restore ownership in the digital economy.

About Aaron
Aaron Perzanowski teaches courses in intellectual property, telecommunications and innovation. Previously, he taught at Wayne State University Law School, as a lecturer at the University of California Berkeley School of Information, and as a visitor at the University of Notre Dame Law School. Prior to his teaching career, he served as the Microsoft Research Fellow at the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology and practiced law at Fenwick & West in Silicon Valley.

His research addresses topics ranging from digital copyright to deceptive advertising to creative norms within the tattoo industry. With Jason Schultz, he is the author of The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy (MIT Press 2016), which argues for retaining consumer property rights in a marketplace that increasingly threatens them. His book with Kate Darling, Creativity Without Law: Challenging the Assumptions of Intellectual Property (NYU Press 2017), explores the ways communities of creators operate outside of formal intellectual property law.

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Climate Change & Global Health Seminar
WHEN  Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016, 1 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  42 Church Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Global Health Institute
SPEAKER(S)  Jonathan Buonocore, Sc.D.
CONTACT INFO  andrew_iliff at harvard.edu
DETAILS  Harvard Global Health Institute is pleased to invite you to the Climate Change and Global Health Seminar on Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. featuring Jonathan Buonocore, Sc.D, presenting on “Health Cobenefits of Clean Energy.” Lunch will be provided.
LINK  http://globalhealth.harvard.edu/event/climate-change-and-global-health-seminar-series-jonathan-buonocore-“health-cobenefits

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Molluscan vulnerability to ocean acidification across life stages 
Tuesday, November 15
4:00 - 5:00pm 
BU, CAS 132, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Justin Ries, Northeastern University
This project aims to investigate the vulnerability of commercially important calcifying marine mollusks to ocean acidification at various stages of their life history. Recently completed and planned future experiments will investigate the impact of ocean acidification on a range of calcifying marine mollusks at various stages of development. Specific projects include investigating: (1) the impact of ocean acidification on calcification rate, shell properties, and epigenetics of juvenile- and larval-stage Eastern Oysters (Crassostrea virginica); (2) the impact of
ocean acidification and warming on calcification rate and shell properties of larval-stage Slipper Limpets (Crepidula fornicata); and (3) the impact of ocean acidification and warming on calcification rate, shell properties, pallial fluid pH, and proteomics of adult Atlantic Sea Scallops (Placopecten magellanicus). Although experimental studies are ongoing, initial results suggest that early-life-stage mollusks exhibit a surprising degree of resilience to moderate levels of CO2-induced ocean acidification (700- 1000 ppm), but exhibit a nonlinear (exponential) increase in vulnerability to more extreme acidification (2000 - 3000 ppm). Microelectrode studies of pallial fluid pH, coupled with targeted epigenetic and proteomic studies, will aim to identify the mechanism(s) behind this non-linearity in mollusks' response to ocean acidification at various stages of development. 

BU’s Seminar Series on Climate Change

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Urban Farming Micro-Credential for Parachute Teachers
Tuesday, November 15 
6:00 pm
Harvard Innovation Lab, 125 Western Avenue, Allston
RSVP at http://www.parachuteteachers.com/urban-farming.html
Cost:  $25

What is the Urban Farming Micro-Credential?
To better prepare you for classrooms, we are excited to offer a micro-credential in Urban Farming. Micro-credentials are bite-sized, practice-based trainings that allow our schools to better understand your qualifications. While the micro-credential is not required for you to teach with us, we believe that it does increase your likelihood of receiving job offers and could lead to an increased hourly rate in our marketplace. 

As an Urban Farming teacher, you will learn how to:
1. Frame 21st century food system issues 
2. Develop scientific minds through culinary experiments 
3. Bridge K-8 students with Boston's innovative urban agriculture initiatives

The Urban Farming Micro-Credential is a competency-based assessment comprised of prep work, in-person training, and a post-assessment. Once the micro-credential is earned, it will be visible on your online profile. The training costs $25 - you can register here!

What is Parachute Teachers?
Parachute Teachers is a marketplace for substitute teachers. Rather then have students watch a movie or complete a worksheet when their teacher is out for the day, we bring in folks from the community to share their talents with students through high-quality enrichment. Schools can book you for a given date and time based on your availabilit

News and Next Steps:
Our first cohort of Urban Farming teachers entered the classroom last month! They bring diverse expertise in nutrition, hydroponics, compost, and much more. 
Our next in-person training will be held on Tuesday, November 15 at 6:00 pm at the Harvard Innovation Lab (arrive at 6 pm for light refreshments; we will begin the training at 6:30 pm). If you have a time conflict, please let me know when a more convenient time would be for you.  Feel free to spread the word to friends!

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Theodore H. White Lecture on Press and Politics with Larry Wilmore
Tuesday, November 15
6:00 p.m. John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum, Littauer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

This year’s Theodore H. White Lecture on Press and Politics will be delivered by comedian, producer and writer Larry Wilmore. The David Nyhan Prize for Political Journalism will also be awarded to Nancy Kaffer of the Detroit Free Press. 

The Theodore H. White Lecture on Press and Politics commemorates the life of the reporter and historian who set the standard for contemporary political journalism and campaign coverage. Past lecturers include Rachel Maddow, Alan K. Simpson, Ben Bradlee, Judy Woodruff, William F. Buckley, Jr. and Congressman John Lewis.

This event will be ticketed. Tickets are free, but will be distributed by lottery. Visit the Harvard Institute of Politics website to enter the lottery. The deadline for entries is midnight Tuesday, November 8. Winners will be notified via email on Wednesday, November 9. Winners must pick up their tickets at the Institute of Politics at HKS on Thursday, November 10 or Monday, November 14 between 9 a.m.-5 p.m. No exceptions.

This event will also be streamed online on the Harvard Institute of Politics website at http://iop.harvard.edu/forum

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Yes, Humans Really Are Causing Earthquakes
Tuesday, November 15,
6:00pm 
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Justin Rubinstein, Research Geophysicist and Deputy Chief of the Induced Seismicity Project, Menlo Park Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey

In 2009, the central United States began to experience an unprecedented surge in earthquakes. They soared from an average of 21 per year to over 650 in 2014 alone. This increased seismicity has been found in just a few regions of the country, with a majority in Oklahoma, and is limited to areas of new and emerging oil and gas production. Rubinstein will discuss the many ways in which humans can cause earthquakes, how local geological conditions can influence their impact, and how scientists measure and analyze seismicity. He will also address the actions that states are taking to minimize or stop human-induced earthquakes and how academic scientists, regulators, and the oil and gas industry are collaborating in these efforts.

Presented in collaboration with the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology and the Seismological Society of America.

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Pedal-Powered Innovation from Rural Guatemala: The Bici-Tec Story
Tuesday, November 15
6:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building N52, MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Carlos Marroquin, David Boudreau, Kate Mytty
Explore innovative bicycle-powered ideas with Bici-Tec founder Carlos Marroquin, David Boudreau from Bikes Not Bombs, and Kate Mytty of MIT D-Lab. The conversation will be followed by a reception with the panelists.

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MIT Museum, D-Lab
For more information, contact:  Jennifer Novotney
617-253-5927
museuminfo at mit.edu 

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Love for Sale:  Pop Music in America
Tuesday, November 15, 2016
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store,, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes DAVID HAJDU—music critic for The Nation and author of Heroes and Villains: Essays on Music, Movies, Comics, and Culture—and BOB BLUMENTHAL, a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Jazz Journalists Association, for a discussion of Hajdu's latest book, Love for Sale: Pop Music in America.

About Love for Sale
From the age of song sheets in the late nineteenth-century to the contemporary era of digital streaming, pop music has been our most influential laboratory for social and aesthetic experimentation, changing the world three minutes at a time.
In Love for Sale, David Hajdu—one of the most respected critics and music historians of our time—draws on a lifetime of listening, playing, and writing about music to show how pop has done much more than peddle fantasies of love and sex to teenagers. From vaudeville singer Eva Tanguay, the “I Don’t Care Girl” who upended Victorian conceptions of feminine propriety to become one of the biggest stars of her day to the scandal of Blondie playing disco at CBGB, Hajdu presents an incisive and idiosyncratic history of a form that has repeatedly upset social and cultural expectations.

Exhaustively researched and rich with fresh insights, Love for Sale is unbound by the usual tropes of pop music history. Hajdu, for instance, gives a star turn to Bessie Smith and the “blues queens” of the 1920s, who brought wildly transgressive sexuality to American audience decades before rock and roll. And there is Jimmie Rodgers, a former blackface minstrel performer, who created country music from the songs of rural white and blacks . . . entwined with the sound of the Swiss yodel. And then there are today’s practitioners of Electronic Dance Music, who Hajdu celebrates for carrying the pop revolution to heretofore unimaginable frontiers. At every turn, Hajdu surprises and challenges readers to think about our most familiar art in unexpected ways.

Masterly and impassioned, authoritative and at times deeply personal, Love for Sale is a book of critical history informed by its writer's own unique history as a besotted fan.

************
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Opportunity
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Effective Altruism MIT Sloan Meetup Group
http://www.meetup.com/effective-altruism-mit-sloan/

Want to make the world the best place it can be? 
Effective Altruism is a worldwide movement that uses rational thinking and science to have the best possible impact. Effective Altruism MIT Sloan is bringing together people from all over the area to share experiences and be more effective by working together. 
To learn more about effective altruism, read the introduction on the international EA website (https://www.effectivealtruism.org) or watch Peter Singer's TED talk.

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Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian at cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
http://www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit
@cambenergy 
http://facebook.com/cambridgeenergyalliance

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 27 and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 12 PM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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