[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - October 15, 2017

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Oct 15 09:52:09 PDT 2017


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) EventsGeo
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Details of these events are available when you scroll past the index

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Index
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Monday, October 16
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11am  Speculative Infrastructures, Collaboration, and the "Eco-Social Good"
11am  Energy Research and Publishing Workshop
12pm  PAOC Colloquium: The Changing Climate of the Southern Ocean
12pm  Nancy MacLean Democracy in Chains Book Talk
12pm  How Nutrition Fuels Human Space Flight
12pm  Can Wholesale Power Markets Survive Subsidies?
12pm  Book Release and Discussion: Innovation Blind Spot 
12:10pm  Darwin’s Damned Land, A.K.A. Patagonia: A paleo(neo)botanist’s paradise
12:15pm  Making American Biomedicine: Science, Health, and the 'Paradox of NIH
12:30pm  Learning from Chinatowns
1pm  TEDx Boston:  Revolutionary Ideas: Advancing Our Machines
4pm  Robot-Proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence
4pm  Climate Change and Infectious Disease Symposium 
4pm  Fire in the Streets: The Rebellions of '67 Revisited
4:30pm  Examining energy services in Indian households 
5:30pm  Advancing Economic Inclusion In Boston's Business Community: A panel discussion
6pm  Upending Evolution:  A Beginner’s Guide
6pm  The Future We Leave Behind -- Hawley, Raymond, and Zuckerman
6pm  Mass Innovation Nights 103

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Tuesday, October 17
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9am  Bugs, Drugs, and Beyond; Translational Approaches to the Microbiome
11:30am  Mens et Manus America: Data, Technology, and the Integrity of Elections
12pm  Jackie Calmes – The Rise of Right-Wing Media
12pm  Pathway to Sustainability Leadership by MIT - Forum
2pm  Brain Fuel x Harvard: brainstorming done right
4pm  Violence Work: Policing and State Power
4pm  How Security Laws Make Citizenship: The Institutional Legacies of the British Empire in Anti-Terror Laws in Israel and India
4:30pm  Why the Palestinian, Zionist, and Algerian National Movements Competed, Fought, and (Mostly) Won
6pm  The Border Wall: Life and Injury on the Frontlines
6pm  Special Event: DC, Massachusetts, and the Future of a Clean Energy Economy
6pm  How Wall Street Tech Can Speed Up The World
6:30pm  Getting to the Point with Katy Tur, Author of Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History
6:30pm  Getting to the Point with Katy Tur, Author of Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History

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Wednesday, October 18
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7:30am  Boston Sustainability Breakfast with NIB and WISE
12pm  5 Essential Questions in Life
12pm  How Does International Intervention Work?
12:30pm  Does Urban Science Have a Politics? Should It?
1pm  Sustainability For Health Leadership Series 2017 - Liz York
3pm  7TH ANNUAL BABSON FOOD DAY
4pm  Deep Mediatization: Social Order in the Age of Datafication
4pm  Can We Synthesize Life In The Lab? How Chemistry May Become Biology
4pm  Doctoral Research on Political Participation, Elite Status, and Race and Merit
4:15pm  Valuing Mortality Risk in China: Comparing Stated‑Preference Estimates from 2005 and 2016
4:30pm  The Cradle of Humanity: Why the Changing Landscape of Africa Made Us So Smart
6pm  The Environment Forum at the Mahindra Center presents Naomi Oreskes, 'Giant Power: Technology, Energy, and the Beginnings of Post-Truth America’
6pm  Conversation 2 of Symposium,“Made in Cambridge: What’s Happening in Kendall. Square?
6pm  Faculty Speaker Series: What Great Service Leaders Know and Do
6pm  Boston New Technology October 2017 Startup Showcase #BNT82
6:30pm  On the Wing: Part 2
7pm  From Microwaves to Microbreweries: The science behind our food
7:30pm  Endurance:  A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery

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Thursday, October 19
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11:30am  Wisdom from the Earth: Deepening Connection with the Web of Life
11:45am  The Trump Administration's Regulatory Rollback: A Panel Discussion on Environmental and Financial Regulatory Reforms
12pm  Discovering the Omura's whale: ecology and conservation of the newest baleen whale species
12:15pm  How to Think About Nuclear Crises
1pm  Acting on Climate: Translating Research into Practice for Global Change
2:50pm  Creative AI: Perceptual Data-Guided Computational Design
4pm  Defense Innovation for the Warfighter - Introducing New Technology to the Defense Community
4:15pm  Economics Commentator, Financial Times
4:30pm  Starr Forum: Syria: Which way forward?
5:15pm  Christianity, Race, and Mass Incarceration Conference
6pm  NORTH KOREA NUCLEAR CRISIS: A Seminar With Professor Thomas Berger
6pm  Lost in Transformation [Editorial Comment:  Toward Carbon Neutral Building]
6pm  Transitioning to a Zero Waste Economy
6:30pm  What do Hurricanes Harvey and Irma portend?
6:30pm  TECH AND SOCIAL INNOVATION
7pm  The Startup Way:  How Modern Companies Use Entrepreneurial Management to Transform Culture and Drive Long-Term Growth
7pm  Chokehold:  Policing Black Men
7pm  Crazy Weather and the Arctic Meltdown: How Are They Connected?
7:30pm  Space Junk: A Traffic Crisis in Outer Space?

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Friday, October 20
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10am  MIT D-Lab 15th Anniversary Symposium
10am  Skills of the Future: Brunch & Learn
10am  Inclusive Security: A Conversation with Swanee Hunt
12:15pm  Electing Peace and Considering Concessions in Colombia
1:30pm  The Future of Advertising and Publishing
2pm  A Post-Industrial Postscript
6pm  Party Under the Harvest Moon - a fundraiser for Food For Free
7pm  "The Peacemaker" Documentary Film Screening and Discussion

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Saturday, October 21 - Sunday, October 22
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The 22nd Annual Boston Veg Food Fest

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Saturday, October 21
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8am  2017 HBS Energy & Environment Club Symposium
8:30am  Harvard Igniting Innovation Summit 2017
9:45am  Field Trip to Fenway Farms!
1:30pm  ENN 2017 Energy Seminar

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Sunday, October 22
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2pm  Chain Reaction Contraption Construction Help Sessions
6pm  Frédérique Apffel-Marglin: Sacred Soil, Biochar and Regeneration of the Earth

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Monday, October 23
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12pm  PAOC Colloquium: Yohai Kaspi (Weizmann Institute)
12pm  American Energy Policy: The Search for Common Ground
12:15pm  Remapping Knowledge Exchange: Scientific Agriculture in Sonora, Mexico and Punjab, India
1pm  Safety Nets: Rescue and Revival for Endangered Born-Digital Records
5:30pm  What to do with biomass waste in India?
6pm  MIT Water Innovation Prize: Kick-Off Dinner
6:30pm  Tapping into the Fountain of Youth:  Does the key to reversing the aging process circulate within us?
7pm  Be as a Tree Planted by the Waters:  The Magic of Roots, Leaves, and Everything in Between

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Tuesday, October 24
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12pm  Speaker Series: Nancy Scola – Reporting on the Tech Industry
2pm  Fact and Fiction: Writing Journalism, Writing Literature
4pm  Cell-based origami: Folding tissues across length scales
4:15pm  Poland at the Crossroads between Authoritarianism and Democracy
4:30pm   Another History of the Refugee Convention's Additional Protocol
6pm  authors at MIT: Gretchen Steidle, Leading From Within
6pm  Newton Harrison Lecture: The Time of the Force Majeure
6pm  Big Data 101
6pm  Writers Speak: Richard Price in Conversation with Claire Messud
7pm  The Storm Before the Storm:  The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic
7pm  BU Climate Action Plan Public Forum
7pm  The Future of our Past, A Vision for Boston Archaeology

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

Renewables in the Wake of the Caribbean Hurricanes
https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2017/10/9/1705594/-Renewables-in-the-Wake-of-the-Caribbean-Hurricanes

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Monday, October 16
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Speculative Infrastructures, Collaboration, and the "Eco-Social Good"
Monday, October 16 
11am - 12:30pm 
MIT, act cube (e15-001), Wiesner Building, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

ACT Artistic Research Lecture:  Dylan Gauthier will give a talk on his recent work and decade-long collaborative practice with Mare Liberum, his waterborne art and publishing collective. 

Founded in 2007, Mare Liberum's mission is to bridge the dialogues in art, design, activism, and science to remap landscapes, reclaim local ecologies, and observe and record the overlaps of nature, industry, and the polis.  

Threading with Mare Liberum's work, Gauthier's practice has engaged with urban waterways as overlooked and often neglected public spaces and forms of urban wilderness from which new eco-social pedagogies, infrastructures, and subjectivities might be developed. How might we collectively reimagine cities as foundational sites in which to (re)learn an ecology for contemporary crisis?

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Energy Research and Publishing Workshop
Wednesday, October 16
11am - 2pm
MIT, Building E19-709, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
Please RSVP to Alexandra Goodwin at: agoodwin at mit.edu

Francis O’Sullivan (Director of Research for the MIT Energy Initiative) and David Hopwood (Publisher, Elsevier), plus a guest from Industry (to be announced), will discuss the following themes:
How to give yourself a better chance of getting published in Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals;
After Publishing: how to promote your papers, keep them visible, and help them gain the right exposure amongst your peers;
Sustainable energy and related research themes: what needs to happen to enable a transition to sustainable energy, and where does research fit in?
Life after Research: An industry-insider perspective on working in the Energy sector (Guest from Industry to be announced).
A light lunch will be available from 11am.

Please do feel free to forward onto colleagues within your Faculty who may find this of interest.

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PAOC Colloquium:  The Changing Climate of the Southern Ocean
Monday, October 16
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

About the Speaker
Lynne Talley is a Distinguished Professor of Physical Oceanography in the Climate, Atmospheric Sciences, and Physical Oceanography division at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego.

Talley’s research focuses on the general circulation of the ocean and the role of various oceanic and atmospheric conditions that affect ocean currents and property distributions, including salinity. Her work involves analysis of data from most of the world’s oceans, depicting the movement of heat, salinity, and water masses, and the formation of water masses, particularly in subpolar regions.

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Nancy MacLean Democracy in Chains Book Talk
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, WCC 1010, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Law and History Program of Study, Charles Hamilton Houston Institute, The Roy and Lila Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Nancy MacLean
COST  Free
DETAILS  Professor Nancy MacLean will give a talk on her new book, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America, a National Book Award nominee. The book explores the historical roots of the radical right’s campaign to eliminate unions, suppress voting, privatize public education, and change the Constitution.
Co-sponsored by the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute and the The Roy and Lila Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
LINK	https://www.facebook.com/events/1846509948695933/

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How Nutrition Fuels Human Space Flight
Monday, October 16
12:00PM
Tufts, 711 Washington Street, Boston

Scott Smith, Ph.D., Senior Scientist. Nutritionist and Manager for Nutritional Biochemistry, NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

More information at http://hnrca.tufts.edu/monday-seminar-series/

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Can Wholesale Power Markets Survive Subsidies?
Monday, October 16
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Joseph Bowring, President, Monitoring Analytics, and Independent Market Monitor, PJM. Lunch is provided.

Energy Policy Seminar
https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html#fall2017

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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Book Release and Discussion: Innovation Blind Spot 
Monday, October 16
12:00 PM – 1:30 PM EDT
LearnLaunch, 281 Summer Street, 2nd Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/book-release-and-discussion-innovation-blind-spot-tickets-37695425031
Cost:  $5 – $23

Please join LearnLaunch, as well as Ross Baird, the founder of Village Capital, to discuss Ross' new book: The Innovation Blind Spot: Why We Back the Wrong Ideas--And What to Do About It. We'll have lunch and discussion with Ross, and talk about what's broken in our innovation economy, highlight how emerging solutions and organizations such as LearnLaunch are helping build the world we want to live in. 
About The Innovation Blind Spot

While big companies in the American economy have never been more successful, entrepreneurial activity is near a 30-year low. More businesses are dying than starting every day. Investors continue to dump billions of dollars into photo-sharing apps and food-delivery services, solving problems for only a wealthy sliver of the world’s population, while challenges in health, food security, and education grow more serious.
In The Innovation Blind Spot, entrepreneur and venture capitalist Ross Baird argues that the innovations that truly matter don’t see the light of day—for reasons entirely of our own making. A handful of people in a handful of cities are deciding, behind closed doors, which entrepreneurs get a shot to succeed. And most investors are what Baird calls “two-pocket thinkers”—artificially separating their charitable work from their day job of making a profit.

With a foreword from AOL co-founder Steve Case, Ross outlines what's wrong with our innovation economy--and how to fix it.

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Darwin’s Damned Land, A.K.A. Patagonia: A paleo(neo)botanist’s paradise
Monday, October 16
12:10PM
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Lecture Hall, 1300 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain

M. Alejandra Gandolfo-Nixon, Senior Research Associate, Cornell University

Arnold Arboretum Research Talk
https://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

Contact Name:  arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu

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Making American Biomedicine: Science, Health, and the 'Paradox of NIH
Monday, October 16 
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Buhm Soon Park (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/
Sandwich lunch is provided. RSVP required. 

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

sts at hks.harvard.edu

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Learning from Chinatowns
Monday, October 16
12:30pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building 9-255,  City Arena, 105 Mass Avenue, Cambridge

The SPURS/Humphrey program is delighted to invite you to our fall seminar series: North American Planning Experience: Is It Relevant for the Developing World?

Our goal is to explore to what extent, and under what conditions, planning ideas generated from practice in the U.S. can travel to cities in the developing world and be implemented effectively. We’ll also consider whether planning ideas, practices and programs are traveling from the rest of the world back to the United States. 

The fourth seminar is Monday, Oct 16, in the City Arena, 12:30 - 2 PM: Learning from Chinatowns, with Gary W. McDonough and Tunny Lee, respondent.

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TEDx Boston:  Revolutionary Ideas: Advancing Our Machines
Monday, October 16
1pm - 5pm
RSVP at https://tedxboston.org

Over the past eight years, we have shared ideas ranging from the ocean’s power, to the musical evolution of the Erhu, to urban beekeeping, and even the counterfeit drug trade. Last year, we honed our focus to artificial intelligence and machine learning, and the potential in this space captivated our collective imagination. We just weren’t ready to let it go yet.

So we are diving even deeper into AI and ML this year. And we couldn’t be more excited about what we’re learning. We’ll hear about filmmaking with a program that named itself Benjamin, machines that could fix themselves to adapt to their environment, emerging legal and ethical issues, and much, much more.

The entire event will be livestreamed right here on our website for free. We encourage you to get together with friends, family, and colleagues to watch as a group, or organize a meet-up. In-person attendance is by invitation only, but there is no limit on the livestream, so make an event out of it. And if you miss the livestream, we’ll be posting full videos of all of the talks shortly after the event.

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Robot-Proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence
Monday, October 16
4­–5 p.m.
Northeastern, East Village, 291 St. Botolph Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/robot-proof-higher-education-in-the-age-of-artificial-intelligence-tickets-38436315053

Please join President Joseph E. Aoun as he talks with Kara Miller, host of WGBH radio’s Innovation Hub, about his new book: Robot-Proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.
In the past, automation was considered a threat to low-skilled labor. Now many high-skilled functions, such as interpreting medical images, doing legal research, and analyzing data, can be done by machines. How can higher education prepare students for their professional lives when professions themselves are disappearing? In Robot-Proof, President Aoun proposes a way to educate the next generation of college students to invent, create, and discover—skills beyond even the most sophisticated AI agents.
Please note: Space is limited at this event and registering does not guarantee admittance. Please arrive early to ensure a spot.
Reception to follow.

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Climate Change and Infectious Disease Symposium 
Monday, October 16
4:00pm to 5:30pm
Harvard Medical School, TMEC 334, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston,
RSVP at https://fs6.formsite.com/harvardhigh/form154/index.html

Climate change is having a significant impact on infectious diseases, producing unanticipated consequences for global health and posing a challenge to public health authorities. On October 16th, the Harvard Global Health Institute and the Planetary Health Alliance will host a symposium on Climate Change and Infectious Disease. Dr. Mercedes Pascual, Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Chicago, will deliver the keynote address. Expert panels will address the effect on the range and lifecycle of key disease vectors, and the intersecting fields of ecology, public health and climate modeling. We hope you will be able to join us for this symposium. 

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Fire in the Streets: The Rebellions of '67 Revisited
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Robinson Hall, Basement Conference Room, Harvard Yard, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Charles Warren Center
SPEAKER(S)  Eric Tang (University of Texas at Austin)
DETAILS  Fifty years ago, between April and September 1967, an astounding 164 African American-led rebellions shook US cities large and small. The long hot summer of ’67 constitutes one of the most significant insurrections in twentieth-century America, a moment in which the struggle for Black liberation reached an apogee, articulating itself with such force and clarity that it would forever change the fate of US cities, as well as the national discourse on race. This lecture focuses on the first major disorder of the season, which took place in Tampa, Florida, to argue that the most impactful protests occurred in places that were not obvious candidates for unrest—cities that were not beacons of organized Black militancy. It suggests that rebellions best took root in communities that were defiant yet organizationally unformed—where residents were not consolidated into organizations with centralized leadership. Drawing on police records and overlooked oral histories, this lecture reveals how the rebellions emerged out of institutions that structured daily life: housing projects, anti-poverty programs and street organizations. Such sites channeled grassroots political ideology and served as reference points for tactical decisions. They made legible the political confidence of the masses—their political “movements” and orientations which eventually gave rise to large scale unrest.
LINK	https://warrencenter.fas.harvard.edu/event/tang?type=month&month=2017-10&admin_panel=1

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Examining energy services in Indian households 
4:30pm
MIT, Building E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
Light refreshments will be served

Radhika Khosla, a Fellow at the Center for Policy Research in India.
Demand-side measures, such as energy management in buildings, are central to addressing global climate change. The window of opportunity to maximize these measures is particularly important in the developing country of India, which is at the brink of unprecedented urban transitions. It is estimated that two-thirds of India’s commercial and high-rise building stock in 2030 will be built in the next 15 years, and the path-dependency from the lifespans of new buildings makes the carbon lock-in risk higher in India than anywhere else. At the same time, the early stages of India’s buildings stock provides an opportunity to examine and inform practices that will significantly influence the country’s energy, development, and climate change agenda. This presentation aims to establish residential building electricity use as central to demand-side mitigation in India’s rapidly urbanizing cities. Based on large-scale surveys undertaken in 2016-17, the work will provide empirical evidence for: (1) the energy efficient lighting transition taking place in urban India; (2) an “appliance ladder” which demonstrates which appliances people buy, and at what stage during their transitions to higher consumption levels; and (3) establish the significant role of behavior in energy services consumption. In sum, this work lays forth new knowledge on mitigation pathways in Indian urban residences, and in doing so identifies gaps and opportunities to stimulate a socio-technical research agenda for India’s buildings stock.

Presenter Bio: Radhika Khosla, Ph.D.
Radhika Khosla is a Fellow at the Center for Policy Research in India. She works on the integrated nature of India’s energy sector to examine the linkages between energy, development and climate change, particularly in urban areas. She also focuses on the demand-side of Indian energy, with attention to the technological, institutional and behavioral aspects of energy use and its lock-in to a rapidly growing built environment. In addition, her work examines the analytic and strategic dimensions of India’s energy and climate policies.

Radhika is a Visiting Scholar at MIT’s Energy Initiative, and a Visiting Scholar at the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy, University of Pennsylvania in the fall of 2017. Her other appointments include the India Fellow for the Oxford India Centre for Sustainable Development at Somerville College, University of Oxford. Prior to being at CPR, she was Staff Scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in New York, where she led research and implementation on building energy policies in Indian states. She has also been the Welch Fellow at NRDC's Center for Market Innovation, and worked with The Energy and Research Institute, The Climate Group, and the Center for Advanced Study of India at UPenn.

Radhika holds a PhD in the Geophysical Sciences from the University of Chicago and an undergraduate and master’s degrees in Physics from the University of Oxford.

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Advancing Economic Inclusion In Boston's Business Community: A panel discussion
Monday, October 16
5:30 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
The Great Hall at Faneuil Hall, 4 S Market Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/advancing-economic-inclusion-in-bostons-business-community-a-panel-discussion-on-strategies-to-tickets-38543241874

Across Boston's business community, companies are leading major initiatives to advance racial equity in Boston's private sector - employing new policies and practices to diversify suppliers, boards, staffs, and leadership teams, and creating new opportunities for minority-owned businesses to thrive. This discussion will bring together business leaders from some of Boston's most prominent companies to talk about the work they are doing every day to advance economic inclusion and racial equity.

The discussion will feature representatives from Keolis, Boston Scientific, and Tufts Health Plan with Carol Fulp, President and CEO of The Partnership, Inc. moderating.

Mayor Walsh, James Rooney of the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, and Jocelyn Sargent of Hyams Foundation will offer introductory remarks.

Join us to hear about the work they do every day. Hosted by The Office of Mayor Martin J. Walsh, in partnership with the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and the Hyams Foundation.

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Upending Evolution:  A Beginner’s Guide
Monday, October 16
6pm
Cambridge Innovation Center, 1 Boadway, Fifth Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Helbling-Visionary-Series/events/243520601/

George Church, Professor, Harvard and MIT
From his PhD work on the first genome sequence methods to tools for hunting down dark matter, George Church’s innovations are numerous and foundational. More engineer than scientist, his lab brings together the brightest minds from physics, neuroscience, genetics, and engineering. Join us for a glimpse into his vision of a future shaped by the power of genetics to solve today’s challenges. 

Refreshments provided by Helbling (6pm-8pm).

Agenda: 6:00-6:30 Refreshments (Swiss Bakers) and Networking  
6:30-7:30 George Church, Intro and Q&A   
7:30-8:00 Networking Then join us for the after party at Firebrand Saints!

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The Future We Leave Behind -- Hawley, Raymond, and Zuckerman
Monday, October 16
6:00 PM
Café ArtScience, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Long-Now-Boston/events/243638334/
Cost:  $15 in advance // $20 at the door. Students w/ID admitted free. 

oin Michael Hawley, Nathaniel Raymond and Ethan Zuckerman for a Long Now Boston Conversation on information gatekeepers, technology and your brain. 

History informs our future thinking and, with a deep time long term view, we need to consider the history subsequent generations will inherit. A looming challenge is the re-writing of history [yes, it’s happened for thousands of year] but the social sphere and raw processing power at hand to spoon-feed clickbait to the masses puts us all at risk. 

Algorithms…AI...Government Regulation. What can we do to mitigate the effects of an Orwellian approach? This is not about politics. It’s about the right to information; safeguarding identity; stewarding the humanities; protecting the right to choose. What impact is the technological revolution having on us and our planet for the next 10,000 years?  

Come early and schmooze with other attendees Each of our guests will speak for about 20 minutes. We'll follow all of that up with a Q&A open discussion. We expect to go 'til about 8:30pm with this conversation. You may even want to hang out longer and grab a drink at the Cafe ArtScience bar or group-up for a dinner table.

Michael Hawley is an educator, computer scientist, musician and photographer who serves as impresario of EG. Educated at Yale and MIT, he held industrial positions at Bell Labs, IRCAM in Paris, Lucasfilm in San Rafael, and NeXT in Palo Alto. For many years, Michael was the Alex Dreyfoos Professor of Media Technology at MIT. He plays the piano (won the Van Cliburn amateur competition in 2002) and has a passion for photography (produced a notable photographic book on Bhutan). Michael lives in an old church in Cambridge where his family includes a quirky HImalayan mastiff (Tashi), an adopted Bhutanese daughter (Choki) and his beloved bride Nina You.

Ethan Zuckerman is director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT, and Associate Professor of the Pratice at MIT's Media Lab.  He is the author of Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection, published by W.W. Norton in June 2013. With Rebecca MacKinnon, Ethan co-founded international blogging community Global Voices. Global Voices showcases news and opinions from citizen media in over 150 nations and thirty languages. Ethan's research focuses on issues of internet freedom, civic engagement through digital tools and international connections through media. He blogs at … My heart’s in Accra and lives in the Berkshire Mountains of western Massachusetts. 

Nathaniel A. Raymond is Director of the Signal Program on Human Security and Technology at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Previous posts include Director of Operations of the Satellite Sentinel Project at HHI, Director of the Campaign Against Torture at Physicians for Human Rights and a variety of roles at Oxfam America. He has served in the field in Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Ethiopia, the Gulf Coast, Jordan, and elsewhere.

He is a 2013 PopTech Social Innovation Fellow and a 2010 Rockwood Leadership Institute National Security and Human Rights Reform Fellow.  Raymond is a co-winner of the 2013 USAID and Humanity United Tech Challenge for Mass Atrocity Prevention.  He has co-written four major peer-reviewed articles on the use of information communication technologies in humanitarian response and human rights work.

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Mass Innovation Nights 103
Monday, October 16
6:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
WeWork Boston, 745 Atlantic Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mass-innovation-nights-103-tickets-36755069402

It's our October Mass Innovation Nights and you know what that means, all women founders! Our "4th Annual Women Founders" event, MIN #103 is happening on October 16th at 6pm at WeWork - South Station. We will again kick off WeBOS week so that means our event will be on a MONDAY! We are thrilled it is that time of year again to bring you ten innovative products from female founders that will showcase on October 16th at 6pm!

If you want to showcase your woman founded tech product, submit here.
Mass Innovation Nights are monthly startup networking and product launch events featuring local companies at various locations in the greater Boston area.

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Tuesday, October 17
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Bugs, Drugs, and Beyond; Translational Approaches to the Microbiome
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Janssen Human Microbiome Institute
Johnson & Johnson Innovation
Puretech Health
SPEAKER(S)  Dirk Gevers | Global Head, Janssen Human Microbiome Institute, Janssen R&D
Denise Kelly | Venture Investment Advisor, Seventure Partners
Cathy Kerzner | Head, Novel Therapeutic Nutrition, Nestle Health Sciences
Raymond Stapleton | Senior Vice President, Manufacturing, Synthetic Biologics
David Steinberg, David Steinberg | Chief Innovation Officer, PureTech Health
[moderator] Bernat Olle | Co-founder and CEO, Vedanta Biosciences
Eric Alm | MIT Director, Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics
Karen Emmons | Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Wendy Garrett | Professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Travis McCready | President and CEO, Massachusetts Life Sciences Center
Michal Preminger | Executive Director/Director of Business Development, Harvard Office of Technology Development
Jose-Carlos (JC) Gutiérrez-Ramos | CEO, Synlogic Inc.
COST  $40 General Public; $20 Student/Academic
TICKET INFO  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bugs-drugs-beyond-translational-approaches-to-the-microbiome-tickets-36010859450
DETAILS	
Join the Janssen Human Microbiome Institute (JHMI), Johnson & Johnson Innovation, JLABS @ LabCentral, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and PureTech Health on October 17, 2017 for the Bugs, Drugs & Beyond: Translational Approaches to the Microbiome, a 1-day event exploring key aspects of microbiome research.
Bugs, Drugs & Beyond: Translational Approaches will explore the ways in which innovators from Boston and beyond are harnessing the human microbiome and advancing novel therapeutics, diagnostics and other health products. During this event, we'll hear from entrepreneurs, academics, investors, and biotech and pharma companies about a variety of product development approaches and the organizations pursuing them.
Interactive sessions will highlight:
Challenges in advancing to market, from IP protection to commercialization
Potential solutions and pathways currently being pursued across the field
Opportunities for collaboration
LINK	https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bugs-drugs-beyond-translational-approaches-to-the-microbiome-tickets-36010859450

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Mens et Manus America: Data, Technology, and the Integrity of Elections
Tuesday, October 17
11:30am to 1:00pm
MIT, E51-345, Tang Center, 2 Amherst Street, (70 Memorial Drive), Cambridge

With the 2018 mid-term Congressional elections approaching, questions continue to swirl about the integrity of US elections.   Join us as political scientists Charles Stewart (MIT) and Eitan Hersh (Tufts) draw on their respective research programs to provide us with needed context, shining a spotlight on the election reform efforts that took place after 2000 and their (unintended) consequences.

Since lunch will be provided, we request that you register via this link.

This event is part of the Mens et Manus America series, sponsored by the MIT School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences and the Sloan School of Management.

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Jackie Calmes – The Rise of Right-Wing Media
Tuesday, October 17
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Jackie Calmes is the White House editor for the Los Angeles Times Washington bureau. She was previously a New York Times national correspondent, covering politics and policy. Calmes also worked at The Wall Street Journal for 18 years, where she covered Congress, elections, the Clinton and Bush administrations, and often focused on fiscal policy. She was a Joan Shorenstein Fellow in spring 2015, and wrote a paper on conservative media, “They Don’t Give a Damn about Governing”: Conservative Media’s Influence on the Republican Party.

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Pathway to Sustainability Leadership by MIT - Forum
Tuesday, October 17
12:00pm to 1:30pm
MIT Building 54-100, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

To the members of the MIT community,
Two years ago we convened the Campus Sustainability Task Force (CSTF), charged to shape a vision and plan of action for campus sustainability at MIT. The CSTF has now drafted its report, Pathway to Sustainability Leadership by MIT, which reflects input from students, faculty, staff, and alumni since the CSTF launch in 2015. In releasing the preliminary report, we are opening a comment period through November, during which we are actively seeking feedback from across the MIT community.

We invite you to attend a campus-wide forum to discuss the report on Tuesday, October 17, 12:00 pm–1:30 pm in classroom 54-100. Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP if you would like to attend.

We encourage you to read the report, which lays out the five key elements of the pathway to sustainability leadership. It is important for all voices to be heard as Institute leadership considers the task force’s recommendations. We and task force co-chairs Andrea Campbell and Julie Newman are eager to hear your thoughts, and hope you will attend the open forum. You may also send comments to sustainablemit at mit.edu.

Sincerely,
Marty Schmidt, Provost
Israel Ruiz, Executive Vice President and Treasurer

We are delighted that so many community members are interested in attending this event. Because of this, we have moved this event to the lecture hall, 54-100.

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Brain Fuel x Harvard: brainstorming done right
Tuesday, October 17
2:00 – 3:00pm
Harvard Science Center, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.nl/e/tickets-brain-fuel-x-harvard-brainstorming-done-right-38815392885

Brain Fuel is a completely new way of brainstorming. Forget sitting around a table with a stack of post-its. Brain Fuel works better, faster, easier and funner (yes, we know that is not a real word). How we know? Well, we've tested Brain Fuel with over 600 people in all kinds of different settings, all over the world. We hope to add something creative and new to everything that is taught at Harvard! 

How will the event look like?
First of all: we will start with a couple of warming up techniques for your brain (your brain is a muscle, you know). After that, we will show you how to use Brain Fuel to improve classic brainstormtechniques like the superhero and brainwriting. And last but not least: we will show you completely new methods that were previously unheard of. 

Who? From the Netherlands three entrepeneurs come to Harvard to help you learn how to use Brain Fuel to solve problems from a totally different perspective - but still by using your own brain!

How does it work?
Brain Fuel works with 100 different association cards. With more than 10 brainstorming-methods, Brain Fuel helps you break through your standard thought patterns to look at your problem from a whole new perspective. This gives you access to a new range of solutions so you can turn your okay ideas in to great ones!

Why does Brain Fuel exist? 
Our mission is to ensure that as many ideas as possible change into good ones. ‘Are there that many bad ideas?’, we hear you thinking. Well, just take a look at the world and think about what happens to our globe. Weren't those bad solutions born from bad ideas? That does not mean that bad ideas can't be transformed into good ones. Sometimes they just need some help. An okay solution is not good enough!

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Violence Work: Policing and State Power
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Robinson Hall, Lower Library, Harvard Yard, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Education, Humanities
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Presented by the Workshop on Crime and Punishment and the Charles Warren Center
SPEAKER(S)  Micol Seigel (Indiana University, Bloomington)
LINK	https://warrencenter.fas.harvard.edu/event/seigel

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How Security Laws Make Citizenship: The Institutional Legacies of the British Empire in Anti-Terror Laws in Israel and India
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CMES, Rm 102, 38 Kirkland Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Center for European Studies Colonial Encounters & Divergent Trajectories in the Mediterranean Study Group, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Yael Berda, Academy Scholar, Harvard Academy for International & Regional Studies, WCFIA, Harvard University; Asst Professor, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Hebrew University
CONTACT INFO	elizabethflanagan at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Abstract: The proliferation of anti-terrorism and counter insurgency laws are often embedded within the contemporary discourse of “the global war on Terror” and practices of homeland security. Security laws are rarely viewed as the sites in which state bureaucracies participated in the construction of citizenship and loyalty to the state. Yet, as these laws define security threats, they also define the limits of legitimate political opposition. Last year, Israel introduced an anti-terrorism law, a process that offers an opportunity to challenge the contemporary discourse by offering an alternative legal history about the colonial origins of these security laws and their relation to citizenship. In this paper, Dr. Berda discloses an alternative analysis of the ways the anti-terrorism bill encapsulates the use of emergency laws in the British Empire. She argues that this legal toolkit enshrines a triple bind between security, loyalty and identity, which the state fashions through bureaucratic means. Through a comparative study security laws in Israel and India, she shows how the British colonial roots of security practices, focused on population management and its classification as loyal to the state, or suspicious, formed the boundaries of citizenship after independence. She argues that the institutionalization of British colonial emergency laws, which occurred differently in Israel and India, deeply impacted the scope and authority of executive power to justify consistent violation to civil rights.
LINK	https://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/imperial-legacies-suspicion-making-loyal-administrators-and-citizens-israelpalestine-and

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Why the Palestinian, Zionist, and Algerian National Movements Competed, Fought, and (Mostly) Won
Tuesday, October 17
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building E51-372, 2 Amherst Street, 70 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Prof. Peter Krause, Boston College
Many of the world’s states—from Algeria to Israel to the United States—are the result of robust national movements that achieved independence. Many other national movements have failed in their attempts to achieve statehood, including the Kurds and the Palestinians. How does one explain these successes and failures? Focusing on the internal balance of power among nationalist groups (who cooperate with each other to establish a new state while simultaneously competing to lead it) and the use of violent and nonviolent strategies provides a new understanding of national movements and the causes and consequences of contentious collective action today, from the Arab Spring to the civil wars and insurgencies in Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, and beyond.

Peter J. Krause is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Boston College and a Research Affiliate with the MIT Security Studies Program. His new book, Rebel Power: Why National Movements Compete, Fight, and Win, is available from Cornell University Press. His research and teaching focuses on Middle East politics, terrorism and political violence, national movements, and international relation. He has a Ph.D. in political science from MIT and a B.A. in political science and history from Williams College.

Emile Bustani Seminar
The Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar is organized under the auspices of the MIT Center for International Studies, which conducts research on contemporary international issues and provides an opportunity for faculty and students to share perspectives and exchange views. Each year the Bustani Seminar invites scholars, journalists, consultants, and other experts from the Middle East, Europe, and the United States to MIT to present recent research findings on contemporary politics, society and culture, and economic and technological development in the Middle East.

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The Border Wall: Life and Injury on the Frontlines
Tuesday, October 17
6:00 pm
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Ieva Jusionyte, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Social Studies, Department of Anthropology and Committee on Degrees in Social Studies; Faculty Associate, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University
The idea of building a wall on the U.S./Mexico border serves as a potent symbol across the political spectrum—a means of assuaging social and economic anxieties by placing them onto a remote frontier. Ieva Jusionyte will consider how an anthropological analysis of the state, borders, and security can help people understand the meaning and impact of such a wall. Drawing on ethnographic research with emergency responders who rescue those injured in government actions against drugs and unauthorized migration, she will discuss how deploying “tactical infrastructure” (of which the wall is but one piece) changes everyday life on both sides of the border.

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Special Event: DC, Massachusetts, and the Future of a Clean Energy Economy
Tuesday, October 17
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
University of Massachusetts Club, 1 Beacon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/special-event-dc-massachusetts-and-the-future-of-a-clean-energy-economy-tickets-36828218192

Please join the Alliance and UMass Boston for a conversation about what the federal government's current approach to policies related to clean energy and the environment will have on the Massachusetts clean energy economy. Moderated by Heather Goldstone, science correspondent for WCAI and WGBH Radio, with David Cash, Dean of UMass Boston's McCormack Graduate School, Ruben Mencos, Founder and CEO of Proper Pipe, U.S.A., and Dr. Emily Reichert, CEO of Greentown Labs.

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How Wall Street Tech Can Speed Up The World
Tuesday, October 17
6:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
WeWork South Station, 745 Atlantic Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-wall-street-tech-can-speed-up-the-world-tickets-37470935577
Cost:  $0 – $3

This will be explaining how Kx supports streaming analytics on extremely large data sets that would simply swamp traditional technologies. The talk is a perfect opportunity for members to learn about the power and scalability of Kx and how it can be applied to real-life business problems across a range of traditional industries from finance to manufacturing and the evolving challenges of IoT and everywhere connected. Speaker is Pending: Food and Drinks will be provided. We would like to thank our venue sponsor, WeWork. WeWork is a community of creators. We transform buildings into collaborative workspaces. Our mission is to help companies grow by providing them with not just beautiful space but benefits, amenities, and community they need to focus on their business, all on very flexible terms. We currently have over 100,000 Members working out of our communities worldwide, and over 5,000 members here in Boston.

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Getting to the Point with Katy Tur, Author of Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History
Tuesday, October 17
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, Columbia Point, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/getting-to-the-point-with-katy-tur-author-of-unbelievable-my-front-row-seat-to-the-craziest-tickets-37551729233

The 2016 campaign was historic, and NBC News Correspondent Katy Tur was there from the beginning. In her new book Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History, Tur shares her story of how, after being told that her assignment covering the 2016 Trump campaign would be “six weeks, tops,” she spent 510 days on the campaign trail reporting on Trump’s inconsistencies, fact-checking his falsities, and as a result, found herself singled out by then-candidate Trump himself. Tur ended up being one of the most visible journalists during the 2016 election cycle, and part of the first women-led politics team in the history of network news.
In a conversation facilitated by Robin Young, Co-Host of NPR’s Here & Now, Tur will discuss her road to journalism, the risks and challenges that today’s journalists face, the state of politics, and the future of political reporting.
A book signing will follow. Books can be purchased at the Institute’s gift store at the program. Two ticket options are available, including general admission tickets (free), and premium tickets ($35; $30 for members). Premium tickets include the book, guaranteed seating, and priority access for the book signing. Free parking is available at the Institute.

Speakers: 
Robin Young, Co-Host, Here & Now, NPR @hereandnowrobin
Katy Tur, Anchor, MSNBC and Correspondent, NBC News @KatyTurNBC

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Wednesday, October 18
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Boston Sustainability Breakfast with NIB and WISE
Wednesday, October 18
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM EDT
Pret A Manger, 101 Arch Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-sustainability-breakfast-with-nib-and-wise-tickets-30734227903

Join us every month for Net Impact Boston's informal breakfast meetup of sustainability professionals for networking, discussion and moral support. It's important to remind ourselves that we are not the only ones out there in the business world trying to do good! Feel free to drop by any time between 7:30 and 8:30 am.
This month we'll be partnering with WISE!

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5 Essential Questions in Life
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Online at hsph.me/Ryan or in The Leadership Studio, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
SPEAKER(S)  James E. Ryan, Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6XMy3YF0h5RvD49
TICKET INFO  Please register to attend in person
CONTACT INFO	Do you have a leadership question for Dean Ryan?
Send to @VoicesHSPH using #VoicesHSPH
or by email to voices at hsph.harvard.edu for consideration to be asked during the webcast.
DETAILS  James E. Ryan is the 11th dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education. A leading expert on law and education, Ryan has written extensively about the ways in which law structures educational opportunity. His articles and essays address such topics as school desegregation, school finance, school choice, standards and testing, pre-K, and the intersection of special education and neuroscience. Ryan is also the co-author of the textbook Educational Policy and the Law, and the author of Five Miles Away, A World Apart, which was published in 2010 by Oxford University Press. In addition, Ryan has authored articles on constitutional law and theory and has argued before the United States Supreme Court.
Before coming to Harvard, Ryan was the Matheson & Morgenthau Distinguished Professor at the University of Virginia School of Law. He also served as academic associate dean from 2005–09 and founded and directed the school’s Program in Law and Public Service. While at Virginia, Ryan received an All-University Teaching Award, an Outstanding Faculty Award from the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, and several awards for his scholarship. Ryan has been a visiting professor at Harvard, Yale, and the University of Auckland. He has also served on numerous education boards and commissions, including the U.S. Department of Education’s Equity and Excellence Commission and the board of the Maya Angelou Public Charter School in Washington, D.C.
Please join us for this exciting talk!
LINK  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/voices/events/james-ryan-dean-of-harvard-graduate-school-of-education/

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How Does International Intervention Work?
Wednesday, October 18
12:00-1:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496 Pye Room, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Alia Matanock, University of California, Berkeley
There is emerging consensus that international intervention can secure peace by helping combatants overcome commitment problems following civil wars. But how do interveners accomplish this? Conventional wisdom suggests that intervention primarily works through military coercion. We theorize an alternative mechanism: monitoring and conditioning incentives on compliance with peace processes. Using United Nations peacekeeping data from 1989-2012, controlling for selection effects, we find these conditional incentives are more consistently correlated with reduced risk of conflict recurrence than military coercion.

Brief Bio
Aila M. Matanock is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research addresses the ways in which international actors engage in conflicted and weak states. She has worked at the RAND Corporation before graduate school, and has held fellowships at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and the Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation at UCSD. She received her Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University and her A.B. magna cum laude from Harvard University.

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Does Urban Science Have a Politics? Should It?
Wednesday, October 18
12:30pm to 2:30am
MIT, Building 9-255, City Arena, 105 Mass Avenue, Cambridge

Part of the Department of Urban Studies and Planning's Planning Ideas that Matter: Urban Science: Regression to Technocracy or Pathway to Progressive Planning?

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Sustainability For Health Leadership Series 2017 - Liz York
Wednesday, October 18
1:00 PM – 1:50 PM EDT
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, FXB G-13, Boston
RSVP at 

This fall, the Center for Health and the Global Environment will be hosting a 4-part Sustainability for Health Leadership Series. Beginning on October 11th and running through November 1st, this speaker series will introduce attendees to pressing issues and opportunities faced by cutting-edge business leaders that navigate the intersection of industry, government, public health and sustainability. Join us to hear about the importance of making the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings.

Oct 18 - Liz York, Associate Director of Quality and Sustainability at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Oct 25 - Ory Zik, Co-founder & Executive Director, Greenometry
Nov 1 - Captain Sara Newman, Director, Office of Public Health, National Park Service

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7TH ANNUAL BABSON FOOD DAY:  Because food is everybody’s business
Wednesday, October 18
3pm
Babson College, Wellesley

Babson Food Day showcases the methodology of Entrepreneurial Thought & Action® as both a tool and a mindset to positively influence how eaters think about, select, and consume food, and how entrepreneurs learn, connect dots and build on their visions. 

Co-hosted by our extraordinary Babson Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR) Andrew Zimmern, Babson Food Day fuels the energy, creativity, and generosity of eaters and entrepreneurs working together for the food future.

It is free to attend, no registration required, and open to the public.

More information at http://www.babson.edu/Academics/centers/the-lewis-institute/food-sol/food-day/

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Deep Mediatization: Social Order in the Age of Datafication
Wednesday, October 18
4:00 pm
Harvard,Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West A, Room 2019, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2017/10/CouldryHepp#RSVP
Event will be live webcast at 4:00 pm at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2017/10/CouldryHepp

with Nick Couldry, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK and Berkman Klein Faculty Associate and Andreas Hepp, Zemki, University of Bremen, Germany
Social and communication theorists Nick Couldry and Andreas Hepp draw on their recent book The Mediated Construction of Reality (Polity 2016) to explore what happens the concept and practice of 'social order' in the era of datafication. They start out from their proposal made in the book that today we are living in an era not just of mediatization, but deep mediatization where every element of social process and social life is composed of elements that have already been mediated. This shifts the question of media's 'influence' on the social into a higher-dimensional problem. Datafication is a good example of this, and its tension with classical forms of social phenomenology will be discussed in detail in the talk. Developing particularly the social theory of Norbert Elias (and his concept of 'figuration'), Couldry and Hepp will explore how social theory can help us grasp the deep conflicts that exist today between our material systems of interdependence (particularly those focussed on information technology and data processing systems) and the normative principles such as freedom and autonomy. Such conflicts as legal theorists such as Julie Cohen note are crucial to the life of democratic subjects and the orders (democratic or not) that they inhabit.

About Nick Couldry
Nick Couldry is a sociologist of media and culture. He is Professor of Media Communications and Social Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is the author or editor of twelve books including most recently The Mediated Construction of Reality (with Andreas Hepp, Polity, 2016), Ethics of Media (2013 Palgrave, coedited with Mirca Madianou and Amit Pinchevski), Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice (Polity 2012) and Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics After Neoliberalism (Sage 2010). He is Visiting Researcher at the Microsoft Research Lab, Cambridge, MA during August to December 2017 and a Faculty Associate of  the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society for 2017-2018. 

About Andreas Hepp
Andreas Hepp is Professor of Media and Communication Studies at the Centre for Media, Communication and Information Research (ZeMKI), University of Bremen, Germany. He is co-initiator of and principal investigator in the research network ‘Communicative Figurations’ as well as the DFG funded priority research program ‘Mediatized Worlds’ (2010-2017). His main research interests are media sociology, mediatization, transnational and transcultural communication, datafication, and qualitative methods of media research. Publications include the monographs Cultures of Mediatization (Polity, 2013), Transcultural Communication (Wiley, 2015) and The Mediated Construction of Reality (with Nick Couldry, Polity, 2017)

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Can We Synthesize Life In The Lab? How Chemistry May Become Biology
Wednesday, October 18
4:00pm to 5:30pm
Haller Hall, Geological Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Professor Sijbren Otto, Stratingh Institute
Abstract:  How the immense complexity of living organisms has arisen is one of the most intriguing questions in contemporary science. We have started to explore experimentally how organization and function can emerge from complex molecular networks in aqueous solution [1]. We focus on networks of molecules that can interconvert, to give mixtures that can change their composition in response to external or internal stimuli. Molecular recognition between molecules in such mixtures leads to their mutual stabilization, which drives the synthesis of more of the privileged structures (Figure 1). As the assembly process drives the synthesis of the very molecules that assemble, the resulting materials can be considered to be self-synthesizing. Intriguingly, in this process the assembling molecules are replicating themselves, where replication is driven by self-recognition of these molecules in the dynamic network [2]. The selection rules that dictate which (if any) replicator will emerge from such networks are starting to become clear [3]. We have observed that factors such as mechanical energy[2] and the nature of the environment [4] can determine which replicator wins the competition for building blocks. We have also witnessed spontaneous differentiation (a process akin to speciation as it occurs in biology) in a system made from a mixture of two building blocks [5]. When such systems are operated under far-from-equilibrium flow conditions adaptation of the replicators to a changing environment can occur. Replicators that are able to catalyze reactions other than their own formation have also been obtained, representing a first step towards metabolism. Thus, the prospect of Darwinian evolution of purely synthetic molecules is tantalizingly close and the prospect of synthesizing life de-novo is becoming increasingly realistic.

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Doctoral Research on Political Participation, Elite Status, and Race and Merit
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Room 133, Barker Center
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Ethics, Lecture, Special Events, Support/Social
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mahindra Humanities Center
SPEAKER(S)  Bo Yun Park, Harvard University
Jonathan D. Hampton, Harvard University
Prabhdeep Kehal, Brown University
CONTACT INFO	Tal_Vaval at gse.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Young Voters’ Understanding(s) of Political Participation: Diversity of Political Repertoires and Balance of Strategies Among Millennial College Students
Bo Yun Park, Harvard University
Status as Security: An Exploration of the Academic Lives of Elite Students
Jonathan D. Hampton, Harvard University
Race and Merit: Racialized Exclusion from Prestige in Higher Education Enrollment, 2004-2013
Prabhdeep Kehal, Brown University
Download pre-circulated papers on our webpage. For password, please register for this event.
LINK	http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/universities-past-present-and-future

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Valuing Mortality Risk in China: Comparing Stated‑Preference Estimates from 2005 and 2016
Wednesday, October 18
4:15PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard, Littauer Building, Room L-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
https://heep.hks.harvard.edu/seminar-schedules

James Hammitt and Fangli Geng, Harvard University

Co-hosted by HKS professors Robert Stavins and Martin Weitzman. Support from Enel Endowment for Environmental Economics and the Department of Economics is gratefully acknowledged.

Contact Name: Bryan Galcik
bryan_galcik at hks.harvard.edu

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The Cradle of Humanity: Why the Changing Landscape of Africa Made Us So Smart
Wednesday, October 18
4:30PM
BioLabs 1080, 16 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

The Department of Human and Evolutionary Biology and the Harvard University Center for the Environment jointly present Mark Maslin, Professor of Physical Geography in the Department of Geography, University College London for a discussion of his latest book The Cradle of Humanity: Why the Changing Landscape of Africa Made Us So Smart.

Contact Name:  Mallory McCoy
mmccoy at fas.harvard.edu

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The Environment Forum at the Mahindra Center presents Naomi Oreskes, 'Giant Power: Technology, Energy, and the Beginnings of Post-Truth America'
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Barker Center, Thompson Room, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Humanities, Lecture, Science, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University
CONTACT INFO	humcentr at fas.harvard.edu, 617-495-0738
DETAILS	 The Environment Forum at the Mahindra Center is convened by Robin Kelsey (Dean of Arts and Humanities, Harvard University) and Ian Jared Miller (Professor of History, Harvard University). Free and open to the public. Seating is limited.
LINK  http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/giant-power-technology-energy-and-beginnings-post-truth-america

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Conversation 2 of Symposium,“Made in Cambridge: What’s Happening in Kendall. Square?
Wednesday, October 18
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Google Cambridge, 355 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/conversation-2-of-symposiummade-in-cambridge-whats-happening-in-kendall-square-whats-next-tickets-37132386969

Our 2017 two-part Symposium’s theme is “Made in Cambridge: What’s Happening in Kendall Square?”
Join us for the second part, “What’s Next?” 

We'll explore what Kendall Square means to us now- what we're proud of and what we fear, what we see and what remains invisible.

We'll hear from speakers and event attendees alike, about how we think Science Cambridge and Resident Cambridge connect now in Kendall Square, what we think we'll see and what we want to see in Kendall Square's and Cambridge's biotech industry's future.
Our Moderator is author Mimi Graney. Our speakers are David Sun Kong, Director, Community Biotechnology Initiative at the MIT Media Lab; Abbie Celniker, Partner at Third Rock Ventures; and Debra Morris, President of the Newtowne Court-Washington Elms Tenant Council.

Biographies:
Mimi Graney is the founder of What the Fluff?, a festival celebrating Marshmallow Fluff that draws thousands annually. Her work in neighborhood economic development takes her to communities across Massachusetts where she focuses on creative industries and food-based businesses. Her favorite way to enjoy Marshmallow Fluff is by the melting spoonful in a mug of hot chocolate.

Abbie Celniker is a Partner at Third Rock Ventures where she focuses on the formation, development and strategy of their portfolio companies. She is a board member and interim chief executive officer of Goldfinch Bio, and the former president and chief executive officer of Eleven Biotherapeutics.
Debra Morris is President of the Newtowne Court-Washington Elms Tenant Council.

David Sun Kong, Director, Community Biotechnology Initiative at the MIT Media Lab.
David Sun Kong, Ph.D., is a Synthetic Biologist, community organizer, DJ, and photographer. He is the Director of the MIT Media Lab's new Community Biotechnology Initiative. He is a pioneer in developing “lab-on-a-chip” technologies for synthetic biology and a leader in the global bio-hacking movement. He is co-founder and faculty of "How To Grow (Almost) Anything,” an international distributed course on biotechnology, a synthetic biology “LEAP” fellow, the founder and director of EMW, an art, technology, and community space in Cambridge, MA, and the founder of two technical tracks for the International Genetically Engineered Machines Competition (iGEM). He is also the official iGEM DJ, and has performed as a DJ, beat-boxer, vocalist, and rapper at hundreds of venues. His photography has been exhibited at the Smithsonian and other museums and galleries across the country.

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Faculty Speaker Series: What Great Service Leaders Know and Do
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, 6 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Special Events
COST  FREE
DETAILS  What is different about leading a breakthrough organization today than in the past? How are the new rules of service impacting our daily lives? Len Schlesinger, professor at Harvard Business School, and Kristen Mugford, senior lecturer in finance at Harvard Business School, will guide an interactive discussion of the challenges and opportunities confronting both businesses and consumers today.
LINK	https://edportal.harvard.edu/event/faculty-speaker-series-what-great-service-leaders-know-and-do

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Boston New Technology October 2017 Startup Showcase #BNT82
Wednesday, October 18
6:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Akamai Technologies, 150 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-new-technology-october-2017-startup-showcase-bnt82-tickets-37740827832?utm_source=BostonNewTechnology&utm_campaign=BostonTechnology

Come learn about 7 innovative and exciting technology products and network with 150 attendees from the Boston/Cambridge startup community!
Please click here to share/tweet our event with your network.
Each presenter gets 5 minutes for a product overview & demonstration and 5 minutes for Q&A. Please follow @BostonNewTech and support our startups by posting on social media using our #BNT82 hashtag. We'll retweet you!

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On the Wing: Part 2
Wednesday, October 18
6:30PM TO 7:30PM
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Boston
RSVP at http://my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277

The Arnold Arboretum welcomes Lorna Gibson, PhD, Matoula S. Salapatas Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who will give a talk on "On the Wing: Part 2."

What do you get from a bird-lover who is a materials science engineer? A close look at feathers. In this second installment of On the Wing, Lorna Gibson discusses how down keeps a bird warm, how the structure of the feather shaft reduces its weight, and how adaptations of flight feathers produce or suppress sound.

Contact Name:  Pam Thompson
pam_thompson at harvard.edu

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From Microwaves to Microbreweries: The science behind our food
Wednesday, October 18
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Endurance:  A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery
Wednesday, October 18
7:30 PM  (Doors at 6:30)
Back Bay Events Center, 180 Berkeley Street, Boston
Cost:  $20 - $36 tickets include a pre-signed book 

Harvard Book Store welcomes the astronaut who spent a record-breaking year aboard the International Space Station—SCOTT KELLY—for a presentation of Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery, a candid account of his remarkable voyage, of the journeys off the planet that preceded it, and of his colorful formative years. He will joined in conversation by Emmy Award–winning journalist and documentary filmmaker MILES O'BRIEN, whose production company creates content for PBS NewsHour and NOVA.

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Thursday, October 19
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Wisdom from the Earth: Deepening Connection with the Web of Life
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  45 Mt Auburn Street, Cambridge, Democracy Center
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	WomenExplore Lecture and Discussion Forum in Cambridge since 1973, formerly Theological Opportunities Program, Harvard Divinity School
SPEAKER(S)  Katy Allen, eco-rabbi, founder, Ma'yan Tikvah, co-convener Boston area Jewish Climate Action Network
COST  $15, Individual; Students, no charge
TICKET WEB LINK  http://www.womenexplore.org
TICKET INFO  http://www.womenexplore.org
CONTACT INFO  info at womenexplore.org
DETAILS  WomenExplore Lecture and Discussion Forum, formed in 1973 at Harvard Divinity Schoool, is a continuously run lecture series featuring cultural topics, from community to global issues, pertinent to women's lives. Lectures, offered every fall and spring semester, are presented by local academics, authors, and other experts in their fields.
Women and men welcome.
LINK  http://www.womenexplore.org

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The Trump Administration's Regulatory Rollback: A Panel Discussion on Environmental and Financial Regulatory Reforms
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Research study, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Regulatory Policy Program (RPP) at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at the Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Jody Freeman, HLS professor and director of the Environmental Law Program, Howell Jackson, HLS professor, and Joseph Aldy, HKS professor.
CONTACT INFO	Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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Discovering the Omura's whale: ecology and conservation of the newest baleen whale species
Thursday, October 19
12:00-1:00pm
Tufts, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

The Omura’s whale was first described from dead specimens in 2003, and not observed in the wild until 2013 off northwest Madagascar, making it the newest and most enigmatic member of the lunge-feeding baleen whales. Since then, the Madagascar research team has studied the species, describing for the first time its external appearance, feeding ecology, social behavior, seasonal and spatial distribution, acoustic and singing behavior and assessing potential anthropogenic threats. Dr. Cerchio will present this voyage of discovery, and what it means to work with a new species of whale in the 21st century.

Tufts alumnus Salvatore Cerchio is a marine mammal biologist who has worked with cetaceans around the world for over 30 years. Dr Cerchio’s current geographic focus is in the Indian Ocean, particularly off Madagascar and the Arabian Sea. He has conducted research on several species of whales and dolphins, applying expertise in conservation biology, bioacoustics, molecular ecology and behavioral ecology. He’s currently a visiting scientist at the New England Aquarium and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He received a BS in Biology from Tufts University,
a MS in Marine Sciences from San Jose State University and a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Michigan.

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How to Think About Nuclear Crises
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, One Brattle Square - Room 350, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom
SPEAKER(S)  Mark S. Bell, Asst. Prof. of Political Science, University of Minnesota Twin Cities; Julia Macdonald, Asst. Prof. in International Relations, Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver
CONTACT INFO	susan_lynch at harvard.edu
LINK	https://www.belfercenter.org/event/how-think-about-nuclear-crises

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Acting on Climate: Translating Research into Practice for Global Change
Thursday, October 19
1 pm
Harvard Global Health Institute, 42 Church Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://globalhealth.harvard.edu/event/climate-change-and-global-health-seminar-heather-henriksen

Join the Harvard Global Health Institute for their Climate Change and Global Health Seminar with Director of the Office for Sustainability Heather Henriksen

Lunch provided

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Creative AI: Perceptual Data-Guided Computational Design
Thursday, October 19
2:50pm - 4:00pm
Tufts, Halligan 102, 161 College Avenue, Medford

Speaker: Craig Yu, University of Massachusetts, Boston

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Defense Innovation for the Warfighter - Introducing New Technology to the Defense Community
Thursday, October 19
4pm - 8pm
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Café Kendall, 1 Broadway, 5th Floor, Havana Room, Cambridge
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eem26glnd322dad8&oseq=&c=&ch=

Interested in connecting with non-traditional innovators? Want to learn about DIUx and connect with other DoD innovation organizations and prime contractors? 

Join the NDIA New England Chapter for a defense innovation mixer with host Venture Café in Kendall Square at the Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC). The mixer will bring together over 300 defense innovation organizations, prime contractors and non traditional vendors for informal networking around panel discussions and concurrent small group breakout sessions, office hours, information tables and startups demo tables -- Venture Cafe Style!!  

EVENT AGENDA
3:00 PM
Venture Cafe Registration Opens (All attendees must register onsite)
4:00 – 6:00 PM     
Panel Sessions (Havana Room)
Seating is Limited during 4-6pm panels. Click here to RSVP.
4:00 – 4:15PM
NDIA New England Welcome
Rear Admiral (retired) Clarke Orzalli, NDIA NE President & Strategic Business Development Executive, Dassault Systèmes
4:15 – 5:00PM
Defense Prime Contractors – Advancing DoD Innovation
Defense industry prime contractors discuss their role in DoD innovation, how they bring new technology to the warfighter, and working with startups and small businesses. Come learn about how leading contractors solve real problems for the US soldier and transition new innovations from the lab to the field.
Moderator: Karen Krause Bencal, CEO, K2C Associates
Lena Furci, PhD, Business Line Manager, Integrated and Unmanned Systems, Mission and Defense Technologies, Battelle
Ellen Ferraro, PhD, Director of Research and Technology, Advanced Technology, Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems
Jerry Wohletz, PhD, VP and General Manager, Technology Solutions, BAE Systems
Joe Simonelli, Senior Director of Engineering for Cyber and Electronic Warfare Systems, General Dynamics Mission Systems 
5:15 – 6:00PM
DoD Innovation Organizations – New Technologies for the Warfighter
Learn about government innovation organizations with a mission to expedite access to commercial innovations, as well as the development of new technologies for the warfighter. Hear from leaders and subject matter experts about technology focus areas, as well as near-term and long-term needs.
Moderator:  Nathan Wiedenman, Director, Sembler Office, Draper
Brad Pantuck, Program Manager, US Navy, Navy Rapid Innovation Fund (RIF)
Col. Michael McGinley, East Coast Military Lead, DIUx
Israel Soibelman, PhD, Assistant to the Director for Strategic Initiatives, MIT Lincoln Laboratory 
6:00 – 8:00PM
Networking Mixer – Join various activities in and around Venture Café Kendall Square on the 5th floor of the Cambridge Innovation Center at 1 Broadway.
6:00 – 7:00PM
Breakout Sessions
 
How to do Business With the Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx) (Havana Room) - Col. Michael McGinley, East Coast Military Lead, DIUx and Bernadette Johnson, Chief Science Officer, DIUx
 
Partnering with Defense Primes to Transition Your Innovation from Idea to Product Launch (Octav) - Christopher Bencal, Business Development Executive, Advanced Technology, Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems 
 
How Startups Can Leverage University Relationships with Industry and Facility Resources (St Thomas) - Nancy Saucier, Director, New Venture Development, UMASS Lowell 
 
How to work with the Navy Rapid Innovation Fund (Santa Clara) - Brad Pantuck, Program Manager, US Navy, Navy Rapid Innovation Fund (RIF) 
 
A Decentralized Data Infrastructure for Autonomy and Artificial Intelligence (Grand Bahama) - Allen Razdow, Inventor of Truenumbers and Mathcad 
6:00 – 8:00PM
Information Tables
Draper Sembler Office for Startups and Small Businesses
Battelle Mission Defense Technologies
BAE Systems
National Defense Industry Association, New England Chapter
General Dynamics Mission Systems
MITRE/ Massachusetts Innovation Bridge
6:00 – 8:00PM
Startup Demos
 
3:00 – 5:00PM
Office Hours
Office hours are available for aspiring and existing entrepreneurs to receive advice from experienced government, business professionals, entrepreneurs and investors.  Click here to register for office hours with:
Bernadette Johnson, PhD, Chief Science Officer, DIUx

This event is open to the public and does not require pre-registration to attend. Seating is limited for panel sessions and advanced RSVP is suggested. To RSVP for the panel sessions, click here. 

More information at http://ndianewengland.org/events/icalrepeat.detail/2017/10/19/82/5/defense-innovation-for-the-warfighter

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Economics Commentator, Financial Times
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CES, 27 Kirkland Street, Adolphus Busch Hall at Cabot Way, Lower Level Conference Room, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	European Economic Policy Forum
SPEAKER(S)  Martin Wolf – Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times
Chair Hans-Helmut Kotz – Visiting Professor of Economics, Harvard University; CES Resident Faculty & Seminar Chair, Harvard University; Member of the Executive Board (2002-2010), Deutsche Bundesbank
CONTACT INFO	Roumiana Theunissen
rtheunissen at fas.harvard.edu
LINK	https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/calendar-submission/

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Starr Forum: Syria: Which way forward?
Thursday, October 19
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building 3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speakers
Steven Simon, a visiting professor at Amherst College, is the former United States National Security Council senior director for the Middle East and North Africa.

Robert Ford, a retired diplomat, is the former United States Ambassador to Syria  (2010 to 2014) and United States Ambassador to Algeria (2006 to 2008).

Free & open to the public | Refreshments served
Can't attend in person? Watch it on Facebook live or on-demand on YouTube.
For more information or accessibility accommodations please contact starrforum at mit.edu.

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Christianity, Race, and Mass Incarceration Conference
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 19, 5:15 p.m. – Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences
SPONSOR	Religions and the Practice of Peace, HDS Dean's Office, and the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice at Harvard Law School.
CONTACT	Matthew B. Turner
DETAILS  The Christianity, Race, and Mass Incarceration Conference will gather scholars of various disciplines, activists, organizers, and formerly incarcerated persons and place them in conversation with each other. We hope to advance through this workshop a critical study of carceral punishment, especially as it relates to questions of Christian thought and practice, and to provoke awareness and activism around incarceration in America.
The conference is being organized by Professors Matthew Potts and Michelle Sanchez and will follow this preliminary schedule:
Thursday, Oct 19
5:15–7:00 pm: Keynote Address
Willie Jennings, Yale Divinity School
Friday, Oct 20
9:00–10:15 am
Panel One: Religion and the Historical Roots of US Incarceration
Jennifer Graber, University of Texas at Austin
Heather Curtis, Tufts University
Amy Howe, Brown University
10:30–11:45 am
Panel Two: Race and Religion in Modern Mass Incarceration
Naomi Murakawa, Princeton University
Elizabeth Hinton, Harvard University
Todne Thomas, Harvard University
11:45 am–1:15 pm Lunch
1:15–2:45 pm
Panel Three: Theology and Humanities Roundtable
Cornel West, Harvard Divinity School
Devin Singh, Dartmouth College
Michelle Sanchez, Harvard Divinity School
M. Shawn Copeland, Boston College
Andre Willis, Brown University
3:00–4:30 pm
Panel Four: Activist Strategies and the Study of Religion
Glenn Martin, JustLeadershipUSA
Kaia Stern, Harvard University
Rahsaan Hall, Massachusetts ACLU
Bev Williams, Criminal Justice Reform Campaign, GBIO
Karlene Griffiths Sekou, Founder and Principal Consultant at The Dignity Project International

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NORTH KOREA NUCLEAR CRISIS: A Seminar With Professor Thomas Berger
Thursday, October 19
6:00pm to 7:00pm
BU, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 313, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/north-korea-nuclear-crisis-a-seminar-with-professor-thomas-berger-tickets-38641853825

North Korea. A country that has been receiving more attention in the recent years. While the world is looking for a solution to North Korea nuclear crisis, people are also trying to find the alternatives that are available in order to constrain North Korean’s aggression. For countries like China, Japan, South Korea, and the U.S., the issue with nuclear weapons does not only concern warfare, but also influencing international relations as a global crisis. 
Organized by ASIABU, this seminar will be focusing on an in-depth observation to the NK nuclear development in a historical context. Our presenter, Professor Thomas Berger, is a BU faculty who teaches International Relations at the Pardee School of Global Studies. With his specialization in East Asian political culture, Professor Berger wishes to create a platform for all students to learn more about North Korea and its place in the global sense.

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Lost in Transformation [Editorial Comment:  Toward Carbon Neutral Building]
Thursday, October 19
6:00pm to 8:00pm
MIT, Building 10, 10-250, 222 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Thomas Auer & Stefan Behnisch
The Ahmad Tehrani Symposium
In order to get to a carbon neutral building stock – which is e.g. required by the EU Carbon roadmap by 2050 – our efforts need to be smart and holistic on all scales of design. At the same time it is essential that a transformation process provide great environmental qualities – indoor as well as outdoor (public realm). This requires mitigation and adaptation strategies, which can only be accomplished by transforming the design process: “Form Follows Process” (Chris Bangle, chief of design at BMW between 1992 and 2009). Integrated design strategies and a performance driven design process is the basis to find answers on the question how the challenges of our time will transform and change our built environment. A transformation, which needs to be radical to achieve a full de-carbonization of our building stock and to provide a highly comfortable. However, to be convincing as a profession we need to be aspirational and at the same time inspirational. The level of aspiration must be determined by research, whereas exemplary lighthouse projects should inspire the industry and the public. 

Thomas Auer is trained as a process engineer. He is director of Transsolar, an engineering firm with offices in Stuttgart, Munich, Paris and New York. He collaborated with distinguished architects on numerous international design projects. He is a specialist in energy efficiency and environmental quality. Thomas taught at various universities around the world. Since 2014 he is full Professor at the Technical University of Munich with a focus in bridging research and environmental design. His research is focusing on the transformation of the built environment as a process to reduce the use of resources and to adapt to the changing conditions caused by global warming.

Stefan Behnisch, born 1957 in Stuttgart, studied philosophy, economics and architecture. Prior to establishing his own practice in 1989, he worked as an architect at Behnisch & Partner, the practice run by his father, Prof. Günter Behnisch. Stefan Behnisch’s firm, since 2005 called Behnisch Architekten, became independent in 1991 and expanded in the years ahead, opening offices in Los Angeles (1999-2011), Boston and Munich, which he directs together with his partners. Stefan Behnisch is a frequent lecturer and guest professor. Among others, he has been the Eero Saarinen Chair visiting professor at the Yale School of Architecture, Visiting Professor at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland, at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque and at the TU Delft, The Netherlands. In 2007 he received a Global Award for Sustainable Architecture, and in 2009 a Good Design Award in the category “People” presented by the Chicago Athenaeum and the European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies. In 2013 Stefan Behnisch received the “Energy Performance + Architecture Award”. He is a member of the BDA, the RIBA, the NCARB and the AIA.

MIT Department of Architecture / Fall 2017 Lecture Series

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Transitioning to a Zero Waste Economy
Thursday, October 19
6pm - 8pm
Old West Church, 131 Cambridge Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/local-emerging-market-series-transitioning-to-a-zero-waste-economy-tickets-36401825841
Cost:  $0 - $15

As part of their Local Emerging Markets Series, the Climate Action Business Association will be hosting a panel discussion about emerging drivers and opportunities for entrepreneurs working to make wealth from waste. Hear from the panelists about their successes, challenges and future business opportunities in the circular economy. 

The circular economy is an emerging economic model that promotes innovation and creative business models for advancing zero waste practices and products. Join Climate Action Business Association and Save That Stuff for a panel discussion about emerging drivers and opportunities for entrepreneurs working to make wealth from waste. Hear from our panelists about their successes, challenges, and future business opportunities in the circular economy.

This event is part of our Local Emerging Market Series in which we focus on specific industries to encourage dialogue within the local industry. Over the past five years, Massachusetts has become the national incubator for innovative business solutions to climate change. Climate Action Business Association has developed a free series of reports, Local Emerging Market Reports (LEMR) to offer a spotlight on what we see as further opportunities for leadership in the transition to a carbon-free economy. 

About the panelists:
Gavin Bodkin is the Co-Owner and COO of Circular Blu, an award-winning Boston-based startup that re-purposes hospital plastics into sustainable products. Gavin has co-authored multiple studies on the circular economy and presented at several conferences. He was awarded the 2015-16 Biogen Fell o w ship, received the Graduate Assistantship Prize in Management and Marketing Department, as well as the Atkin's Dean Fund Prize in 2016.

Joel Dashnaw is a Territory Manager for Save That Stuff, a Boston, MA based resource management company enabling over three thousand New England businesses and institutions to safely and efficiently get rid of paper recyclables and a wide variety of other recoverable scrap materials otherwise destined for the dumpster.
John Lively is currently the Director of Environment and Materials at Preserve , a. Waltham, MA based certified B Corporation who is the leading maker of performance driven and stylish 100% recycled household products. John is a first mover in the green business world, having 18 years of successful entrepreneurial experience in sustainable consumer products.

About Save That Stuff:
Save That Stuff is a recyclable materials waste service company that makes saving customers time and money a top priority, along with responsibly managing the recyclable waste materials they throw away. They help over three thousand New England businesses and institutions safely and efficiently dispose of a wide range of recoverable materials otherwise destined for the dumpster. They operate an independently-owned 100,000 sq. ft. processing facility in Charlestown, Boston, Massachusetts.

Agenda:
6:00-6:30: Networking
6:30-7:00: Speaker Introductions
7:00-7:45: Q&A
7:45-8:00: Networking

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What do Hurricanes Harvey and Irma portend?
Thursday, October 19
6:30pm to 8:30pm
MIT, Building NW86, MP Room, 70 Pacific Street, Cambridge

CoSI Lecture with Professor Kerry Emanuel
Join us for the second CoSI lecture this semester. We've invited Professor Kerry Emanuel, a world renowned hurricane expert, to talk about the recent tragic hurricane surges.

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TECH AND SOCIAL INNOVATION
Thursday, 19 October
6:30 – 8:30 pm EDT
GA Boston, 125 Summer Street 13th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://generalassemb.ly/education/tech-and-social-innovation/boston/41859

TECH AND...is a monthly event series where we host thought-leaders from a specific industry and explore new intersections between their field and technology.
TECH AND SOCIAL INNOVATION

In October, we are inviting some of Boston's most impressive social entrepreneurs to General Assembly to share how they are leveraging technology to make the world a better place. From platforms that promote civic engagement to tools that help us lower our carbon footprint, we are seeing innovative solutions pop-up everywhere to help solve the world's most complex problems.

Why It Matters:  With the introduction of technology to the social sector, we are starting to see organizations increase efficiencies, cast a wider net of donors, and increase awareness for their cause. It has also empowered entrepreneurs to solve social problems in new and creative ways. The more the tech industry and the social sector intersect, the better our world will be.

By signing up for this event, you're giving our sponsors permission to contact you about upcoming events and promotions.

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The Startup Way:  How Modern Companies Use Entrepreneurial Management to Transform Culture and Drive Long-Term Growth
Thursday, October 19
7:00 PM (Doors at 6:30)
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
$Cost:  $5 - 30.50 (book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes entrepreneur and bestselling author of The Lean Startup, ERIC RIES, for a discussion of his latest book, The Startup Way: How Modern Companies Use Entrepreneurial Management to Transform Culture and Drive Long-Term Growth. This event is co-sponsored by the Arthur Rock Center for Entrepreneurship at Harvard Business School.

About The Startup Way
Eric Ries reveals how entrepreneurial principles can be used by businesses of all kinds, ranging from established companies to early-stage startups, to grow revenues, drive innovation, and transform themselves into truly modern organizations, poised to take advantage of the enormous opportunities of the twenty-first century.  
In The Lean Startup, Ries laid out the practices of successful startups—building a minimal viable product, customer-focused and scientific testing based on a build-measure-learn method of continuous innovation, and deciding whether to persevere or pivot. In The Startup Way, he turns his attention to an entirely new group of organizations: established enterprises like iconic multinationals GE and Toyota, tech titans like Amazon and Facebook, and the next generation of Silicon Valley upstarts like Airbnb and Twilio. 

Drawing on his experiences over the past five years working with these organizations, as well as nonprofits, NGOs, and governments, Ries lays out a system of entrepreneurial management that leads organizations of all sizes and from every industry to sustainable growth and long-term impact. Filled with in-the-field stories, insights, and tools, The Startup Way is an essential road map for any organization navigating the uncertain waters of the century ahead.

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Chokehold:  Policing Black Men
Thursday, October 19
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes award-winning author and Georgetown University law professor PAUL BUTLER for a discussion of his latest book, Chokehold: Policing Black Men.

About Chokehold
Cops, politicians, and ordinary people are afraid of black men. The result is the Chokehold: laws and practices that treat every African American man like a thug. In this explosive new book, an African American former federal prosecutor shows that the system is working exactly the way it’s supposed to. Black men are always under watch, and police violence is widespread—all with the support of judges and politicians.
In his no-holds-barred style, Butler, whose scholarship has been featured on 60 Minutes, uses new data to demonstrate that white men commit the majority of violent crime in the United States. For example, a white woman is ten times more likely to be raped by a white male acquaintance than be the victim of a violent crime perpetrated by a black man. Butler also frankly discusses the problem of black on black violence and how to keep communities safer—without relying as much on police.

Chokehold powerfully demonstrates why current efforts to reform law enforcement will not create lasting change. Butler’s controversial recommendations about how to crash the system, and when it’s better for a black man to plead guilty—even if he’s innocent—are sure to be game-changers in the national debate about policing, criminal justice, and race relations.

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Crazy Weather and the Arctic Meltdown: How Are They Connected?
Thursday, October 19
7-9pm
Simons IMAX Theatre New England Aquarium, Aquarium Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=107285&view=Detail

Jennifer Francis, Ph.D., Research Professor I, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University
Does it seem as though the weather gods have gone crazy lately? It is not your imagination. The question on everyone’s minds is why? And is it related to climate change? In this presentation, Dr. Jennifer Francis will explain new research that links increasing extreme weather events with the rapidly warming and melting Arctic during recent decades. Evidence suggests that Arctic warming is causing weather patterns to become more persistent, which can lead to extremes such as droughts, cold spells, heat waves, and some flooding events.

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Space Junk: A Traffic Crisis in Outer Space?
Thursday, October 19
7:30 pm
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophsics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge

Jonathan McDowell, CfA, Astrophysicist with Chandra X-Ray Observatory
It's been 60 years since the launch of the first artificial satellite, Sputnik, and space is getting busier and busier. There are over 1,500 working satellites up there, but there are also over 17,000 known pieces of orbital debris whizzing around at up to 18,000 miles an hour. McDowell will talk about the demographics of the satellite population: who is putting satellites up there, what are they doing, what the space junk is and why there's so much of it - and what can we do about it?

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Friday, October 20
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MIT D-Lab 15th Anniversary Symposium
Friday, October 20
10:00am to 7:00pm
MIT, Building W16, Little Kresge Theater, 48 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Celebrate MIT D-Lab's 15th anniversary with an all-day symposium of TED-style talks by D-Lab students, researchers, alumni, instructors, fellows, and partners, and a technology and product showcase! Keynote by D-Lab Founding Director at 5 pm followed by a reception.

More information at http://d-lab.mit.edu/

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Skills of the Future: Brunch & Learn
Friday, October 20
10:00am to 12:00pm
MIT, Building E70, 12th Floor, 1 BROADWAY, Cambridge

Entrepreneurship & Employment
Join the Legatum Center for a conversation on how innovation-driven entrepreneurship is increasing employment opportunities and developing talent in emerging markets.

Guest speakers include:
Thomas Kochan, Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management
Dr. Kenfield Griffith, Co-Founder & CEO, mSurvey
Yulkendy Valdez, Co-Founder & Managing Partner, Project 99
*Please bring a photo ID to check in at the guest desk in the One Broadway (E70) lobby.

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Inclusive Security: A Conversation with Swanee Hunt
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Malkin Penthouse, Littauer Building 4th Floor, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Ethics, Lecture, Social Sciences
SPEAKER(S)  Ambassador Swanee Hunt
DETAILS  Join former U.S. ambassador to Austria Swanee Hunt for breakfast and conversation about the history, present, and future of women in security studies. Topics will include the question of whether women are biologically or culturally more peaceful than men, women as leaders at both the grassroots and parliamentary levels, how to foster the inclusion of underrepresented groups in peace processes, and how to ensure that peace deals are durable and long-lasting. The conversation will involve material and content from Ambassador Hunt's January term course, IGA-218M: Inclusive Security.

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Electing Peace and Considering Concessions in Colombia
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Fainsod Room, Littauer 324, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	International Security Program
SPEAKER(S)  Aila M. Matanock, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
CONTACT INFO	susan_lynch at harvard.edu
LINK	https://www.belfercenter.org/event/electing-peace-and-considering-concessions-colombia

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The Future of Advertising and Publishing
Friday, October 20
1:30 PM – 4:30 PM EDT
Harvard Business School, Batten Hall, 125 Western Ave (Room 301), Allston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-future-of-advertising-and-publishing-tickets-38089066423

Join the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, the Digital Initiative at Harvard Business School and the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School on October 20 for an afternoon conference on The Future of Advertising and Publishing: Finding new revenue models for journalism in the digital age. Panels will feature academics, journalists, media executives and industry experts who will discuss the distribution and advertising challenges facing traditional publishers and present lessons learned from adjacent media spaces about digital revenue models.

Follow the conversation online on Facebook (live streaming from https://www.facebook.com/towcenter) and on Twitter #adforum17 

PROGRAM:
1:30pm	Welcome Address from David Homa (Digital Initiative - Harvard Business School)
1:45pm	Social Distribution, Advertising and the Free Press
With Emily Bell (Tow Center for Digital Journalism) and Nicco Mele (Shorenstein Institute)
3:15pm	Revenue Models & Adjacent Media Spaces
With Janet Balis (Ernst & Young), Tim Ganss (The Echo Nest), Wolfgang Hammer (Super Deluxe) and Kerri Hoffman (PRX). Moderated by Bharat Anand (Harvard Business School).
4:30pm	Closing Remarks from Emily Bell (Tow Center for Digital Journalism - Columbia University

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A Post-Industrial Postscript
Friday, October 20
2:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, ACT Cube (E15-001) 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

David Reinfurt will report on his last six months in Rome as a fellow at the American Academy interrogating one small, industrially produced artwork-product from 1965. The Tetracono was designed by Bruno Munari and produced by Danese Milano as an austere 15-cm black steel cube housing four aluminum cones, each painted half-red and half-green, which spin at four distinct speeds on an 18-minute cycle. Its function is to “show forms while they are in the process of becoming.”

This lecture is part of the Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT)'s Fall 2017 Lecture Series. 

For more information on the series see http://act.mit.edu/projects-and-events/lectures-series/about-pages/fall-2017-about-series/

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Party Under the Harvest Moon - a fundraiser for Food For Free
Friday, October 20
6-10pm
MIT, Morss Hall
RSVP at https://www.501auctions.com/foodforfree/tickets
Cost:  $65 - $75

Eat. Drink. Dance. Bid. Celebrate. Support.

Enjoy beer, wine, nibbles, and desserts from:
Bandit Wines, Cabot Cheese, Cambridge Brewing Company, Dave's Fresh Pasta, Flour, Henrietta's Table, iCater, Mainely Burgers, Manoa Poke, Nubar, Q's Nuts, Royal East Restaurant, Russell House Tavern, Spindler Confections, Sub Zero Ice Cream and Yogurt, Veggie Galaxy, Viale,  and more!

Every dollar spent on tickets , auction bids, sponsorships , and donations helps get healthy food to people who need it. 

More information at https://www.501auctions.com/foodforfree/

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"The Peacemaker" Documentary Film Screening and Discussion
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, 7 – 9 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ames Courtroom, Austin Hall, 1515 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Film
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School
SPEAKER(S)  James Demo, Director and Producer
Padraig O’Malley, Protagonist of the film
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	Julie Barrett, jbarrett at law.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Join the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and the Massachusetts Bar Association’s Dispute Resolution Section for the close of Conflict Resolution Week with a special screening of "The Peacemaker," a documentary film directed and produced by James Demo.
The film is an intimate portrait of Padraig O’Malley, owner of the Plough & Stars bar in Cambridge, author, and UMass Boston professor, who has worked for decades to help divided societies come together.
The film takes us from Padraig’s life in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to some of the most dangerous crisis zones on earth – from Northern Ireland to Kosovo, Nigeria to Iraq over five years – as he works with a peacemaking model based on his recovery from addiction. We meet Padraig in the third act of his life in a race against time to find some kind of salvation for both the world and himself.
A discussion with James Demo and Padraig O’Malley will follow the screening.
Watch the trailer at www.peacemakermovie.com.
LINK  https://www.pon.harvard.edu/events/peacemaker-film-screening-discussion/

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Saturday, October 21 - Sunday, October 22
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The 22nd Annual Boston Veg Food Fest
Saturday, October 21, 2017, 11AM* - 6PM
Sunday, October 22, 2017, 10AM - 4PM
Reggie Lewis Athletic Center, 1350 Tremont Street, Boston

FREE Admission! FREE Parking! FREE Food Sampling!
*Saturday 10 - 11 a.m. Preview Hour. A limited number of tickets ($5) are now on sale at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3071510 to enter the Exhibitor Room at 10a.m., before the doors open at 11a.m. for Free Admission to all.

More information at http://bostonveg.org/foodfest/

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Saturday, October 21
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2017 HBS Energy & Environment Club Symposium
Saturday, October 21
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM EDT
Harvard Business School, Spangler Center, 117 Western Avenue, Allston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-hbs-energy-environment-club-symposium-tickets-37701983648
Cost:  $25 – $90

Building on last year's symposium that drew over 600 attendees, Energy Symposium 2017: Exploring New Horizons convenes utilities, startups, executives innovating in the energy ecosystem, and academics at Harvard Business School to identify the key trends that are shaping the industry now and will continue to do so over the next ten years. 
This year, we are very excited that our key notes speakers will include: Jigar Shah, President of Generate Capital and Katherine Hamilton, Founder, 38 North Solutions & Green Tech Media Energy Gang Co-Host. In addition to the keynote speakers, the conference will include panel discussion on topics in energy finance, innovation, and policy as well as career lunches, a start-up pitch competition, and networking events.

More information at http://energyclubathbs.org/symposium/

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Harvard Igniting Innovation Summit 2017
Saturday, October 21
8:30 AM – 3:00 PM EDT
Harvard, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/harvard-igniting-innovation-summit-2017-tickets-35583192286 
Cost:  $15 – $20

The Igniting Innovation Summit unites students, academics, and leaders in the field who are passionate about developing innovative solutions to today's most pressing problems. Over the past six years, the Summit has grown from a small-scale initiative of Harvard students to a nationally recognized forum for social change.

The 8th annual Summit will explore a diverse range of topics through our keynote speeches, intimate panels on how to approach our society's most pressing issues, and an Innovation Showcase to present tangible examples of social innovation. We are proud and excited to welcome Matthew Glotzbach of Quizlet and YouTube, Shama Amalean and Siobhan Lonergan of THINX, Dr. Alaa Murabit, one of United Nations' 17 Global Sustainable Development Goals Advocates, and Tyler Gage from Runa.

In the past, attendees have enjoyed keynote addresses by Paul Rice, President & CEO of Fair Trade USA, and Rick Ridgeway, Vice President of Environmental Affairs at Patagonia. The annual Summit has been featured on Forbes.com, The Guardian UK and DoSomething.org, and has hosted guests such as David Gergen of CNN, Cheryl Dorsey of Echoing Green, and John Paul DeJoria of John Mitchell Systems and The Patron Spirits Company.

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Field Trip to Fenway Farms!
Saturday, October 21
9:45 AM – 1:00 PM EDT
Fenway Park, 4 Yawkey Way, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/field-trip-to-fenway-farms-tickets-38483023760

Join us on a Food Literacy Project-sponsored field trip to Fenway Farms! Fenway Farms is an urban agriculture site built by Green City Growers in conjunction with Fenway Park located on the roof of the ballpark. We will tour the farmsite and hear about their growing practices and food distribution, in addition to touring the rest of the ballpark and hearing some Fenway/Red Sox history.

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ENN 2017 Energy Seminar
Saturday, 21 October
1:30 PM – 6:00 PM EDT
W Boston, 100 Stuart Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.hk/e/enn-2017-energy-seminar-tickets-38220111382

The ENN Group is a diversified group of companies whose objectives are to establish modern energy systems and to improve people’s quality of life. With over twenty eight years of sustained business growth and expansion, ENN’s portfolio includes energy research, natural gas distribution, energy engineering, bio-chemicals and business that positively affect people’s daily lives such as health, culture and eco-tourism. At present, ENN employs over 40,000 people across 120 subsidiaries worldwide whose 2016 annual sales were $15.6 billion USD with assets valued at $19.0 billion USD. 
To expand our business internationally and gear to global personnel, we look forward to exchanging industrial insightsand potential ENN career opportunities with overseas talents and experts—2017 ENN Energy Seminar will be held on Oct.21st in Boston, US. 
Keynote speeches will be given by ENN experts:
World energy outlook—a focus on China
ENN powers the future of China energy
You are part of our future
If you are interested, please register for our event and we will send you the formal invitation. 

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Sunday, October 22
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Chain Reaction Contraption Construction Help Sessions
Sunday, October 15 (More dates through November 5, 2017)
2:00pm to 4:00pm
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Attention Friday After Thanksgiving [F.A.T.] teams! Want help designing your contraption for the Friday After Thanksgiving Chain Reaction Event? Have an idea but not sure how to get started? Looking for feedback on your designs? Then come to one or all three of our Sunday afternoon contraption construction building help sessions.

Not particpating in F.A.T. this year? Not a problem! Join us anyway.

October 15, October 29, November 5
2:00 - 4:00 p.m.

$10/adult and $5/youth (one parent or guardian per max 3 youth) includes Museum admission.
Pre-registration required.

Register in advance for one or all of the sessions! 

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Frédérique Apffel-Marglin: Sacred Soil, Biochar and Regeneration of the Earth
Sunday, October 22
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (Potluck 6:00-7:00 p.m. followed by discussion 7:00-9:00 p.m.)
One, Fayette Park, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Biodiversity-for-a-Livable-Climate/events/243827672/
Biodiversity for a LIvable Climate is a small non-profit so a $10 donation is requested. 

Biodiversity for a Livable Climate has a profound, even gripping, story to tell.  It is a story people want to hear because it is positive, hopeful, inspirational!  The story’s overriding message is that humans can turn the climate crisis around if we join together, roll up our sleeves, and get right to ecological restoration at the local, regional, and continental scales.  

Frédérique Apffel-Marglin is founder of the Sachamama Center for Biocultural Regeneration (http://www.centrosachamama.org/sachamamain/), and is the author of five books, the editor or co-editor of an additional eight books and the author of more than fifty five articles and book chapters. Her interests cover ritual, gender, political ecology, critiques of development, science studies and Andean-Amazonian shamanism. Her areas of specialization are South Asia and the Amazonian Andes. You may view an excellent video on her work here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=daItQZs0HSQ).

Frédérique will discuss  her latest book, co-authored with Robert Tindall and David Shearer, and a forward by Ian Baker. Sacred Soil: Biochar and the Regeneration of the Earth.  She considers the Earth as a whole system, and presents a fascinating description of how utilizing the biochar, the recently rediscovered sacred soil of the pre-Columbian peoples of the Amazon rainforest, can cut our dependency on petrochemicals, restore the health of our soils, remove carbon from our overheating atmosphere, and restore the planet to pre-industrial levels of atmospheric carbon by 2050. 

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Monday, October 23
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PAOC Colloquium: Yohai Kaspi (Weizmann Institute)
Monday, October 23
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

About the Speaker
Interests: Geophysical fluid dynamics; The general circulation of the atmosphere; Storm track dynamics; Formation of zonal jets; Dynamics on giant planet atmospheres and interiors; Exoplanet atmospheric dynamics; Geostrophic turbulence; Convection in rotating systems; Climate dynamics

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American Energy Policy: The Search for Common Ground
Monday, October 23
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

The Consortium for Energy Policy Research presents Dan Poneman, President and CEO, Centrus Energy Corp; Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Lunch is provided.

Energy Policy Seminar
https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html#fall2017

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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Remapping Knowledge Exchange: Scientific Agriculture in Sonora, Mexico and Punjab, India
Monday, October 23
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Harvard, History of Science

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/
Sandwich lunch is provided. RSVP required. 

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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Safety Nets: Rescue and Revival for Endangered Born-Digital Records
Monday, October 23
1:00pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building E-212m 30 Wadsworth Street, Cambridge

Join us for a brown bag talk with Jefferson Bailey.
The web is now firmly established as the primary communication and publication platform for sharing and accessing social and cultural materials. This networked world has created both opportunities and pitfalls for libraries and archives in their mission to preserve and provide ongoing access to knowledge. How can the affordances of the web be leveraged to drastically extend the plurality of representation in the archive? What challenges are imposed by the intrinsic ephemerality and mutability of online information? What methodological reorientations are demanded by the scale and dynamism of machine-generated cultural artifacts? This talk will explore the interplay of the web, contemporary historical records, and the programs, technologies, and approaches by which libraries and archives are working to extend their mission to preserve and provide access to the evidence of human activity in a world distinguished by the ubiquity of born-digital materials.

Jefferson Bailey is director of Web Archiving at Internet Archive. Jefferson joined Internet Archive in Summer 2014 and manages Internet Archive’s web archiving services including Archive-It, used by over 500 institutions to preserve the web. He also oversees contract and domain-scale web archiving services for national libraries and archives around the world. Read more

We will provide lunch, please bring your own drink and your questions.

Join the session on WebEx at https://libraries.mit.edu/news/safety-nets-rescue/26127/

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What to do with biomass waste in India?
Monday, October 23
5:30 p.m.
MIT Building 3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge
RSVP at https://owa.exchange.mit.edu/owa/auth/logon.aspx?replaceCurrent=1&url=https%3a%2f%2fowa.exchange.mit.edu%2fowa%2fredir.aspx%3fC%3dJ3ir_YEShKyh-jyv_ZLZuH0tiikGWI2Uzh1hOnPABQgwAHCmThLVCA..%26URL%3dhttp%253a%252f%252fweebly.us10.list-manage.com%252ftrack%252fclick%253fu%253d38ec156e716dd89f6358c27a7%2526id%253d0b8ec6d504%2526e%253def4113ca39
 
Sonal Thengane is a visiting postdoctoral researcher from the Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, where he studies the treatment and upgrading of biomass waste for fuel consumption through pelletization and gasification. He will share his perspective on biomass waste utilization in India. 

Questions? Contact trashiscash at mit.ed

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MIT Water Innovation Prize: Kick-Off Dinner
Monday, October 23
6:00pm to 9:00pm
MIT Media Lab, E14 - 6th Floor 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Save the date for the Kickoff Dinner of this year's MIT Water Innovation Prize! Come learn more about water innovation, pitch your own idea, or network to find teammates. We will hear from speakers across sectors about the world’s water challenges and new innovations to address them. Join the competition for innovation grants of up to $30,000, awarded next April 2018. More info can be found at http://mitwaterinnovation.org

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Tapping into the Fountain of Youth:  Does the key to reversing the aging process circulate within us?
Monday, October 23
6:30-8:30pm
Burden, 247 Elm Street, Somerville

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/science-by-the-pint/

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Be as a Tree Planted by the Waters:  The Magic of Roots, Leaves, and Everything in Between
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 23, 2017, 7 – 8:15 p.m.
WHERE  Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Arnold Arboretum
SPEAKER(S)  Hope Jahren, Ph.D., Center for Earth Evolution and Dynamics, University of Oslo
COST  $20 after October 15; Free-member-only through October 15
TICKET WEB LINK   https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1671&DayPlannerDate=10%2f23%2f2017
TICKET INFO  Arnold Arboretum member-only registration through October 15. Become a member at 617-384-5766.
CONTACT INFO  adulted at arnarb.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Trees are the oldest, biggest, and most successful creatures in the world. Using energy from the sun, and carbon from the air, they have thrived on land for more than four hundred million years. Hear about the amazing and unique methods that plants around us use to establish, grow, flourish, and defend themselves. Learn how plants are much more than food, medicine, and wood — they form the living, striving foundation of Planet Earth.

Hope Jahren is an award-winning scientist and the author of Lab Girl, her revelatory treatise on plant life and a celebration of the lifelong curiosity, humility, and passion that drive every scientist.
LINK  https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1671&DayPlannerDate=10%2f23%2f2017

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Tuesday, October 24
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Speaker Series: Nancy Scola – Reporting on the Tech Industry
Tuesday, October 24
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Nancy Scola is a senior technology reporter for Politico. For more than a decade, Scola has covered the intersections of technology, politics, and public policy for a variety of outlets. She has served as a tech policy reporter for The Washington Post, a tech and politics correspondent for The Atlantic, and a contributing writer at Next City. As a freelance writer, she has also contributed to Washingtonian, Reuters, and many other publications.

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Fact and Fiction: Writing Journalism, Writing Literature
WHEN Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, 2 – 3 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center (110), 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Ethics, Humanities, Lecture, Poetry/Prose, Research study, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Cosponsored by the Department of English and the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  A Writers in the Parlor conversation with Lorraine Adams, Jill Abramson, and Claire Messud
CONTACT INFO	humcentr at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Free and open to the public; seating is limited.
LINK	http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/fact-and-fiction-writing-journalism-writing-literature

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Cell-based origami: Folding tissues across length scales
Tuesday, October 24
4pm
MIT, Building 32-123, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Adam Martin

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Poland at the Crossroads between Authoritarianism and Democracy
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CES, 27 Kirkland Street Adolphus Busch Hall at Cabot Way, Cambridge
Lower Level Conference Room
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Director's Seminar
SPEAKER(S)  Jan Kubik, Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University; Monika Nalepa,
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Chicago; Karolina Wigura, Assistant Professor, Institute of Sociology, Warsaw University; Brian Porter-Szűcs, Professor of History, University of Michigan
CONTACT INFO	Roumiana Theunissen, rtheunissen at fas.harvard.edu
LINK	https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2017/10/ces-directors-seminar

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Another History of the Refugee Convention's Additional Protocol
Tuesday, October 24
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT,  Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Itty Abraham, Department of Southeast Asian Studies, National University of Singapore

Free and open to the public | Refreshments will be served
Sponsored by the Inter-University Committee on International Migration

The Inter-University Committee on International Migration
Since its establishment in 1974, the Inter-University Committee on International Migration has been a focal point for migration and refugee studies at member institutions, which include Boston University, Brandeis University, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Harvard University, MIT, Tufts University, and Wellesley College. The committee is chaired by MIT as a program of the Center for International Studies (CIS).

Migration Seminar Series
During each academic year, the Committee sponsors a seminar series on international migration, The Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration, held at MIT's Center for International Studies. The seminars explore factors affecting international population movements and their impact upon sending and receiving countries and relations among them. 

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authors at MIT: Gretchen Steidle, Leading From Within
Tuesday, October 24
6:00pm to 7:00pm
The MIT Press Bookstore 301 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

The MIT Press Bookstore presents Gretchen Ki Steidle, Founder and President of Global Grassroots, discussing her book Leading From Within, on Tuesday, October 24, at 6:00 pm at the Bookstore. This event includes a book signing. Books will be on sale at the event for 20% off, or you can purchase an event ticket that includes a discounted book.

In Leading from Within, Steidle describes the ways that personal investment in self-awareness shapes leaders who are able to inspire change in others, build stronger relationships, and design innovative and more sustainable solutions. Drawing on her own experiences, including her work helping women to found their own grassroots social ventures in post-conflict Africa, Steidle offers mindfulness practices for individuals and groups, presents the neuroscientific evidence for its benefits, and argues for its relevance to social change.

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Newton Harrison Lecture: The Time of the Force Majeure
Tuesday, October 24
6:00pm to 7:00pm
MIT, Building 32-123,  Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Visiting Artist Newton Harrison will give a public presentation tracing the eco-art movement that he and Helen Mayer Harrison pioneered and have led for more than 40 years, which uses art to address environmental problems, such as agriculture and forestry issues, watershed restoration and urban renewal, among others.

Lecture followed by a reception

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Big Data 101
Tuesday, October 24
6:00pm to 7:30pm
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Join Sandy Pentland, MIT Professor of Media Arts & Sciences, Director of the MIT Human Dynamics Laboratory, and Co-leader of the World Economic Forum Big Data & Personal Data Initiatives for an discussion on big data. What is it? Why do we use it? What makes it so powerful? Get the answers to these questions and learn more about the implications big data  holds for the future of business, health, technology and beyond. This is BIG!

Free. No pre-registration necessary
6:00 - 7:30 p.m.

This program is offered in conjunction with Big Bang Data, on view now. 

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Writers Speak: Richard Price in Conversation with Claire Messud
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, 6 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Emerson Hall 105, Harvard Yard, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Ethics, Film, Humanities, Lecture, Poetry/Prose, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Richard Price is the acclaimed author of numerous novels and screenplays. His books include Clockers (1992) Lush Life (2008) and, most recently, Whites (2015), under the pseudonym Harry Brandt. He has written many film and television scripts, including The Color of Money (1986), Clockers (1995), The Wire (2002), Freedomland (2006) and, most recently, the Emmy Award-nominated 8-part HBO series, The Night Of (2016), which tells the story of a young man accused of murder, imprisoned in New York’s Rikers Island prison while awaiting trial. Price engaged in extensive research in the writing and making of this series.
Claire Messud is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing (Fiction) in the English Department at Harvard. The author of numerous novels, most recently The Burning Girl (2017), she writes regularly for The New York Review of Books and the New York Times Book Review.
CONTACT INFO	humcentr at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Free and open to the public. Seating is limited.
LINK	http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/richard-price-conversation-claire-messud

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The Storm Before the Storm:  The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic
Tuesday, October 24
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This event is free; no tickets are required.
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome MIKE DUNCAN—creator of the award-winning podcast The History of Rome—for a discussion of his latest book, The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic.
About The Storm Before the Storm

The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. After its founding in 509 BCE, the Romans refused to allow a single leader to seize control of the state and grab absolute power. The Roman commitment to cooperative government and peaceful transfers of power was unmatched in the history of the ancient world.

But by the year 133 BCE, the republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled. Almost as soon as they had conquered the Mediterranean, Rome became engulfed in violent political conflicts and civil wars that would destroy the Republic less than a century later.

Chronicling the years 133-80 BCE, The Storm Before the Storm is a rollicking deep-dive into the bloody battles, political machinations, and human drama that defined a dangerous new political environment—a stark warning for modern readers about what happens to a civilization driven by increasing economic inequality, political polarization, and ruthless ambition.

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BU Climate Action Plan Public Forum
Tuesday, October 24
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM EDT 
BU Photonics Center - Colloquium Room, 9th Floor, 8 St Marys Street, Boston
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eej46a6e052703b3&oseq=&c=&ch=

Last fall, the Climate Action Plan Task Force was charged with developing a plan to address the University’s carbon emissions and prepare for the impacts of climate change on BU’s campuses. The Task Force invites you to attend its upcoming public forum to learn about and discuss its recommendations to the Board of Trustees.

Climate Action Plan Task Force Boston University
617-358-4000
pardee at bu.edu

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The Future of our Past, A Vision for Boston Archaeology
Tuesday, October 24
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
Old State House, 206 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-future-of-our-past-a-vision-for-boston-archaeology-tickets-37709894309

Join Joe Bagley, Boston's City Archaeologist, as he presents his bold visions for the future of Boston's City Archaeology Program. Founded in 1983, the Program has experienced recent rapid growth thanks to a robust social media presence and an engaged Boston public. Joe will discuss goals in public education partnerships, lab expansion plans, digital archaeology initiatives, and many other topics. A discussion will follow with feedback encouraged.

About the City Archeology Program
The City Archaeology Program was founded to protect Boston's irreplaceable archaeological resources. Boston is the "City of Archaeology," with hundreds of known archaeological sites within the City's borders. These archaeological sites record the Native American history of Shawmut, the name of the place we now call Boston, and tell the story of the founding of our nation.

About the Speaker
Joe Bagley joined the City Archaeology Program in 2011 as the fourth City Archaeologist since 1983. Bagley curates a growing repository of archaeological collections currently housed at the City Archaeology Laboratory at 201 Rivermoor St. in West Roxbury, acts as the review and compliance agent for below-ground cultural resources in the city, educates the public in archaeology through a number of city programs, manages Rainsford Island, and manages the Archaeology Programs social media platforms.

Joe received his Bachelor's Degree in Archaeology from Boston University and a Master’s Degree in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston. While a senior at BU he worked at the City Archaeology Lab under the previous City Archaeologist, Ellen Berkland, to analyze the Native American artifacts excavated by former City Archaeologist, Steven Pendery, on Boston Common.


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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, October 25
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MAPC [Metropolitan Area Planning Council] Fall Council Meeting
Wednesday, October 25
9:00AM - 11:30AM
Quincy Marriott, 1000 Marriott Drive, Quincy
RSVP at http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eemnx49v512cc1e2&llr=jqfo5obab

Join us in recognizing the great work individuals have done at MAPC and don't miss out on a chance to learn more about innovative mobility.

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Come Test Drive Electric Cars!
Wednesday, October 25
11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Quincy Marriott, 1000 Marriott Drive, Quincy

Co-hosted by MAPC and the Department of Energy Resources, this event will highlight the clean-air and cost-saving benefits provided by electric cars.

You are invited to attend a free Ride and Drive event on . You'll have the opportunity to learn about, view, and test drive (or ride in) an assortment of plug-in vehicles from local automobile dealers.

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Junko Habu. Jomon Food Diversity, Climate Change and Long-term Sustainability: Lessons from Prehistoric Japan
Wednesday, October 25
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Harvard, Tozzer 203, 21 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Archaeologists have long been interested in the study of long-term social change. Factors that involve specialization and centralization have been proposed as prime movers for the “development” of human societies. Contrary to these interpretations, I propose a hypothesis that diversity and decentralization may be critical for maintaining long-term sustainability of human societies. Using a case study from the Early and Middle Jomon periods (ca. 4000-2400 BC) of prehistoric Japan, this presentation emphasizes the importance of framing recent and current global environmental problems in the context of the greater human experiences.

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Liberal Entrenchment: Reordering French Grand Strategy after the Cold War
Wednesday, October 25
12:00-1:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496 Pye Room.1Amherst Street, Cambridge

Thierry Balzacq, Australian National University
France pursued a unique grand strategy, "Grandeur," from the late 1950s to 1989. However, since the end of the Cold War, converging sets of pressures have compelled France to reorient its grand strategy, one that I characterize as "Liberal entrenchment." The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare the characteristics of Grandeur and Liberal entrenchment - along three axes: theoretical bases, causal logic, and policy components; to describe how liberal entrenchment is changing how France engages the world; to assess whether it serves France's interests; and to evaluate the consequences of those choices.

Thierry Balzacq is a Visiting Fellow at the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy (APCD), at the Australian National University. In 2016, he was awarded a Francqui Research Chair (Belgium's most prestigious academic title) at the University of Namur, and elected Visiting Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

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Vice Admiral Jan Tighe: Information Warfare and the U.S. Navy
Wednesday, October 25
12:15pm - 1:30pm
Harvard, 1 Brattle Square - Suite 470, Cambridge

Please join us for a conversation with Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare and Director of Naval Intelligence, Vice Admiral Jan Tighe. Lunch will be served.*

*This event is open to the public, but seating and lunch will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

More information at http://www.belfercenter.org/index.php/events

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Why You Don’t Know Your Carbon Footprint
Wednesday, October 25
1–2 pm
HSPH, FXB Building, G-13, 651 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Ory Zik, Co-Founder & Executive Director of Greenometry will present as part of this lunch-time Sustainability Leadership Series.

Lunch provided.

About the Sustainability Leadership Series:
This fall, the Center for Health and the Global Environment in partnership with the Harvard Office for Sustainability will be hosting a 4-part Sustainability for Health Leadership Series. Beginning on October 11, and running through November 1, this speaker series will introduce attendees to pressing issues and opportunities faced by cutting-edge business leaders that navigate the intersection of industry, government, public health and sustainability. Join us to hear about the importance of making the connection between people, their health, and their surroundings.

Oct 25 - Ory Zik, Co-founder & Executive Director, Greenometry
Nov 1 - Captain Sara Newman, Director, Office of Public Health, National Park Service

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Does Neighborhood-Scale Urban Form Influence Non-Motorized Transport in China? Toward Walkable Low-Carbon Cities
Wednesday, October 25
3:30PM TO 4:45PM
Harvard, Pierce 100F, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

The Harvard-China Project hosts Guan Chenghe, Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard-China Project; Research Fellow, Harvard Graduate School of Design

China Project Seminar
https://chinaproject.harvard.edu/event/guan20171025

Co-sponsored by China Project, Harvard Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Environment in Asia Series, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

Contact Name:  Tiffany Chan
tiffanychan at seas.harvard.edu

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Are Co-Benefits Real? Interactions between Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control in China
Wednesday, October 25
4:15PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard, Littauer Building, Room L-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jing Cao, Yangqin Weng, Tsinghua University, Valerie Karplus, Minghao Qiu, and Noelle Selin, MIT

Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
https://heep.hks.harvard.edu/seminar-schedules

Co-hosted by HKS professors Robert Stavins and Martin Weitzman. Support from Enel Endowment for Environmental Economics and the Department of Economics is gratefully acknowledged.

Contact Name: Bryan Galcik
bryan_galcik at hks.harvard.edu

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The Future of Work and Welfare - A German Perspective
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Center for European Studies, 27 Kirkland Street, Adolphus Busch Hall, Hoffmann Room, at Cabot Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Center for European Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Max Neufeind, German Federal Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs; Discussant: Peter A. Hall, Krupp Foundation Professor of European Studies, Harvard University; Respondent: Katja Möhring, Assistant Professor for Sociology of the Welfare State, University of Mannheim, Germany
CONTACT INFO  Colin Brown
brown4 at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS	 Dr. Neufiend will lay out how major stakeholders in Germany are currently discussing the digital transformation, and particularly its effects on the labor market and the welfare system. He will then present the structure and key findings of a comprehensive dialogue process on the future of work and welfare, initiated by the German Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs. He will elaborate on specific challenges Germany faces based on its institutional set-up, vis-à-vis other varieties of capitalism. He concludes by describing policy options currently being discussed within the German government and public sphere, and will offer more general suggestions on how to reform the “German model” to adapt it to the digital age.
LINK  https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2017/10/the-future-of-work-and-welfare-a-german-perspective

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Dissident Speaker Series: "Nemtsov" with Vladimir Kara-Murza
Wednesday, October 25
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT,  Building 6-120, 182 Memorial Drive (rear), Cambridge

Q & A session and discussion with Vladimir Kara-Murza will follow the screening.
Nemtsov chronicles a remarkable political life. It is a story told by those who knew Boris Nemtsov at different times: when he was a young scientist and took his first steps in politics; when he held high government offices and was considered Boris Yeltsin’s heir apparent; when he led Russia’s democratic opposition to Vladimir Putin. The film contains rare archival footage, including from the Nemtsov family. Nemtsov is a portrait. It is not about death. It is about the life of a man who could have been president of Russia.

Vladimir Vladimirovich Kara-Murza is a Russian opposition politician. He serves as vice chairman of Open Russia, a NGO founded by Russian businessman and former political prisoner Mikhail Khodorkovsky, which promotes civil society and democracy in Russia. He was elected to the Coordinating Council of the Russian Opposition in 2012, and served as deputy leader of the People's Freedom Party from 2015 to 2016. Kara-Murza holds an M.A. in history from Cambridge University.

Writer and director: Vladimir V. Kara-Murza. Executive producer: Renat Davletgildeev. 66 min. Russia, 2016.

Co-sponsors:  MIT Center for International Studies, MIT Department of Linguistics and Philosophy, and MIT Russia

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MITEI Fall Colloquium: "The future of energy: Certain uncertainties"
Wednesday, October 25
4:45 PM – 6:30 PM EDT
MIT Media Lab; Room E14-674, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mitei-fall-colloquium-the-future-of-energy-certain-uncertainties-by-norman-r-augustine-tickets-38662055248

The future of energy: Certain uncertainties with Norman R. Augustine, Retired Chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin Corporation
Arguably the most difficult type of planning involves major, long-term capital investments that are surrounded by great uncertainty. Such is the case in the world of energy. Opportunities for technology breakthroughs in the production and use of energy abound; major shifts in demand seem inevitable, but vulnerabilities also thrive. It is a field of countless possibilities…especially for those who enjoy taking risks.

Speaker bio:  Norman R. Augustine attended Princeton University where he graduated with a BSE and MSE in aeronautical engineering. He has served as Under Secretary of the Army and later as Acting Secretary of the Army, chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin Corporation, and lecturer with the rank of professor on the faculty of Princeton University.
Augustine was chairman and principal officer of the American Red Cross for nine years, chairman of the National Academy of Engineering, chairman of the Aerospace Industries Association, and chairman of the Congressionally-mandated NIH Scientific Management Review Board. He served on the advisory board of the Department of Energy, as a founder of the American Energy Innovation Council, and for 16 years as a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, as well as in numerous committee and board positions.

Please note this is a public event and we will open our doors to unregistered participants 15 minutes before the event start time. To guarantee your seat, we recommend you register and arrive at least 15 minutes early. 
If you are not able to attend, note there will be a high-quality recording of this seminar made available on our YouTube channel, https://www.youtube.com/user/MITEnergyInitiative about a week following the event.

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Migration Stories: The US Visa Lottery and Global Citizenship
Wednesday, October 25
5:30pm
MIT, Building 2-105, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
 
Charles Piot: Chair and Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies at Duke University
More Togolese per capita apply for the US Diversity (Green Card) lottery than those from any other African country, with winners attempting to game the system by adding “spouses” and dependents to their dossiers.  The US consulate in Lomé knows this gaming is going on and constructs ever-more elaborate tests to attempt to decipher the authenticity of winners’ marriages and job profiles – and of their moral worth as citizens – tests that immediately circulate to those on the street.  This presentation explores the cat-and-mouse game between street and embassy, situating it within the post-Cold War conjuncture – of ongoing crisis, of an eviscerated though-still-dictatorial state, of social death and the emptiness of citizenship under such conditions, of a sprawling transnational diaspora and the desires and longings it creates, of informationalism and its new technologies, of surveillance regimes and their travails, and of the way in which mobility/immobility and sovereignty are newly entangled and co-constitutive in the contemporary moment.

The MIT Global France Seminar aims to bring together MIT faculty, instructors, and graduate students from across disciplines interested in the study of French and francophone cultures around the world. The seminar series is free and open to the public.

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Gutman Library Distinguished Author Series Event: Improving Education Together
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017, 6 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gutman Conference Center - Area 3, 6 Appian Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Gutman Library
SPEAKER(S)  Geoff Marietta, MBA’07, Ed.M.’12, Ed.D.’15
Chad d’Entremont
Emily Murphy Kaur
DETAILS	
Improving Education Together offers a step-by-step guide to Labor-Management-Community collaboration, an intervention that has successfully improved student outcomes in a wide variety of school districts across the country. The authors illustrate how a culture of collaboration between labor, management, and community stakeholders can be built using readily available tools for needs assessment, root-cause analysis, team norms, brainstorming, consensus-building, and long-term planning. Improving Education offers detailed examples of how districts across the country have successfully implemented the LMC approach, along with resources and strategies employed and lessons learned from obstacles and setbacks encountered along the way.
LINK	http://hepg.org/hep-home/books/improving-education-together

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Solar 101
Wednesday, October 25
6pm-8pm
First Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden Street, Cambridge

More information at http://sunnycambridge.org

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The Words To Say It: Teaching, Writing, and Incarceration
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017, 6 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Emerson Hall 210, Harvard Yard, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Ethics, Health Sciences, Humanities, Lecture, Poetry/Prose, Research study, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Speakers
Richard Price is the acclaimed author of numerous novels and screenplays. His books include "Clockers" (1992) "Lush Life" (2008) and, most recently, "Whites" (2015), under the pseudonym Harry Brandt. He has written many film and television scripts, including "The Color of Money" (1986), "Clockers" (1995), "The Wire" (2002), "Freedomland" (2006) and, most recently, the Emmy Award-nominated 8-part HBO series, "The Night Of" (2016), which tells the story of a young man accused of murder, imprisoned in New York’s Rikers Island prison while awaiting trial. Price engaged in extensive research in the writing and making of this series.
Edyson Julio, a writer and prison-reform educator, is currently an Urban Scholar in the Harvard School of Education Master's Program. He is a Creative Writing instructor at Rikers Island Correctional Facility, and a long-time teacher in the CASES’ high school equivalency program, teaching inmates and former inmates of Rikers Island prison. (CASES is the Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services.) He also holds an MFA in Fiction from Hunter College (CUNY).
Michelle Kuo is the author of "Reading with Patrick: A Teacher, a Student, and a Life-Changing Friendship." She currently teaches in the History, Law, and Society program at the American University of Paris on issues related to race, punishment, immigration, and the law, and has taught at San Quentin through the Prison University Project, the only college-degree granting program at a state prison in California.
Moderator
Claire Messud is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing (Fiction) in the English Department at Harvard. The author of numerous novels, most recently "The Burning Girl" (2017), she writes regularly for The New York Review of Books and the New York Times Book Review.
CONTACT INFO	humcentr at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  A discussion with novelist and Emmy-nominated screenwriter Richard Price, Harvard School of Education Urban Scholar and teacher in CASES’ HSE program Edyson Julio, and author and legal scholar Michelle Kuo, moderated by novelist Claire Messud.
Free and open to the public. Seating is limited.
LINK  http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/words-say-it-teaching-writing-and-incarceration

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Autonomous Vehicle Research at MIT with Lex Fridman
Wednesday, October 25
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Thales, 125 High Street, 3rd Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/autonomous-vehicle-research-at-mit-with-lex-fridman-tickets-38510294327

Join us to learn about the latest research on autonomous vehicles at MIT by esteemed researcher and lecturer, Lex Fridman. A more specific topic may be provided as we get closer to the event. Event organized by the Boston Self Driving Cars Meetup group.

AGENDA:
6:00p - 6:30p: Food, soft drinks, and networking
6:30p - 6:35p: Announcements and updates
6:35p - 6:45p: Brief presentation from our sponsor, Thales
6:45p - 7:45p: Autonomous Vehicle Research at MIT by Lex Fridman
7:45p - 8:00p: Networking

SPEAKER BIO:
Lex Fridman is a researcher at MIT, developing and applying new computer vision and deep learning approaches in the context of self-driving cars with a human-in-the-loop. He works with large-scale, real-world data, with the goal of building intelligent systems that have real-world impact.

Lex received his BS, MS, and PhD from Drexel University where he worked on applications of machine learning, computer vision, and decision fusion techniques in a number of fields including robotics, active authentication, activity recognition, and optimal resource allocation on multi-commodity networks.

Before joining MIT, he was at Google working on machine learning and decision fusion methods for large-scale behavior-based authentication.

Earlier this year, he taught the MIT 6.S094: Deep Learning for Self-Driving Cars course, which can be accessed at http://selfdrivingcars.mit.edu/.
His team also received the Best Paper Award (<1%) at CHI 2017 for their work on driver glances: What Can Be Predicted from Six Seconds of Driver Glances?

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I Can't Breathe: A Killing on Bay Street
Wednesday, October 25
7:00 PM (Doors at 6:30 )
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Cost:  $5 - $28.75 (online only, book included) - On Sale Now

Harvard Book Store welcomes bestselling author and journalist MATT TAIBBI for a discussion of his latest book, I Can't Breathe: A Killing on Bay Street. He will be joined in conversation by ROBIN YOUNG, the Peabody Award–winning host of NPR's Here & Now.

About I Can't Breathe
On July 17, 2014, a forty-three-year-old black man named Eric Garner died on a Staten Island sidewalk after a police officer put him in what has been described as an illegal chokehold during an arrest for selling bootleg cigarettes. The final moments of Garner’s life were captured on video and seen by millions. His agonized last words, “I can’t breathe,” became a rallying cry for the nascent Black Lives Matter protest movement. A grand jury ultimately declined to indict the officer who wrestled Garner to the pavement.

Matt Taibbi’s deeply reported retelling of these events liberates Eric Garner from the abstractions of newspaper accounts and lets us see the man in full—with all his flaws and contradictions intact. A husband and father with a complicated personal history, Garner was neither villain nor victim, but a fiercely proud individual determined to do the best he could for his family, bedeviled by bad luck, and ultimately subdued by forces beyond his control. 

In America, no miscarriage of justice exists in isolation, of course, and in I Can’t Breathe Taibbi also examines the conditions that made this tragedy possible. Featuring vivid vignettes of life on the street and inside our Kafkaesque court system, Taibbi’s kaleidoscopic account illuminates issues around policing, mass incarceration, the underground economy, and racial disparity in law enforcement. No one emerges unsullied, from the conservative district attorney who half-heartedly prosecutes the case to the progressive mayor caught between the demands of outraged activists and the foot-dragging of recalcitrant police officials. 

A masterly narrative of urban America and a scathing indictment of the perverse incentives built into our penal system, I Can’t Breathe drills down into the particulars of one case to confront us with the human cost of our broken approach to dispensing criminal justice.

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Economics for the Common Good
Wednesday, October 25
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Nobel Prize–winning economist JEAN TIROLE for a discussion of his latest book, Economics for the Common Good.

About Economics for the Common Good
When Jean Tirole won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Economics, he suddenly found himself being stopped in the street by complete strangers and asked to comment on issues of the day, no matter how distant from his own areas of research. His transformation from academic economist to public intellectual prompted him to reflect further on the role economists and their discipline play in society. The result is Economics for the Common Good, a passionate manifesto for a world in which economics, far from being a "dismal science," is a positive force for the common good.
Economists are rewarded for writing technical papers in scholarly journals, not joining in public debates. But Tirole says we urgently need economists to engage with the many challenges facing society, helping to identify our key objectives and the tools needed to meet them.

To show how economics can help us realize the common good, Tirole shares his insights on a broad array of questions affecting our everyday lives and the future of our society, including global warming, unemployment, the post-2008 global financial order, the euro crisis, the digital revolution, innovation, and the proper balance between the free market and regulation.

Providing a rich account of how economics can benefit everyone, Economics for the Common Good sets a new agenda for the role of economics in society.

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The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the World
Wednesday October 2
7:00 pm
Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Street, Brookline 


New York Times bestselling author and neuroscientist David Eagleman teams up with composer Anthony Brandt in this powerful, wide-ranging exploration of human creativity. Together, they incisively explore how individuals, organizations, and educational institutions can benefit from fostering creativity, while celebrating humanity’s unique ability to remake the world.

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Here Comes the Sun: Harnessing the power of renewable energy
Wednesday, October 25
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Building Boston 2030 Series: Is Climate Change Flooding Boston's Future?
Wednesday, October 25
7:45 AM – 9:45 AM EDT
Modern Theatre at Suffolk University, 525 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/building-boston-2030-series-is-climate-change-flooding-bostons-future-tickets-38332255809

According to the Climate Ready Boston Report, Boston has experienced 21 weather-related events that have triggered federal or state disaster declarations since 1991. How does climate change affect Boston’s future? Come and explore with experts the future impact of extreme heat, stormwater flooding, as well as coastal and riverine flooding for greater Boston.

Co-sponsored by the Greater Boston Real Estate Board and the Center for Real Estate at Suffolk University.

Panelists:
Bill Golden, National Institute for Coastal & Harbor Infrastructure
Kathy Abbott, President & CEO, Boston Harbor Now
Additional Panelists to be announced shortly!
Moderated by: Peter Howe, Denterlein

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Thursday, October 26
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Housatonic river cleanup: 20+ years
Thursday, October 26
12:00-1:00pm
Tufts, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Jim Murphy, Leader of the Intergovernmental Relations and Community Involvement Team, Environmental Protection Agency
From 1932 through 1977, General Electric manufactured and serviced electrical transformers containing toxic, now banned, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Industrial chemical use and improper disposal led to extensive contamination around Pittsfield, MA as well as down the entire length of the Housatonic River, which runs from Massachussets to the Long Island Sound. After decades of cleaning efforts, EPA issued a $613 million Proposed Cleanup Plan in 2014 requiring GE to excavate most of the contaminated soil and transport it to an approved out of state location. This has resulting in an ongoing dispute between EPA and GE.

Jim Murphy is currently the Leader of the Intergovernmental Relations and Community
Involvement Team at EPA’s New England regional office in Boston. Over the past 20 years, Jim has worked on more than 70 Superfund and Emergency Response sites across New England including the GE-Pittsfield Housatonic River Site in western Massachusetts. Prior to coming to EPA in 1997, Jim directed the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program at a Boston area non-profit for eight years and served as Chair of the Massachusetts Energy Directors’ Association. He worked as a civil rights and community organizer in North Carolina for five years during the 1970s, as director of the Connecticut Council of Senior Citizens, and as a congressional staff member for U.S. Congressman Bruce Morrison in New Haven, CT during the 1980s.

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Power through Influence: Understanding Great Power Competition in the Contemporary World
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, One Brattle Square, Room 350, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	International Security Program
SPEAKER(S)  Mathias Ormestad Frendem, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Security Program
CONTACT INFO	susan_lynch at harvard.edu
LINK	https://www.belfercenter.org/event/power-through-influence-understanding-great-power-competition-contemporary-world

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Colorado’s Low-Income Community Solar Demonstration Project
Thursday, October 26
1-2:15pm ET
Webinar
RSVP at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/186218072689457409 

In 2015, the Colorado Energy Office launched the Low-Income Community Solar Demonstration Project to develop community solar projects for low-income residents. The project provides over 1 MW of electricity and serves over 300 low-income Coloradans. On this webinar, representatives from the Colorado Energy Office, Lotus Engineering and Sustainability, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Solar Technical Assistance Team (STAT) will describe and evaluate the Low-Income Community Solar Demonstration Project.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

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A Brief History on the Last 20 years of Educational Data Mining: A Personal Perspective
Thursday, October 26
2:50pm - 4:00pm
Tufts, Halligan 102, 161 College Avenue, Medford

Speaker: Neil Heffernan, WPI
Abstract
Personalizing education has emerged as a popular topic in recent years. Mark Zuckerberg's foundation, for instance, is devoting large sums of money toward incorporating personalized instruction and pacing into the educational experience. Intuitively, if a human or computer instructor thinks that a student knows a particular topic, then the student should be allowed to progress to learn new topics. The question here then becomes how this estimation of knowledge is made. How can researchers, developers, and administrators operationalize student knowledge (i.e. the ‘if a student knows a particular topic' aspect of the problem)? The field of educational data mining, including a large society of over 200 scientists, has focused on this problem for the last 20+ years. The field now has a thriving journal and an annual conference that has just met for its 10th consecutive year. In 2010, the KDD Cup Competition raised a great deal of interest in predicting student knowledge as individuals and teams competed to win prizes over whose algorithms could best predict what is now termed “Next Problem Correctness” (NPC); given a student history of problem correctness over time, the task is to predict whether the student will answer the next problem correctly. In the past decade, a large number of papers have explored how best to do this prediction using a variety of techniques including Random Forests, Bayesian Networks, Logistic Regression-based techniques, and several others. Some of these approaches have even attempted to personalize the predictions, investigating the use of techniques such as clustering or through learning individualized latent attributes such as prior knowledge and learning rates. Most recently, Deep Learning techniques have been applied to the task as well. In this talk I will give a personal history of this research area with which I have remained actively involved. I will talk about what we have learned as a field, and I will also discuss what I believe the new agenda needs to be, as predicting NPC has serious limitations and has waned in its usefulness to the field. In particular, I suggest that the EDM community needs to focus on how to act to benefit students in a personalized manner; if ‘personalization’ means anything, a system should be able to decide what to give each student (i.e. what assistance to provide) to most benefit that student. Toward achieving this goal, we, as a field, need to run Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) that compare different instructional messages and analyze them with the latest state-of-the-art techniques to determine which types of instruction work best for each individual student. I will talk about a recent attempt my graduate student and I have made to apply Deep Learning to predict the results of 22 experiments conducted inside of ASSISTments, a web-based tutoring system used by 50,000 kids to do their homework. Lastly, I will end with shared conversation about how we are further using reinforcement learning (i.e. bandit algorithms) to attack these problems. While accurate predictions are presumably an important step toward doing so, I will posit that if our field is going to achieve our lofty goals we will need to not just PREDICT but to take ACTION.

Bio
Since 2002 Neil Heffernan has been a Professor at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in the Computer Science Department. He taught middle school math and science in the Teach for America program in Baltimore where he met his soon to be be spouse, Cristina. When he got into CMU's PhD program in computer science he knew he would be building educational technology to help school teachers. Cristina and Neil created the ASSISTments, a platform used by 50,000 across the United States for daily classwork and nightly homework. In 1997 he had a seizure and was told he had brain cancer and only had 2-3 years to live; this helped motivate giving away this platform as a free public service. In October of 2016 an objective independent research organization, SRI International, published a peer-review journal article reporting that ASSISTments caused students to learn 75% more on a standardized test of math achievement, compared to what they would have learned in a typical school year. In December of 2016 Cristina and Neil were invited to present at the White House on ASSISTments. Neil has written 60+ papers on learner analytics (using data to predict some outcome in education) and over two dozens papers reporting the results on randomized controlled trials. Neil served as Program Chair for AIED 2015. For the AIED society Neil wants to make sure we have an inclusive society open to all forms of research on smarter educational software. Despite AIED's name, "Where is the AI?" is not a useful criterion in reviewing papers. Alternatively he asks "Can this research help make smarter, more effective experiences for teachers and children?"

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FOODTECH CONNECT 2017
Thursday, October 26
2:59 PM - 8:30 PM
Venture Cafe at Cambridge Innovation Center, 5th floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge

Save the date for Venture Cafe’s FoodTech Connect mini-conference, “Boston’s Recipe for Food Innovation”, taking place on October 26, 2017. Come prepared to not only hear the best ideas and see the latest technologies but also to participate in building Boston’s food & beverage innovation.

Please visit http://vencaf.org/foodtechconnect/ for opportunities to participate and additional details about this event.

About Venture Café Kendall
Venture Café opens its doors to the entrepreneurial, innovation, and creative communities around Greater Boston every Thursday. Mix and mingle with fellow entrepreneurs, find serendipitous connections, get advice and feedback during office hours, and attend entrepreneurship- and innovation-focused events.

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Biological Engineering Seminar:  Bringing Bioelectricity to Light
Thursday, October 26
4:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, Building 32-141, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Adam E. Cohen, Harvard University  

For more information about this event, please contact:
617-253-1712 or be-acad at mit.edu

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Cloud Policy: Anatomy of a Regulatory Crisis
Thursday, October 26
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
MIT, Building 56-114, Access via 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Jennifer Holt, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara
Jennifer Holt examines the legal and cultural crises surrounding the regulation of data in “the cloud.” The complex landscape of laws and policies governing digital data are currently rife with unresolvable conflicts. The challenges of distributing and protecting digital data in a policy landscape that is simultaneously local, national, and global have created problems that often defy legal paradigms, national boundaries, and traditional geographies of control. She examines these challenges with an eye towards their shared histories with obscene phone calls, wiretapping organized crime figures, the PATRIOT Act, Facebook, and the battles over net neutrality. Ultimately, these intertwined histories of policies related to privacy, data security, and digital freedoms become most instructive when they are brought to bear on the current regulatory crisis, revealing the growing stakes for the digital futures of culture, information, and citizenship.

Jennifer Holt is Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of Empires of Entertainment and co-editor of Distribution Revolution; Connected Viewing; and Media Industries: History, Theory, Method. She is currently writing a monograph about the history of US digital media policies. She is also a co-founder of the Media Industries journal.

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Boston Energy Mixer
Thursday, October 26
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
MIT, Forbes Family Café, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP athttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-energy-mixer-tickets-38477596527

The Boston Energy Mixer is a great chance to meet fellow undergraduates in energy clubs at other schools across the Boston area. Come to network and discuss the status of energy in the US and in the world.

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A Brief History of Environmental Successes
Thursday, October 26
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Simons IMAX Theatre New England Aquarium, One Aquarium Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=107286&view=Detail

Susan Solomon, Ph.D., Lee and Geraldine Martin Professor of Environmental Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
This is the seventh annual John H. Carlson Lecture, presented by Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lorenz Center and the New England Aquarium.

Humans have faced a series of national and global environmental challenges in the past half-century, including smog, the use of lead in gasoline, ozone depletion, and many others. Dr. Susan Solomon reveals how combinations of science, public policy, industry participation, and the engagement of citizens succeeded in addressing past environmental challenges. Solomon also probes how the lessons learned help us understand how to better manage today’s environmental problems, including climate change.

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Raising Resilience: The Wisdom and Science of Happy Families and Thriving Children
Thursday, October 26
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge
 
In every spiritual tradition, we find teachings on the virtues and qualities that we most want to pass on to our kids--such as generosity, kindness, honesty, determination, and patience. Today, a growing body of research from neuroscience and social psychology supports these teachings, offering insights into cultivating these virtues in ourselves and in our families. Raising Resilience is a practical guide for parents and educators of children from preschool through adolescence, detailing ten universal principles for happy families and thriving children.

Bridging the latest science with Eastern wisdom to explore ourselves and share with our children, Dr. Christopher Willard offers a wealth of teachings on:
Getting through Giving--the many types of generosity we can model for kids, and the fascinating new findings on the power of giving:
Why Doing the Right Thing Is the Right Thing to Do--living in harmony with oneself, one's family, and one's community
Less is More Parenting--how letting go of what's no longer necessary creates space, freedom, and the possibility for something new
Building a Wiser Brain--three types of wisdom and how to steer kids' "under-construction" minds toward wise action
Even the Buddha Had Helicopter Parents--releasing anxiety about over- or under-parenting and the desire for the "perfect" family
The Buddha and the Marshmallow--patience in spirituality and science, including practices to strengthen patience in yourself and your children
What Sets Us Free--how truthfulness and honest behavior create safety and freedom for everyone
Growing Up with a Grit and Growth Mindset--the best ways to encourage resilience and determination through reinforcing and rewarding the "growth mindset"
The Kindness Contagion--cultivating lovingkindness, compassion, and empathy
Finding Balance in a Broken World and Staying Steady through the Stress--how to abide life's inevitable ups and downs through the attitude of equanimity

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Data Provenance: From Theory to Practice
Thursday, October 26
7:00pm to 9:00pm
MIT, Building 32-G449: Kiva conference room, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

There seems to be wide spread agreement that data provenance, the history of how a digital artifact came to be in its present state, is important.  There also seems to be a great deal of activity in the research community about data provenance: how to collect it, how to represent it, how to store it, and how to query it. Given this apparent meeting of he minds, why then do we not have seamlessly integrated provenance systems? I'll present a brief, and undoubtedly biased, history of what the research community has been up to in this domain and then talk about the obstacles to wide spread adoption. Finally, I'll wrap up with some suggestions about how we might
bring theory and practice closer together in this important domain.

Margo I. Seltzer is Herchel Smith Professor of Computer Science and the Faculty Director for the Center for Research on Computation and Society in Harvard's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Her research interests are in systems, construed quite broadly: systems for capturing and accessing provenance, file systems, databases, transaction processing systems, storage and analysis of graph-structured data, new architectures for parallelizing execution, and systems that apply technology to problems in healthcare.

She is the author of several widely-used software packages including
database and transaction libraries and the 4.4BSD log-structured file
system. Dr. Seltzer was a founder and CTO of Sleepycat Software, the makers of Berkeley DB, and is now an Architect at Oracle Corporation. She was the USENIX representative to the Computing Research Association Board of Directors and a past President of the USENIX Association. She is a Sloan Foundation Fellow in Computer Science, an ACM Fellow, a Bunting Fellow, and was the recipient of the 1996 Radcliffe Junior Faculty Fellowship. She is recognized as an outstanding teacher and mentor, having received the Phi Beta Kappa teaching award in 1996, the Abrahmson Teaching Award in 1999,
and the Capers and Marion McDonald Award for Excellence in Mentoring and Advising in 2010.

Dr. Seltzer received an A.B. degree in Applied Mathematics from
Harvard/Radcliffe College in 1983 and a Ph. D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1992.

This joint meeting of the Boston Chapter of the IEEE Computer Society and GBC/ACM will be held in MIT Room 32-G449 (the Kiva conference room on the 4th floor of the Stata Center, buildng 32 on MIT maps) .  You can see it on this map of the MIT campus.

Up-to-date information about this and other talks is available online at http://ewh.ieee.org/r1/boston/computer/. You can sign up to receive updated status information about this talk and informational emails about future talks at http://mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/ieee-cs, our self-administered mailing list.

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Friday, October 27,7:00 PM – Saturday, October 28, 5:00 PM
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Disrupting the Human Trafficking-Migration Nexus Workshop
Friday, October 27,7:00 PM – Saturday, October 28, 5:00 PM EDT
Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, 121 Bay State Road, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/disrupting-the-human-trafficking-migration-nexus-workshop-tickets-35728194993

On October 27-28, FMHT will host a EU Jean Monnet Erasmus + funded interactive innovative workshop, titled Disrupting the Human Trafficking-Migration Nexus.
This workshop seeks to investigate human trafficking within a broader migration framework and propose innovative solutions to disrupt trafficking and prevent humanitarian and labour right violations. We will address this from multiple perspectives, including policy, activism, and research.

By bringing together academics, practitioners, local, national, and regional policymakers, NGOs, advocates, students, first person observers, and survivors, we are interested in convening to discuss the convergence of trafficking and migration, with a particular focus on innovation that disrupts exploitation markets of vulnerable and displaced refugees.

Prospective attendees include notable representatives from: UNHCR, UNICEF, Council of Europe (GRETA), Microsoft, MSF, ICMPD, and the IOM - in addition to academics, human rights lawyers, students, and local practitioners from the Boston area.
Broadly, the structure of the conference will be centered upon three themes:
Legal Challenges – Prevention, Prosecution, and Protection
Private Sector Solutions – Combatting Human Trafficking with Data Analytics and Disruptive Technologies
Exploring the Intersectionality of Human Trafficking and Migration – Recommendations for Future Policy & Research

In addition to the core roundtable discussions, there will be breakout panels featuring a variety of presentations, papers, technological solutions, and innovative approaches. The FMHT Initiative will publish the contributions in two formats: a conference policy report and an academic symposium publication.

For more information please go to http://mailchi.mp/86f30c047faf/disrupting-the-human-trafficking-migration-nexus-workshop-1008909

In addition to the European Commission, our co-sponsors include: The Center for the Study of Europe, African Studies Center, Institute for the Study of Muslim Societies and Civilizations, Institute on Culture, Religion & World Affairs at Boston University (CURA), Initiative on Cities (IOC), BUzz Lab, Elie Wiesel Center for Jewish Studies, Global Programs, and the Boston Consortium for Arab Regional Studies (BCARS).

Please save the date and join us on October 27-28, 2017.

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Friday, October 27
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2017 AAPI Civil Rights Forum
Friday, October 27
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM EDT
Federal Reserve Plaza, 600 Atlantic Avenue, Boston
RSV at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-aapi-civil-rights-forum-tickets-32144795950

The annual Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) Civil Rights Forum aims to advance the presence of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the Northeastern region, both in numbers and in prominence. To achieve this mission, this forum will provide the community with a broad range of learning experiences towards advancing AAPI civil rights and liberties, which are often overlooked within the national narrative. Additionally, this forum aims to foster a network of advocates who will work together to raise awareness and further the interests of the AAPI community.

We welcome you to join us in an open discussion of Asian American and Pacific Islanders’ civil rights with resource speakers.
Registration ends on 10/13 @ 11:59pm.

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Contagion: Exploring Modern Epidemics
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 27, 2017, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Health Sciences, Lecture, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Epidemic disease spreads quickly in our interconnected, globalized world. This symposium looks at new ways of tracking epidemics using big data and social networks to predict and stem the rise of emergent diseases.
From Ebola to SARS to the more recently recognized social epidemics of the opioid crisis and gun violence, this event assembles epidemiologists, journalists, physicians, public officials, scientists, and sociologists to discuss their cutting-edge research, prediction mechanisms, and possible solutions to the range of epidemics that face our world today. Please register online and join us.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2017-contagion-symposium

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Now for a Look at the Weather Where You Are
Friday, October 27
5:00pm to 6:30pm
MIT,  Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Dana Tomlin
We live in a world where much of what we know about things is affected by the manner in which those things are represented in digital form.  In fact, our interaction with that world itself in increasingly influenced by the manner in which it is seen through through the eyes of geospatial technology.  Most of this technology still casts the world in terms of maps, and much of it does so by mapping “where” for each of a set of “whats.”  The less common alternative to this feature-oriented view is a field-oriented perspective that maps “what” for each of a set of “wheres.”  From this perspective, the presence of discrete objects is regarded as a quality of the space(s) they occupy, a quality not unlike distance, direction, density, intensity, likelihood, magnitude, or anything else that might vary continuously from one location to another.  While that degree of generality can make it possible to address a broader range of spatial phenomena than might otherwise be possible, it can also demand a broader conceptual attitude toward those phenomena.  The purpose of this presentation will be to describe and encourage that attitude.

Dana Tomlin has managed to avoid real work for several decades now by instead pursuing a hobby that was first acquired as a graduate student here in Cambridge and which has since been sustained by professorships at Harvard, Yale, Penn, and Ohio State.  As designer of one of the earliest geographic information systems and originator of the Map Algebra language that is embodied in much of today’s image-processing software, Tomlin has long been an active player in this field.

MIT Department of Architecture / Fall 2017 Lecture Series
Organized by Moa Carlsson, PhD Candidate, Design & Computation Group at MIT, MIT Department of Architecture

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What literature can do: Literature, shame and politics
Friday, October 27
5:30pm to 7:00pm
MIT,  Building 2-105, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Édouard Louis, author
Is literature a tool to expand our awareness and challenge society?
Or does it reinforce the existing social order and its violence?

Édouard Louis was born and raised in the town of Hallencourt in the North of France, which is the setting of his first novel En finir avec Eddy Bellegueule(published in English as The End of Eddy). His work deals with class, sexuality and violence. His two first novels were translated into more than 25 languages. He is also the editor of a scholarly work on the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, and the coauthor, with the philosopher Geoffroy de Lagasnerie, of “Manifesto for an Intellectual and Political Counteroffensive”, published in English by the Los Angeles Review of Books.

The MIT Global France Seminar aims to bring together MIT faculty, instructors, and graduate students from across disciplines interested in the study of French and francophone cultures around the world. The seminar series is free and open to the public.k

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X-Position with Vadim Bolshakov: The Panic Lab
Friday, October 27
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard Science Center Hall E, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/x-position-with-vadim-bolshakov-the-panic-lab-tickets-38541436474

Do you love a good fright? Or, do you hide under the covers at night? What makes us love scary movies and haunted houses, and on the other hand, get a “sinking feeling” or a “skin-crawling sensation” that makes you want to turn tail and run?
 
Neuroscientist Dr. Vadim Bolshakov has dedicated his career to studying the mechanisms of fear. Join us as he guides us through the science behind his work and the exhilarating and horrifying feeling of FEAR.

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Saturday, October 28
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Peoples' History Walking Tour of Boston
Saturday, October 28
9:30 am
Suffolk University, Amenities Room, 73 Tremont Street, Boston

Please join the Labor Resource Center at UMASS Boston for the first James Green Memorial Lecture, featuring Patricia Reeve, to be followed by the kick-off of the walking tour.

Using James Green's "A Working People's Heritage Trail" (2001) as a point of departure, historian Cristina Groeger (Harvard, PhD) created "The People's History Walking Tour of Boston" by identifying and researching important sites, writing their histories, and putting her tour on-line so friends of labor can now follow along using their smartphones.

The event will begin with the first James Green Memorial Lecture.  Patricia Reeve, a professor of history at Suffolk University, will talk about the relationship between history and the labor movement, what it means to be an activist-public historian, and reflect on various paths forward for history and the labor movement. Professor Cristina Groeger will then discuss the making of the "Peoples' History Walking Tour of Boston."

People's History Walking Tour https://peopleshistoryboston.wordpress.com/

If you have any questions, please contact Wally Soper at Wally.Soper at umb.edu 

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Boston Bookfest
Saturday, October 28
10am - 5pm
Copley Square, Boston

More information at https://bostonbookfest.org

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The Student Media Innovation Conference
Saturday, October 28

Where is student media headed in the digital age? How are campus publications and broadcast engaging new audiences? How are student media telling stories that lack coverage from mainstream press? 

More information at http://www.storybench.org/studentmi/

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The Green Arts Expo '17
Saturday, October 28
12pm - 4pm
Pozen Center of the Arts, 621 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Join the Green Arts Network for their third annual Green Arts Expo! The Pozen Center will come alive with artists, social justice interest groups, free samples of eco-friendly art supply products, music, and food from sustainable sources. 

This event is FREE and open to the public! 

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Sunday, October 29
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Be the Change Community Action: Economic Justice
Sunday, October 29
3:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Join Cambridge-Somerville for Change for a presentation and discussion on economic justice and Raise Up. 

Learn more about Be the Change at http://www.portersquarebooks.com/announcing-be-change

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What I Found in a Thousand Towns:  A Traveling Musician’s Guide to Rebuilding America’s Communities—One Coffee Shop, Dog Run, and Open-Mike Night at a Time
Sunday, October 29
4:00 PM
Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge
Cost:  $5 - $28.00 (online only, book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes folk musician, composer, and social justice advocate DAR WILLIAMS for a discussion of her latest book, What I Found in a Thousand Towns: A Traveling Musician’s Guide to Rebuilding America’s Communities—One Coffee Shop, Dog Run, and Open-Mike Night at a Time. This event, taking place at the Brattle Theatre, is co-sponsored by Harvard Square's Club Passim.
About What I Found in a Thousand Towns

A beloved folk singer presents an impassioned account of the fall and rise of the small American towns she cherishes.

Dubbed by the New Yorker as "one of America's very best singer-songwriters," Dar Williams has made her career not in stadiums, but touring America's small towns. She has played their venues, composed in their coffee shops, and drunk in their bars. She has seen these communities struggle, but also seen them thrive in the face of postindustrial identity crises.

Here, Williams muses on why some towns flourish while others fail, examining elements from the significance of history and nature to the uniting power of public spaces and food. Drawing on her own travels and the work of urban theorists, Williams offers real solutions to rebuild declining communities.

What I Found in a Thousand Towns is more than a love letter to America's small towns, it's a deeply personal and hopeful message about the potential of America's lively and resilient communities.

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Monday, October 30 – Tuesday, October 31
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MIT Legal Forum on AI & Blockchain
Monday, October 30, 8:30 AM – Tuesday, October 31, 4:00 PM EDT
MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-legal-forum-on-ai-blockchain-tickets-37953670450

About the Event: The inaugural MIT Legal Forum on AI & Blockchain mission is to provide a forum for legal scholars, practitioners, technologists and business professionals to (A) discuss the current and likely future impact of AI and blockchain technologies on the law, and (B) develop an initial framework for the evaluation, prioritization and practical application of AI and blockchain technologies to the law.

Register through this EventBrite page to receive email invitations with links to live streams and Twitter hashtags for plenary sessions and panel discussions of the MIT Legal Forum. To be a full online or in-person conference contributor in MIT Legal Forum breakout groups, workshops, learning sessions and other activities request an invitation through this Google Form: https://goo.gl/forms/unO3Do94Mi04bItH2

For more information on Legal Forum speakers, topics and activities check out: http://MITLegalForum.org

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Monday, October 30
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PAOC Colloquium: Nathan Steiger (LDEO)
Monday, October 30
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923,21 Ames Street, Cambridge

About the Speaker
Nathan John Steiger is a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellow at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. His work engages the fundamental problem of understanding the historical variability of the climate system and its relevance to human societies. In particular, he conducts research on the physical mechanisms of severe droughts as well as Arctic and Antarctic climate variability.

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HouseZero: A First-of-its-kind, Ultra-efficient Retrofit
Monday, October 30
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Ali Malkawi, Professor of Architectural Technology and Founding Director of the Harvard Center for Green Buildings and Cities. 

Energy Policy Seminar
https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html#fall2017

Lunch is provided.

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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How Much Poison is Too Much? Calculating Hazard in International Nutrition Programs and Commodity Trade
Monday, October 30
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Lucas Mueller (MIT HASTS).

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunch is provided. RSVP required. 

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

sts at hks.harvard.edu

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Responsive Science:  A Path towards faster, safer, community-guided research
Monday, October 30
4pm
MIT, Building E51, Wong Auditorium, Tang Center, 2 Amherst Street, (70 Memorial Drive), Cambridge

Kevin Esvelt, Leading Sculpting Evolution Group, Assistant Professor, MIT Media Lab

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The Decline of International and European Rule of Law
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 30, 2017, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Center for European Studies, 27 Kirkland Street, Hoffmann Room, Adolphus Busch Hall at Cabot Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Center for European Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Georg Nolte
Chairman UN's International Law Commission; Chair: José Manuel Martinez Sierra
Jean Monnet ad Personam Professor in EU Law and Government;
CONTACT INFO	José Manuel Martinez Sierra
jose_martinez at harvard.edu
LINK	https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2017/10/the-decline-of-the-international-and-european-rule-of-law

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Tuesday, October 31
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Short stories in genomics and environmental health: Bernardo Lemos, PhD, Assistant Professor of Environmental Epigenetics, MIPS, HSPH
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, 9:30 – 10:30 a.m.
WHERE  HSPH Bldg I, Rm 1302, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston

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Waste Alliance Lecture Series: Sanergy
Tuesday, October 31
3:00pm
MIT, E40-163, Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, One Amherst Street, Cambridge

David Auerbach is a co-founder of Sanergy, a social enterprise incubated at MIT and then launched in Nairobi, Kenya in 2011. Sanergy provides safe sanitation services for residents of urban slums and quality agricultural inputs for farmers. David will be visiting from Nairobi, and so come hear Sanergy's founding story, updates on its growth, future plans, and their opportunities for students! 

Want to learn more? Check them out at saner.gy

This event is brought to you by the MIT Waste Alliance and the Sloan Entrepreneurs for International Development (SEID), with support from the GSC Funding Board. 

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"Said Negro has been guilty of theft and many misdemeanors”: Fugitive Slave Advertisements as Imperial Infrastructure in late Eighteenth- and early Nineteenth-Century Canada and Jamaica”
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Seminar on Cultural Politics, Chair: Professor Panagiotis Roilos
SPEAKER(S)  Charmaine A. Nelson, William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Canada Program. Professor of Art History, Department of Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
CONTACT INFO	Ilana Freedman (ifreedman at g.harvard.edu)
DETAILS  Found throughout the Transatlantic World, fugitive slave advertisements demonstrate the ubiquity of African resistance to slavery. Produced by white slave owners seeking to recapture their runaways, standardized icons of enslaved males and females became a staple of such print advertisements. However, the more complex textual descriptions were also fundamentally visual and arguably comprise an archive of unauthorized “portraits” that have sadly come to stand as “the most detailed descriptions of the bodies of enslaved African Americans available.” (Graham White and Shane White, 1995, p. 49). Besides noting things like names, speech, accents, language, and skills, fugitive notices frequently recounted the dress (hairstyles, adornment, clothing etc.), branding, scarification, mannerisms, physical habits, and even the gestures and expressions of runaways. Recalling fugitive slave advertisements as a form of visual culture, this paper positions them as one part of the colonial infrastructure and network (including slave owners, printers, and jailers) that sustained the racialized distinction between free and unfree populations. This paper shall also highlight the ways in which the advertisements inadvertently disclosed the ingenuity, persistence, bravery, and intelligence of the enslaved and the brutality and callousness of the enslavers; an unintended consequence which in time would be taken up by abolitionists and used against the slave owning classes.
LINK	https://wcfia.harvard.edu/event/cultural-politics-seminar-9-14-17

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Opportunity
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Greenfest Looking for Volunteers

10th Annual Boston GreenFest will be at Boston City Hall Plaza, August 11-13, 2017.  It is the largest multicultural environmental music festival in the region featuring lots of local and international exhibits, performances, films, food, fashion and forums.  Our goal is to educate and empower people to create a more sustainable, healthier world. We are actively building an interconnected, ever expanding network throughout our neighborhoods, city and region.  From business to nonprofit, neighborhood association to academic institution, Boston GreenFest spans age, culture and industry.   Celebrating our 10th anniversary, Boston GreenFest is excited to bring this wonderful free three-day festival to Boston City Hall Plaza as it is transformed into a fun interactive community classroom.  

We are looking for volunteers to help throughout the weekend.

Please visit:  http://www.bostongreenfest.org/

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New Climate CoLab Contests:
Adaptation
Buildings
Carbon Pricing
Energy Supply
Land Use Change
Shifting Attitudes & Behaviors
Transportation

More information at https://www.climatecolab.org/

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Discounted Solar for Somerville

As part of the State’s Solarize Mass program, local volunteers and the City of Somerville recently launched the Solarize Somerville campaign to make it easier and cheaper for residents and small businesses to install solar panels.

The program, which is offering information and guidance, free site consultations, and solar panel discounts through November, has set an ambitious goal to inspire at least 200 property owners to sign up for solar —and each of those private solar installations will also benefit the community directly. For every 400 kW in signed private contracts through the program, the program’s solar vendor SolarFlair will donate a system of up to 5 kW for a public or community purpose. All are invited to the program kickoff at a Meet the Installer event on Tuesday, July 26 at 6-7:30 p.m., 167 Holland St. Additional events on topics such as solar basics, financing, and solar for multifamily homes will be announced.

Unique to the program is its neighbor-to-neighbor approach: trained resident volunteers and a designated volunteer Solar Coach are available essentially as mentors. They can, for example, walk anyone through the process, provide general loan program and tax incentive information, and share their own solar experiences. The campaign’s webpage and blog offers useful information, tips, and a link to websites where you can estimate the solar potential of your home and roughly calculate how much solar could save you on your energy bills at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize.

Somerville is one of the most urban communities ever to participate in Solarize Mass, which makes the neighbor-to-neighbor approach especially helpful due to some of the unique challenges here such as multi-family houses with more than one owner. Winter Hill resident Mary Mangan, the program’s volunteer Solar Coach, went through that process and is ready to share helpful tips.

"I'm excited to work with our eager volunteers to help our neighbors understand the benefits of solar power. As a co-owner of a two-family home with solar, I can also offer some insights about how that process went for us," said Mangan.

Also key to the program is the selection of a designated vendor, which allows the program to offer reduced cost installation through bulk purchasing. Through a competitive process, SolarFlair, based in Ashland, MA, was selected. They were also the selected installer for the communities of Arlington, Hopkinton, Mendon, Brookline, Carlisle-Chelmsford, Newton, and Quincy.

"We're excited to be the selected installer for Solarize Somerville, and look forward to speaking with any home or business owners that are interested in reducing their electric bills while also making a great investment," said Matt Arner, the owner and President of SolarFlair.

Quick facts:
Solar systems can be purchased outright (with a payback of about 4-5 years). The Mass Solar Loan program offers rates of 3.25% or less. 
Or, for no money down owners can choose a power purchase agreement (PPA), where the system is owned and maintained by a third party, and residents buy back the electricity at a discounted price.   
More on-site renewable energy is critical to reducing carbon emissions.  It also saves money for residents.

Tax incentives for solar installations include:
Federal Tax Credit: A 30 percent federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is available for qualified residential and commercial projects
Massachusetts Personal Income Tax Credit: The lesser of 15% of the total cost of the solar electric system or $1,000, for qualified clean energy projects
Five-year Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS): Business owners can depreciate solar electric systems over a five-year schedule

For more information or to sign up for a free site consultation:

Visit the Solarize Somerville webpage at www.somervillema.gov/sustainaville/solarize for
Helpful information and FAQs
To contact a volunteer or Solar Coach Mary Mangan to discuss solar options and incentives
To set up an appointment for a free site consultation directly with SolarFlair
To find out about events
To volunteer for Solarize Somerville

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://somervilleyogurtmakingcoop.wordpress.com

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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"Greening Our Grid" Report Released April 24, 2017

MAPC is excited to announce the release of “Greening Our Grid,” a fact sheet and a case study detailing MAPC’s strategy to use municipal aggregation to help build new renewable energy in New England. 

“Greening Our Grid” highlights MAPC's work with the City of Melrose as a case study for MAPC's innovative green municipal aggregation strategy. Melrose recently completed its first year of implementation. The city’s results demonstrate that economic and environmental goals can be met simultaneously, and provide a compelling example for others to follow. 

The case study and fact sheet further describe the renewable energy strategy overall, why it can have a real impact on our electricity grid, and MAPC’s program to help other municipalities follow Melrose's lead. Arlington, Brookline, Gloucester, Hamilton, Millis, Somerville, Sudbury, and Winchester are poised to roll out their green aggregations within the year. 

MAPC believes that municipal aggregation offers an opportunity for communities to leverage the collective buying power of their residents and businesses to transform our electric grid to cleaner sources of energy, while also providing cost savings and price stability for electricity. The fact sheet and case study will be useful tools for cities and towns that are exploring green municipal aggregation, as well as for those that already have active aggregation programs.

Check out “Greening Our Grid” today at http://www.mapc.org/greening-our-grid, and contact Patrick Roche, MAPC Clean Energy Coordinator, at proche at mapc.org for more information about MAPC's program.

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Cambridge Climate Change Game

Extending our work on face-to-face games, the MIT Science Impact Collaborative has developed a digital game on the health impacts of climate change that you can play alone on your computer or on your mobile phone. The game should take about 10-20 minutes. We would appreciate it if you could play the game at your convenience.

Play the game at http://www.doublecoconut.com/climate/

Any and all feedback on the game should be directed to Ella Kim at ella at mit.edu.  

Thank you for your time and consideration!

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 41 (up from 27 in 2016) and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
Solidarity Network Economy:  https://ussolidarityeconomy.wordpress.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://calendar.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar
Take Action MA:  http://takeactionma.com

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 11 AM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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