[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - March 18, 2018

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Mar 18 11:53:38 PDT 2018


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) EventsGeo
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Details of these events are available when you scroll past the index

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Index
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Monday, March 19
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12pm  PAOC Colloquium: Patchy ice core records of climate and greenhouse gases during 40,000 year climate cycles of the Early Pleistocene
12pm  Age of Air and the Circulation of the Stratosphere
12pm  Methane: A Uniquely Difficult Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Problem
12:15pm  DNA and Divination: On Yearning For Genetic Deliverance
12:30pm  City Leaders as Disruptors: Finding Unexpected Allies and Getting Results 
3pm  Merging Electronics with Living Systems: Intrinsically Stretchable and Self-Powered Electronics
4pm  Enabling Interaction on Everyday Surfaces
4pm  Waste of A Nation Book Talk
4:15pm   Citizen Indigenous
5pm  Book Launch: "The Return of the Moguls”
5pm  THE FOURTH CHAPTER OF AMERICAN HISTORY - Demographics
6pm  Ancient Egypt in Africa: New Excavations at the Island Fortress of Uronarti
6pm  Our Community Food Shed and Climate Change
6:30pm  Idea CoLab Boston - Connecting Young Talent with Startups & Tech Pros

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Tuesday, March 20
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11am  Censored: Distraction and Diversion Inside China's Great Firewall
12pm  Tempo and Mode of Biodiversity Hotspot Assembly in China's Hengduan Mountains
12pm  Speaker Series: Heather Ann Thompson
12pm  Is Sustainable Management of Marine Resources Sufficient to Meet Increasing Global Demand for Fish? The Icelandic Story
1pm  Climate Change and Global Health Seminar
4pm  2018 Spring Wulff Lecture
4pm  Estelle Freedman seminar:  Redefining Rape: Sexual Violence in the Era of Suffrage and Segregation
4pm  Mandate My Ass: Vanishing Voters, Voter Fraud, and the Battles to Shape the Electorate in the Postwar United States
4:15pm  Should Robots be Taxed? 
4:30pm  Starr Forum: US-Russian Relations: What's Next?
5pm  Open Society's New Enemies and the Assault on Truth
6pm  Vannevar Bush Lecture Series on Science and Technology Innovation: Richard Lester
6pm  The Inner Life of Animals:  Love, Grief, and Compassion―Surprising Observations of a Hidden World
6pm  #NEVERAGAIN: How Parkland Students are Changing the Conversation on Guns
6pm  Stealing Culture: The Complicated Politics of Cultural Appropriation
6pm  Protecting Human Health in a World Above Two Degrees: Smart Pathways toward Climate-Smart Health Systems in the Philippines and From Junkyard to Peace Promotion Project: A Transdisciplinary Approach through Participatory Design
6pm  Modern Humans' Earliest Artwork and Music: New European Discoveries
6pm  Boston Community Briefing on Paid Leave and $15/Hour Minimum Wage
6pm  Vietnam 1968: The War, the Turmoil, and the Presidential Election
6pm  History of Making at MIT
6:30pm  Self-driving Panel Discussion: The 'New Safe' in Self-driving
7pm  Preventing a Mad Max Future:  How Green Electricity Could Fix Our Water Pollution Problem
7pm  Upgrade Cambridge:  Municipal Broadband
7pm  Non Violent Civil Disobedience Training

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Wednesday, March 21 - Thursday, March 22
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GLOBAL CON - Energy, Power & Facility Management, Strategies & Technologies

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Wednesday, March 21
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7:30am Boston Sustainability Breakfast
10am  Managing the National Security Labs Effectively: What really helps?
12pm  HACK YOUR MIND:  The Big Disconnect:  Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age
12pm  Solar Geoengineering Research Reading Group
12pm  Lessons in Leadership: A Conversation with Cornell Brooks
12pm  Restorative Justice, Social Movements & The Law: Fania Davis & Peter Gabel at Harvard Law School
12pm  Community, Organizing, and Power
12pm  The South China Sea: At the Intersection of China's Silk Road Initiative and the US Indo-Pacific Strategy
12:30pm  Spot the Horse: Cities and the Opportunities to Start-Up
4pm  Insidious Threats to Academic Freedom in the US and Abroad
4:15pm  Book Talk: How Democracies Die
4:15pm  Tribalism's Sirens: Cable TV's Role in Modern Politics
5pm  Women for Planetary Health
5:30pm  Gutman Library Distinguished Author Series: What's Worth Teaching?
6pm  authors at MIT: Christopher Preston, The Synthetic Age
6pm  "What is Truth?/Role of the Media and Facts and the Rule of Law" — Myra Kraft Open Classroom
6pm  A Globe Discussion: Getting Past the Language Barrier to Talk About Race
6pm  Jacobs Office Tour at Hancock Tower
6:30pm  Science and Music: Converging Hypothesis and Interpretation
7pm  The Biological Mind
7:30pm  The Canary Effect

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Thursday, March 22
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8:30am  Social Issue Talk: Eviction Prevention: A Model for Addressing Homelessness in Massachusetts
10am  Community Development: Food Justice and Healthy Communities
11:45am  6TH ANNUAL MASS. WATER FORUM 
12pm  Policing Identity Politics in Trump's America: Briahna Joy Gray at The Harvard Law Forum
12pm  Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering Large Ensemble (GLENS) Project
2:30pm  Political Turnover, Bureaucratic Turnover, and the Quality of Public Services
3pm  xTalk with Taso DuVal:  Building Trust, Quality, and Integrity on the Internet, at Scale 
4pm  Adaptive Adversarial Learning for a Diverse Visual World
5pm  The Aftermath of Financial Crises: What Happens and Why: The 2018 Robert A. Muh Alumni Award Lecture
5pm  Moving Broadband from Sea to Land: Internet Infrastructure and Digital Labor in Tanzania
5pm  Shifting Borders of Justice: Territory, Market, Migration - Ayelet Shachar
5:15pm  The Perfect Gift? Unwrapping the Mysteries of Giving and Receiving
5:30pm  MassChallenge & Zipcar Present: The Future of Mobility
5:30pm  To The Mountaintops
5:30pm  Cleantech Open's 2018 Boston Kickoff Party
5:30pm  Materials Selection for Millennial Industry
5:30pm  Advanced Tech: Autonomous & Drone Technologies
6pm  Future of Food Products
6pm  MIT Water Night 2018 : Exploring the Science & Art of Water
8pm  Capitalism and The Climate

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Friday, March 23 – Saturday, March 24
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Human Rights in a Time of Populism
African Development Conference

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Friday, March 23
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12pm  Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar:  Chemical Mechanism Development for the Formation of Components of Secondary Organic Aerosol
12pm  3D Anatomical Data for Everyone: the openVertebrate Thematic Collections Network
1pm  Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC) Tour
1pm  IACS Seminar: Data Science and Our Environment
3pm  Automating Inequality:  How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor
4:30pm  Graduate Lecture Series: Ron Prinn (CGCS/EAPS)
7pm  Braiding Sweetgrass: The Teachings of Plants

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Saturday, March 24
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12pm  March for Our Lives Boston

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Sunday, March 25
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4:30pm  Tardigrade Stage #2: Arts for Climate

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Monday, March 26
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9am - 12pm  LET MY PEOPLE GO! Exodus from Fossil Fuels: An Interfaith Witness for Climate Action
10am  Towards Quantification of the Paris Agreement's Social Value of Mitigation Activities
12pm  Glacial Climates and Monsoon Dynamics in Proxies and Models
12pm  Challenges for Getting the Prices Right in PJM's Wholesale Electricity Markets
12pm  Brown Bag Lunch: Ari Daniel
12:10pm  Ecological Transitions during the Evolution of C4 Photosynthesis
12:15pm  Sex in the Age of Medical Jurisprudence: The Law and Science of Hermaphrodites in the 19th century U.S.
2pm  Food for Thought: the Origins of Massachusetts Food and Why it Matters
3pm  Privacy Despite Mass Surveillance
6pm  Old North Speaker Series: Nancy Seasholes - The Changing Shape of Boston
7pm  China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know

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Tuesday, March 27 - Friday, March 30 
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West Roxbury PIpeline Protest Trial

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Tuesday, March 27
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8:30am  Richard Rothstein: The Color of Law & Changing Patterns
12pm  Shorenstein Center Speaker Series: Adam Serwer
12pm  Dividing Lines: Why Is Internet Access Still Considered a Luxury in America?
12pm  Healthy Fathers, Healthy Families, Healthy Communities: Addressing Father Absenteeism as a Public Health Matter
12pm  The Camp and the City: Territories of Extraction
4:30pm  Physical Chemistry Seminar Series:  Photosynthetic Excitons and Charge Transfer
5:30pm  "Theory of Change" workshop for social entrepreneurs
5:30pm  Celebrating Delightful Moments and the Tech Vectors of Happiness
6pm  How Mushrooms Changed the World
6pm  The First Amendment: What Are Its Limits?
6pm  Forgotten Farms Film Screening
6:30pm  Fuckup Nights Boston Vol. VI
6:45pm  Managing Climate Change
7pm  Finding Solutions in a Divisive World:  What We are Learning from the News Gathering Trenches of Solutions Journalism
8pm  Never Remember:  Searching for Stalin's Gulags in Putin's Russia

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

Geometry Links - March 17, 2018
http://geometrylinks.blogspot.com/2018/03/geometry-links-march-17-2018.html

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Monday, March 19
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PAOC Colloquium: Patchy ice core records of climate and greenhouse gases during 40,000 year climate cycles of the Early Pleistocene
Monday, March 19
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Michael Bender (Princeton)
A multi-institutional collaboration has retrieved samples of Antarctic ice dating beyond 2 Ma, and analyzed these samples for greenhouse gas concentrations and other climate properties. Interpreting the data is complicated because the samples are stratigraphically disturbed. Nonetheless, the results suggest that interglacial Antarctic temperatures, as well as atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations, are within the ranges observed for the past 800,000 years. None of our old ice samples have temperatures or greenhouse gas concentrations as low as glacial values of the past 800,000 years. The data suggest some simple speculations about the dynamics of Pleistocene climates.

About the Speaker
Michael Bender received a BS in Chemistry from Carnegie-Mellon University, where he was introduced to geochemistry by Truman Kohman. He did his PhD in Geology at Columbia University with Wallace Broecker. After a brief postdoc, he moved to the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, where he taught for 25 years. In 1997, he moved to Princeton.

Bender's research has centered on two themes. One is glacial-interglacial climate change, and the other is the global carbon cycle. Since 1984, Bender's paleoclimate research has involved measuring gas properties in ice cores to date critical climate changes of the ice ages, and to advance our understanding of changes in the biosphere on glacial-interglacial timescales. The carbon cycle research involves studies characterizing the fertility of ecosystems at the global scale, at the scale of ocean basins, and at regional to local scales within the oceans.

Much current work in Bender's lab involves making highly precise measurements of the concentration and isotopic composition of O2 in air, in seawater, and in ice core trapped gases as a means of studying both the geochronology of climate change and the carbon cycle at a range of scales. Bender's past work has also included studies of trace element assimilation by carbonate tests, seawater trace metal geochemistry, hydrothermal processes on the flanks of mid-ocean ridges, diagenesis of organic matter in deep sea sediment pore waters, and the history of the seawater Sr isotope composition.

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Age of Air and the Circulation of the Stratosphere
Monday, March 19
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Marianna Linz, Postdoctoral Scholar, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles
Abstract: The circulation of the stratosphere determines spatial distributions of trace gases, which impact climate, radiation and human health. The circulation has been predicted to strengthen with climate change, but observations are ambiguous. While observations have provided an excellent qualitative picture of the circulation, using them to quantify the stratospheric circulation has been more difficult. Thus, trend calculations from most observations are inconclusive. The idealized tracer “age” of stratospheric air describes how long an air parcel has been in the stratosphere, and I have developed theory to quantify the stratospheric circulation by utilizing the unique properties of age. I will show validation of this theory with an idealized model and a comprehensive GCM. I will then show how “age” is derived from nitrous oxide and sulfur hexafluoride measurements from satellites in order to apply the theory. This is the first calculation of the mean global overturning strength of the stratosphere from observations. I will conclude with a brief look at extensions of the theory both within the stratosphere and beyond. Finally, I will share some innovative new measurements and planning for a future campaign that would enable the calculation of the critical stratospheric circulation trends that have been so elusive to date.

Contact Name:  Milena Perez
aperez02 at fas.harvard.edu

EPS/ESE Joint Colloquium Series
https://eps.harvard.edu/event/epsese-joint-colloquium-series

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Methane: A Uniquely Difficult Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Problem
Monday, March 19
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Robert Kleinberg, Schlumberger. Lunch will be provided. 

Energy Policy Seminar
https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Lousia Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu
617-485-8693

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DNA and Divination: On Yearning For Genetic Deliverance
Monday, March 19
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S250, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

Patricia Williams, Columbia Law School

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/

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City Leaders as Disruptors: Finding Unexpected Allies and Getting Results 
Monday, March 19
12:30pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building 10-485, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Trinity Simons, Mayors’ Institute for City Design
Abstract:  With the rapid expansion of new urban technologies and increased demands from citizens-all the while seeing budget and resource constraints-mayors are increasingly called upon to use their leadership to be visionaries for the creation of public space. The Mayors' Institute on City Design (MICD) is a leadership initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the United States Conference of Mayors that works to empower elected officials to provide leadership in city design and development. Among its 1100+ alumni mayors include current and/or past mayors of Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, Miami, and others.

This talk will consider the role of public sector leaders in the creation and promotion of solutions to the most critical planning and design challenges facing their cities, and the preparation required to turn mayors into their communities' chief urban designers. We will explore current pressures on cities and how local elected officials are stepping up, often where state and federal government lags behind.

Bio:  Trinity Simons is the executive director of the Mayors' Institute on City Design (MICD). The MICD is a partnership program of the National Endowment for the Arts, the American Architectural Foundation, and the United States Conference of Mayors. Since 1986, the Mayors' Institute has helped transform communities through design by preparing mayors to be the chief urban designers of their cities.

The MICD achieves its mission by organizing sessions where mayors engage leading design experts to find solutions to the most critical urban design challenges facing their cities. Sessions are organized around case-study problems. Each mayor presents a problem from his or her city for the other mayors and designers to discuss. Simons comes to MICD from the Enterprise Community, where she was a program officer for national design initiatives and director of the Rose Architectural Fellowship. Simons also worked with architecture students at her previous position as the national vice president of the American Institute of Architects Students (AIAS).

City Design & Development Forum 

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Merging Electronics with Living Systems: Intrinsically Stretchable and Self-Powered Electronics
Monday, March 19
3:00pm
MIT, Building 34-401, Grier A, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Sihong Wang
Abstract:  The vast amount of biological mysteries and biomedical challenges faced by human provide a prominent drive for seamlessly merging electronics with biological living systems (e.g. human bodies) to achieve long-term stable functions. Towards this trend, the main bottlenecks are the huge mechanical mismatch between the current form of rigid electronics and the soft biological tissues, as well as the limited lifetimes of the battery-based power supplies.
In this talk, I will first describe a new form of electronics with skin-like softness and stretchability, which is built upon a new class of intrinsically stretchable polymer materials and a new set of fabrication technology. As the core material basis, intrinsically stretchable polymer semiconductors have been developed through the physical engineering of polymer chain dynamics and crystallization based on the nanoconfinement effect. This fundamentally-new and universally-applicable methodology enables conjugated polymers to possess both high electrical-performance and extraordinary stretchability. Then, proceeding towards building electronics with this new class of polymer materials, the first polymer-applicable fabrication platform has been designed for large-scale intrinsically stretchable transistor arrays. As a whole, these renovations in the material basis and technology foundation have led to the realization of circuit-level functionalities for the processing of biological signals, with unprecedented mechanical deformability and skin conformability. In the second part of the talk, I will introduce the invention and development of triboelectric nanogenerators as a new technology for mechanical energy harvesting, which provides a solution for sustainably powering electronics. The discussion will span from the establishment of basic operation mechanisms, the design strategies of material and device structure towards high energy conversion efficiency, to the hybridization with Li-ion batteries for effective energy storage. Equipping electronics with human-compatible form-factors and biomechanically-driven power supplies has opened a new paradigm for wearable and implantable bio-electronic tools for biological studies, personal healthcare, medical diagnosis and therapeutics.
 
Bio:  Sihong Wang is a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, working with Prof. Zhenan Bao. He received his PhD degree in Materials Science and Engineering (with Minor in Electrical Engineering) from the Georgia Institute of Technology under the supervision of Prof. Zhong Lin (Z.L.) Wang, and his Bachelor’s degree from Tsinghua University. Currently, he is working on intrinsically stretchable polymer semiconductors and transistors for wearable and biomedical electronics. His PhD research had focused on nanogenerators for mechanical energy harvesting and their integrated energy storage systems. He was awarded MRS Graduate Student Award, Chinese Government Award for Outstanding Students Abroad, Top 10 Breakthroughs of 2012 by Physics World, etc.

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Enabling Interaction on Everyday Surfaces
Monday, March 19
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Refreshments: 3:45 PM
MIT, Building 32-G449, Patil/Kiva, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Robert Xiao 
Abstract: Computers are now ubiquitous. However, computers and digital content have remained largely separate from the physical world – users explicitly interact with computers through small screens and input devices, and the “virtual world” of digital content has had very little overlap with the immediate, physical world. My work aims to help computing escape the confines of screens and devices, and spill information- and computationally-rich digital content out into the familiar world around us. I approach this problem from several directions: from the low-level algorithmic work of providing ad hoc touch sensing on everyday surfaces, to high-level questions surrounding the interaction design between physical and virtual realms. I have built many embodiments of these mixed-reality experiences, including a computational lightbulb capable of projecting interactive content onto everyday surfaces, as well as a head-mounted augmented reality system that integrates touch interaction on the environment. 

Bio:  Robert Xiao is a Ph.D. candidate at Carnegie Mellon University in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute. He develops novel sensing and interactive technologies that enable richer and more powerful interactions with our computers, combining his love of computer science, mathematics and electronics. He has won Best Paper Awards at UIST 2016, ICMI 2015, and GI 2011, and is an NSERC Scholar and Qualcomm Innovation Fellow. His research has been covered by the New York Times, NBC News, Wired, Discovery Channel, TechCrunch, Gizmodo and many other outlets. Robert is also active in computer security competitions, winning DEFCON CTF the past two years with the CM

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Waste of A Nation Book Talk
WHEN  Monday, Mar. 19, 2018, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South, S250, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Poetry/Prose
SPEAKER(S)  Assa Dorn and Robin Jeffrey
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS	  Waste of A Nation Book Talk with Assa Dorn and Robin Jeffrey

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Citizen Indigenous
WHEN  Monday, Mar. 19, 2018, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Fay House, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Norbert Hill (Oneida Nation), Former Director of Education, Oneida Nation of Wisconsin; Founder, “Winds of Change” magazine, published by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society; and “The American Indian Graduate Magazine,” published by the American Indian Graduate Center; Lifetime Achievement Award, National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering
Olivia Hoeft (Oneida Nation), associate product marketing manager, Google; Former Miss Oneida, 2014–2015
Tesia Zientek (Citizen Potawatomi Nation), Director, Department of Education, Citizen Potawatomi Nation
Moderated by N. Bruce Duthu (United Houma Nation of Louisiana), Samson Occom Professor of Native American Studies and Frank J. Guarini Associate Dean of the Faculty for International Studies & Interdisciplinary Programs, Dartmouth College 
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Leading members from the Oneida Nation, Citizen Potawatomi Nation, and United Houma Nation of Louisiana will discuss vital issues of tribal citizenship in Indian Country. By exploring topics such as constitutional reform, tribal enrollment, blood quantum, and descendancy, the speakers will discuss the many different ways Native tribes and national define, grant, and express indigenous citizenship. Register online.
This program is cosponsored by the Harvard University Native American Program and the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development’s Honoring Nations Program.
LINK	https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-citizen-indigenous-panel-discussion

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Book Launch: "The Return of the Moguls”
Monday, March 19
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM EDT
Northeastern University Alumni Center, 716 Columbus Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/book-launch-the-return-of-the-moguls-tickets-43053200281

Please join Northeastern University's Dan Kennedy for the formal launch of his new book, "The Return of the Moguls: How Jeff Bezos and John Henry Are Remaking Newspapers for the Twenty-First Century" (ForeEdge). Kennedy, a panelist on WGBH-TV's "Beat the Press" and a columnist for WGBHNews.org, will read and sign copies. Light refreshments will be served. The Alumni Center is on the sixth floor of Columbus Place, which is a short walk from the Ruggles T station and from the Renaissance Park Garage. For more information about the book, including early critical praise from Bob Schieffer, Ken Auletta and Kirkus Reviews, please visit http://thereturnofthemoguls.com

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THE FOURTH CHAPTER OF AMERICAN HISTORY - Demographics
Monday, March 19
5:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
MIT, Building 32-123, Kirsch Auditorium, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-fourth-chapter-of-american-history-demographics--tickets-43671515679
Cost:  $20

The nation's future requires alignment with the Latino demographic.
Join us to open the discussion!

The discussion will focus on exploring:
Hispanic population growth. 
The real and dramatic change that is occurring.
The crucial role demography plays in important aspects of life and the impact of these on key aspects of American society. 

About the speakers:
Lorna Rivera, PhD
Dr. Lorna Rivera is the director of the Gaston Institute for Latino Community Development & Public Policy, and an associate professor of Women’s/Gender Studies and Latino Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Dr. Rivera’s family is from Puerto Rico, she is a proud graduate of the Chicago Public Schools, and is an alumnus of the Latino Leadership Opportunity Program (class of 1991, Midwest Region). She has a bachelor of science in elementary education from DePaul University and taught Social Studies and Language Arts grades K-9. Rivera moved to Jamaica Plain, MA in 1992 to pursue her PhD in sociology at Northeastern University. Rivera’s publications and research focus on Latino/a communities, women’s health disparities, and educational inequalities. She has received research grants from the Society for the Study of Social Problems, the Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship, the National Academy of Education’s Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship, the National Center for Family Literacy, and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. 

Angel Taveras
Angel Taveras is a current shareholder at Greenberg Traurig. From 2011 to 2015, Angel served as the Mayor of Providence, Rhode Island, where he led a city government with 5,700 employees and a budget of $678 million. He is credited with rescuing the city from the brink of bankruptcy and confronting a $110 million structural deficit through landmark reforms to pensions, negotiated concessions in labor contracts and unprecedented assistance from tax-exempt institutions. Under his leadership, Providence was recognized with the All-America City Award from the National Civic League for its plan to boost third-grade reading proficiency, was the recipient of a $3 million award from the Carnegie Foundation to create innovative high schools, and received the City Livability Award at the U.S. Conference of Mayors in 2014. In addition, Angel won Bloomberg Philanthropies' Mayors Challenge $5 million grand prize for his innovative proposal to improve the vocabularies of pre-school age children.

Jesse Treviño
Jesse's experience includes work as a speechwriter and communications advisor at the White House for President Clinton’s Special Envoy to the Americas and as a senior speechwriter for Energy Secretary Federico Peña. He was a special assistant for media development to INS Commissioner Doris Meissner and an advisor to the Attorney General of Texas and the Texas Health Commissioner. Prior to moving to Washington, D.C. he was the editorial page editor of The Austin American Statesman and wrote for The Corpus Christi Caller-Times and The Riverside (California) Press-Enterprise. He wrote a column on social and political issues that was carried by 12 newspapers in Texas, including The Dallas Morning News and The San Antonio Express-News. He also produced a live weekly news program for KERA, the PBS station in Dallas. He worked with pollster Sergio Bendixen in Miami conducting national market research on the Latino community and conceiving new ways to implement large-scale voter registration. Most recently he advised the Under Secretary of Commerce on international trade and globalization in the U.S. Department of Commerce.

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Ancient Egypt in Africa: New Excavations at the Island Fortress of Uronarti
Monday, March 19
6:00pm
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Laurel Bestock, Associate Professor of Archaeology and the Ancient World, Egyptology and Assyriology, and the History of Art and Architecture, Brown University

Ancient Egyptian kings conquered Lower Nubia—today northern Sudan—nearly 4,000 years ago, defending it with a string of monumental fortresses along the Nile River. Previously thought lost, when the construction of the Aswan High Dam flooded the area, one fortress, known as Uronarti, was recently rediscovered and is being excavated for the first time since George Reisner’s Harvard University–Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition worked there in the early twentieth century. Laurel Bestock will highlight recent archaeological finds at the site and discuss the intercultural encounters and lifestyles in this Egyptian colonial outpost.

Livestreamed at https://www.facebook.com/harvardmuseumsofscienceandculture

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Our Community Food Shed and Climate Change
Monday, March 19
6pm - 8pm
Lesley, University Hall 2-078, 1815 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.massclimateaction.org/our_food_system_and_climate_change

Join MCAN and Green Cambridge and hear from local farmers, local food activist, food retailers, and food rescue organizations in a lively discussion about the opportunities and challenges in our community foodshed. This roundtable discussion will leave you with concrete ideas and tools to help you start increasing local food production, localizing distribution, and utilizing the embedded energy in unused food. We will also show you innovative ways to increase more equitable access to fresh food in your community.

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Idea CoLab Boston - Connecting Young Talent with Startups & Tech Pros
Monday, March 19
6:30 PM – 9:30 PM EDT
LearnLaunch, 281 Summer Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/idea-colab-boston-connecting-young-talent-with-startups-tech-pros-tickets-43712190338

Idea CoLab brings together the best and brightest young minds who have an interest in tech & startups and ten (10) experienced startup founders and tech professionals for an evening of exciting collaborations. Please note that this is not your typical mixer or evening social, as the capacity for entrepreneurs & professionals will be limited only to 10 people working in AR, VR, AI, iOT and robotics for structured activities with the students.

This month's program features high school students visiting Boston from Golda Och Academy in NJ. Each student has an extensive background in STEM education and has the group as a whole has demonstrated interest in the technologies listed above.

We think of this event as a "Hackathon for Ideas." Not only do the student participants gain expert knowledge and advice from the area's top minds, but you as our "Guest Pro" have the opportunity to gain fresh perspectives on your current ventures or work projects, while meeting the next generation of tech talent in a fun, engaging and meaningful way. 

To better understand who you are as a "Guest Pro" for the students participating in this event, we have a brief questionnaire with a few questions with the registration. Please note that all registrations will be reviewed and we may contact you for more information. We also reserve the right to cancel any registration for any reason, including not completing all of the questions in the registration form.

Please email us at info (at) cototravel.com if you have any questions.

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Tuesday, March 20
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Censored: Distraction and Diversion Inside China's Great Firewall
Tuesday, March 20, 
11:00 am
Northeastern, 177 Huntington Avenue, 11th floor, Boston

Margaret Roberts, Department of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego
This book describes how incomplete and porous censorship in China have an impact on information consumption in China, even when censorship is easy to circumvent. Using new methods to measure the influence of censorship and propaganda, Censored presents a theory that explains how censorship impacts citizens' access to information and in turn why authoritarian regimes decide to use different types of censorship in different circumstances to control the spread of information. The book is forthcoming with Princeton University Press.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Margaret Roberts is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. Roberts research focuses on better measuring and understanding the political information strategies of authoritarian governments, with a specific focus on studying censorship and propaganda in China. She has also developed widely used methods for automated content analysis in the social sciences. Roberts received her PhD in Government from Harvard University in 2014, an M.S. in Statistics and B.A. in International Relations and Economics from Stanford in 2009. Her work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, Journal of the American Statistical Association and Science.

Editorial Comment:  The Chinese have one of the most restricted online environments around.  Studying what they are doing and how the Chinese people get around those restrictions may be useful here in the USA too.

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Tempo and Mode of Biodiversity Hotspot Assembly in China's Hengduan Mountains
Tuesday, March 20 
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, HUH Seminar Room 125, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge

Richard Ree, Associate Curator of Flowering Plants, Field Museum
The disproportionately rich biodiversity of mountains is often attributed to uplift-driven diversification, the idea that orogeny creates conditions favoring rapid in situ speciation of resident lineages. Of the mountains surrounding the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP), the Hengduan Mountains region is the richest in plant species; it is also the wettest, and was uplifted most recently, since the late Miocene. Analyses of the tempo and mode of species accumulation across time, space, and clades shows that the Hengduan Mountains flora was assembled disproportionately by recent in situ diversification, temporally congruent with its orogeny. This supports the uplift-driven diversification hypothesis. However, dispersal has also played an outsize role, reflecting the connectedness of the Hengduan Mountains relative to other mountain hotspots. In some clades, pulses of diversification detected prior to Hengduan uplift may reflect uplift of the Himalayas, suggesting ancestral diversification outside of the current center of endemism.

Herbaria Seminar 
https://huh.harvard.edu/event/huh-seminar-richard-ree

Contact Name:  Wendy Heywood
wheywood at oeb.harvard.edu

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Speaker Series: Heather Ann Thompson
Tuesday, March 20
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Dr. Heather Ann Thompson is a historian at the University of Michigan, and is the Pulitzer Prize and Bancroft Prize-winning author of Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy (Pantheon Books, 2016). Blood in the Water was won the Ridenhour Prize, the J. Willard Hurst Prize, the Public Information Award from the New York Bar Association, the Law and Literature Prize from the New York County Bar Association, the Media for a Just Society Award from the National Council for Crime and Delinquency, and the book also received a rarely-given Honorable Mention for the Silver Gavel Award from the American Bar Association. Blood in the Water was also long listed for the Cundill Prize in History, and was a finalist for the National Book Award as well as the Los Angeles Times Book Award. Upon its release Blood in the Water was prominently reviewed and profiled in the New York Times in four different sections, and Thompson herself was profiled in the highly-coveted “Talk” section in the New York Times Magazine. Blood in the Water ultimately landed on fourteen “Best of 2016” lists including the New York Times Most Notable Books of 2016 list, and ones published by Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, Newsweek, Christian Science Monitor, the Boston Globe, and others. The book also received rave reviews in over 100 top popular publications, and Thompson appeared on over 25 television shows, including PBS Newshour, CBS Sunday Morning and the Daily Show, as well as on over 50 radio programs, including Sirius and NPR.

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Is Sustainable Management of Marine Resources Sufficient to Meet Increasing Global Demand for Fish? The Icelandic Story
Tuesday, March 20 
12:00PM TO 1:15PM/
Harvard, Marc Heng and Family Conference Room (Wex 102), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
Lunch will be served. RSVP is required as space is limited:  https://www.belfercenter.org/event/seminar-mr-johann-sigurjonsson-icelands-special-envoy-ocean-affairs#!rsvp

The Arctic Initiative will host a seminar, "Is sustainable management of marine resources sufficient to meet increasing global demand for fish? The Icelandic story of relying on scientific policymaking to ensure sustainable fish stocks" with Mr. Jóhann Sigurjónsson, Iceland's Special Envoy on Ocean Affairs and a former Director General of Iceland's Marine Research Institute, discussing Icelandic resource management and science-based policy.

In a world of diminishing fishery resources, Iceland's fish stocks thrive in a relatively sustainable way. The key to this success is science-based policymaking, in which Iceland's independent Marine Research serves as a steady cornerstone.

In this talk, Mr. Jóhann Sigurjónsson, Iceland's Special Envoy on Ocean Issues and a former Director General of Iceland's Marine Research Institute, shares lessons from Iceland on resource management. He will provide insights into how science-based policymaking became respected in Icelandic politics, despite coinciding with an era in which short-term economic gains and pressure from commercial interests continues to grow.

In addition to serving as the Government’s chief advisor in this field for decades, Mr. Sigurjónsson leads Iceland's participation in international fishery management, including participation in UN activities as well as within international scientific bodies such as the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, where he acted as vice president for several years. He currently co-chairs the Arctic Council Task Force on Arctic Marine Cooperation.

Mr. Sigurjónsson holds degrees from Wayne State College, the University of Iceland (BSc biology) and the University of Oslo (Cand. Real., marine zoology) and has published more than 80 scientific articles on marine mammals and fisheries. In 2015, Mr. Sigurjónsson was awarded the President of Iceland’s Knight's Cross of the Order of the Falcon for his service on ocean issues.

https://www.belfercenter.org/event/seminar-mr-johann-sigurjonsson-icelands-special-envoy-ocean-affairs

Contact Name:  Julie Gardella 
julie_gardella at hks.harvard.edu

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Climate Change and Global Health Seminar:  Climate Change, Air Quality, and Human Health
Tuesday, March 20
1:00PM
Harvard Global Health Institute, 42 Church Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://fs6.formsite.com/harvardhigh/form146/index.html

Join the Harvard Global Health Institute for an exciting Climate Change and Global Health seminar with Professor Patrick Kinney, Beverly Brown Professor of Urban Health, Boston University's School of Public Health

Registration required.

Contact Name:   global_health at harvard.edu

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2018 Spring Wulff Lecture
Tuesday, March 20
4:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, Building 34-101, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge

21st-century materials science is now making possible a world where buildings harvest their own energy, bridges repair themselves, clothes increase life expectancy by monitoring health. But many alternative realities are possible, each driven by different cultural and economic forces. We could find ourselves dealing with seas full of plastic, declining life expectancy, and energy black-outs. Which future will we choose? In this lecture, Professor Mark Miodownik argues that only a deeper understanding of materials science will allow us to navigate the future successfully. 

Professor Miodownik is a best-selling author, broadcaster, and innovative thinker who has been bringing new ideas in materials science to the general public for decades. His many awards and honors include the Communication Awards of the National Academics of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 
http://www.markmiodownik.net

The Wulff Lecture is an introductory, general audience, entertaining lecture that aims to educate, inspire, and encourage MIT undergraduates to take up study of materials science and engineering and related fields. The entire MIT community, particularly freshmen, is invited to attend. The Wulff Lecture honors the late Professor John Wulff, a skilled, provocative, and entertaining teacher who conceived of a new approach to teaching general chemistry and inaugurated the popular freshman subject, 3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry. 

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Estelle Freedman seminar:  Redefining Rape: Sexual Violence in the Era of Suffrage and Segregation
Tuesday, March 20
4:00pm to 5:30pm
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

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Mandate My Ass: Vanishing Voters, Voter Fraud, and the Battles to Shape the Electorate in the Postwar United States
WHEN  Tuesday, Mar. 20, 2018, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Lower Library, Robinson Hall, Robinson Hall, 35 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Charles Warren Center, Crime and Punishment Workshop
SPEAKER(S)  Julilly Kohler-Hausmann
LINK	https://warrencenter.fas.harvard.edu/event/kohler-hausmann

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Should Robots be Taxed? 
Tuesday, March 20
4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
MIT, Building E52-432, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge 

Pedro Teles (Banco de Portugal)

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Starr Forum: US-Russian Relations: What's Next?
Tuesday, March 20
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building E25-111, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge

Speakers
Barry Posen (MIT), Angela Stent (Georgetown) and Andrei Kozyrev (Russia's first Foreign Minister)  

Co-sponsors:  MIT Center for International Studies, MIT Security Studies Program, MIT-Russia Program

A session of the Focus on Russia Lecture Series
Co-chairs, Carol Saivetz and Elizabeth Wood

Free & open to the public | Refreshments served

Can't attend in person? Watch it in real-time on Facebook live at https://www.facebook.com/MITCenterForInternationalStudies/ or later at your convenience on our YouTube channel event archive at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo3E2h2KZsZD3S8ThEn_UxA

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Open Society's New Enemies and the Assault on Truth
Tuesday, March 20
5–7 pm
Harvard, Science Center, Lecture Hall D, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

As a philosopher of science, Karl Popper was unique, among 20th century political thinkers, in the emphasis he placed upon scientific knowledge as a precondition for political freedom in a democratic society. Openness was, above all, a moral and intellectual commitment to falsification and to constant self-correction and self-criticism. The 21st century’s ‘new enemies’ of open society—ideological nationalism and authoritarian populism, empowered by new technologies—pose a challenge to Popper’s epistemological ideal of a free society and ask us to think again about ‘the marketplace of ideas’ model of democratic debate. The lecture responds to these challenges by exploring how to restore the authority of scientific knowledge in public debate.

MICHAEL IGNATIEFF is a university professor, writer, and former politician. His major publications are The Needs of Strangers (1984), Scar Tissue (1992), Isaiah Berlin (1998), The Rights Revolution (2000), Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry (2001), The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror (2004), Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics (2013), and The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World (2017). Between 2006 and 2011, he served as an MP in the Parliament of Canada and then as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and Leader of the Official Opposition. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and holds eleven honorary degrees. Between 2012 and 2015 he served as Centennial Chair at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York. Between 2014 and 2016 he was Edward R. Murrow Professor of the Practice of the Press, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is currently the Rector and President of Central European University in Budapest.

With panelists:
Rakesh Khurana, Danoff Dean of Harvard College; Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, Harvard Business School
James T. Kloppenberg, Charles Warren Professor of American History, Harvard University
Julie A. Reuben, Charles Warren Professor of the History of American Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Moderated by:
Sheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Harvard Kennedy School 

This event is organized by the Program on Science, Technology & Society at the Harvard Kennedy School, and co-sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. The lecture and discussion are free and open to the public.

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Vannevar Bush Lecture Series on Science and Technology Innovation: Richard Lester
Tuesday, March 20
6:00pm to 7:00pm
MIT, Building 3-333, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This lecture series, which includes imminent researchers and innovators from a wide variety of fields across MIT, will showcase the numerous forms that innovation takes and the pathways it can take from ideation to implementation. 

Topic Summary
Innovation happens at a variety of scales and with the involvement of innumerable parties. Prof. Lester will discuss how systems of innovation are built, how they compare with another, and how they can be harnessed to tackle the energy issues that face us today.

About the Speaker
Richard Lester is the Japan Steel Industry Professor and Associate Provost at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he oversees the international activities of the Institute. From 2009 to 2015 he served as head of MIT’s Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, leading the Department successfully through a period of rapid rebuilding and strategic renewal. His research is concerned with innovation strategy and management, with a frequent focus on the energy and manufacturing sectors. He is widely known for his work on local, regional, and national systems of innovation, and he has led major studies of national and regional competitiveness and innovation performance commissioned by governments and industry groups around the world. He is the founding director and faculty chair of the MIT Industrial Performance Center.

Professor Lester is also well known for his teaching and research on nuclear technology innovation, management and control. He has been a long-time advocate of advanced nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technologies to improve the safety and economic performance of nuclear power, and his studies in the field of nuclear waste management helped provide the foundation for new institutional and technological strategies to deal with this longstanding problem. His latest book, Unlocking Energy Innovation: How America Can Build a Low-Cost, Low-Carbon Energy System (written with David Hart), outlines a strategy for mobilizing America’s innovation resources in support of a decades-long transition to an affordable and reliable low-carbon global energy system.

Professor Lester obtained his undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from Imperial College and earned his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from MIT. He has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1979. He is an advisor to governments, corporations, foundations and non-profit groups, and he serves as chair of the National Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy.

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The Inner Life of Animals:  Love, Grief, and Compassion―Surprising Observations of a Hidden World
Tuesday, March 20
6:00 PM (Doors at 5:30)
Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/peter_wohlleben/
Cost:  $5.00 - $26.25 (online only, book included) 

Harvard Book Store welcomes PETER WOHLLEBEN—bestselling author of The Hidden Life of Trees—for a discussion of his latest book, The Inner Life of Animals: Love, Grief, and Compassion―Surprising Observations of a Hidden World.
About The Inner Life of Animals

Through vivid stories of devoted pigs, two-timing magpies, and scheming roosters, The Inner Life of Animals weaves the latest scientific research into how animals interact with the world with Peter Wohlleben's personal experiences in forests and fields.

Horses feel shame, deer grieve, and goats discipline their kids. Ravens call their friends by name, rats regret bad choices, and butterflies choose the very best places for their children to grow up.

In this, his latest book, Peter Wohlleben follows the hugely successful The Hidden Life of Treeswith insightful stories into the emotions, feelings, and intelligence of animals around us. Animals are different from us in ways that amaze us—and they are also much closer to us than we ever would have thought. Published in partnership with the David Suzuki Institute.

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#NEVERAGAIN: How Parkland Students are Changing the Conversation on Guns
Tuesday, March 20
6:00pm - 7:15pm
Livestream at http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/neveragain-how-parkland-students-are-changing-conversation-guns

A Conversation with Students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School:  Ryan Deitsch, Matt Deitsch, Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg, Cameron Kasky, Alex Wind, Mark Gearan
Moderator(s):  Meighan Stone, Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations, Women and Foreign Policy Program, Board of Directors, Indivisible, President, Malala Fund (2015-2017)
Welcome Remarks by Mark Gearan, Director, Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School

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Stealing Culture: The Complicated Politics of Cultural Appropriation
Tuesday, March 20
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
BU Photonics Center, 8 Saint Marys Street, Room 206, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/stealing-culture-the-complicated-politics-of-cultural-appropriation-tickets-44165314645

"Stealing Culture: The Complicated Politics of Cultural Appropriation” aims to not only examine cultural appropriation from a variety of unconventional perspectives, but to engage current tensions around race and culture on college campuses. Topics to include, African-Americans appropriating African culture, or ethnic minorities appropriating other minority cultures, to broader questions of cultural ownership in the context of racism and inequality. This student-led forum and panel discussion will deepen traditional conversations on race via new cultural tensions and exchanges.
Special Guest:
Dr. Adrienne Keene, Asst. Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies, Brown University
Author of nativeappropriations.com
Panelists:
Dr. Saida Grundy, Asst. Professor of Sociology and African American Studies, Boston University
Dr. Joseph Rezek, Associate Professor of English, Boston University
Dr. Takeo Rivera, Asst. Professor of English and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Boston University

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Protecting Human Health in a World Above Two Degrees: Smart Pathways toward Climate-Smart Health Systems in the Philippines and From Junkyard to Peace Promotion Project: A Transdisciplinary Approach through Participatory Design
Tuesday, March 20
6:00PM TO 7:30PM
Harvard School of Public Health, Kresge 439, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Join the Harvard Global Health Institute for a ‘work-in-progress’ research seminar featuring two talented students from HSPH and GSD:Renzo Guinto, HSPH, and Ignacio Cardona, GSD.

Dinner will be served. 

https://globalhealth.harvard.edu/event/hghi-global-health-student-research-seminar-0?delta=0

Contact Name:  courtney_bridgeo at harvard.edu

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Modern Humans' Earliest Artwork and Music: New European Discoveries
WHEN  Tuesday, Mar. 20, 2018, 6 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Music, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Presented by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology
SPEAKER(S)  Randall White, Professor, Department of Anthropology, New York University
COST  Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO  peabody at fas.harvard.edu 617-496-1027
DETAILS  The earliest evidence of artwork made by modern humans, Aurignacian art, was created more than 35,000 years ago and has been found in French, German, and Romanian archaeological sites. Randall White will discuss the rich corpus of Aurignacian painting, engraving, bas-relief sculpture, musical instruments, and personal ornamentation that was studied before World War I in southwest France, along with recent discoveries from classic Aurignacian sites. He will also highlight how the combined study of archives, long-forgotten museum collections—and even back dirt (excavated material)—is contributing new discoveries and contextual data about early Eurasian expressive culture.
LINK  https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/Modern-Humans-Earliest-Artwork

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Vietnam 1968: The War, the Turmoil, and the Presidential Election
Tuesday, March 20
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Columbia Point, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/vietnam-1968-the-war-the-turmoil-and-the-presidential-election-registration-43345087323

Lawrence O’Donnell, author of Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics and host of MSNBC’s The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell; Fredrik Logevall, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam; and Chris Appy, professor of history at UMass Amherst and author of American Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity discuss the critical events of 1968 in Vietnam and in American politics with Ellen Fitzpatrick, professor of history at the University of New Hampshire. Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero introduces the program.

This forum is featured in the National Archives’ Remembering Vietnam initiative. Remembering Vietnam is presented in part by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family, Pritzker Military Museum & Library, AARP, and the National Archives Foundation.

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Boston Community Briefing on Paid Leave and $15/Hour Minimum Wage
Tuesday, March 20
6 PM - 8 PM
St. Paul's Cathedral, Boston, 138 Tremont Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.facebook.com/events/899456656888431/

The legislature needs to hear from us, in every corner of the Commonwealth, that it’s time to pass Paid Family and Medical Leave and a $15 Minimum Wage. Now that we’ve collected enough signatures to put both of these questions on the ballot, our message to the legislature is clear: let’s do this. Join us with legislators from across the region to make 2018 the year that these campaigns are realized for all workers and families across Massachusetts!

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History of Making at MIT
Tuesday, March 20
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/history-of-making-at-mit-tickets-43722929459

Speakers: Woodie Flowers (Founder of 2.70 and key figure in the First Competitions)
Ken Stone (former Director of Hobby Shop)
Hayami Arakawa (Director of Hobby Shop)
Peter Houk (Director of Glass Lab)
Ed Moriarty (Instructor at the Edgerton Center)
Moderator: Debbie Douglas (Director of Collections & Curator of Science & Technology)

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Self-driving Panel Discussion: The 'New Safe' in Self-driving
Tuesday, March 20
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
CIC Cambridge, 101 Main Street, 14th floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/self-driving-panel-discussion-the-new-safe-in-self-driving-tickets-43684926792
Cost:  $10 – $20

SELF-DRIVING: REDEFINING WHAT SAFE DRIVING MEANS AND WHAT’S NEEDED NEXT
Collaborative Partner: The German-American Business Council of Boston

While the topic of self-driving continues to dominate headlines and leading car manufacturers to invest heavily in a bid to become the first major provider, the path from investment to wide scale implementation remains nebulous. At the core, we’re still concerned about what self-driving actually entails, as questions concerning safety, mobility, and autonomy arise.

For self-driving to be actualized, several factors need to be taken into consideration, beginning with connectivity and reliability. As 5G spreads, questions surrounding how to account for blips in connectivity inevitably come up. Can currently available technologies really anticipate hazards ahead, from both small to big? If so, how do we create systems by which self-driving cars will know how and what choices to make? What does a safe self-driving experience in the next 10 years realistically look like? Underpinning these are also ethical considerations one can’t ignore in the conversation.

The Swedish American Chamber of Commerce New England therefore invites you to a lively panel discussion comprised of diverse industry and thought leaders in autonomous vehicles. We will learn from them the most cutting edge developments in self-driving, the important points we need to understand to form educated opinions on the topic ourselves, and our role as both observers and future passengers.

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Preventing a Mad Max Future:  How Green Electricity Could Fix Our Water Pollution Problem
Tuesday, March 20
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street, Newsfeed Café, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/preventing-a-mad-max-future-tickets-43439278050

Water pollution and subsequent water shortages are popular motifs in many dystopian science fiction stories and have now become a reality in many places around the world. As these issues become more prevalent, the sustainability of the ways we purify our water also present a daunting challenge. Using electricity from clean power sources is a promising approach to purify polluted water; however, in addition to a power source, this technology also requires use of electrodes—conductors that allow electrons to assist in removing toxins. Although many materials have been found to be efficient as electrodes, scientists are still seeking affordable and environmentally-friendly alternatives.
In this talk, Dr. Ljiljana Rajic will discuss the ways in which water pollution is currently impacting our world and innovative approaches to using cost-effective materials to clean heavily polluted waters.

Seating is first-come, first-serve in WGBH's Boston Public Library Studio. Overflow seating will be located in the Newsfeed Café and is not guaranteed.

Speaker bio:  Dr. Lily Rajic is a senior research scientist at Northeastern University and a chief science officer for Pioneer Valley Coral & Natural Science Institute (Hadley, MA). Dr. Rajic received her B.Sc. (2002-2007) and Ph.D. (2007-2010) in Chemistry from Faculty of Sciences at University of Novi Sad (Serbia). Trained as a chemist but with a broad set of interests for environmental protection and injustice, Dr. Rajic focuses on creating sustainable and affordable water treatment systems along with great commitment to mentorship and education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) for learners of all ages. Find more information on her website.

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Upgrade Cambridge:  Municipal Broadband
Tuesday, March 20
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Central Square Library, 45 Pearl Street, 2nd floor in the Lewis Room, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Upgrade-Cambridge/events/248506077/

What we'll do
Come help us discuss Cambridge Municipal Broadband and helpus plan what we will do next!
See https://upgradecambridge.org for more details and sign up for our newsletter there.

What to bring
Bring your friends and neighbors!

Important to know
We want to have a respectful and inclusive conversation, please be considerate of others.

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NonViolent Civil Disobedience Training
Tuesday, March 20
7 PM - 9:30 PM
Church of the Covenant, 67 Newbury Street, Boston

This training is general in nature and will help prepare anyone planning to participate in NVCD actions related to the expansion of fossil fuel infrastructure in our commonwealth - including people focused on the 3-26-18 Exodus from Fossil Fuels: Interfaith Witness for Climate Action.

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Wednesday, March 21 - Thursday, March 22
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GLOBAL CON - Energy, Power & Facility Management, Strategies & Technologies
Wednesday, March 21 - Thursday, March 22
Hynes Convention Center, Boston

GLOBALCON showcases a powerful schedule of events covering energy management, power distribution and generation, buildings and facilities, energy services and commissioning, and sustainable development, which also includes the latest developments and strategies for clean, green and renewable technologies.

More information at http://www.globalconevent.com

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Wednesday, March 21
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Boston Sustainability Breakfast
Wednesday, March 21
7:30 AM – 9:00 AM EST
Pret A Manger, 101 Arch Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-sustainability-breakfast-tickets-41704784132

Join us every month for Net Impact Boston's informal breakfast meetup of sustainability professionals for networking, discussion, and moral support. It's important to remind ourselves that we are not the only ones out there in the business world trying to do good! Feel free to drop by any time between 7:30 and 9:00 am.

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Managing the National Security Labs Effectively: What really helps?
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 10 – 11:30 a.m.
WHERE  Harvard, 1 Brattle Square, 3rd Floor, Room 250, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Project on Managing the Atom, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Charles F. McMillan, Los Alamos Director, Retired
DETAILS  The National Security Labs (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories) are essential to the care of the US nuclear deterrent as well as an understanding of what is happening globally in the nuclear domain. Whether one looks at the 2010 or the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review, the requirements that the labs must address are very similar. What can be done to enable effective coordination between the Department of Energy and the Labs to ensure that, as partners, they meet the nation's needs? What drives the complexity of lab operations? How can it be managed? Charles McMillan brings leadership experience from two of these laboratories to a dialog on these topics.
Dr. Charles F. McMillan served as Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and President of Los Alamos National Security, LLC from June 2011 to December 2017. The Laboratory is a principal contributor to the U.S. Department of Energy mission to maintain the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Los Alamos uses innovative science and technology to enhance global nuclear security and protect the world. Los Alamos has an annual operating budget of approximately $2.5 billion, roughly 11,000 employees, and a nearly 40-square-mile site featuring some of the most specialized scientific equipment and supporting infrastructure in the world.
McMillan guided Los Alamos through continuing high levels of mission execution. He has signed seven annual assessment reports to the President and Congress evaluating the Los Alamos-designed weapons in the stockpile. Under McMillan's leadership, the Laboratory has continued to innovate new techniques and tools to ensure that the nation's deterrent remains safe, reliable, and effective. For example, Los Alamos debuted and has exercised novel systems that provide exponential improvements in data-gathering for subcritical nuclear tests.
LINK  https://www.belfercenter.org/event/managing-national-security-labs-effectively-what-really-helps#!speaker

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HACK YOUR MIND:  The Big Disconnect:  Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age
Wednesday, March 21 
12pm 
MIT, Building 66-144, 25 Ames Street, Cambridge

With Catherine Steiner-Adair, clinical psychologist and author of The Big Disconnect.
Join us for our monthly Hack Your Mind series with guest speaker clinical psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair who will be speaking about the impact of technology on your relationships with the people you love the most. Dr. Steiner-Adair takes an in-depth look at how the Internet and the digital revolution are profoundly changing childhood and family dynamics, and offers solutions parents can use to successfully shepherd their children through the technological wilderness.  

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Solar Geoengineering Research Reading Group
Wednesday, March 21
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room 429, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Solar Geoengineering Research Reading Group
https://geoengineering.environment.harvard.edu/
A weekly reading group, interspersed with more formal seminars, to deepen members' understanding of solar geoengineering research.

Lunch provided. RSVP to contact listed.

Contact Name:  Lizzie Burns
eburns at g.harvard.edu

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Lessons in Leadership: A Conversation with Cornell Brooks
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Taubman Building, 5th Floor, Nye A, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Center for Public Leadership
Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Cornell William Brooks, former President & CEO, NAACP and Visiting Professor, BU school of Law and BU School of Theology
COST  FREE, RSVP required
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NG9TDRZ
CONTACT INFO	cpl_events at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Join us for a conversation with former President and CEO of the NAACP Cornell William Brooks. Reverend Brooks will share lessons he has learned throughout his career as a leader in public service, media, and academia. Rev. Brooks is currently a Visiting Professor of Social Ethics, Law & Justice at Boston University.
Lunch will be served.
This event is free and open to the public. Questions? Email: cpl_events at hks.harvard.edu.
About Cornell Brooks
Reverend Cornell William Brooks, Esq. (STH’87, LAW Hon.’15), former president and CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is a Visiting Professor of Social Ethics, Law, and Justice Movements at both the Boston University School of Law and School of Theology.
Prior to the NAACP, Brooks previously served as executive director of the Fair Housing Council of Greater Washington, was a trial attorney with the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, was the 1998 Democratic Nominee for the US House of Representatives for the 10th District of Virginia, was the senior counsel of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and served as the president and CEO of the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice.
He has authored several published articles and essays, and delivered 11 keynote or commencement addresses at domestic and international universities since 2015, as well as hundreds of speeches. Rev. Brooks also serves as a regular contributor for CNN, providing analysis and commentary on public affairs, civil rights and social ethics. His appearances include The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer, CNN Newsroom, and New Day.
Brooks earned a Bachelor of Arts with honors in political science from Jackson State University in 1983, and his Master of Divinity degree with a concentration in social ethics and systematic theology from Boston University School of Theology in 1987. As a Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholar while studying at Boston University, he was awarded both the Oxnam-Leibman Fellowship for outstanding scholarship and promoting racial harmony, and the Jefferson Fellowship for outstanding scholarship and excellence in preaching. In 1990, he earned his Juris Doctorate from Yale Law School, where he served as a senior editor of the Yale Law Journal and member of the Yale Law and Policy Review.
LINK	https://cpl.hks.harvard.edu/event/lessons-leadership-conversation-cornell-brooks-1?delta=0

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Restorative Justice, Social Movements & The Law: Fania Davis & Peter Gabel at Harvard Law School
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wasserstein Campus Center, Room #2004, 1585 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Law Forum
SPEAKER(S)  Fania Davis and Peter Gabel
Fania Davis is a leading national voice on restorative justice, a new way to think about and do justice, based on principles and practices that mediate conflict, strengthen community and repair harm. She is a long-time social justice activist, Civil Rights trial attorney, restorative justice practitioner, writer, and scholar with a PhD in Indigenous Knowledge.
Peter Gabel is former president of New College of California and was for thirty years a law professor at New College’s public-interest law school. He is Editor-At-Large of Tikkun magazine, a co-founder of the Critical Legal Studies movement, and the president of the Arlene Francis Center for Spirit, Art, and Politics in Santa Rosa, California. He is the recent author of Another Way of Seeing: Essays on Transforming Law, Politics, and Culture.
DIRECTED BY Pete Davis
CONTACT INFO	Pete Davis, pedavis at jd18.law.harvard.edu, 347-453-3135
DETAILS  Fania Davis is a leading national voice on restorative justice, a new way to think about and do justice, based on principles and practices that mediate conflict, strengthen community and repair harm. She is a long-time social justice activist, Civil Rights trial attorney, restorative justice practitioner, writer, and scholar with a PhD in Indigenous Knowledge.
Peter Gabel is former president of New College of California and was for thirty years a law professor at New College’s public-interest law school. He is Editor-At-Large of Tikkun magazine, a co-founder of the Critical Legal Studies movement, and the president of the Arlene Francis Center for Spirit, Art, and Politics in Santa Rosa, California. He is the recent author of Another Way of Seeing: Essays on Transforming Law, Politics, and Culture.
They are coming to Harvard Law School to share with students their experience and wisdom in shifting the criminal justice and legal system from a system that breaks communities apart toward one that brings communities back together.
Free and open to the public, with lunch provided.
Contact Ross Brockway at rbrockway at jd18.law.harvard.edu with any questions.
LINK  https://www.facebook.com/events/1886729738006002/

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Community, Organizing, and Power
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 12 – 1:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center Foyer, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200 North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Gordon Whitman, author of Stand Up! and Deputy Director of Faith in Action (formerly PICO National Network)
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	Info at ash.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Join Gordon Whitman, author of Stand Up! and Deputy Director of Faith in Action (formerly PICO National Network), for a discussion of emerging efforts by base-building community organizing movements to achieve governing power in cities and states. Lisa McGirr, Professor of History, Harvard, will serve as a respondent. Marshall Ganz, Senior Lecturer in Public Policy, will moderate the conversation.
LINK	https://ash.harvard.edu/event/community-organizing-and-power

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The South China Sea: At the Intersection of China's Silk Road Initiative and the US Indo-Pacific Strategy
Wednesday, March 21
12:00pm to 1:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496 (Pye Room), 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Peter Dutton (Naval War College)
Brief Bio
Peter Dutton's research focuses on American and Chinese views of sovereignty and international law of the sea as viewed through the lenses of China's maritime disputes. He also researches Chinese views of maritime security and how those views are shaped by geostrategic and historical factors. He has advised senior officials and military leaders across the government and testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the House Armed Services and Foreign Affairs Committees, and the U.S. China Economic and Security Review Commission. He is currently an adjunct professor of law at New York University School of Law.

SSP Wednesday Seminar
All Welcome

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Spot the Horse: Cities and the Opportunities to Start-Up
Wednesday, March 21
12:30pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building 10-485, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Shaun Abrahamson is the managing director of Urban.Us, a seed stage venture fund and network of experts serving startups that make cities better. Urban.Us, along with MINI, built URBAN-X, an accelerator for startups reimagining city life.

Before founding Fund I, Shaun was an active angel investor, investing in more than 20 firms between 2007 and 2013 in his personal capacity. Early-stage investing and advising is informed by his experiences building MediaSentry (acquired by SafeNet in 2005), Starmedia Network (acquired by France Telecom) and Oculus Technologies (MIT CADLab spin-out). 

In 1999, he was an early employee at govWorks, one of the earliest startups focused on serving local government. govWorks was ahead of the market and failed during the dot com bust, becoming the subject of the documentary Startup.com in 2001. 

Shaun has written for organizations such as The Economist Intelligence Unit, The Huffington Post, and CNNMoney. Crowdstorm, published by Wiley, was his first book and is a guide to working with large online crowds to find and evaluate ideas. The book is a based on Shaun’s experience working with Starbucks, Omnicom Group, $300 House, and Life Edited.

Shaun has an MSc from MIT; an MBA from the Berlin School of Creative Leadership; and a BSc from the University of Cape Town. He is papai to his children, Max and Oli, and the number-one fan of his partner, artist Andrea Nhuch. When he is not at work or with his family, you will most likely find him swimming, Onewheeling, or voiding a warranty.

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Insidious Threats to Academic Freedom in the US and Abroad
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard.CGIS South, Belfer Case Study Room (S020), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Weatherhead Center for International Affairs
Samuel L. and Elizabeth Jodidi Lecture
SPEAKER(S)  Craig Calhoun, President, Berggruen Institute.
Michael Ignatieff, President, Central European University.
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO  Sarah Banse
sarahbanse at wcfia.harvard.edu
DETAILS	 The Weatherhead Center for International Affairs warmly welcomes you to the 2018 Samuel L. and Elizabeth Jodidi Lecture
“Insidious Threats to Academic Freedom in the US and Abroad”
The lecture will consist of brief opening remarks from each speaker. A twenty-minute exchange between the speakers will follow, and a Q&A will conclude. The event will be streamed live through the WCFIA Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/WCFIA/
Speakers
Craig Calhoun, President, Berggruen Institute.
"Insidious Threats to Academic Freedom"
In some settings, universities are being closed or academics are silenced by direct political force. But even where there is less of this kind of pernicious intervention, academic contributions to informed public debate are threatened by institutional transformations, shifts in academic career structures, structures of funding, and attacks on the standing and place of knowledge.
Michael Ignatieff, President, Central European University.
"Academic Freedom and Authoritarian Populism: Lessons from the Front Line"
In many countries—Turkey, Russia, Hungary, to take three examples—universities are being closed or threatened with closure and researchers, teachers, and students are being targeted. What is the political logic behind these attacks, and what will the consequences be for academic freedom and democracy worldwide?
Moderator
Michèle Lamont, Center Director; Faculty Associate; Chair, Weatherhead Research Cluster on Comparative Inequality and Inclusion.
Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies; Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies, Departments of Sociology and African and African American Studies, Harvard University.
LINK  https://wcfia.harvard.edu/event/jodidi-2018

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Book Talk: How Democracies Die
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Starr Auditorium, Belfer Building, Floor 2.5, 79 JFKennedy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt
CONTACT INFO  info at ash.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Donald Trump’s presidency has raised a question that many of us never thought we’d be asking: Is our democracy in danger? Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt have spent more than twenty years studying the breakdown of democracies in Europe and Latin America, and they believe the answer is yes. Democracy no longer ends with a bang—in a revolution or military coup—but with a whimper: the slow, steady weakening of critical institutions, such as the judiciary and the press, and the gradual erosion of long-standing political norms. The good news is that there are several exit ramps on the road to authoritarianism. The bad news is that, by electing Trump, we have already passed the first one. 
Drawing on decades of research and a wide range of historical and global examples, from 1930s Europe to contemporary Hungary, Turkey, and Venezuela, to the American South during Jim Crow, Levitsky and Ziblatt show how democracies die—and how ours can be saved.
Join us for a discussion with Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, authors of How Democracies Die. HKS Academic Dean Archon Fung, Winthrop Laflin McCormack Professor of Citizenship and Self-Government, will moderate. Scott Mainwaring, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor for Brazil Studies, will provide an introduction.

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Tribalism's Sirens: Cable TV's Role in Modern Politics
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 4:15 – 5:45 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Institute of Politics, IOP Conference Room, L-166, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  Scott Jennings, IOP Spring 2018 Resident Fellow
Rebecca Kutler, Vice-President of Content Development and Contributors for CNN
DETAILS  Americans go to their respective corners for news and information. So who decides which voices are heard on cable TV? Join CNN Political Commentator Scott Jennings and Rebecca Kutler, Vice-President of Content Development and Contributors for CNN, to discuss America’s fragmented political discourse. Hear directly from someone behind the scenes who enormously impacts our national conversation.
LINK	http://www.iop.harvard.edu/calendar/events/tribalisms-sirens-cable-tvs-role-modern-politics

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Women for Planetary Health
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 5 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Haller Hall, Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Health Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Planetary Health Alliance, Harvard University Center for the Environment, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
SPEAKER(S)  Panelists:  Kinari Webb, Health in Harmony
Laura Statchel, We Care Solar
Fatima Ahmed, Zenab for Women in Development
Moderators:  Gina McCarthy, Director Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment and former EPA Administrator
Tim Wirth, former US Senator and Vice-Chair of the United Nations Foundation
Sam Myers, Director of the Planetary Health Alliance and Principal Research Scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
DETAILS  "Women for Planetary Health" features women from around the world showcasing solutions at the intersection of global environmental change, human health, and social justice. Panelists include: Dr. Kinari Webb, founder of Health In Harmony, sharing insights on advancing conservation, affordable healthcare, and alternative livelihoods in Indonesia; Dr. Laura Stachel, founder of We Care Solar, speaking to how solar electricity can reduce maternal mortality in developing regions; and Fatima Ahmed, founder of Zenab for Women in Development, discussing how supporting women farmers in Sudan improves food security and climate resilience. Professor Gina McCarthy, Director of the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment and former EPA Administrator, Tim Wirth, former US Senator and Vice-Chair of the United Nations Foundation, and Sam Myers, Director of the Planetary Health Alliance and Principal Research Scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, will moderate the discussion. This event is co-sponsored by the Planetary Health Alliance, the Harvard University Center for the Environment, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Gutman Library Distinguished Author Series: What's Worth Teaching?
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gutman Conference Center - Area 3, 6 Appian Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Gutman Library
SPEAKER(S)  Allan Collins
DETAILS  This important contribution to the future of education, by bestselling author and renowned cognitive scientist Allan Collins, proposes a school curriculum that will fit the needs of our modern era. Offering guidelines for deciding what is important to learn in order to become a knowledgeable person, a good citizen, a thoughtful worker, and a valuable friend in the 21st century, Collins considers the qualities needed for a healthy and productive life. Taking a close look at how advances in technology, communication, and the dissemination of information are reshaping the world, this volume examines how schools can foster flexible, self-directed learners who will succeed in the modern workplace. A concluding chapter presents a broad new vision for how schools can be redesigned to teach the kinds of knowledge and skills students will need in an increasingly complex society and global world.
LINK  https://www.tcpress.com/what-s-worth-teaching-9780807758656

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authors at MIT: Christopher Preston, The Synthetic Age
Wednesday, March 21
6:00pm
MIT Building N50, The MIT Press Bookstore, 301 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 02139

Join us as we welcome Christopher J. Preston to the MIT Press Bookstore to discuss and sign copies of The Synthetic Age. Books will be on sale at the event for 20% off, or you can purchase an event ticket that includes a discounted book.

About The Synthetic Age:
In The Synthetic Age, Christopher Preston argues that what is most startling about this coming epoch is not only how much impact humans have had but, more important, how much deliberate shaping they will start to do. Emerging technologies promise to give us the power to take over some of Nature’s most basic operations. It is not just that we are exiting the Holocene and entering the Anthropocene; it is that we are leaving behind the time in which planetary change is just the unintended consequence of unbridled industrialism. A world designed by engineers and technicians means the birth of the planet’s first Synthetic Age.

What does it mean when humans shift from being caretakers of the Earth to being shapers of it? And in whom should we trust to decide the contours of our synthetic future? These questions are too important to be left to the engineers.

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"What is Truth?/Role of the Media and Facts and the Rule of Law" — Myra Kraft Open Classroom
Wednesday, March 21
6:00pm to 8:00pm
Northeastern, West Village F, 20, 40A Leon Street, Boston

Speakers:  David Shribman, Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist; Executive Editor, Pittsburgh Post Gazette
Laurel Leff, Associate Professor of Journalism, Northeastern University
The Spring 2018 Open Classroom will explore the definition of the Rule of Law, what it requires, what happens in its absence, and how it has declined and emerged globally. We will also explore some of the tensions between the Rule of Law and Democratic Governance, focusing on the Rule of Law in time of polarization and technological upheaval (as in the United States but also abroad).

The Spring 2018 Myra Kraft Open Classroom is co-sponsored by the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and Northeastern’s School of Law.

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A Globe Discussion: Getting Past the Language Barrier to Talk About Race
Wednesday, March 21
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Dudley Cafe, 15 Warren Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-globe-discussion-getting-past-the-language-barrier-to-talk-about-race-tickets-43977404601

Join Meghan E. Irons, The Boston Globe's Social Justice/Race Reporter in her first News Cafe, a conversation with some of Boston's creative thinkers. She asks "How do we get past a language barrier that makes it difficult to talk about race?" to guests Tanisha Sullivan, president of the Boston chapter of the NAACP, Brandon Terry, an assistant professor of African-American studies at Harvard University, and Mark Culliton, founder of the education nonprofit College Bound Dorchester. 
This event is hosted by Dudley Cafe. Food and beverage are available on site for purchase. 
Questions? Contact Erin Maghran at erin.maghran at globe.com

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Jacobs Office Tour at Hancock Tower
March 21 
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
200 Clarendon Street, Boston	
RSVP at https://usgbcma.org/event/tour-of-john-hancock-tower-2/
Cost:  $15.00

Jacobs is hosting the USGBC for a tour of their office at 120 St. James Ave, Fifth Floor, Boston (John Hancock Tower). The total gross area is 46,655sf. The office is pursuing certification for WELL Gold, 3 Stars FitWel and LEED ID+C Gold. Jacobs will lead us on the tour and give us a presentation about the specific features of the design.

Here are some key features:
Sit-to-stand desks at 100% of workstations
Covered trash cans
Library + reading materials
Wellness/mother’s rooms
Showers
Individual lockable storage
Decals/wall art for wayfinding
Views/daylight access
Self-dimming light fixtures
LED lighting throughout
Sound masking
Adjustable window shades
Adjustable monitorarms
Dedicated dining space for employees
Cold storage for food
Water bottle filler
Filtered water and quality testing
Low VOC finishes
Ergonomic furniture
Walkability + public transit: 99/100 walk score, 99/100 transit score and 87/100 bike score!
Following the tour and presentation, join us for a networking session with food and drinks provided by Jacobs in their Café.

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Science and Music: Converging Hypothesis and Interpretation
Wednesday, March 21
6:30 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Le Laboratoire Cambridge, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/science-and-music-converging-hypothesis-and-interpretation-tickets-43846105883

with Lynn Chang & Robert Sackstein and moderated by Lisa Wong

This fascinating talk is part of the Artsenses series 
curated by the Arts and Humanities Initiative at Harvard Medical School
Two college classmates--one now a research scientist and professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School; the other a performing violinist and professor of Music at Boston Conservatory -- sit down for a "fireside chat" about the similarities and differences in the practice and pedagogy of art and science. Join us for an evening of Music and Musings.
Join us for an exciting evening, filled with deep conversation about music, science, and education. The format for that night will be designed to encourage the opportunity for this kind of reflection

Lynn Chang
A top-prize winner in the international Paganini Competition, Lynn Chang has led a varied career as soloist, chamber musician and pedagogue. He is a founding member of the Boston Chamber Music Society and performed with that group for 25 years. His discography includes the works of William Grant Still on New World Records, Made in America with Yo-Yo Ma, and the Grammy Award-winning The Girl with Orange Lips with Dawn Upshaw. In 2010 Chang performed at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, to honor Liu Xiaobo. In 2011, Lynn performed for President Obama at the nationally telecast Kennedy Center Honors to celebrate cellist Yo-Yo Ma.
Chang studied at the Juilliard School and Harvard University. He served as Overseer at Harvard and chaired the Board's Arts and Humanities committee. 
A devoted teacher, he teaches at , Boston Conservatory at Berklee, New England Conservatory, Boston University and MIT. Chang's former students now play in the Boston Symphony, Chicago Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, and Juilliard String Quartet.
Robert Sackstein, M.D., Ph.D.

Robert Sackstein, M.D., Ph.D., is a Professor in the departments of Dermatology and Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a Bone Marrow Transplant Physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He also serves as the Director of the Program of Excellence in Glycosciences at the Harvard Medical School, as well as the Co-Director of the Harvard University Center for Glycosciences. 

Dr. Sackstein is an expert in cell-based therapeutics. His scientific research efforts have helped define how cells migrate from blood into tissues, and clinical applications of his research findings have led to improved outcomes for patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation and for patients with life-threatening diseases.
A once-aspiring oboist, and the son of a concert pianist, Dr. Sackstein’s most notable and sustaining life-lessons have been shaped by music.

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The Biological Mind
Wednesday, March 21
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Harvard Coop, 1400 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/alan-jasanoff-the-biological-mind-tickets-43319366391

A pioneering neuroscientist argues that we are more than our brains
To many, the brain is the seat of personal identity and autonomy. But the way we talk about the brain is often rooted more in mystical conceptions of the soul than in scientific fact. This blinds us to the physical realities of mental function. We ignore bodily influences on our psychology, from chemicals in the blood to bacteria in the gut, and overlook the ways that the environment affects our behavior, via factors varying from subconscious sights and sounds to the weather. As a result, we alternately overestimate our capacity for free will or equate brains to inorganic machines like computers. But a brain is neither a soul nor an electrical network: it is a bodily organ, and it cannot be separated from its surroundings. Our selves aren't just inside our heads--they're spread throughout our bodies and beyond. Only once we come to terms with this can we grasp the true nature of our humanity.

About the Author
Alan Jasanoff is the award-winning director of the MIT Center for Neurobiological Engineering. He lives near Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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The Canary Effect
Wednesday, March 21
7:30PM
First Church in Jamaica Plain Unitarian Universalist, 6 Eliot Street, Jamaica Plain

The Canary Effect is a documentary that examines the impact of US policies on the Indigenous peoples of North America.  Delving deeply into the often misunderstood and frequently over looked historic realities of the American Indian, The Canary Effect follows the terrifying and horrific abuses instilled upon the Indigenous people of North America, and details the genocidal practices of the US government and its continuing effects on present day Indian country. Featuring interviews with the leading scholars and experts on Indian issues including controversial author Ward Churchill, the film brings together the past and present in a way never before captured so eloquently and boldly on film. The movie was directed by Robin Davey and Yellow Thunder Woman, who are both members of LA Based alternative pop group The Bastard Fairies.

Dismantling White Supremacy Film Series

As persons of faith living in 21st century America, we feel called to question how we might work, take action, do our part, to dismantle white supremacy. We seek to deepen our understanding of the role white supremacy has played in the development of our modern day society, take some inventory, and identify opportunities for collective action.  We are inspired by the words of Rev. Mary Margaret Earl, Executive Director and Senior Minister of UU Urban Ministries in Roxbury:
“We must continue the work that many of us have been engaged with, to dig deeper into the ways that racism has infiltrated our subconscious, our hearts, and our educational, prison and government systems since our country was founded. The hate on display in Charlottesville, as grotesque as it was, is not disconnected from the rest of us. It is the most egregious, visible outgrowth of the racism we have all breathed in, like polluted air, our whole lives.”
We are all caught in that web. For those of us who identify as white, we work to become unstuck through listening and learning. Listening nondefensively to people of color who are willing to share their experiences and viewpoint.  Learning about the history of racism in our nation.
Co-sponsored by 
First Church Unitarian Universalist in Jamaica Plain, Social Justice Action Committee, and The Racial Justice Task Force of the Theodore Parker Church

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Thursday, March 22
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Social Issue Talk: Eviction Prevention: A Model for Addressing Homelessness in Massachusetts
Thursday, March 22
8:30 - 10:00 am 
Cooley LLP, 500 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-issue-talk-eviction-prevention-a-model-for-addressing-homelessness-in-massachusetts-registration-42997583931

SPEAKER
Lydia Edwards, Boston City Councilor
As the Boston City Councilor, Lydia Edwards represents the independent voices of the Boston community, and prioritizes social and economic justice for marginalized groups. Lydia Edwards is a strong advocate for affordable, accessbile housing, and quality public education

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Community Development: Food Justice and Healthy Communities
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 22, 2018, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gund Hall, Room 318, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	SES 5374 Community Development, Urban Planning and Design (UPD) Department
SPEAKER(S)  Norma Rey-Alicea, Cassandria Campbell, Bing Broaderick, Ray Huling
DIRECTED BY  Dr. Lily Song
COST  Free
DETAILS  How can planners and designers engage with reformist, progressive, and radical traditions of food justice? Join us for a discussion with four practitioners. Norma Rey-Alicea is an organizer of the Whose Foods / Whose Community? coalition that worked against Whole Foods' move into the Jamaica Plain neighborhood and raised awareness about the grocer's unique role in accelerating gentrification. Cassandria Campbell is a founder of Fresh Food Generation, a catering business, food truck, and cafe committed to serving on-the-go real foods using ingredients from local farms prepared into Caribbean goodness. Bing Broaderick is Executive Director of Haley House Bakery Cafe, a non-profit restaurant that offers creative and healthy food, made from scratch, in a congenial community-based setting in Dudley Square. Ray Huling is a folklorist who studies the creative expression of people who work in sustainable food. He is investigating how food justice operations in Greater Boston foster community, especially along their supply chains.
LINK	https://www.facebook.com/events/159361878206524/

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6TH ANNUAL MASS. WATER FORUM 
Thursday, March 22
11:45 AM to 1:45 PM 
Massachusetts State House, 24 Beacon Street, Boston

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Policing Identity Politics in Trump's America: Briahna Joy Gray at The Harvard Law Forum
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 22, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wasserstein Campus Center, Room #1015, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Harvard Law Forum
SPEAKER(S)  Briahna Joy Gray is a leading Millennial writer on identity politics, racial justice and economic power. She is a contributing editor at Current Affairs and has been featured in New York Magazine, Rolling Stone and The Guardian. She is the co-host of SWOTI (Someone's Wrong on the Internet) podcast, "a podcast from two POCs who enjoy discussing politics, relationships, and pop culture."
DIRECTED BY  Pete Davis
CONTACT INFO	Pete Davis, PeDavis at jd18.law.harvard.edu, 347-453-3135
DETAILS  Briahna Joy Gray is a leading Millennial writer on identity politics, racial justice and economic power. She is a contributing editor at Current Affairs and has been featured in New York Magazine, Rolling Stone and The Guardian. She is the co-host of SWOTI (Someone's Wrong on the Internet) podcast, "a podcast from two POCs who enjoy discussing politics, relationships, and pop culture."
She is coming to Harvard Law to share her views on identity politics, racial and economic justice, and paths forward for progressives in the Trump era.
Free and open to the public, with lunch provided.
Contact Pete Davis at PeDavis at jd18.law.harvard.edu for more information.
LINK  https://www.facebook.com/events/564295343907845/

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Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering Large Ensemble (GLENS) Project
Thursday, March 22
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room 429, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

The Harvard University Solar Geoengineering Research Program presents Simone Tilmes, Project Scientist II, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). 

The third Solar Geoengineering Research Seminar, co-sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Belfer Center’s Science Technology and Public Policy program. Lunch provided. Formal seminars are interspersed with more informal weekly reading group meetings on Wednesdays to deepen members’ understanding of solar geoengineering research. 
12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Formal presentation with lunch
1:00 - 1:30 p.m. Informal gathering with coffee and dessert

RSVP to contact below. 
Contact Name:   Lizzie Burns
eburns at g.harvard.edu

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Political Turnover, Bureaucratic Turnover, and the Quality of Public Services 
Thursday, March 22
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
MIT, Building E62-550, 100 Main Street, Cambridge

Diana Moreira (University of California, Davis)

Editorial Comment:  There might be some relevance to this topic considering what is and is not happening in the White House these days.

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xTalk with Taso DuVal:  Building Trust, Quality, and Integrity on the Internet, at Scale 
Thursday, March 22
3:00pm to 4:00pm
MIT, Building 4-149, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

In today's age, internet companies are primarily focused on building disruptive technologies that focus on the scale of its user base, rather than the scale of its trust, quality, and integrity first. Toptal has built a company that has scaled trust, quality, and integrity first, as foundational elements, to facilitate its business at scale. In this talk, we will discuss the components that make up for a successful "quality first" company and how technology can facilitate this today.

Taso DuVal
As Toptal’s co-founder and CEO, Taso manages Toptal’s core team of hundreds of team members distributed throughout the world, with a focus on innovation. Since Toptal was founded in 2010, Taso has led it to become the largest high-skilled, on-demand talent network in the world. Taso serves on the board of multiple organizations, advising on talent strategy and innovation for Fortune 100s and nonprofits. Taso has guest lectured at Harvard Business School, Wharton, and Oxford on talent management and entrepreneurship.

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Adaptive Adversarial Learning for a Diverse Visual World
Thursday, March 22
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Refreshments: 3:45 PM
MIT, Building 32-G449 Patil/Kiva, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Judy Hoffman 
Abstract: Automated visual recognition is in increasingly high demand. However, despite tremendous performance improvement in recent years, state-of-the-art deep visual models learned using large-scale benchmark datasets still fail to generalize to the diverse visual world. In this talk I will discuss a general purpose semi-supervised learning algorithm, domain adversarial learning, which facilitates transfer of information between different visual environments and across different semantic tasks thereby enabling recognition models to generalize to previously unseen worlds. I’ll demonstrate applications of this approach to different visual tasks, such as semantic segmentation in driving scenes and transfer between still image object recognition and video action recognition.

Bio: Judy Hoffman is a postdoctoral researcher at UC Berkeley. Her research lies at the intersection of computer vision and machine learning with a specific focus on semi-supervised learning algorithms for domain adaptation and transfer learning. She received a PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from UC Berkeley in 2016. She is the recipient of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, the Rosalie M. Stern Fellowship, and the Arthur M. Hopkin award for seriousness of purpose and high academic achievement. She is also a founder of the WiCV workshop (women in computer vision) co-located at CVPR annually.

Contact: Roxana Hernandez, roxanah at csail.mit.edu

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The Aftermath of Financial Crises: What Happens and Why: The 2018 Robert A. Muh Alumni Award Lecture
Thursday, March 22
5:00pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building E14 6th Floor, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Christina Romer (University of California, Berkeley)

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Moving Broadband from Sea to Land: Internet Infrastructure and Digital Labor in Tanzania
Thursday, March 22
5:00pm to 6:30pm
MIT, Building 54-114, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Lisa Parks
As digital networks are extended across the world, new forms of labor are required to enable and sustain mediated communication. This talk addresses the need for further critical conceptualizations of the labor and resource challenges inherent in extending the global internet from urban areas to rural, low-income communities in various parts of the world. The East African country of Tanzania hosts four major undersea cable landings, suggesting that the country’s 51 million people would be well integrated within global broadband fibre optic networks. Despite Tanzanians’ close proximity to major internet gateways and the country’s innovative regulatory climate (van Gorp & Maitland, 2009), limited electrical and terrestrial telecommunication infrastructure prevents most citizens from benefitting from these cable landings. By 2014 only 15% of the population used the internet in Tanzania (Internet World Stats, 2016). This study uses ethnographic fieldwork, including site visits and interviews with workers at network facilities and data centers in Dar es Salaam and the Mara region, to investigate the material conditions undergirding these paradoxical dynamics. Building on her past research on rural connectivity in neighboring Zambia, CMS/W professor Lisa Park‘s study will also explore how labor and resource conditions have effected an initiative called the Serengeti Broadband Network (SBN), which began in 2007 to establish broadband connectivity across 15 villages in one of Tanzania’s remote interior regions. Ultimately, the talk will draw upon this empirical research to contribute to theorizations of labor, infrastructure, and (dis)connectivity in the digital era.

Lisa Parks is a global media scholar whose research focuses on three areas: satellite technologies and media cultures; critical studies of media infrastructures; and media, militarization and surveillance. She is Principal Investigator for MIT’s Global Media Technologies and Cultures Lab.

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Shifting Borders of Justice: Territory, Market, Migration - Ayelet Shachar
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 22, 2018, 5 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Emerson Hall 210, 25 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
SPEAKER(S)  Ayelet Shachar
COST  FREE
CONTACT INFO	Vickie Aldin, events at ethics.harvard.edu, 617-495-0599
DETAILS  Contributing to debates about migration and globalization, this lecture explores how and why the multiple borders of justice — territorial, legal, and normative — are shifting. These dramatic transformations unsettle ideas about waning sovereignty just as they illustrate the limits of unilateral, refortified bordering responses. As an alternative to these established theoretical poles and as part of a broader attempt to overcome policy deadlocks at the domestic and international level, Professor Shachar proposes a new approach to human mobility and security in a world of persistent inequality.
LINK	https://ethics.harvard.edu/event/public-lecture-ayelet-shachar

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The Perfect Gift? Unwrapping the Mysteries of Giving and Receiving
Thursday, March 22
5:15 - 6:45 PM
Harvard, Wexner 436, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge

Gift giving is an ancient custom, but modern science and philosophy are only just beginning to shape our understanding of what it means to give. Come hear our expert panelists as they discuss the psychosocial and biological underpinnings behind why we give, illuminate what gifts matter most, and challenge our conceptions on what gifts can be.

Moderator
Jeffrey Huffman, MD
Panelists
Lewis Hyde, PhD
Michael Norton, PhD
Ashley Whillans, PhD
Steven Schlozman, MD

Free and open to the public

Editorial Comment:  This is a stellar panel and the power of gratitude is being proven over and over again in reproducible social experiments.

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MassChallenge & Zipcar Present: The Future of Mobility
Thursday, March 22
5:30 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
MassChallenge Headquarters, 21 Drydock Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/masschallenge-zipcar-present-the-future-of-mobility-tickets-43363062086

Join Boston's largest startup accelerator and the Boston-based world car-sharing leader for a preview of the hottest innovations in transportation that Boston has to offer. A celebration devoted to recognizing Boston's role as a pioneer in mobile technology, the evening will include:
A showcase with 15 of the region's top startup companies bound to have an impact on mobility in years to come
A panel discussion addressing the future of Boston transportation 
Networking with key innovators, government officials, and corporates in the mobility space

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To The Mountaintops
Thursday, March 22
5:30pm to 8:00pm
Northeastern, Behrakis Health Sciences Center, 010 30 Leon Street, Boston

Join the Asian Studies Program and CITIZENARTS for a showing of documentary To The Mountaintops, a comparison of the surging dynamics of China and India -- the world's largest authoritarian and democratic state.

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Cleantech Open's 2018 Boston Kickoff Party
Thursday, March 22
5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Greentown Labs, 444 Somerville Avenue, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.facebook.com/events/159480891360420/
Cost: $12.61 - $17.89

Please join us in celebrating the launch of the 2018 Cleantech Open accelerator! This is the 14th year of Cleantech Open and we are excited to welcome back our community as we look forward to this year's program. We welcome all entrepreneurs, students, investors, savvy technologists, and anyone interested in joining our growing community. This is a great way to connect with Cleantech Open alumni, mentors, and thought leaders in the cleantech space. 

If you're a cleantech entrepreneur, this is the perfect event to learn how your venture can benefit from Cleantech Open. You will have the opportunity to give a 1-minute pitch in front of the audience and if you get voted crowd favorite you'll win a free application to Cleantech Open valued at $150!

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Materials Selection for Millennial Industry
Thursday, March 22
5:30pm - 8:30pm
Hyatt Regency Hotel, 575 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP by March 20 at http://www.asmboston.org
Cost:  $15 - $30
                  
The aerospace and nuclear industries have developed greatly over the last 60 years, and pressures of modern day economics have changed the requirements surrounding selection of materials.  Differences in materials and in procedures for selecting materials are discussed, in light of advances in priorities and realities for the Materials Engineer.  The topics will be of interest both to seasoned engineers, who have seen modifications to their standard selection approach evolve over time, and to early career engineers, who are looking for guidance and insight in the modern world of material selection.  Focus is provided on the effects of green programs, lean quality initiatives, specification origins, and research funding on materials selection process and criteria. 

Featured Speaker:
Daniel is a Staff Engineer in Design Metallurgy with Pratt & Whitney, providing materials selection expertise in the design, manufacture, and service of jet engines.  Prior to Pratt & Whitney, he was a Senior Materials Engineer with Westinghouse Electric Company, advising for design and service of nuclear power plant primary systems.  Previously, he was a Research Assistant in Inertial Confinement Fusion with MIT’s Plasma Science Fusion Center.  

Daniel has received Bachelor’s Degrees in Nuclear Engineering and Literature from MIT.  He has received a Master’s Degree in Engineering Science (Materials) from RPI, focusing on Aerospace Superalloys.  Daniel is a Licensed Professional Engineer for Metallurgical and Materials Engineering in the States of Connecticut and Missouri.  He is the Chair of the Hartford Section of ASM International.

Schedule:  5:30 PM - 6:30 PM - Networking; cash bar
6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Dinner 
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM Featured presentation

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Advanced Tech: Autonomous & Drone Technologies
Thursday, March 22
5:30pm to 9:00pm
MIT, Building 32-123, Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.mitforumcambridge.org/event/advanced-tech-autonomous-drone-technologies/
Cost:  $20 Members; $30Non-Members: $10 Students; $5 Student Members 
(In-Auditorium or Live Stream)

Innovation continues to be a focus of strategic discussions within the Department of Defense as they increasingly confront nimble drone and autonomous technologies on the battlefield and are seeking advanced counter technologies to support our troops.

Our panel of experts from Raytheon, the U.S. Air Force AFwerX, and Draper Labs will discuss how recent and future innovations in commercial detection, tracking, identification, characterization and mitigation technologies can and will benefit the military with quicker adoption and reduction in procurement prices.

Following the panel discussion, come upstairs to the R&D Commons on the 4th Floor of the MIT Stata Center to a showcase featuring startups working on relevant and tangential technologies will be demoing their technologies to you in an open setting. Learn about their tech, ask questions, and vote on the best showcase elevator pitches and your favorite technology. Appetizers and beverages will be served.

Showcase teams will include the Techstars Autonomous Technology class of 2018,  MIT Sloan as well as MIT students and Alumni.

Confirmed panelists:
Chitra Sivanandam is a Technology Strategist at Raytheon developing partnerships and investment strategies that serve the DoD/Intel market as well as commercial markets. She is a tech junkie and entrepreneur who has experience in startups, large corporations, and prior to her most recent role, served as the Director at Blackbird Technologies, and as technical staff at In-Q-Tel.

Capt. Steven Lauver is a Deputy Director within the A8XP Innovation Branch in the United States Air Force, AFwerX. A graduate of the of the US Air Force Academy and pilot, Captain Lauver is an entrepreneur at heart having co-founded Nodify Inc. in 2012 and recently helped to create the AFwerX innovation team which is helping to change the way the Air Force identifies and potentially adopts new technologies.

Moderator:  Warren Katz, Managing Dir. of Techstars Autonomous Technology Accelerator

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Future of Food Products
Thursday, March 22
6 - 8:30pm
Lighthouse 20th Floor, CIC Boston, 50 Milk Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/branchfood-presents-the-future-of-food-panel-series-tickets-39173251249
Cost:  $20 - $75.95

Flavor Clouds, Gelato with zero added sugar, and prickly pear water are just a few examples of the new food products, trends, and businesses that are emerging daily. Though we’re seeing innovative consumer packaged goods startups launching around the world, Boston is home to some of the most progressive food product innovations out there.

In our 2nd Future of Food Series panel, we will speak with Boston’s leading startup founders, investors, and manufacturers to discuss the latest trends in food product innovation, development and marketing.

PRESENTERS
Adam Melonas, Founder & CEO at Chew LLC and Nursery
Adam is one of the worlds most respected innovators in the experimental culinary arts. In 2013 he founded Chew, a food innovation lab in Cambridge, MA that redefines what is possible in the world of packaged food by creating game-changing products that are not only delicious but also nutritious and sustainable. Adam’s latest venture, the Nursery, is a Food and Beverage incubator designed to build and scale both new Food and beverage products, as well as Food and Beverage Technology.

Risa Sherman, Philanthropy, Social Impact and Cause Marketing at The Boston Beer Company
Risa’s role at The Boston Beer Company is to oversee all philanthropy across multiple brands including the company’s award-winning initiative, Samuel Adams Brewing the American Dream, a program she helped to create in 2007. The program connects hard-working entrepreneurs in the food, beverage and brewing areas with working capital, coaching and networks they need to start, strengthen and grow their small businesses. 

MODERATOR
Janelle Nanos, Reporter at The Boston Globe
Janelle is a writer, editor, and journalism professor in Boston. She is currently a business reporter at the Boston Globe, where she writes about retail, e-commerce, the food industry and consumer culture. She thrives on diving deep into the ideas, people, and businesses that drive Boston’s economy.

The Future of Food is a 4-part series exploring topics surrounding the Future of Food. The series is jointly hosted by Branchfood andCIC in Boston, Massachusetts. Tickets are available to purchase for individual events or an all-access series pass. 

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MIT Water Night 2018 : Exploring the Science & Art of Water
Thursday, March 22
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
MIT, Walker Memorial, Morss Hall (50-140), 142 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-water-night-2018-exploring-the-science-art-of-water-tickets-42452093354

Come join the MIT Water Club for its annual Water Night, a family-friendly event to celebrate water on the evening of World Water Day, March 22. This year's theme is about Exploring the Art and Science of Water! Come learn about water through research posters, art exhibits, interactive demos, and more. Researchers at MIT, local universities and industries will present their water-related work. This year, in addition to the research showcase, we are featuring for the first time artistic and experimental displays! Open to everybody -- attendance is FREE and food will be provided. Don't miss this amazing opportunity to interact with the local water community.
Keynote: We are pleased to announce Prof. Jeffrey A. Hoffman, MIT AeroAstro and former NASA astronaut, will speak on water in space, don't miss this exciting opportunity at 7pm!

Call for Presenters: Are you working on a great water-related topic? Do you have an experiment that you'd like to show the world? Do you have cool artistic items - pictures, paintings, displays, etc - related to water? Then hesitate no more and come present at the MIT Water Night by filling out the form on our website!

Volunteering Opportunities are available with the MIT Water Night organizing team. If you are interested in artistic and scientific content development, or gaining experience in PR, fundraising, or event organizing, please send an email to water-night at mit.edu expressing your interests and our team will get in contact with you.

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Capitalism and The Climate
Thursday, March 22
8:00 PM ET 
RSVP at https://wevolunteer.openprogress.com/Opportunities/Details/?oId=345846
Call in number: 1 917-444-5627

Join by computer to ask questions or "raise your hand" Gotcm.org/uber

Dr. Benjamin Fong will be joining Margaret for a discussion of political power, our ecocidal economic system, the emergency climate movement, and how psychoanalysis can help us strategize to prevent climate catastrophe.

Benjamin Y. Fong teaches at the Honors College at Arizona State University and is on the steering committee of the Democratic Socialists for Medicare for All campaign. He recently authored "The Climate Crisis? It's Capitalism, Stupid"in the New York Times, and is also the author of Death and Mastery: Psychoanalytic Drive Theory and the Subject of Late Capitalism (Columbia, 2016).

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Friday, March 23 – Saturday, March 24
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Human Rights in a Time of Populism
WHEN  Friday, Mar. 23, 12 p.m. – Saturday, Mar. 24, 2018, 5 p.m.
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Law
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Law School Human Rights Program
SPEAKER(S)	Select Speakers Include:
Tyler Giannini, Clinical Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; Clinical Director, Human Rights Program
Martha Minow, Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence, Harvard Law School
Gerald Neuman, J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law, Harvard Law School; Co-Director, Human Rights Program
Ruth Okediji, Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law; Co-Director, Berkman Klein Center
Michael Posner, Jerome Kohlberg Professor of Ethics and Finance and Professor of Business and Society, NYU Stern School of Business; Director, Center for Business and Human Rights
(Other speakers will be announced closer to the date).
CONTACT INFO	hrp at law.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The “Human Rights in a Time of Populism” conference will discuss the challenges that current developments characterized as populist pose to the goals of the international human rights system, and more broadly the relationship between human rights and populism, and strategies for dealing with the current challenges.
The range of approaches to this general topic will be intentionally broad-ranging and multidisciplinary, including:
What is populism; is it increasing and why; is populism in conflict with internationally recognized human rights, or a legitimate exercise of human rights?
What challenges does populism create for the protection of internationally recognized human rights; how can human rights NGOs and human rights institutions respond to these challenges?
Should human rights-based responses directly address populism; what can human rights-based responses do to decrease populism; what human rights-based responses are likely to make matters worse by causing or increasing populist backlash?
Have human rights NGOs or institutions contributed unintentionally to the rise of populism by provoking backlash; if so what should human rights NGOs or institutions do in the face of populist backlash; does increased populism point in other ways to lessons that should be learned by human rights NGOs or institutions?
The above questions are generally phrased, but speakers will address them in particular national or regional contexts, such as (to name only a few) the Philippines, Latin America, the United Kingdom, Western or Eastern Europe, and the United States.
To facilitate discussion, participants will prepare short working draft papers that will be shared privately among the participants several weeks before the conference. The plan is to have a candid and interactive public discussion on these important issues, and subsequently a book formalizing contributions of interested participants.
The conference is planned for March 23-24, 2018 a Friday afternoon and the following Saturday.
LINK  http://hrp.law.harvard.edu/events/

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African Development Conference
WHEN  Friday, Mar. 23 – Saturday, Mar. 24, 2018
WHERE  Harvard University
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Harvard Law School
SPEAKER(S)  David Maraga
Amina J. Mohammed
Cecilia Akintomide
Antoinette Monsio Sayeh
COST  From $33 - $117
TICKET WEB LINK  https://ticketbud.com/events/47adf15e-01cf-11e8-b901-4fcec0fbc8a7
DETAILS  Join us at the 9th Annual African Development Conference at Harvard University as we unpack these nuances of African development policies. Through the theme: Our Time; Our Vision: Wielding Africa’s Potential for Sustainable Growth we will spark discussions around three major pillars of growth: Democracy and Good Governance, Technology, and Economic Partnerships, and their contribution to the achievement of Africa’s Agenda 2063 and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
LINK	https://www.harvardadc.com

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Friday, March 23
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Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar:  Chemical Mechanism Development for the Formation of Components of Secondary Organic Aerosol
Friday, March 23
12:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Matt Elrod, Oberlin College

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/111766

Contact Name:  Kelvin Bates
kelvin_bates at fas.harvard.edu

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3D Anatomical Data for Everyone: the openVertebrate Thematic Collections Network
Friday, March 23
12:00PM
Harvard, Agassiz Room (101a), MCZ, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with David Blackburn, University of Florida

MCZ Lunchtime Seminar 
http://mcz.harvard.edu/news/seminars/

Contact Name:  Melissa Aja
maja at oeb.harvard.edu

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Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC) Tour
Friday, March 23
1:00PM
Charlestown Facility, Building 80, 100 Terminal Street, Boston
Registration required at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdKTCudGDASNGkO24-i_Vf21MLexNS1JHVH0G-6JrwEiSicJQ/viewform

Join the Harvard Extension Student Environmental Club (HESEC) in a guided tour of the largest wind turbine blade testing center in North America. 

Come with us and explore the latest wind turbine blade testing and prototype development methodologies to help the wind industry deploy the next generation of land-based and offshore wind turbine technologies.

Contact Name:   heec at hesa.dce.harvard.edu

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IACS Seminar: Data Science and Our Environment
WHEN  Friday, Mar. 23, 2018, 1 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard SEAS Campus, Maxwell Dworkin Building. G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge 
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Ethics, Health Sciences, Information Technology, Lecture, Research study, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute for Applied Computational Science at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science
SPEAKER(S)  Francesca Dominici, Professor of Biostatistics, HSPH & Co-Director of the Harvard Data Science Initiative (HDSI)
COST  Free and open to the public. No registration required.
CONTACT INFO  Email: iacs-info at seas.harvard.edu
Phone: 617-496-2623
DETAILS  What if I told you I had evidence of a serious threat to American national security – a terrorist attack in which a jumbo jet will be hijacked and crashed every 12 days. Thousands will continue to die unless we act now. This is the question before us today – but the threat doesn’t come from terrorists. The threat comes from climate change and air pollution.
Researchers have developed an artificial neural network model that uses on-the-ground air-monitoring data and satellite-based measurements to estimate daily pollution levels across the continental U.S., breaking the country up into 1-square-kilometer zones. They have paired that information with health data contained in Medicare claims records from the last 12 years, and for 97% of the population aged 65 or older. They have also developed statistical methods and computational efficient algorithms for the analysis over 460 million health records.
Their research shows that short and long term exposure to air pollution is killing thousands of senior citizens each year. Their data science platform is telling us that federal limits on the nation’s most widespread air pollutants are not stringent enough.
This type of data is the sign of a new era for the role of data science in public health, and also for the associated methodological challenges. For example, with enormous amounts of data, the threat of unmeasured confounding bias is amplified, and causality is even harder to assess with observational studies. Dr. Dominici will discuss these and other challenges.
LINK  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/111801

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Automating Inequality:  How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor
Friday, March 23
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store, Harvard Kennedy School's digitalHKS, the MIT Center for Civic Media, and Mass Humanities welcome VIRGINIA EUBANKS, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University at Albany SUNY, for a discussion of her latest book, Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor. She will be joined in conversation by ETHAN ZUCKERMAN, director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT.

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Graduate Lecture Series: Ron Prinn (CGCS/EAPS)
Friday, March 23
4:30pm to 5:30pm
MIT, Building 54-915, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

About the Speaker
Ron Prinn's research incorporates the chemistry, chemical evolution, dynamics and physics of the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets. Current projects involve atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemistry, climate science, and integrated assessment of science and policy regarding climate change. He leads the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) that measures rates of changes of the concentrations of trace gases involved in the greenhouse effect and ozone depletion. He is pioneering the use of inverse methods using AGAGE measurements and 3D models to determine trace gas emissions and understand atmospheric chemical processes. Through his directorship of the Center for Global Change Science and the Joint Program for the Science and Policy of Global Change he works with social scientists to link the science, economics, and policy aspects of global change. Prinn has co-developed a model which couples economics, climate dynamics, and land and ocean ecosystems to elucidate uncertainties in climate predictions.

Prinn, who has been a faculty member at MIT since 1971, served as Head of Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences from 1998 to 2003.

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Braiding Sweetgrass: The Teachings of Plants
Friday, March 23
7:00PM TO 8:30PM
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu
Cost: $10 member, $20 nonmember

Robin Wall Kimmerer, PhD, Distinguished Teaching Professor and Director, Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, State University of New York, Syracuse

Drawing on her life as an indigenous plant scientist, a teacher, a writer and a mother, Robin Wall Kimmerer will share ideas found in her award-winning book, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants, in which she shows how plants—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In traditional ecological knowledge, plants are regarded not only as persons, but as among our oldest teachers. If plants are our teachers, what are they teaching us and how can we be better students? In a rich braid of ecological science, indigenous philosophy and literary reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she explores and celebrates the material and cultural gifts of plants and our responsibilities for reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world.

https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1708&DayPlannerDate=3/23/2018

Contact Name:   arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu

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Saturday, March 24
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March for Our Lives Boston
Saturday, March 24
12pm
Boston Common, Boston

In the words of Stoneman Douglas High School shooting survivors; the fearless, faithful, resilient cries of those students, “This is it.” 

Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg, Alex Wind and Jaclyn Corin are just a few of those many Stoneman Douglas High School students who on February 14th, 2018 endured the tragic Parkland shooting that lost the lives of 17 of their beloved peers, faculty, teachers, and community members. But with an average of 96 Americans dying by gun homicides each day (CDC), they stand amongst fellow students, survivors, and fed-up citizens across the country in demanding just the same to lawmakers: “This is it.” 

So this must not just be a legislative turning point for our country in regards to gun control - but a social turning point, and a moral one. There has existed in the United States, in New England, in Massachusetts - communities plagued by gun violence for so long they have felt muted-out; rejected and neglected by our politicians and lawmakers. But we - as students, survivors; many of us members of these same communities - hear them here too. So together with fellow students, survivors, exhausted constituents from Broward County to Suffolk County, on March 24th, we “March for Our Lives.” To finally reject, in all forms, this uniquely American epidemic. 

All who stand against the senselessness of American gun violence are welcome to attend. 

National March for Our Lives main page: 
http://www.facebook.com/marchforourlives/

Boston MFOL Twitter: @MFOLBoston #MarchforOurLivesBoston
Boston MFOL Snapchat: bostonmfol
Boston MFOL Instagram: mfolboston

Official Boston MFOL fundraising merchandise: https://shop.bonfire.com/marchforourlivesboston/

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Sunday, March 25
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Tardigrade Stage #2: Arts for Climate
Sunday, March 25
4:30 PM – 6:00 PM EDT
The Democracy Center, 45 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tardigrade-stage-2-arts-for-climate-tickets-43336063332

Care about climate? Love the arts? Join us for folktales from around the world, dynamic chamber music, virtuosic viola, and a special appearance by climate activist Craig Altemose, founder of CREW. Supporting Communities Responding to Extreme Weather (CREW): a network of volunteers building local climate resilience. 

Suggested Donation: whatever you can share, $20+ per person would be great! All donations go directly to CREW after $1 per person is donated to the Democracy Center for use of the space.
much more info and ways to pitch in at https://www.lieurance.com/tardigrade-stage
stay up to date and give us a boost by "liking" Tardigrade Stage's Facebook page
Craig Altemose, climate activist
Doria Hughes, Storyteller
Alex Vavilov, violist
Rebecca Thornblade, cellist
Amy Sims, violin
This event will be most enjoyed by children who can easily listen quietly to 10 minute long pieces of music.Having said that, all ages welcome!

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Monday, March 26
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LET MY PEOPLE GO! Exodus from Fossil Fuels: An Interfaith Witness for Climate Action
Monday, March 26
12:00 noon at the State House in downtown Boston, preceded by an optional training in non-violent civil disobedience (9-11 am), and followed by an opportunity to lobby for clean energy 
RSVP at https://goo.gl/forms/KuAQkwHI2aIqhVsG3

We are gathering people of all faiths to witness to climate injustice in our state, and to speak truth to Governor Baker. We have chosen March 26th because it is during Holy Week and right before Passover and Easter celebrations. We will be speaking from the heart of our diverse faiths, demanding that the Governor stop cooperating with fossil fuel interests and do everything in his power to stop the expansion of fossil fuel infrastructure in the Commonwealth. We will confront the governor, as Moses confronted Pharaoh, with the realities of climate change and the very real "plagues" that climate change is bringing and will continue to bring...until we break free from fossil fuels and begin to repair our climate for future generations.

We will have an opportunity for non-violent direct action training just before we gather at the State House on March 26th, from 9:00-11:00 a.m., in the sanctuary of the Cathedral Church of St. Paul (138 Tremont St., Boston, opposite the Park Street stop on the MBTA). This NVDA training will focus on a faith-based approach. Please RSVP at https://goo.gl/forms/KuAQkwHI2aIqhVsG3

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Towards Quantification of the Paris Agreement's Social Value of Mitigation Activities
Monday, March 26
10:00AM
Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room 440, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Drew Shindell, Duke University.

Hosts: Loretta Mickley, Jonathan Moch

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/112211

Contact Name:  Kelvin Bates
kelvin_bates at fas.harvard.edu

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Glacial Climates and Monsoon Dynamics in Proxies and Models
Monday, March 26
12:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Tripti Bhattacharya, Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona
Monsoons are critical features of the global hydrological cycle, but our understanding of their past and future variability remains incomplete. In this talk, I use proxy indicators of past monsoonal climates and general circulation model simulations to explore the processes that regulate the long-term evolution of these circulations. In particular, I focus on the North American Monsoon (NAM), an iconic feature of the Southwest climate that is the dominant source of rainfall for northwest Mexico and Arizona. Despite its importance, the NAM remains one of the least understood monsoon systems. Novel measurements of the isotopic composition of leaf waxes indicate a regional decrease in monsoon rainfall during the Last Glacial Maximum (21 ka BP), and show that the deglacial trajectory of the NAM closely tracks North American ice cover. GCM simulations reproduce this link between monsoon strength and ice volume, largely as a result of ice-sheet induced changes in the subtropical jet that `ventilate' the monsoon by favoring the mixing of cold, dry air into the NAM region. This work coheres with a growing body of literature that highlights the role of mid-latitude circulations in altering the energetic environment for monsoon convection. It also shows that comparisons of the sensitivity of regional hydroclimates to large-scale forcings across proxies and models can provide unique insights into the dynamical drivers of climate change.

EPS/ESE Joint Colloquium Series
https://eps.harvard.edu/event/epsese-joint-colloquium-series-1

Contact Name:   Sabinna Cappo
scappo at fas.harvard.edu

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Challenges for Getting the Prices Right in PJM's Wholesale Electricity Markets
Monday, March 26
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Hung-Po Chao, Senior Director & Chief Economist, PJM Interconnection. Lunch will be provided. 

Energy Policy Seminar
https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Lousia Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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Brown Bag Lunch: Ari Daniel
Monday, March 26
12:00pm to 1:30pm
MIT, Building 10-340, Emma Rogers Room, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This event is rescheduled following cancellation during the March 13th snowstorm. Please join us!

Ari Daniel, PhD ’08, is dedicating his career to science communication. He is currently a digital producer on Nova, for PBS, and a freelance reporter for a host of beloved public radio shows such as NPR’s Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. He will be joining the MIT Women’s League for a Brown Bag Lunch to talk about his work and the role of storytelling in the changing landscape of science communication. Please RSVP to attend, and feel free to bring your lunch!

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Ecological Transitions during the Evolution of C4 Photosynthesis
Monday, March 26
12:10PM
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Research Building, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Marjorie Lundgren, Postdoctoral Fellow, MIT

Watch live on the Arboretum’s YouTube channel if you are unable to attend in person. The streaming video is visible only when in progress.

Arnold Arboretum Research Talk
https://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

Contact Name: 
arbweb at arnarb.harvard.edu

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Sex in the Age of Medical Jurisprudence: The Law and Science of Hermaphrodites in the 19th century U.S.
Monday, March 26
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, Pierce 100F, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Maayan Sudai, Harvard Law School

Sandwich lunch is provided. RSVP to via the online form by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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Food for Thought: the Origins of Massachusetts Food and Why it Matters
Monday, March 26
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT
Public Library of Brookline - Putterham Library, 959 West Roxbury Parkway, Brookline
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/food-for-thought-the-origins-of-massachusetts-food-and-why-it-matters-tickets-42651659261

Join us for an afternoon with Stephen Kenney, Director of the Commonwealth Museum as he talks about the history of food in Massachusetts. What foods are native to Massachusetts and what foods arrived with the English colonists?

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Privacy Despite Mass Surveillance
Monday, March 26
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Sebastian Angel, University of Texas at Austin
In the past decade there has been a significant increase in the collection of personal information and communication metadata (with whom users communicate, when, how often) by governments, Internet providers, companies, and universities. While there are many ongoing efforts to secure users' communications, namely end-to-end encryption messaging apps and E-mail services, safeguarding metadata remains elusive.

Computer Science Colloquium Series

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Old North Speaker Series: Nancy Seasholes - The Changing Shape of Boston
Monday, March 26
6:00 pm
Old North Church & Historic Site, 193 Salem Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/old-north-speaker-series-nancy-seasholes-the-changing-shape-of-boston-tickets-31648597808

Tickets: “pay what you will” donation
Did you know that Boston was once a small peninsula? How did the fact that Boston was located on a peninsula affect the choices made by both the British and the Patriots on April 18, 1775? What happened to that small peninsula afterwards to transform it into the Boston of today? This talk will explore the changes in Boston’s topography from the time of the Revolutionary War to the present.
Nancy S. Seasholes is a historian and historical archaeologist. Her area of expertise is all the filling that’s been done to create the land on which Boston is located. She is the author of Gaining Ground: A History of Landmaking in Boston (MIT 2003) and its companion book, Walking Tours of Boston’s Made Land (MIT 2006). She’s also the author of a chapter in Krieger and Cobb’s Mapping Boston (MIT 1999). Nancy is an independent scholar and is currently directing a project to produce an historical atlas of Boston. Titled Atlas of Boston History: The Making of a City, it will be published by the University of Chicago Press in fall 2019.

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China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know
Monday, March 26
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Harvard Coop, 1400 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/jeff-wasserstrom-and-maura-cunningham-china-in-the-21st-century-what-everyone-needs-to-know-co-tickets-43320936086

In this fully revised and updated third edition of China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know®, Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom and Maura Elizabeth Cunningham provide cogent answers to urgent questions regarding the world’s newest superpower and offer a framework for understanding China’s meteoric rise from developing country to superpower. Framing their answers through the historical legacies – Confucian thought, Western and Japanese imperialism, the Mao era, and the Tiananmen Square massacre – that largely define China’s present-day trajectory, Wasserstrom and Cunningham introduce readers to the Chinese Communist Party, the building boom in Shanghai, and the environmental fallout of rapid Chinese industrialization. They also explain unique aspects of Chinese culture, such as the one-child policy, and provide insight into Chinese-American relations, a subject that has become increasingly fraught during the Trump era. As Wasserstrom and Cunningham draw parallels between China and other industrialized nations during their periods of development, in particular the United States during its rapid industrialization in the 19th century, they also predict how we might expect China to act in the future vis-à-vis the United States, Russia, India, and its East Asian neighbors.

Updated to include perspectives on Hong Kong’s shifting political status, as well as an expanded discussion of President Xi Jinping’s time in office, China in the 21st Century provides a concise and insightful introduction to this significant global power.

Maura Elizabeth Cunningham is a writer and historian of modern China. She is a graduate of Saint Joseph’s University (B.A., 2004), Yale University (M.A., 2006), the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies (graduate certificate, 2008), and the University of California, Irvine (Ph.D., 2014). Maura was the editor-in-chief of The China Beat, a blog based at UC Irvine, between 2009 and 2012, and associate editor of ChinaFile during a fellowship at the Asia Society’s Center on U.S.-China Relations in 2011-12. From 2014 to 2016, Maura served as a program officer at the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, where she co-directed the Public Intellectuals Program; in 2016, she became the digital media manager at the Association for Asian Studies. As a writer, her work has appeared at the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and other publications.

Jeffrey Wasserstrom is a graduate of UC Santa Cruz (B.A., 1982), Harvard (A.M., 1984), and Berkeley (Ph.D.,1989), and he is now Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine. He has written five books, the most recent of which are Eight Juxtapositions: China through Imperfect Analogies from Mark Twain to Manchukuo(Penguin, 2016) and the third edition of China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford, 2018). He has also edited or co-edited several other books, including The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China (2016). In addition to writing for academic journals, he has contributed to many general interest venues, among them the New York Times, the TLS, and the Los Angeles Review of Books (LARB). He is an academic editor of LARB’s China Channel and the Editor of the Journal of Asian Studies.

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Tuesday, March 27 - Friday, March 30 
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West Roxbury PIpeline Protest Trial
Tuesday, March 27 - Friday, March 30 
West Roxbury District Court, 445 Arborway, Jamaica Plain

More information at http://www.climatedisobedience.org
https://www.facebook.com/events/963730847119074/

Editorial Comment:  Fifteen activists from five different days of protests combined in one trial.  Could be interesting.

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Tuesday, March 27
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Richard Rothstein: The Color of Law & Changing Patterns
Tuesday, March 27
8:30 AM – 11:00 AM EDT
MassHousing, One Beacon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/richard-rothstein-the-color-of-law-changing-patterns-tickets-42873252051
Cost:  $15

In THE COLOR OF LAW, Richard Rothstein argues with exacting precision and fascinating insight how segregation in America—the incessant kind that continues to dog our major cities and has contributed to so much recent social strife—is the byproduct of explicit government policies at the local, state, and federal level.
“The Color of Law is one of those rare books that will be discussed and debated for many decades. Based on careful analyses of multiple historical documents, Rothstein has presented what I consider to be the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation.” —WILLIAM JULIUS WILSON, author of The Truly Disadvantaged 
Join the Massachusetts Community & Banking Council as Jim Campen, author of Changing Patterns XXIV, presents some key findings from our most recent report and then hear from Richard Rothstein as he explores the role of goverment in contributing to and reinforcing segregation in Boston, Greater Boston and Massachusetts. Richard will take questions from the audience.
THE COLOR OF LAW will also be available for purchase on site, and Richard will be signing copies at the end of the event.
Tickets are limited so please purchase your ticket now to ensure a space.
Agenda:
8:30 - 9:00	Arrival & breakfast
9:00 – 9:05	Introduction of Richard Rothstein 
9:00 – 9:10	Presentation of Changing Patterns XXIV Data
9:10 – 9:45	Richard Rothstein Remarks
9:45 – 10:20	 Audience Q&A 
10:20 – 11:00 Book Signing

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Shorenstein Center Speaker Series: Adam Serwer
WHEN  Tuesday, Mar. 27, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Taubman 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy
SPEAKER(S)  Adam Serwer
DETAILS  Adam Serwer is the Deputy Politics Editor at The Atlantic. He has previously worked for BuzzFeed News, MSNBC, Mother Jones and The American Prospect.
LINK	https://shorensteincenter.org/event/speaker-series-adam-serwer/

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Dividing Lines: Why Is Internet Access Still Considered a Luxury in America?
Tuesday, March 27
12:00 pm
Harvard Law School campus, Pound Hall Room 101, Ballantine Classroom
RSVP required to attend in person at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2018/luncheon/03/Smith#RSVP
Event will be live webcast at 12:00 pm at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2018/luncheon/03/Smith

featuring Berkman Klein Project Coordinator, Maria Smith
The online world is no longer a distinct world. It is an extension of our social, economic, and political lives. Internet access, however, is still considered a luxury good in the United States. Millions of Americans have been priced out of, or entirely excluded from, the reach of modern internet networks. Maria Smith, an affiliate of Berkman Klein and the Cyberlaw Clinic, created a four-part documentary series to highlight these stark divides in connectivity, from Appalachia to San Francisco, and to uncover the complex web of political and economic forces behind them.   

About Maria
Maria Smith is a Project Coordinator working with Professor Susan Crawford in Harvard Law School's Cyberlaw Clinic and leading the efforts of the Responsive Communities project within Berkman Klein. She is focused on the intersection of technology deployment and social and economic justice. Maria is also a documentary filmmaker whose productions expose the impacts of and forces behind America's stark digital divides. She made her directorial debut in college with the film One Nation, Disconnected, in cooperation with the Harvard Law Documentary Studio, that details the hardship of a teenager growing up in New York City without internet access at home. Dividing Lines, a four-part series, is in production this year.   

Maria first joined the Berkman Klein and Harvard Law communities as an undergraduate conducting teaching, research, and project support for Professor Susan Crawford. Maria graduated from Harvard College with a B.A. in Economics. In college she was invested in work with the Global Health and AIDS Coalition and co-chaired the annual Women’s Leadership Conference. She worked as an intern for the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, Connecting for Good, and Morgan Stanley.  

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Healthy Fathers, Healthy Families, Healthy Communities: Addressing Father Absenteeism as a Public Health Matter
Tuesday, March 27
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Brown Rudnick LLP, 1 Financial Center, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-issue-talk-healthy-fathers-healthy-families-healthy-communities-addressing-father-registration-42998445508

Guest Speaker: Monica Valdes Lupi, Executive Director, Boston Public Health Commission
Featured Innovator: Fathers' Uplift

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The Camp and the City: Territories of Extraction
Tuesday, March 27
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Stubbins (112), Gund Hall, 42 Quincy Street, Cambridge

Urbanization metabolizes territories surrounding cities as well as territories that are located far beyond the centers themselves and provide the needed resources and goods. Landscapes of extraction are probably one of the most evident examples of this: whole regions are exploited for their resources to ensure the development of others. However, while it is becoming evident that these territories could be considered as part of the urbanization process itself, they are still very marginal in the agenda of urban designers, planners, regional administrators, and political institutions. Territories of extraction are not paid enough attention as places for living themselves – they are in a way the negative of cities: they are what ensures the development, prosperity, and consolidation of cities, but are themselves the emblem of deployment and precariousness.

The Camp and the City book aims to articulate a discussion about territories of extraction in order to set up concepts and provide a general overview of their common challenges throughout different landscapes. Calama – the most important mining cluster in Chile and one of the most important hubs for copper extraction in the world – is presented as a case study in order to generate a more specific and evidence-based discussion, offering the ground for the development of a more projective critical view.

Jeannette Sordi
Jeannette Sordi is Associate Professor of Landscape and Urbanism at the Design Lab of Univer­sidad Adolfo Ibanez, Santiago, Chile. She holds a PhD from the Polytechnic School of the University of Genoa (2014) and has been DAAD post-doctoral research fellow at Leib­niz Universität Hannover (2014) and PhD Special Student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (2011- 2012). Her research focuses on the investigation of recycling strategies for architecture, landscape, and urbanism and on the development of planning instruments and devices based on recycling, landscape, and ecology. She is the author of the book Beyond Urbanism (List, 2014) that reassembles the origins and the­ories of Landscape Urbanism, and co-editor of Andrea Branzi. Ten Humble Suggestions for a new Athens Chart (Arq, 2015).

Luis Valenzuela
Director for the Center of Territorial In­telligence and academic for DesignLAB at Adolfo Ibañéz University, professor at the school of business at Adolfo Ibañéz Univer­sity and associated researcher at the Center of Conflict and Social Cohesion, COES. He holds an Architecture diploma and a Master in Architecture from Chile’s Catho­lic University and a Doctor of Design from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design.

In 2014 and 2015 he was guest professor at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. In 2011 he founded the Center of Territorial Intelligence and worked as sub-director for the school of design. From 1997 to 2011 he was academic at the School of Architec­ture, Design and urban Studies of Chile’s Catholic University, where he leaded the urbanism department for the School of Ar­chitecture and created the Master in Urban Project program. He was also academic of the Master in Building Administration at the School of Engineer at Chile’s Catholic University. He was executive director of extension and external services at School of Architecture, Design and urban Studies and director of the Cities Observatory, both at Chile’s Catholic University.

Felipe Vera
Architect, Universidad de Chile (2009). MDeS in Urbanism, Landscape & Ecology from Harvard Graduate School of Design (2013). Professor and co-director of the Cen­ter for Ecology, Landscape and Urbanism at the UAI DesignLab in Chile and Member of the Initiative for Sustainable and Emergent Cities at the Inter American Development Bank. He is editor of ‘Kumbh Mela: Mapping The Ephemeral Mega City’ (2014), ‘Andrea Branzi: Ten Recommendations for a New Athens Charter’ (2015) ‘Rahul Mehrotra: Dissolving Thresholds’ (2015), Ephemeral Urbanism (2016) and curator of the ‘Radical Temporalities’ Pavilion at the Shenzhen Bi­ennale of Architecture and Urbanism (2015) awarded with the International Academic Award, and ‘Ephemeral Urbanism Cities in Constant Flux’ Pavilion at the Venice Bien­nale (2016). Felipe Vera was a faculty at the Department of Urban Planning and Design at Harvard University.

The Camp and the City: Territories of Extraction is edited by Jeannette Sordi, Luis Valenzuela, Felipe Vera, with essays by Pablo Allard, Maria Ignacia Arrasate, Mariana Barrera, Sourav Kumar Biswas, Diane Davis, Agustina González Cid, Rania Goshn, El Hadi Jazairy, Rahul Mehrotra, Flavio Sciaraffia, Jeannette Sordi, Ricardo Truffello, Luis Valenzuela, Felipe Vera.

http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/the-camp-and-the-city-territories-of-extraction/

Contact Name:   events at gsd.harvard.edu

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Physical Chemistry Seminar Series:  Photosynthetic Excitons and Charge Transfer
Tuesday, March 27 
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building 6-120, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Prof. Rienk Van Grondelle, University of Amsterdam

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"Theory of Change" workshop for social entrepreneurs
Tuesday, March 27
5:30 PM – 7:00 PM EDT
Harvard Innovation Labs, 125 Western Avenue, Classroom, Allston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/theory-of-change-workshop-for-social-entrepreneurs-tickets-43860504951

Interested in creating impact and curious about how to prove it, measure it, and enhance it?
The first question you'll receive from any impact investor or donor worth their salt will be "what's your theory of change?"
Don't be caught flat-footed with such a soft-ball.
Come workshop yours tonight with simple, proven frameworks.

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Celebrating Delightful Moments and the Tech Vectors of Happiness
Tuesday, March 27
5:30 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
District Hall, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/celebrating-delightful-moments-and-the-tech-vectors-of-happiness-tickets-42155320699

Delightful Moments are part of all human experience: the small, but powerful, separations from the daily humdrum when we feel stronger, calmer, more joyful, more in control, more distant from pain and anxiety.
A range of new technologies has the potential to deliver these experiences. They vary from transforming the human (genetics, neurosciences), to creating new forms of human chemistry (personal pharma), to changing human experience rather than the body (virtual and augmented reality).

This event marks the official launch of Joyance Partners. By investing in these tech vectors of happiness, Joyance Partners is the first venture fund focused on health experience, not process.Young companies with technology that can deliver Delightful Moments can meet face-to-face with partners from the fund. 

Presenters & Panel
David Edwards - Founder and Director, Le Laboratoire & Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Idea Translation at Harvard University
Nataly Kogan - Founder of Happier
Sara Lazar - Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School
Moderator - Mike Edelhart, Managing Director of Joyance

Panel Description 
Mike Edelhart (Moderator) is the managing partner for the Joyance Partners fund and Social Starts VC Partnership. Mike is a pioneering media and startup executive, consultant, and author.

Nataly Kogan is the founder of Happier, a global technology and learning platform enabling users to discover new methods of pursuing emotional wellbeing. She is an entrepreneur, speaker, coach, and author passionate about helping people design and live their lives to be what they genuinely want.

Sara Lazar is an Associate Researcher in the Psychiatry Department at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Harvard Medical School. The focus of her research is to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of yoga and meditation, both in clinical settings and in healthy individuals.

David Edwards is the founder and director of Le Laboratoire and Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Idea Translation. He invents radically new ways of delivering human health and wellness and creates forums where like-spirited ideas enrich cultural dialog.

Startups will be demonstrating their delightful experiences before and after the event.  The startups participating so far are:
figur8 - Figur8 is building the first real-time and wearable platform that provides a live analysis of body movement control.
Ixcela - Ixcela is a health and wellness company helping individuals improve their internal health.
Droplette - Droplette is a patented, portable, hand-held device that generates an enhanced aerosol which utilizes a fluid physics phenomena to deliver molecules deep into skin, tissue, and cells over short timescales. The platform has broad applications across multiple fields, such as delivery of drugs for inflammatory skin diseases, skin care products for cosmetic applications, inhalation and lower airway delivery, and gene delivery for gene therapy and biomedical research.
oNotes - oNotes pioneers the digitization of scent in all its natural forms for sensory-enriched lives.
Thryve - Thryve helps people learn about the microbes inside their body to improve health - A gut health program that includes microbiome genomics and personalized probiotics.

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How Mushrooms Changed the World
Tuesday, March 27
6:00pm
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

David Hibbett, Professor of Biology, Clark University 2017–2018 Fellow, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

Fungi receive little attention in mainstream media, but these organisms have an enormous impact on ecosystems and on the production of food and pharmaceuticals. As decomposers, fungi recycle nutrients and are key contributors to the global carbon cycle. David Hibbett will examine the diversity of fungal decay mechanisms and how they have evolved across geologic time. He will also address the controversial hypothesis that fungal evolution contributed to the decline in coal formation at the end of the Carboniferous Period.

This event will be livestreamed on the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/harvardmuseumsofscienceandculture

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The First Amendment: What Are Its Limits?
Tuesday, March 27
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Columbia Point, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-first-amendment-what-are-its-limits-registration-43352140419

Susan Benesch, Carol RoseSusan Benesch, director of the Dangerous Speech Project, and Carol Rose, executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts, discuss contemporary First Amendment issues.

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Forgotten Farms Film Screening
Tuesday, March 27
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Tufts, Jaharis Family Center for Biomedical and Nutritional Sciences, 150 Harrison Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/forgotten-farms-film-screening-tickets-43991421526

On March 27th, the Tufts Friedman School will host a film screening titled Forgotten Farms, an modern agricultural documentary that details the decline of the dairy economy in New England.
Most people buy their food in supermarkets and don’t have a chance to meet their farmer, as the bumper sticker recommends. But in more affluent communities, farm-to-table restaurants, farmer's markets and CSAs are booming and the new farmers are celebrated. There is another farmer who is left out of the local food celebration. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years; fewer than 2,000 farms remain. Collectively, they tend 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. In our enthusiasm for the new food movement, we often overlook the farmers at the foundation of the regional agricultural economy.
The documentary shows the cultural divide between the new food movement and traditional farming, highlighting the need to examine differences, develop mutual understanding, and find common ground. The film screening will be followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker Sarah Gardner and a farmer from the film, so the night promises to host lively discussion on the future of New England's regional food economy.

Feel free to email Laura Barley at laurabarley88 at gmail.com or Kelly Kundratic at kelly.kundratic at tufts.edu if you have any questions or insights. The Facebook event can be found here.
Film Website: http://forgottenfarms.org/
Film Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieNQSTc4H3w&feature=youtu.be

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Fuckup Nights Boston Vol. VI
Tuesday, March 27
6:30 PM – 9:30 PM EDT
ImpactHub Boston, 50 Milk Street, 15th floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fuckup-nights-boston-vol-vi-tickets-42142187417
Cost:  $10

What is Fuckup Nights?
Fuckup Nights is a global movement born in Mexico in 2012 to publicly share business failure stories. Hundreds of people attend each event to hear three to four entrepreneurs share their failures.

Each speaker is given 7-10 minutes and is able to use 10 images to illustrate their story.

What to expect in Vol. VI? 
Thank you to ImpactHUB for graciously hosting us at 50 Milk St ! 

Doors open at 6.30pm. First speaker goes on at 7.30pm. We will wrap up all the loveliness by 9.30pm.

There will be a surprise activity at this event...we want to hear about YOUR fuckups. If you've had a spectacular/funny/particularly heartbreaking startup failure we'll give a few audience members 2 minutes to publicly share their own fuckup.

And as always stay tuned for speaker previews.

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Managing Climate Change
Tuesday, March 27
6:45 PM to 9:00 PM
MIT, Building E51(Tang Hall), 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge
Down the stairs to the left at the round tables
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/BostonGeopolitics/events/248721001/

Last meet we touched on, but deliberately did not elaborate upon, the international implications of climate change. This meet, let's focus on this topic. Discussions about international politics are rooted in geography. Geography is a wonderful contextual tool to explain behavior in international relations, like why the United States has grown exponentially without foreign invasion [as Bismarck noted, the US is "bordered to the north and south by weak neighbors, and to the east and west by fish], why Russia is stuck in a continuous cycle expanding beyond its means [when no natural border separates your capital from Napoleon and Hitler, holding buffer territory is the best remaining option], and why China historically sees little value in foreign intervention [foreign operations are difficult when you're isolated between the Himalayas, the Gobi Desert, and open ocean].

By extension, every aspect of politics is affected by environmental factors. Natural disasters and climate changes can have immediate and lasting effects on political powers. Civilizations from Mesa Verde to Easter Island have collapsed due to environmental degradation. Mongolia's two attempts to invade Japan (1274; 1282) were scuttled by typhoons. The government's poor response to the 1970 Bhola cyclone helped spark Bangladesh's independence from Pakistan in 1971. Years of drought and ensuing famine helped prompt unrest in Syria that has since spiraled out of control.

The environment underlies every action in politics, even when it may not seem to be an overwhelming factor. As droughts, famines, heatwaves, hurricanes, snowstorms and wildfires become more common, managing the effects of climate change will be a central topic of the future. Even those that reject the idea of climate change will need to manage increasing migration from increasingly inhospitable land around the equator, funding ballooning rebuilding expenditures for areas devastated by natural disaster, and the subtle but real depletion of necessities like water. While it is currently seen as a "tangential" area of study in relation to international politics, humanity's relationship with the environment will become increasingly important as climate change progresses.

How will climate change's role in international affairs develop over the coming decades? Can international cooperation centered on environmental issues be effective? How will different regions be affected, and what will the repercussions be? Come discuss!

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Finding Solutions in a Divisive World:  What We are Learning from the News Gathering Trenches of Solutions Journalism
Tuesday, March 27
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Dockser Hall (240), Northeastern University Law, 65 Forsyth Street, Boston
Please register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/finding-solutions-lessons-from-the-trenches-of-solutions-journalism-tickets-44041551466

There are plenty of tough issues confronting you each morning in the news. It is easy to feel information fatigue. But a growing number of journalists are piercing through those dark headlines, discovering people and organizations creating solutions to some of the deepest crises in areas such as poverty, inequality, education, and crime.

Join us on March 27th at Northeastern University for an evening with reporters and editors who have been covering responses to deeply entrenched social challenges, from Baltimore’s historically high murder rate to the opioid epidemic in rural Pennsylvania.

Plus an educator who spends much of her time training newsroom staffs in the field will share best practices drawn from large and small newsrooms all around the US.

These practitioners of solutions journalism are finding small corners of hope and diligence where people are driving meaningful and constructive change.

Mark Sappenfield, Editor of The Christian Science Monitor introduces the panel
Jonathan Kaufman, Dean of Northeastern Universities School of Journalism moderates the panel
Kevin McCorry, education reporter for WHYY in Philadelphia and statewide public media partnership Keystone Crossroads
Harry Bruinius, New York correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor
Liza Gross, Director of Practice Change at Solutions Journalism Network and faculty member at Columbia University
Sponsored by The Christian Science Monitor, Northeastern University, and ONA - the Online News Association.

Registering for this event also registers you for a free weekly newsletter of the best stories from the Christian Science Monitor which can be unsubscribed at any time.

FAQs
If you register, but can't come, please cancel your registration so another person can attend. Thanks!
How can I contact the organizer with any questions?
Email Greg Fitzgerald at fitzgeraldg at csps.com or call (617) 450-2439

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Never Remember:  Searching for Stalin's Gulags in Putin's Russia
Tuesday, March 27
8:00 PM (Doors at 7:00)
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/masha_gessen1/
Cost:  $5.00 - $28.75 (online only, book included)

Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome National Book Award–winning journalist MASHA GESSEN and acclaimed photographer MISHA FRIEDMAN for a discussion of their new book, Never Remember: Searching for Stalin's Gulags in Putin's Russia. They will be joined in conversation by ALEXANDRA VACROUX, the Executive Director of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University.

About Never Remember
The Gulag was a monstrous network of labor camps that held and killed millions of prisoners from the 1930s to the 1950s. More than half a century after the end of Stalinist terror, the geography of the Gulag has been barely sketched and the number of its victims remains unknown. Has the Gulag been forgotten?
Writer Masha Gessen and photographer Misha Friedman set out across Russia in search of the memory of the Gulag. They journey from Moscow to Sandarmokh, a forested site of mass executions during Stalin’s Great Terror; to the only Gulag camp turned into a museum, outside of the city of Perm in the Urals; and to Kolyma, where prisoners worked in deadly mines in the remote reaches of the Far East. They find that in Vladimir Putin’s Russia, where Stalin is remembered as a great leader, Soviet terror has not been forgotten—it was never remembered in the first place.

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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, March 28
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Solar Geoengineering Research Reading Group
Wednesday, March 28
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room 429, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Solar Geoengineering Research Reading Group
https://geoengineering.environment.harvard.edu/
A weekly reading group, interspersed with more formal seminars, to deepen members' understanding of solar geoengineering research.

Lunch provided. RSVP to contact listed.

Contact Name:  Lizzie Burns
eburns at g.harvard.edu

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MTL Seminar Series: "The Intelligent Tool and the Future of Semiconductor Manufacturing"
Wednesday, March 28
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 34-401 (Grier), 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Keith Wells, Lam Research

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Student Protests in South Africa
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 28, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  The W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Adam Habib, Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of the Witwatersrand
COST  Free & open to the public
CONTACT INFO  hutchinscenter at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  A Q+A session will follow the talk.
LINK  http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events-lectures/events/march-28-2018-1200pm/spring-colloquium-adam-habib

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Mechanical properties of semiconducting polymers for energy and virtual touch
Wednesday, March 28
3:30pm to 4:45pm
3:00 PM REFRESHMENTS
MIT, Building 66-110 25 Ames Street, Cambridge

Prof. Darren J. Lipomi (UC San Diego) 

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The Drama of Celebrity
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 28, 2018, 4 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture, Poetry/Prose
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Sharon Marcus, 2017–2018 Elizabeth S. and Richard M. Cashin Fellow, Radcliffe Institute; Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  During her fellowship year at the Radcliffe Institute, Sharon Marcus is completing “The Drama of Celebrity,” a book that traces the roots of modern celebrity to 19th-century theater and seeks to explain why people find celebrity culture so alluring. Departing from the common view that celebrities and fans alike are dupes of an all-powerful culture industry, Marcus argues that celebrity culture is an evenly pitched struggle in which media workers, publics, and celebrities all vie to define stars.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-sharon-marcus-fellow-presentation

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How People Update Beliefs about Climate Change: Good News and Bad News
Wednesday, March 28
4:15pm
Harvard, Taubman Building 5th floor, Nye B-C, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Cass Sunstein, Harvard University, Sebastian Bobadilla-Suarez, Stephanie Lazzaro, and Tali Sharot, University College London
(Joint with HLS Behavioral Economics, Law, and Public Policy Seminar) 

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Care Tactics: Environmental Practice of Everyday Life
Wednesday, March 28
5:00PM TO 6:00PM
Harvard, CGIS Knafel Bldg, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/?trumbaEmbed=vie...
Witnessing a return to longstanding theories of sensation and perception, environmental criticism is reconsidering (or retrofitting) phenomenology for an inventive ethics and aesthetics of quotidian life. Proposing that on the basis of sentience and perception we can fashion an art of the everyday of political mettle, it displaces work of time past into the ecological crises of our moment. Turning historical objects into critical counterparts, Gilles Deleuze, Isabelle Stengers and others concerned about the “state of the world” rethink early 20th century philosophers such as A. N. Whitehead to find an ecology of practices. The aim of this paper is less to excavate or exonerate than to redeploy or redesign ways of thinking into an ethics of care.

Contact Name:   roilos at fas.harvard.edu

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"Death Drive, Organic Pacifism: Reconsidering Freud and Einstein for the Present" William James Lecture 2017-18 presented by Dr. Judith Butler
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 28, 2018, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ames Courtroom, Austin Hall, Austin Hall, 1515 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
SPONSOR	Harvard Divinity School 
CONTACT	Dean's Office and Office for Academic Affairs
DETAILS	
Judith Butler, the author of Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity and Maxine Elliot Professor of Comparative Literature in the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley, will present the annual William James Lecture. Butler's talk, "Death Drive, Organic Pacifism: Reconsidering Freud and Einstein for the Present," will take place in the Ames Courtroom at Harvard Law School's Austin Hall. View this map for directions from HDS to Austin Hall.
Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature and the Program of Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her PhD in Philosophy from Yale University in 1984. She is the author of several books, including Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity (1990), Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex” (1993), The Psychic Life of Power: Theories of Subjection (1997), Excitable Speech (1997), Antigone’s Claim: Kinship Between Life and Death (2000), Precarious Life: Powers of Violence and Mourning (2004); Frames of War: When Is Life Grievable? (2009), Parting Ways: Jewishness and the Critique of Zionism (2012), Dispossession: The Performative in the Political co-authored with Athena Athanasiou (2013), Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly (2015), and Vulnerability in Resistance (2016).
Her books have been translated into more than 20 languages and she is the recipient of nine honorary degrees.
She presently has a Mellon Foundation Grant supporting International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs. She has served on the Executive Council of the Modern Languages Association and chaired its committee on Academic Freedom. Butler is active in several human rights organizations, serving on the board of the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York and the advisory board of Jewish Voice for Peace.
She was the recipient of the Andrew Mellon Award for Distinguished Academic Achievement in the Humanities (2009-13). She is currently the Second Vice-President of the Modern Language Association.

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Data Science for Social Good Career Panel
WHEN  Wednesday, Mar. 28, 2018, 6 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS S010 Tsai Auditorium, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Humanities, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Big Data Club in GSAS
TICKET WEB LINK  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfPsbWoKnbmBYbx84ywgEfyD0VNU5jDfuRkI-Y9TrDwmcmtTw/viewform
DETAILS  Data science has far-reaching applications beyond the tech world. Ever wonder what does a data science career in social sciences or public service look like? Come hear from data scientists at the Red Cross, McGrawHill Education, City of Boston - Analytics team, Civis Analytics, and National Fire Protection Association.

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VR and Art at the ICA
Wednesday, March 28
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
The Institute Of Contemporary Art/Boston, 25 Harbor Shore Drive, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tech-night-at-the-ica-tickets-43105414455

Boston is one of the leading innovation centers in the country, and the ICA is harnessing that energy around the groundbreaking exhibition Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today.

For one night only the ICA will be open for just the Greater Boston Tech Community! Experience talks from local innovators and experts including immersive storyteller and AR artist Charity Everett and a General Assembly discussion of ethics in user experience design with Aaron Scott the Founder and Creative Director of Symbolic Design, private access to the exhibition with an introduction from curator Jeff De Blois, tech demos, an interactive VR experience that teaches music as you play, a cash bar, spotlight talks in the galleries, a pop-up shop, and more!
Mingle, get inspired, and enjoy private access to the landmark exhibition Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today.

Space is limited. Save your spot today!

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Thursday, March 29
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Fake News and Misinformation Series: Deb Roy
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 29, 2018, 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Wexner 434, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Shorenstein Center
SPEAKER(S)  Deb Roy
DETAILS  Speaker series on fake news and misinformation, co-sponsored by the NULab at Northeastern University.
Deb Roy is an Associate Professor at MIT where he directs the Laboratory for Social Machines (LSM) based at the Media Lab. His lab explores new methods in media analytics (natural language processing, social network analysis, speech, image, and video analysis) and media design (information visualization, games, communication apps) with applications in children’s learning and social listening.
Roy is also co-founder and chairman of Cortico, a not-for-profit media technology company that is developing media technologies and services with the aim of improving the health of discourse in the public sphere. Cortico and LSM collaborate in order to translate MIT research into field-ready scalable technologies, and to inform new research questions at MIT grounded in field experience.
He was co-founder and CEO of Bluefin Labs, a social TV analytics company, which MIT Technology Review named as one of the 50 most innovative companies of 2012. Bluefin was acquired by Twitter in 2013, Twitter’s largest acquisition at the time. From 2013-2017 Roy served as Twitter’s Chief Media Scientist. In this role, he guided Twitter’s product strategy and led the transition of the Bluefin team to become a global data science capability for the platform.
An author of over 130 academic papers, his popular TED talk Birth of a Word presents his research into his own son’s language development that led to new ideas in media analytics. A native of Canada, Roy received a Bachelor of Applied Science (computer engineering) from the University of Waterloo and a PhD in Media Arts and Sciences from MIT.
LINK  https://shorensteincenter.org/event/fake-news-misinformation-series-deb-roy/

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The Geopolitics of Energy
Thursday, March 29
11:45AM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
Energy Policy Seminar
https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Jason Bordoff, Professor of Professional Practice in International and Public Affairs and Founding Director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University. Lunch will be provided. 

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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Going Beyond Aid:  Off-grid Water and Wastewater Systems in the West Bank
Thursday, March 29
12:00-1:00pm
Tufts, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Suleiman Halasah, Center for Transboundary Water Management, Arava Institute for Env Studies
Almost half of the world's population lives in rural areas where opportunities for access to large- scale centralized water and sanitation systems is limited. This is due to the high capital cost affiliated with building these networks and the energy required for long distance pumping. Off-grid decentralized wastewater treatment is an alternative solution for these communities and became one of the main targets for development agencies. However, many of these development projects fail soon after their completion by the donor/development agencies. In the Palestinian Territories, both the political and economic conditions prevent the installation of proper centralized wastewater treatment, together with the dependency on financial support for wastewater infrastructure projects from international donors. This talk will discuss a model for long-term sustainability of off-grid wastewater management solutions in the West Bank.

Suleiman Halasah is the co-founder Global Sun Partners, a renewable energy company that works on building solar energy PV power plants in several countries in the world. He established Integrated GREEN Solutions (i.GREENs) which aims to improve the environmental awareness and introduce green solutions in Jordan and the Middle East. He has worked for the Jordan Valley Authority in the Jordanian Ministry of Water and Irrigation and has served as a panel member on the topic of water security and climate change at the UN Department of Public Information/NGO Conference in New York in 2007. Mr. Halasah has BSc in electrical engineering the University of Jordan, and a MSc. from Ben Gurion University.

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Shaky Ground: The Untold Story of the Largest Earthquake Surge in Modern History
Thursday, March 29
12pm - 1:30pm
Harvard, HUCE Seminar Room 429, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Conevery Bolton Valencius, Professor of History, Boston University; David Corcoran, Associate Director, MIT’s Knight Science; and Anna Kuchment, Journalist, Dallas Morning News and Scientific American.

The Environmental History Working Group at Harvard University convenes once or twice a month to discuss the many ways in which humans have shared their history with non-human entities and forces. We welcome participants studying all regions and time periods at any stage of their career and from any relevant branch of history or allied fields. 

Environmental History Working Group
https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/envihist

Contact Name:  Daniel Zizzamia
zizzamia at fas.harvard.edu

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Social Issue Talk: Financial Education as a Building Block for Success
Thursday, March 29
12:00 PM – 1:30 PM EDT
Fiduciary Trust Company, 175 Federal Street #16, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-issue-talk-financial-education-as-a-building-block-for-success-registration-43001007170

Track Partner: MassMutual Foundation
Speaker: Alayna Van Tassel, Deputy Treasurer, Executive Director of the Office of Economic Empowerment, Commonwealth of Massachusetts
2018 Social Innovator: ACT Lawrence

Join the Social Innovation Forum on March 29, 2018 from 12:00 - 1:30 pm for the Social Issue Talk "Financial Education as a Building Block for Success." Lunch will be provided. Space is limited so please RSVP.

SPEAKER
Alayna Van Tassel, Deputy Treasurer, Executive Director of the Office of Economic Empowerment, Commonwealth of Massachusetts
The Office of Economic Empowerment (OEE) is a department within the Office of the Treasurer and Receiver General of Massachusetts tasked with supporting, advocating, and facilitating policies that empower all Massachusetts residents. Their programs serve women, families, high school students, veterans, and seniors. The OEE's priorities include closing the wage gap, increasing access to financial education, improving college affordability, and investing in STEM careers and education.

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Book Round Table for Globalists: The End of Empire and the Birth of Neoliberalism
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 29, 2018, 12 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South, Public Gathering Room (S030), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Weatherhead Initiative on Global History, A Research Cluster on Global Transformations
SPEAKER(S)  Author: Quinn Slobodian, ACLS Burkhardt/WIGH Fellow; Wellesley College
Panelists:  Katrina Forrester , Assistant Professor of Government, Harvard University;  Priya Lal, Associate Professor of History, Boston College;  Jamie Martin, Assistant Professor of History and School of Foreign Studies, Georgetown.
CONTACT INFO	jbarnard at wcfia.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Author Quinn Slobodian (ACLS Burkhardt/WIGH Fellow; Wellesley College) will meet with a panel of critics to discuss his new book Globalists: The End of Empire and the Birth of Neoliberalism (Harvard University Press, 2018).
LINK	https://wigh.wcfia.harvard.edu/event/book-panel-quinn-slobodian-globalists-end-empire-and-birth-neoliberalism?delta=0

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Google's Project Aristotle: The Five Keys to a Successful Google Team
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 29, 2018, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin, G-125, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Learning Incubator (LInc)
John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
SPEAKER(S)  Abeer Dubey, Director, People Analytics, Google
CONTACT INFO	Lisa Frontado, Director, SEAS LInc
lfrontado at seas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Google’s research uncovers surprising insights around why some groups flourish and others falter.
Pod. Work group. Committee. Autonomous collective. Whatever you call it, you’re part of one at Google and probably wherever you work: a team. So, what is it that makes a team effective? Over two years, we conducted 200+ interviews with Googlers (our employees) and looked at more than 250 attributes of 180+ active Google teams to learn the same. The talk describes how we conducted this research, what we found and how we have put this research into action.
LINK  https://learningincubator.seas.harvard.edu/event/science-learning-speaker-series-1

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"These Classes Equip Me": The Development of Complex Understandings of Race in College Classrooms
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 29, 2018, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard,, William James Hall, Room 105, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Graduate School of Education
Mahindra Humanities Center
SPEAKER(S)  Janine de Novais, Harvard Graduate School of Education
DETAILS  What is the relationship between classroom experience in academic courses on race, and students’ understanding of race? To explore this question, I analyzed data from two college courses—one focused on narratives by enslaved people, and one focused on black political thought. I found that students drew from the new knowledge they gained and the experiences they had in the courses to develop a critical and nuanced understanding of race. Students also reported that the courses “equipped them” to better engage with issues of race in their lives. I argue that this relationship between students' classroom experiences and their framing of race has implications for both contemporary higher education and the larger society.
LINK  http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/universities-past-present-and-future

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The Sleep-Deprived Human Brain
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 29, 2018, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Lecture, Research study, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Nora D. Volkow, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  In this lecture, Nora D. Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institute of Health, will examine the results from two sets of brain-imaging studies done to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation on the human brain. Taken together, these studies suggest a complex picture in which the sleep-deprived human brain may tell us much about addiction and other diseases. Register online.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-nora-d-volkow-lecture

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Ocean Acidification and Marine Phytoplankton
Thursday, March 29
5:00PM
Harvard, Northwest B101, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge

The Harvard University Center for the Environment hosts a special seminar with François Morel, Albert G. Blanke, Jr., Professor of Geosciences; Professor of Geosciences and the Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University. 

François Morel is the Albert G. Blanke, Jr., Professor of Geosciences at Princeton University. He received a B.S. in Engineering from the University of Grenoble, France, and a Ph.D. in Engineering Science from the California Institute of Technology. He was a faculty member at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1973 to 1994 and joined the Princeton faculty in 1994. The research in his laboratory focuses on the interaction of trace metals and microorganisms in the environment, with particular emphasis on the role of metals in the global cycles of carbon and nitrogen in marine and terrestrial systems. Morel’s research group discovered the only known cadmium enzyme, a cadmium carbonic anhydrase used by marine phytoplankton to acquire inorganic carbon for photosynthesis. At Princeton, Pr. Morel teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses. Morel and his student Janet Hering authored the widely used teaching text: “Principles and Applications of Aquatic Chemistry (Wiley). He directed the Ralph M. Parsons laboratory at MIT from 1991 to 1994, the Princeton Environmental Institute from 1998 to 2006 and the NSF-supported Center for Environmental BioInorganic Chemistry from 1998 to 2007.

Morel is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettre ed Arti. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and of the Geochemical Society. He received the Patterson Medal from the Geochemical Society in 2001, the Urey Medal from the American Geophysical Union in 2005, the Distinguished Alumni Award from the California Institute of Technology in 2009, and the Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology from the American Chemical Society in 2010. He is the recipient of the 2010 Eni Environmental Award from the Eni Foundation and of the 2012 Dickson Prize in the Sciences from Carnegie Mellon University.

Contact Name:  Erin Harleman
eharleman at fas.harvard.edu

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Boston Environmental Sustainability Meetup
Thursday, March 29
5:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Harpoon Brewery And Beer Hall, 306 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Boston-Sustainability-Meetup/events/247313283/

This is intended to be a kickoff for the group. Ideas are welcome.
This is NOT a protest group.

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Askwith Debates - Charter Schools and Educational Equity
WHEN  Thursday, Mar. 29, 2018, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, Askwith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
FEATURED EVENT  Askwith Forums
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS   Speakers include:
Cornell Williams Brooks, senior fellow, Brennan Center for Justice, New York University; visiting professor of social ethics, law, and justice movements, Boston University
Eva Moskowitz, founder and chief executive officer, Success Academy Charter Schools
Gerard Robinson, Ed.M.’95, executive director, Center for Advancing Opportunity
Moderator: Martin West, associate professor of education, HGSE and deputy director, Program on Education Policy and Governance, Harvard Kennedy School
Rapid growth in the number of public charter schools, which now serve more than three million students nationwide, has sparked debate over their implications for educational equity. Proponents contend that charters provide an escape valve for low-income, mostly minority students in struggling school districts, while critics allege that charters serve a select few, reinforce racial and economic school segregation, and destabilize urban communities. Some prominent organizations within the civil rights community have called for a moratorium on charter growth. Do charter schools enhance or undermine equity in American education? Should their growth be encouraged or curtailed? Join us as leading educators, policymakers, and researchers come together to debate the charter school movement and its future.

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Are We Ready to Embrace a Future Powered by Offshore Wind?
Thursday, March 29
5:30 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Greentown Labs, 444 Somerville Avenue, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/are-we-ready-to-embrace-a-future-powered-by-offshore-wind-tickets-43417058591

On August 8, 2016, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed the Act to Promote Energy Diversity which allows for the procurement of up to 1,600MW of offshore wind. This act establishes Massachusetts as a front runner in becoming an industry leader and reaffirms the State’s commitment to clean power. Offshore wind energy has the potential to fulfill all the energy needs of not just Massachusetts but the United States as a whole while simultaneously creating thousands of jobs. But as we’ve seen with projects like Cape Wind, we’re facing several obstacles. What are the lessons learned and how can we ensure the success of offshore wind in MA? Who are the leaders developing technologies and processes needed to turn these energy outlooks into realities? Are we ready to embrace a future powered by offshore wind?
Join us in the new Global Center for Cleantech Innovation at Greentown Labs, the largest cleantech incubator in the United States, for an evening of discussion about the future of offshore wind energy from the vantage point of the corporate leaders, startups, and industry experts driving innovation in Massachusetts and around the globe. 

PROGRAM AGENDA: 
5:30pm - 5:35pm: Event begins
5:45pm - 5:55pm: Opening Remarks 
6:00pm - 7:00pm: Offshore Wind Panel (see panelists below) 
7:00pm - 8:30pm: Poster Session + Networking 

PANELISTS INCLUDE: 
Francis Slingsby, Head of Strategic Partnerships, Orsted
Eric Hines, Professor of the Practice, Tufts School of Engineering, and Principal, LeMessurier Consultants
Ravi Paintal, CEO, Autonomous Marine Systems
Bill White, Senior Director for Offshore Wind, MassCEC
Barbara Kates-Garnick, (Moderator) Professor of the Practice, The Fletcher School at Tufts University 

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Film Screening of “Asmarina”
Thursday March 29
6:00 P.M.  Doors will open at 5:30pm
Harvard Art Museum, Menschel Hall, Lower Level (Please enter the museums via the entrance on Broadway), 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge

Introduction by Dr. Angela Davis, UC Santa Cruz
Followed by conversation with film director Medhin Paolos and Dr. Angela Davis

This program is free and open to the public, but tickets are required.

Free tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis, beginning at noon on Thursday, March 22, at the Harvard Box Office, located in Farkas Hall, 12 Holyoke St, Cambridge.

Tickets must be picked up in person and are not available online or by phone.

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Science by the Pint: Artificial Memories
Thursday, March 29
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Aeronaut Brewing Company, 14 Tyler Street, Somerville
RSVP athttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/science-by-the-pint-artificial-memories-tickets-43168908367

“How to artificially erase, activate, and create memories in the brain”

This Science by the Pint event features Dr. Steve Ramirez. Dr. Ramirez is an Assistant Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Boston University. Check back later for a more detailed description of the topic covered!

Science by the Pint is a free science café in which we invite a Boston-area research lab out to a pub or brewery to chat science over a cold one. The events are geared toward a general audience – all are welcome and no experience is necessary! To learn more about our Science by the Pint series, visit:
http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/science-by-the-pint/

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One Life at a Time – Saving Sea Turtles in Ghana
Thursday, March 29
7pm
NE Aquarium, Simons IMAX Theater, One Aquarium Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=107465&view=Detail

John Flynn, co-founder and director of Wildseas and New England Aquarium Marine Conservation Action Fund Fellow*

During a 2011 visit to the western region of Ghana, Marine Conservation Action Fund (MCAF) Fellow John Flynn and his colleague Neil Davis witnessed the rampant poaching of nesting sea turtles and their eggs. They reached out to local village chiefs, recruited a dedicated team from the community, and began nightly beach patrols to deter poachers. Within a few years, Flynn, Davis, local anti-poaching patrol leader Enock Agyimah, and numerous seasonal staff helped protect thousands of turtle eggs and many nesting turtles from poachers. The conservation mission of the group, known as Wildseas, soon grew beyond protecting sea turtle nesting beaches.

In 2012, Flynn and Davis’ interpreter, Eric Quayson, alerted them to high bycatch rates of sea turtles in offshore fishing nets. Working with Quayson, who served as a liaison to the fishing community, Flynn and Davis secured a commitment from the fishermen to safely release turtles caught in their nets. This collaborative safe-release program has saved nearly 1,000 turtles since 2012. Flynn will speak about the many challenges and successes he and his team have experienced in their efforts to save turtles, collaborate with fishermen, engage local communities, and build local capacity for conservation.

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Friday, March 30
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ArtTechPsyche IV
Friday, March 30
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM EDT
Arts @ 29 Garden, 29 Garden Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/arttechpsyche-iv-tickets-41397875159?

Returning for a fourth year, ArtTechPsyche celebrates human expression at the intersection of technology and the arts through numerous immersive digital experiences, art installations, technology demos, and visionary speakers. This annual symposium run by Harvard’s Digital Futures Consortium is a unique collaboration between Harvard Arts and Humanities Research Computing (DARTH), the Harvard Library, and Arts @ 29 Garden, with additional sponsorship from Academic Technology for Faculty of Arts and Sciences. We invite you to join us for ArtTechPsycheIV on Friday, March 30, 2018 at Arts @ 29 Garden.

Explore the creative process and its impact on emerging technologies. Discover the ways in which technology shapes us, and conversely, how the artist continually challenges and informs technological development. Interact with cutting edge art installations and software demos to experience the world in new ways. Meet like-minded faculty, staff, students, researchers, and colleagues of any skill level while exploring new projects and collaborations on and around campus.

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Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
Friday, March 30
12:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

John Pohlman, USGS

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/111771

Contact Name:  Kelvin Bates
kelvin_bates at fas.harvard.edu
206-909-3412

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Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon
Friday, March 30
1:00pm to 4:00pm
MIT, Building 14N-132 (DIRC), 160 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://libcal.mit.edu/event/4021320

Join the MIT Libraries for our 2018 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, focused on artists’ books and the artists who make them. Join us for a talk about artists' books in the MIT Libraries collection. Then learn about how to edit Wikipedia, the world's largest encyclopedia, and join a global movement seeking to improve coverage of women artists and art. More information at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/Boston/MIT_Art%2BFeminism_2018

Schedule​
1-1:30pm: Settle in, introduction to resources, creating Wikipedia accounts
1:30-2pm: Talk by Anna Boutin-Cooper, librarian for SA+P at MIT, about artists’ books in the MIT Libraries collection
2-2:30pm: Wikipedia editing training
2:30-4pm:  Edit Wikipedia! Assistance from experienced editors will be available
Snacks will be provided, and all are welcome.

Registration encouraged, but not required to attend 

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Her Own Hero: The Origins of Women's Self-Defense
Friday, March 30
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/book-talk-her-own-hero-the-origins-of-womens-self-defense-tickets-42881587984

Join us as Wendy L. Rouse presents research from her latest book: Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement. At the turn of the twentieth century, women famously organized to demand greater social and political freedoms like gaining the right to vote. However, few realize that the Progressive Era also witnessed the birth of the women’s self-defense movement. Some women were inspired to take up boxing and jiu-jitsu for very personal reasons that ranged from protecting themselves from attacks by strangers on the street to rejecting gendered notions about feminine weakness and empowering themselves as their own protectors. Perhaps more importantly the discussion surrounding women’s self-defense revealed powerful myths about the source of violence against women opening up conversations about the less visible violence that many women faced in their own homes. Through self-defense training women debunked patriarchal myths about inherent feminine weakness creating a new image of women as powerful and self-reliant.

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Saturday, March 31,10:00 AM – Saturday, June 23, 1:00 PM 
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Building Relationships Across Difference: A Restorative Approach
Saturday, March 31,10:00 AM – Saturday, June 23, 1:00 PM EDT
Trinity Church Boston, 233 Clarendon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/building-relationships-across-difference-a-restorative-approach-tickets-42876759542

In this 6 part workshop we will use a variety of modalities to explore our own racial and cultural identity. Through this exploration, we will begin to identify the ways that our values, beliefs, and experiences impact our relationships with others. We will share tools based on a restorative justice approach that will help participants build and deepen their relationships with others. This offering is part of a series aimed at supporting volunteers working in various settings. Participants can expect to leave this workshop with skills for working through relational challenges, increased self-awareness, and resources for further study. This workshop is designed for anyone who wants to learn more about themselves, others, and how to work toward a more just society

Please note: By registering, you're committing to attend the sessions below:
Session 1: March 31, 10am-1pm
Session 2: April 7, 10am-1pm
Session 3: April 28, 10am-1pm
Session 4: May 5, 10am-1pm
Session 5: June 16, 10am-1pm
Session 6: June 23, 10am-1pm

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Saturday, March 31
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Revitalizing Ecosystems in Greater Boston to Survive Climate Change
Saturday, March 31
9:00 AM to 4:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/revitalizing-ecosystems-in-greater-boston-to-survive-climate-change-tickets-42952016638
Cost:  $11.42	

Ecosystems across our highly developed region are threatened by climate change. Local ecosystems can help us to weather the coming climate shocks. These ecosystems are our allies, and there is much that we can do to revitalize them in our yards, streets, neighborhoods, parks, wetlands and waters. Come to this conference to be inspired and learn about current efforts and new possibilities for revitalizing ecosystems. You will leave with information on practical ways you can help right now.

Program: Keynote speaker Tom Wessels, author of The Myth of Progress, Toward a Sustainable Future, will address the critical similarities between ecosystems and human society. There will be presentations (in development) on the Ecology of Greater Boston Then and Now and a Survey of Current Ecological Conservation and Restoration Efforts. In afternoon workshops attendees will meet, connect with and learn from organizations that are practicing restoration and conservation of ecosystems in locations around the Greater Boston region: soils, trees, forests and other plants, wetlands, freshwater streams, lakes and ponds, coastal shores and salt marshes.

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Sunday, April 1
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Equinox Lecture: Lee McIntyre on "Post-Truth: Is Every Day April Fools Day Now?"
Sunday, April 1
1:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Humanist Hub, 30 JFK Street, 4th Floor Harvard Square, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/GreaterBostonHumanists/events/248593921/

Greater Boston Humanists is happy to present a special lecture in the gap in the Hub's programming for Spring. On SUNDAY at 1:30 pm at the Humanist Hub space in Harvard Square, we'll celebrate the Spring Equinox with a lecture and discussion on one of the most important topics of our era, with special guest Lee McIntyre of Boston University: "Post-Truth: Is Every Day April Fools Day Now?"

Are we living in a post-truth world, where "alternative facts" replace actual facts and feelings have more weight than evidence? In this talk I trace out the development of the post-truth phenomenon from its roots in science denial, cognitive bias, and postmodernism through the rise of "fake news," "information silos," and alternative media. The denial of scientific facts about smoking, evolution, vaccines, and climate change paved the way for today's more widespread fact denial. I also discuss ways to fight back against the authoritarian threat posed by the politicization of reality, the first of which is to understand where post-truth comes from.

Lee McIntyre is a Research Fellow at the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University and an Instructor in Ethics at Harvard Extension School. His MIT Press book, Post-Truth, has just been published, and opens our dialogue as we all struggle together with this changed world. Snacks will follow. Parking is available on the street (free in Cambridge on Sundays) or in the JFK Garage (paid). The Harvard Square Red Line T station is just a half block away, as well as bus routes that stop at that station. Join us in the Hub space for this excellent follow-up to Lee McIntyre's previous engaging discussions.

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Monday, April 2
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PAOC Colloquium: Galen McKinley (LDEO)
Monday, April 2
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

About the Speaker
Professor McKinley studies the mechanisms of the carbon cycle in the global oceans and Great Lakes, with her research lying at the intersection of physical and chemical oceanography. Her primary tools are numerical models and analysis of large datasets. More specifically, her research addresses the physical drivers of ecosystem and carbon cycle variability in the North Atlantic, global oceans and Great Lakes. Professor McKinley is a member of the faculty at Columbia University and the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory; she was previously at University of Wisconsin – Madison. In addition to research and teaching, Professor McKinley frequently contributes to national and international scientific coordination and offers scientific advice to policy-makers.

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Congressman Keith Ellison at The Harvard Law Forum
WHEN  Monday, Apr. 2, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Langdell Hall North, 225 Vorenberg Classroom, 1545 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Harvard Law Forum
SPEAKER(S)  Congressman Keith Ellison represents Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives and is the Deputy Chair of the Democratic National Committee. He was the first Muslim elected to the House of Representatives.
CONTACT INFO	Pete Davis, PeDavis at jd18.law.harvard.edu, 347-453-3135
DETAILS  Congressman Keith Ellison represents Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives and is the Deputy Chair of the Democratic National Committee. He was the first Muslim elected to the House of Representatives.
He is coming to Harvard Law School to share his thoughts and experience on what the path forward for the Democratic Party is in the Trump era.
Free and open to the public, with lunch provided.
Contact Pete Davis at PeDavis at jd18.law.harvard.edu for more information.
LINK  https://www.facebook.com/events/890027284488931/

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Nuclear Energy in Decarbonizing China's Energy System: Loosening Constraints, Mitigating Risks
Monday, April 2
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice, HKS, and Co-Principal Invstigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, HKS. Lunch is provided.

Energy Policy Seminar
https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/seminar.html

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu
617-495-8693

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Tree selection in the inner city
Monday, April 2
12:10 pm
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Lecture Hall, 1300 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain

Nina Bassuk, Professor, Cornell University

More information at https://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

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Alpine Dreams, Earthly Realities: Epochalism, Continuity, and Democracy in Imagining the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Monday, April 2
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Kasper Hedegård Schiølin (Harvard, STS Program)

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunch is provided. RSVP to via the online form by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

STS at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/

Contact Name:  sts at hks.harvard.edu

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Norton Lecture V, 'Poetry in Motion' by Wim Wenders
WHEN  Monday, Apr. 2, 2018, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Ethics, Humanities, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Wim Wenders
COST  Free
TICKET WEB LINK	www.boxoffice.harvard.edu…
TICKET INFO  Tickets will be available starting at noon on the day of each lecture. Tickets will be available in person at Sanders Theatre or online (handling fees apply). Limit of two tickets per person. Tickets valid until 3:45pm.
CONTACT INFO	humcentr at fas.harvard.edu, 617-495-0738
DETAILS  Wide Angle: The Norton Lectures on Cinema
The Norton Professors in 2018 are Agnès Varda, Wim Wenders, and Frederick Wiseman
Monday, Jan. 29 and Monday, Feb. 5: Frederick Wiseman
The Search for Story, Structure, and Meaning in Documentary Film: Part I and Part II
Monday, Feb. 26 and Tuesday, Feb. 27: Agnès Varda
The 7th Art and Me and Crossing the Borders
Monday, April 2 and Monday, April 9: Wim Wenders
Poetry in Motion and The Visible and the Invisible
LINK	http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/norton-lectures

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Askwith Forums – Protecting Brains, Stimulating Minds: The Early Life Roots of Success in School
WHEN  Monday, Apr. 2, 2018, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, Askwith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
FEATURED EVENT  Askwith Forums
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
DETAILS  Speaker: Jack Shonkoff, Julius B. Richmond FAMRI Professor of Child Health and Development, HGSE and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; professor of pediatrics, Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital; director, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
Understanding both the biology of adversity and the science of early learning is essential for building a strong foundation for reducing disparities in educational achievement. The benefits of evidence-based curricula in the early childhood years cannot be fully achieved without effective strategies for preventing the consequences of toxic stress.

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Gardens of Memory: Design Against Amnesia
Monday, April 2
6:00pm to 7:30pm
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 

Annalinda Neglia, Professor of Landscape Architecture, Polytechnic University of Bari, Italy

Giulia Annalinda Neglia is Assistant Professor in Landscape Architecture at the Department of Civil Engineering Sciences and Architecture of the Polytechnic University of Bari (Italy). She received her Ph.D. in Architectural Design for Mediterranean Countries from Polytechnic University of Bari in 2003 with a thesis on Aleppo (Syria).

For her researches on Mediterranean - Islamic cities and landscapes she has received scholarships from international and national research centers such as the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at MIT, DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst), Max van Berchem Foundation (Geneve), the Italian Ministry of Education, East-West Nexus / PROTA Institute, and Polytechnic University of Bari.

An author of three monographs on Islamic cities and landscapes and more than 90 articles and essays in books, proceedings of international conferences and peer-reviewed journals, her interest cover basic re­search, applied research, theory and methodology, spanning from sustainable (urban and landscape) design, to analytical work on typo-morphology of Middle Eastern, Balkans and North African landscapes, cities and urban fabric, history of Islamic architecture, and cultural heritage preservation. 

Her recent research has been focused on new regional models for sustainable urban and landscape regeneration of non-core areas, grounded on the relationship between urban fabric, open spaces and gardens.

MIT Department of Architecture / Spring 2018 Lecture Series
Aga Khan Program in Islamic Architecture

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Tuesday, April 3
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The Wind Tunnel Model
Tuesday, April 3
MIT, Building E15-001, act cube, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Florian Dombois and Haseeb Ahmed (SMACT’10) present their individual and collaborative artistic practices and research on wind tunnels.

Together with the Research Focus in Transdisciplinarity Zurich, led by Dombois, they edited the “Wind Tunnel Bulletin.”

Dombois will present last year’s project Galleria del Vento in Venice, while Ahmed presents excerpts from The Wind Egg, a film shot during an intervention at the von Karman Institute outside of Brussels, screened continually in the Keller Gallery from March 5 – 29.

The artists’ wind research and projects subvert the language and methods of scientific experiment and reportage, using modern wind tunnel technology to engender new narratives and new, fluid speculations about the relationships among science, art and, engineering.

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First MIT Food & Agriculture Club Lunch N' Learn 
Tuesday, April 3
11:45am to 12:45pm
MIT, Building E51-385, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Come join us at the MIT Food and Agriculture Club’s first lunch and learn. This lunch creates the space to catch up with fellow club members and discuss current trends in the industry and drivers that are turning food reality on its head. We look forward to seeing you there!

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Harvard HouseZero Typology Symposium
Tuesday, April 3
4:00pm-6:00pm
Harvard, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge

The Harvard Center for Green Buildings and Cities (CGBC) retrofitted its headquarters, a pre-1940s house in Cambridge, MA, into a first-of-its-kind test case to demonstrate unprecedented levels of building efficiency and promote substantial shifts in the design and operation of existing buildings. Dubbed “HouseZero,” the project aims to prove that ultra-efficient retrofits can, indeed, be achieved and replicated by coupling current technologies with better design.

All components of HouseZero are highly-sensored to generate data that will allow the building to adjust and reconfigure itself. This data will fuel future CGBC research involving simulated environments and the development of new systems and algorithms that can help to answer pressing questions involving energy efficiency, health and sustainability.

Scheduled to coincide with the completion of the retrofit, the Harvard HouseZero Typology Symposium will gather GSD faculty members to analyze the project. Presentations will discuss the building’s typology, design, and technologies, the collaborative process, historical context and more—resulting in a diverse range of observations that illustrate the complex issues involved in realizing an ultra-efficient retrofit and determining scalability. The program will conclude with a panel discussion.

PRESENTERS
Ali Malkawi, Professor of Architectural Technology, Harvard Graduate School of Design; Founding Director, Harvard Center for Green Buildings and Cities
K. Michael Hays, Eliot Noyes Professor of Architectural Theory, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Preston Scott Cohen, Gerald M. McCue Professor in Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Antoine Picon, G. Ware Travelstead Professor of the History of Architecture and Technology, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Erika Naginski, Professor of Architectural History, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Stephen Gray, Assistant Professor of Urban Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design
Gary R. Hilderbrand, Professor in Practice of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design

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Starr Forum: Women's Empowerment: Are Global Development Organizations Helping or Hurting?
Tuesday, April 3
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building 2-190, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speakers
Nimmi Gowrinathan, PhD, Visiting Professor, City College New York, Colin Powell School for Global and Civic Leadership, Director, Politics of Sexual Violence Initiative
Kate Cronin-Furman, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Security Program, Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Free & open to the public | Refreshments served
Can't attend in person? Watch it in real-time on Facebook live (https://www.facebook.com/pages/MIT-Center-for-International-Studies/174031032346) or later at your convenience on our YouTube channel event archive at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo3E2h2KZsZD3S8ThEn_UxA

For more information or accessibility accommodations please contact starrforum at mit.edu.

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Vannevar Bush Lecture Series on Science and Technology Innovation: Katie Rae
Tuesday, April 3
5:00pm to 6:00pm
MIT,  Building E51-335, 70 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

This lecture series, which includes imminent researchers and innovators from a wide variety of fields across MIT, will showcase the numerous forms that innovation takes and the pathways it can take from ideation to implementation. 

About the Speaker
Katie is the CEO and Managing Partner of The Engine. Previously, Katie was a founder and Managing Director at Project 11 Ventures and Managing Director of Techstars Boston. Katie spent her early career building significant Internet businesses as the Head of Product for Microsoft Startup Labs and SVP of Product at Eons. She learned the ropes of product and business development at AltaVista, RagingBull, Zip2, and Mirror Worlds. Katie currently serves as Chairman of Startup Institute where she is also a founder. She holds an MBA from Yale University and a BA in Biology from Oberlin College.

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Life’s Engines: How Microbes Made Earth Habitable
Tuesday, April 3
6:00pm
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Paul Falkowski, Distinguished Professor, Bennett L. Smith Chair in Business and Natural Resources, Departments of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University

For almost four billion years, microbes had the primordial oceans all to themselves. Over time, they transformed the chemistry of our planet, making it habitable for plants, animals, and humans. Paul Falkowski will discuss how microbes made life on Earth possible—and how human life would cease without them today. By examining the inner workings of these miniature “engines” and the processes by which they are built and assembled—like building blocks— within every creature that walks, swims, or flies, he will reveal how microbes are the great stewards of life on Earth.

Evolution Matters Lecture Series

This event will be live streamed at https://www.facebook.com/harvardmuseumsofscienceandculture\

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Opportunity
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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://somervilleyogurtmakingcoop.wordpress.com

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.

The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Resource
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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 41 (up from 27 in 2016) and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
Solidarity Network Economy:  https://ussolidarityeconomy.wordpress.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://calendar.mit.edu
MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 11 AM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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