[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - September 16, 2018

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Sep 16 11:27:22 PDT 2018


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) EventsGeo
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Details of these events are available when you scroll past the index

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Index
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Monday, September 17
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12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Ian Eisenman (Univ. of California, San Diego)
12pm  Caring for Survivors of Torture and Refugee Trauma
12pm  Let's Rebuild Earth Science with Al
12pm  A Process Systems Framework for Design and Operation of Modular Energy Systems
12pm  Why Distributed? How to Think about the Value and Cost of Distributed Energy Resources
12pm  The Harvard Law School Project on Disability Open House In honor of Special Olympics, with guest Tim Shriver
12:10pm  Aligning Production Methods & Urban Tree Planting Objectives
12:15pm  Multiple Carbons: Ontologies and Governance in the Climate Regime
2pm  Global Maternal Health Symposium
4:15pm  El Niño as a Topological Insulator: A Surprising Connection Between Climate and Quantum Physics
5pm  BERKMAN KLEIN CENTER & FRIENDS Fall 2018 Open House
5pm  Boston Idealist Grad Fair 2018
5:30pm  E4Dev Talk: Accelerating sustainable energy transitions in developing countries
5:30pm  Human Rights in 2018 - Salil Shetty, former Secretary General of Amnesty International
6pm   Saving Coral Reefs in the Florida Keys
6pm  Why Gridlock Rules Washington and How We Can Solve the Crisis
6pm  Science Policy Initiative September Discussion: Public Discourse in the Information Age
6pm  Sport Matters: On Art, Social Artifice, and Athletics, or, the Politics of Sport
6pm  The MIT Forum: Robert Lustig
6pm  Boston Indies: September, Lightning Talks
6:30pm  Role of Clouds and Particles in Climate... with a Dash of Fog
7pm  When History Is Personal

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Tuesday, September 18
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8:30am  Intro to WELL Building Standard
12pm  Government, Campaigns, and The Media
12pm  Platforms, Politics, and Power:  UNDERSTANDING AND SHAPING THE INTERNET IN 2018
12pm  EBC Energy Resources Webinar: Public Perception of Power in New England	@ WEBINAR
12:30pm  A Labor Perspective on Human Trafficking
12:30m  North Korea as a Nuclear Weapons State
3pm  CCIS DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER AND CYBERSECURITY SPEAKER SERIES: SIDE CHANNELS IN MULTI-TENANT ENVIRONMENTS 
3pm   Sexual Harassment of Women - A Consensus Study Report of NASEM
4pm   Reinforcement Learning Systems at DeepMind
4pm  Mission Zero: Interface's Journey to Zero Negative Environmental Impact
4:15pm  Polling China: Understanding Public Opinion Across China
4:30pm  Impostor Syndrome: Why Capable People Suffer and How to Thrive in Spite of It
5:30pm  Augustine's City of God and the Nature of Politics
5:30pm  Blockchain Technology: Patents vs. Open Source
6pm  Boston New Technology Startup Showcase
8pm  PechaKucha Somerville Presents: Volume 1: Trial & Error

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Wednesday, September 19
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7:30am  Boston Sustainability Breakfast
11:45am  Doing Capitalism: The Dark Side of the Three-Player Game
12pm  Deciphering aging: Linking senescence with DNA damage and the cell cycle 
12pm  Pacific Abyssal Transport and Mixing near the Samoan Passage and Manihiki Plateau
12pm  Before the 13th: The Origins of Convict Leasing
12:30pm  PICS Seminar: Selecting the Site for Mars Sample Return for the Mars-2020 Rover Mission
12:30pm  Social Impact Investing and Development
12:30pm  Igor Istomin: What Drives Russian Foreign Policy?
3:30pm  Gerrymandering: Can Computing Cut the Gordian Knot?
4pm  Materials in Energy: From Nano to Macro
4pm  3rd Annual Origins Prize Lecture
4:15pm  Think You Know the American Electorate?
5pm  Women Waging Peace
5pm  STH Distinguished Alumni Panel: The Three Greatest Challenges Facing Us In the Next Decade
5:30pm  A Foreign Policy Conversation with U.S. Congressman Joaquín Castro
6pm  The Lust for Land and the Roots of King Philip's War
7pm  Rising Out of Hatred:  The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist
7pm  GRAND CANYON FOR SALE:  Public Land versus Private Interest?

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Thursday, September 20, 6:00 PM – Saturday, September 22, 4:00 PM EDT
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Slums: New Visions for an Enduring Global Phenomenon

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Thursday, September 20
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11am  Sustainability Festival
12pm  The planet on our plates: The case for incorporating sustainability into dietary guidelines
12pm  Get Involved: Enter the Digital Universe of Your Tween/Teen
12:30pm  Displacement Research & Action Network (DRAN) Social
3pm  MIT Press Essential Knowledge Book Launch:  Carbon Capture
3pm  Playing to the Crowd (Leading Voices Speaker Series)
3:30pm  Consilience, Model Lineages, and A Truly Integrative Phylogenetic Biology
4pm  Populism and the Future of Liberal Democracy in the West - A Lecture by Sheri Berman
4pm  'Circle Up' Film Screening and Discussion
4pm  BlueTech New England: Innovating Oceans & Waterfronts with Cutting-Edge Tech
5pm  Let Me Be Frank: The Traitorous Turnabout of an Evangelical Heir Apparent
5pm  Thomas Allen Harris: “Collective Wisdom” Keynote
5pm  PTC & MassChallenge Oktoberfest Party and Tech Showcase
5:30pm  Gitner Family CAS Lecture: The Opioid Crisis from a Humanist's Perspective
5:30pm  Jeanne S. Chall Lecture and Reception - Teaching Readers, Not Reading: Addressing Students' Individual Differences
6pm  authors at MIT: Mark Stuart Day, Bits to Bitcoin
6pm  Congress’ Role in Trump Era Foreign Policy
6pm  Breakpoint: Reckoning with America’s Environmental Crises
6pm  Reception: Teresita Fernández — Wayfinding
6pm  Resilient Places + People
6pm   Synaptic Stories
6:30pm  Making Robots Behave:  Doing for our robots what nature did for us
6:30pm  MIT Energy Club Kickoff 2018
6:30pm  Ranjani Mazumdar, “The Cinematic Slum”
6:30pm  Viewing of the movie Chasing Coral, followed by panel discussion
6:30pm  Social Media Panel Online vs Reality
7pm  Big Game: The NFL in Dangerous Times
7pm  Betraying Big Brother
7pm  The Science and the Engineering of Intelligence with Tomaso Poggio
7pm  The Knife Edge of Value Alignment in AI: Utopia or Extinction
8pm  A Documentary History of the United States

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 Friday, September 21, 9 a.m. – Saturday, September 22, 3 p.m.
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Changing Middle Classes: Comparative and Global Perspectives

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Friday, September 21
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Parking Day
8:15am  Molecular Robotics, 9th Annual Wyss International Symposium
8:30am  So You’re a Multicellular Microbe…
9:30am  Being Bold: The Implementation of BU’s Climate Action Plan
12:15pm  Gutman Library Book Talk: Educational Goods
3pm  Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?
3pm  Network Science – A Network of Sciences 
4:15pm  Global Income Inequality
7pm  No Property in Man:  Slavery and Antislavery at the Nation's Founding
7pm  Lessons from Nature for Edible Ecosystems and Human Societies with Dave Jacke
8pm  Leadership:  In Turbulent Times

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Saturday, September 22, 8:45am to 6pm, and Sunday, September 23, 12 noon to 6pm
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Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) Two-Day Basic Level Workshop

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Saturday, September 22
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9am  Lynn Wind & Water Tour
9am  Gardening Like the Forest: Designing Plant Guilds and Perennial Polycultures
12pm   Homes For All Assembly: Build a People's Plan!
1pm  Symbiotic Earth: How Lynn Margulis Started a Scientific Revolution!
3pm  Fluff the 13th

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Sunday, September 23
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12pm  FARM KICKOFF WITH GREEN CAMBRIDGE
2pm  Jazz Along The Charles: A Walkable Concert
2pm  United Nations International Day of Peace 2018 - Boston
2pm  FarmFarm UnBrunch Potluck Party

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Monday, September 24 - Sunday, September 30
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Cambridge Climate Preparedness Week

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Monday, September 24
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8:30am  African Sustainable Development Conference
11am  The Growing Need for Precision in LED Lighting
12pm  Kristen Soltis Anderson
12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Paul Wennberg (Caltech)
12pm  State Policies and Wholesale Electricity Markets
12pm  Immigrants Making America Great Again: Lessons from an Undocumented Immigrant Turned Lawyer
12:10pm  Invasive plant challenges and opportunities in the U.S.
12:15pm  Not-so-big Data and Ebola Virus Disease
3pm  Science, Religion, and Out-of-Body Experiences
3:30pm  Land-use Regimes and the Future of New England’s Forest Carbon
4:30pm  Reflections on a lifetime effort to bring peace to the Middle East: An Interview with Herbert C. Kelman
4:30pm  The Future of Food and Nutrition: Implications for Science, Dietary Guidelines, and Food Policy
5pm  Science Sounds Strange: Ether Waves, Espionage, and the Theremin’s Odyssey
5:30pm  Boston's Creative Economy Mingle
6pm  Conflict and the Global Threat of Pandemics
6pm  Solar Access Celebration
6:30pm  Sheila Remes, "The Future is Built Here”
7pm  Tales from an Uncertain World

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Tuesday, September 25
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8am  By the People: Revolutionizing the Democratic Process to Ensure Full Participation by Millennials and People of Color
8:30am  Intro to PassivHaus
11am  Sustainability Festival
12pm  Eugene Scott
12pm  Neighborhood Matters: a Screening of Invisible Crisis and Conversation with Patricia Montes
12pm  "Click Here to Kill Everybody”
12pm  FORUM: VULNERABILITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE
12pm  Achieving Access: Professional Movements and the Politics of Health Universalism
12:30pm  What Makes a Climate Leader? The Politics of Climate Policy in California and Germany
3pm  Outbreak Week - Global Disease Outbreaks: Shaping public health infrastructure and investments
3:30pm  Books at Baker with Nancy Koehn
4pm  Resiliency with Microgrids: A Peek Inside
4:30pm  Starr Forum: The Assault on Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies
5pm  Gotta Get Down to It: Conversations with musician David Crosby
5:30pm  DUSP [Department of Urban Studies and Planning] Lightning Talks
6pm  What’s New? What’s Next? Cultural and Structural Threats to the Constitutional Order of the United States and Western Europe
6:30pm  Outbreak Week - Emerging Infections Then and Now: From the Influenza Pandemic to the Antibiotic Resistance Crisis
7pm  On the Other Side of Freedom:  The Case for Hope
7pm  Black Flags, Blue Waters
7pm  Dancing with the Future
7pm  Boston Science for the People chapter meeting


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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com


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Monday, September 17
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PAOC Colloquium - Ian Eisenman (Univ. of California, San Diego)
Monday, September 17
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-915/923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Ian Eisenman (Univ. of California, San Diego)

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars generally take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged.

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Caring for Survivors of Torture and Refugee Trauma
Monday, September 17
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
BU, 121 Bay State Road, Boston

Dr. Michael Grodin joins the Pardee School Initiative on Forced Migration and Human Trafficking from the Medical Campus to discuss the complexities of providing care to refugees and survivors of torture.</p> <p>Michael Alan Grodin, M.D., is Professor of Health Law, Ethics and Human Rights at the Boston University School of Public Health, and in the Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, where he has received the two highest awards granted the Faculty, the Career Research and Scholarship Award and the Norman A. Scotch Award for Excellence in Teaching. Dr. Grodin is Professor of Psychiatry and Family Medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine. In addition, Dr. Grodin is Director of the Project on Ethics and the Holocaust at the Elie Wiesel Center for Judaic Studies, Professor of Jewish Studies and a member of the Division of Religious Studies of the College of Arts and Sciences. He completed his B.S. degree at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his M.D. degree at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, his postdoctoral and fellowship training at UCLA and Harvard, and he has been on the faculty of Boston University for the past 37 years.</p><p>Dr. Grodin is also the Medical Ethicist at Boston Medical Center and founding director of the Boston Center for Refugee Health & Human Rights.

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Let's Rebuild Earth Science with Al
Monday, September 17
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, Haller Hall (102), Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Brandon Meade, Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences. 

EPS Colloquium
https://eps.harvard.edu/event/department-colloquium-series-57
Lunch will be provided.

Contact Name:  Summer Smith
summer_smith at fas.harvard.edu

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A Process Systems Framework for Design and Operation of Modular Energy Systems
Monday, September 17
12:00 NOON
Tufts, Scitech Room 136, 4 Colby St, Medford

Dr. Fernando Lima, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, West Virginia University 
Abstract:  With the growing energy demand and stringent environmental regulations, the efficient, economic and sustainable use of major energy sources has become increasingly important. The development and implementation of novel technologies for the improved utilization of such energy sources can be accelerated by the use of process systems engineering tools, such as process modeling, design, control, and optimization. In particular, the investigation of intensified and modular methane conversion routes with reduced cost and minimized environmental impact is especially motivated by the presence of abundant amounts of natural gas in different shale formations in the country, including the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia. This presentation will focus on the development of a process systems framework to enable the design and operation of modular energy systems.

Modular systems have the potential to transform the US economy, by utilizing local distributed feedstock (e.g., stranded gas) without the need of transporting it from the exploration areas to the utilization plants. However, the design and intensification of modular energy systems is a challenging task as these processes are represented by complex and nonlinear models, with large numbers of differential and algebraic equations that demand high computational effort for their solution. This presentation will introduce a novel operability-based approach as a tool for enabling process design and intensification of nonlinear energy processes, facilitating the realization of the concept of modular manufacturing. The developed operability approach is based on nonlinear programming tools and describes the relationship between key process input/design and output variables through a nonlinear mapping obtained by employing the process model. To address the dimensionality challenge, the incorporation of bilevel and parallel programming approaches into the classical process operability concepts is proposed. The employment of computational geometry tools is also explored for further reduction of computational expense. For the operation of such modular systems under the presence of uncertainties, a stochastic model predictive controller (MPC) combined with a moving horizon estimator (MHE) are designed for implementation on a catalytic membrane reactor system for the direct methane aromatization (DMA) conversion to hydrogen and benzene. Such developments for modular systems will be discussed, along with their expansion to address other complex chemical and energy systems.

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Why Distributed? How to Think about the Value and Cost of Distributed Energy Resources
Monday, September 17
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jesse Jenkins, Environmental Fellow, Harvard University Center for the Environment

Lunch will be served.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar
https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/energyconsortium/seminars

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The Harvard Law School Project on Disability Open House In honor of Special Olympics, with guest Tim Shriver
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 17, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Austin Hall, Room 101 East, 1515 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Athletic, Award Ceremonies, Law
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Harvard Law School Project on Disability
SPEAKER(S)  Timothy P. Shriver, Ph.D., Chairman, Special Olympics International
Melissa Joy Reilly, Athlete, Board Member, Special Olympics, Massachusetts
CONTACT INFO	hpod at law.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The Harvard Law School Project on Disability Open House
With special guests Timothy P. Shriver, Ph.D., Chairman, Special Olympics International
And Melissa Joy Reilly, Athlete, Board Member, Special Olympics, Massachusetts
In celebration of The Special Olympics 50th Anniversary
Monday, Sept. 17, 2018, noon
http://www.hpod.org
Catered lunch available at 11:30 a.m.
LINK  http://hpod.law.harvard.edu/events/event/hpods-open-house-in-honor-of-special-olympics-at-50-save-the-date

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Aligning Production Methods & Urban Tree Planting Objectives
Monday, September 17
12:10p
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Rick Harper, Extension Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

More information at https://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

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Multiple Carbons: Ontologies and Governance in the Climate Regime
Monday, September 17 
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd7VGUkAvTU655Dub2FTGSNMjpVs6f8Qbu0kpmXh6oz11MgFw/viewform

Stefan Schäfer (Berlin IASS and Harvard STS)
The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to via the online form by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/
sts at hks.harvard.edu

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Global Maternal Health Symposium
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 17, 2018, 2 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard School of Public Health, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Maternal Health Task Force, a project of the Women and Health Initiative at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
SPEAKER(S)  Aparajita Gogoi, National Coordinator, White Ribbon Alliance India
Christy Turlington-Burns, Founder and CEO, Every Mother Counts
Nina Martin, Reporter, ProPublica
Ana Langer, Director of the Maternal Health Task Force, Harvard Chan School of Public Health
Margaret Kruk, Associate Professor of Global Health, Harvard Chan School of Public Health
Jigyasa Sharma, Doctor of Science Candidate, Harvard Chan School of Public Health
Mary Mwanyika-Sando, CEO, Africa Academy of Public Health
Richard Adanu, Dean of the School of Public Health, University of Ghana
DIRECTED BY  Maternal Health Task Force
COST  Free
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/global-maternal-health-symposium-tickets-47067851210
TICKET INFO  RSVP required. Seating is limited.
CONTACT INFO  mhtf at hsph.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The symposium will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Maternal Health Task Force, showcase achievements in global maternal health and chart a course forward for critical steps to end preventable maternal mortality and optimize maternal health around the world. A reception will follow. At the symposium, we will also announce the recipients of the inaugural Maternal Health Visionary Awards.
LINK  https://www.mhtf.org/global-maternal-health-symposium/

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El Niño as a Topological Insulator: A Surprising Connection Between Climate and Quantum Physics
Monday, September 17
4:15 – 5:15pm
Harvard, Jefferson 250, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Symmetries and topology play central roles in our understanding of physics. Topology, for instance, explains the precise quantization of the Hall Effect and the protection of surface states in topological insulators against scattering from disorder or bumps. However discrete symmetries and topology have so far played little role in thinking about the fluid dynamics of oceans and atmospheres. In this talk I show that, as a consequence of the rotation of the Earth that breaks time reversal symmetry, equatorially trapped Kelvin and Yanai waves emerge as topologically protected edge modes. Thus the oceans and atmosphere of Earth naturally share basic physics with topological insulators. As equatorially trapped Kelvin waves in the Pacific Ocean are an important component of El Niño Southern Oscillation and other climate processes, these new results demonstrate that topology plays a surprising role i n Earth’s climate system.

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BERKMAN KLEIN CENTER & FRIENDS Fall 2018 Open House
Monday, September 17
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM ET
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West AB (Room 2019), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Please join us to learn about the Berkman Klein Center, our amazing community and digital Harvard friends at the Fall 2018 Open House. Our faculty, fellows, and staff look forward to meeting you!

5:00-6:00 pm - Project Showcase Session: Select Berkman Klein projects (as well as projects from our friends at the Harvard) will be present with information about their current activities. Staff working with each of these projects are eager to share information about the big research questions they are considering, meet potential future collaborators, and solicit ideas. In addition to the project tabling, there will be space and opportunity to connect with new Berkman Klein community members and Berkman Klein Center Staff and Faculty. You may come for any portion of time during this session.

6:00-7:00 pm - Reception: Keep the conversations going with the help of light snacks and drinks!
Spoiler alert: check out the current open research positions with our teams!
As a University-wide research center at Harvard, our interdisciplinary efforts in the exploration of cyberspace address a diverse range of backgrounds and experiences. If you're interested in the Internet’s impact on society and are looking to engage a community of world-class fellows and faculty through events, conversations, research, and more please join us to hear more about our upcoming academic year.
People from all disciplines, universities, organizations, and backgrounds are encouraged to attend the Open House. We look forward to seeing you there!

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Boston Idealist Grad Fair 2018
Monday, September 17
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
BU, George Sherman Union, 2nd Floor Ballroom, 775 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-idealist-grad-fair-2018-tickets-44922865500

Learn about admissions requirements and application deadlines for graduate programs in social work, public policy, nonprofit management, international affairs, public interest law, social entrepreneurship, and many more

Speak with graduate admissions advisors from local, national and international universities
The fair is free and open to anyone considering graduate school. Now you can seamlessly share your information with recruiters with the click of a button! Find out about our new Grad Fair Mobile Site here.

Visit IdealistGradSchool.org for additional resources to assist you in planning for grad school. 

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E4Dev Talk: Accelerating sustainable energy transitions in developing countries
Monday, September 17
5:30pm to 6:30pm
MIT, Building E19-319 400 Main Street, Cambridge

This is e4Dev's first event of the semester! Dr. Laurence Delina will give a presentation on delibrately produced energy transition as a communal practice for expanding energy transitions in rural Thailand. 

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Human Rights in 2018 - Salil Shetty, former Secretary General of Amnesty International
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 17, 2018, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wexner Room 434 AB, 9 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Ethics, Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Carr Center for Human Rights Policy
SPEAKER(S)  Salil Shetty, former Secretary General of Amnesty International
CONTACT INFO	Sarah Peck
DETAILS  The Carr Center is excited to announce the continuation of its Speaker Series: The Fierce Urgency of Now: Human Rights in 2018. The series will be faciliated by Professor Mathias Risse.
At the 1963 March on Washington, Martin Luther King, Jr spoke of “the fierce urgency of now,” the need for immediate, “vigorous and positive action” on civil rights. This year, the Carr Center will host a series of talks that will examine the current state of human rights in the country, and worldwide. Please see our calendar for all upcoming dates and times.
*Please note, times/rooms might change. Always check our calendar for the most up-to-date information!*
LINK	https://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/event/fierce-urgency-now-speaker-series-salil-shetty-former-secretary-generalof-amnesty

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Saving Coral Reefs in the Florida Keys
Monday, September 17
6:00pm
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

James W. Porter, Josiah Meigs Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia
Coral reefs support more than a quarter of all marine life, yet many are critically endangered. In the Florida Keys, the once common elk horn coral (Acropora palmata) has experienced steep declines since the 1970s. Preliminary blame was attributed to  global warming and coral bleaching, but in fact, a human bacterial pathogen associated with a wide range of serious infections was the culprit. James Porter will discuss how Key West residents are saving these reefs and he will highlight the intricate links among conservation, medicine, public health, economics, and politics.

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Why Gridlock Rules Washington and How We Can Solve the Crisis
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 17, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)	Devontae Freeland '19, David Jolly, Victoria Marquez '20, Patrick Murphy, Joseph J. Heck (Moderator  
CONTACT INFO	IOP Forum Office, 617-495-1380
DETAILS  A Conversation with
Devontae Freeland '19
President, Harvard College Democrats
David Jolly
Member of Congress (R-FL 13, 2014-2017)
Analyst, CNN & MSNBC
Victoria Marquez '20
VP for Campaigns and Activism, Harvard Republican Club
Patrick Murphy
Member of Congress (D-FL 18, 2013-2017)
Joseph J. Heck (Moderator)
Fall 2018 Resident Fellow, Institute of Politics
Member of Congress (NV-03, 2011 to 2017)
2016 Republican Nominee, U.S. Senate in Nevada
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/why-gridlock-rules-washington-and-how-we-can-solve-crisis-0

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Science Policy Initiative September Discussion: Public Discourse in the Information Age
Monday, September 17
6:00pm to 7:30pm
MIT, Building 56-162, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

At SPI’s Orientation Panel, we heard from experts at MIT about their views on social media. Now it’s your turn. How has online media shaped democracy? Can social media benefit individuals and society more than it does harm? And what should be done to prevent the spread of misinformation or harassment on the Internet? These are just a few of the questions that will become increasingly relevant as more and more public discourse takes place online. Join SPI at our first monthly meeting of the year on Monday, 9/17 at 6 pm in Room 56-162 for free dinner and lively discussion.

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Sport Matters: On Art, Social Artifice, and Athletics, or, the Politics of Sport
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 17, 2018, 6 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Room 133, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ludics seminar, the Mahindra Humanities Center
SPEAKER(S)  Louis A. Ruprecht Jr., Georgia State University
CONTACT INFO  vasiliki_rapti at emerson.edu
DETAILS  This lecture will explore three interrelated topics. First, I will examine the moral implications of viewing sport as an example of social artifice, that is, arbitrary norm-and-boundary-creation which makes certain complex social rituals possible. Second, I will examine the history of the Modern Olympic Revival as an example of Neohellenism, one which emphasized the moral meaning of such athletic artifice. This will set the stage for the third and longest portion of the talk, a discussion of what is arguably the finest book on the moral and political meaning of organized sport, C. L. R. James’s Beyond a Boundary.
LINK  http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/ludics

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The MIT Forum: Robert Lustig
Monday, September 17
6:00pm to 8:30pm
MIT, Samberg Conference Center, 7th Floor, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://alumic.mit.edu/s/1314/17form/interior.aspx?sid=1314&gid=13&pgid=44518&content_id=46952

Join fellow MIT alumni and friends for a special MIT Forum event featuring Robert Lustig '77, bestselling author, physician, and consumer advocate. 

Lustig, a Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco, has spent his academic career exposing the role sugar has played in contributing to poor health in America. His books Fat Chance and The Hacking of the American Mind, Sugar Has 56 Names, and Obesity Before Birth have effected significant change in the way food companies, governments, and consumers view the American diet.

Lustig's talk will be by a fireside chat with and audience Q&A. The event includes a reception with drinks and hors d'oeuvres. MIT alumni and guests are welcome.

Space is limited—register today.

The MIT Forum is a quarterly series, produced by the MIT Alumni Association, that spotlights thought leaders from around the world.

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Boston Indies: September, Lightning Talks
Monday, September 17
6:00pm to 9:00pm
MIT, Building 32-141, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/bostonindies/events/rkwsqlyxmbwb/

The MIT Game Lab is happy to host the Boston Indies group this September for their monthly meeting. This month features a round of 'Lightning Talks' - short talks, rants, or raves from members of the Boston Indies communities about topics that are important to them.

Doors open at 6pm. Announcements and talks start at 7pm.

About Boston Indies (www.bostonindies.com):
Boston Indies is a community of dedicated independent game developers in Massachusetts and the surrounding area. Boston Indies works to foster a sense of community among Boston’s independent game developers, facilitate monthly meet-ups and other related community events, encourage developers to create games independent of large budgets and large company ties, provide a safe environment to obtain critical feedback on game development works in progress and serve as a brain trust for important information sharing among local independent developers.

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Role of Clouds and Particles in Climate... with a Dash of Fog
Monday, September 17
6:30–8:00pm
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain
RSVP at https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Policies.aspx

Daniel Ciczo, PhD, Associate Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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When History Is Personal
Monday, September 17
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

When History Is Personal contains the stories of twenty-five moments in Mimi Schwartz's life, each heightened by its connection to historical, political, and social issues. These essays look both inward and outward so that these individualized tales tell a larger story--of assimilation, the women's movement, racism, anti-Semitism, end-of-life issues, ethics in writing, digital and corporate challenges, and courtroom justice.

A shrewd and discerning storyteller, Schwartz captures history from her vantage as a child of German-Jewish immigrants, a wife of over fifty years, a breast cancer survivor, a working mother, a traveler, a tennis player, a daughter, and a widow. In adding her personal story to the larger narrative of history, culture, and politics, Schwartz invites readers to consider her personal take alongside "official" histories and offers readers fresh assessments of our collective past.

Mimi Schwartz is a professor emerita in the writing program at Stockton University. She is the award-winning author of Good Neighbors, Bad Times: Echoes of My Father's German Village and Thoughts from a Queen-Sized Bed and is the coauthor of Writing True: The Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction. Her essays have been widely anthologized, and ten of them have been listed as Notables in the Best American Series.

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Tuesday, September 18
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Intro to WELL Building Standard
Tuesday, September 18
8:30 AM – 10:30 AM EDT
50 Milk Street, 16th Floor, "Edison" Room, 17th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-well-building-standard-tickets-48618031842
Cost:  $45 – $60

The Introduction to the WELL Building Standard provides an overview of the WELL Building Standard ideology, structure, and certification process. The medical basis for the concept categories is introduced along with design and construction strategies to create healthy buildings. This training will introduce how to reinvent buildings that are better for both people and the planet using the WELL Building Standard as the framework.
Objectives
Articulate the financial, societal, and environmental benefits of WELL certification
Identify the role of the International Well Building Institute and the WELL Building Standard
Recognize the structure of the WELL Building Standard
Explain the 7 concepts of the WELL Building standard, the strategies to achieve them, and the health impacts they address
Summarize the certification process of the WELL Building Standard
If you are interested in having this session count towards your LEED credential, please self-report at USGBC.org and use GBCI: 0920003583 when referring to the session.

About the Instructor: Jen Taranto
Jenn Taranto, WELL AP, has over 15 years experience in the commercial real estate and construction industry. Jenn serves as Structure Tone’s Director of Sustainability, a key component of the team on any project. Her ability to manage and lead subcontractors through the LEED and WELL process comes from her previous background as a superintendent and a project manager. Jenn understands the importance of creating awareness at the early stages of the project with the subcontractor’s in order to succeed in meeting the client’s sustainability goals. Additionally, she understands the importance of being an active partner during the preconstruction integrated design process on projects that have sustainable goals.

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Government, Campaigns, and The Media
Tuesday, September 18
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Taubman 5th floor, Allison Dining Room, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Setti Warren

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Platforms, Politics, and Power:  UNDERSTANDING AND SHAPING THE INTERNET IN 2018
Tuesday, Sep 18
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2018-09-18/platforms-politics-and-power

Jonathan Zittrain
Join us on Harvard Law School campus to hear from Jonathan Zittrain, the George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at the Harvard Law School Library, and co-founder of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society to learn more about the Berkman Klein Center and its network of researchers, activists, faculty, students, technologists, entrepreneurs, artists, policy makers, lawyers, and more in an interactive conversation.

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EBC Energy Resources Webinar: Public Perception of Power in New England	@ WEBINAR
Tuesday, September 18
12:00 pm – 1:15 pm
Webinar
RSVP at http://ebcne.org/event/ebc-energy-resources-webinar-public-perception-of-power-in-new-england/

Utilities and product companies are undergoing unprecedented change driven by climate policy, innovative smart-grid technologies, customer adoption of distributed energy, and new customer expectations. The stakes are high, and so is the price tag. Are customers really looking for an energy revolution – akin to how smart phones have changed the telecom industry? Or are they just looking for more affordable, resilient, reliable, clean power from their trusted utility? What are the barriers and opportunities for adapting to a shifting energy marketplace and how do utilities and customer adapt? We have asked customers directly what they expect and need from their utility and how they see the future. Join us for an information presentation to illuminate public opinion on this topic.

Program Chair:
Dale Knapp, MSc, CSS, LSE, CEP, PWS, Senior Environmental Consultant, Tetra Tech

Webinar Presentation:
Utility of the Future: The Customer’s Perspective
Harrison Grubbs, Director of Strategic Partnerships, KSV Company
Following the Speaker Presentation will be time for a Q&A session.

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A Labor Perspective on Human Trafficking
Tuesday, September 18
12:30pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building 9-255, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Human trafficking is considered by many to be one of the most pressing moral and political challenges of today’s global economy. However, despite significant international commitment to combat trafficking a mere 3% of the millions of victims are identified every year, and far fewer are assisted. In her talk Dr. Shamir will propose that one reason for the low effectiveness of contemporary anti-trafficking efforts lies in the mismatch between the legal tools we use to address the problem, and the actual causes of human trafficking. 

Dr. Shamir will discuss the need to move away from the currently predominant approach to trafficking, which focuses on criminal law, border control, and human rights, towards a labor-based approach that targets the structure of labor markets that are prone to severely exploitative labor practices. She will suggest a blueprint for such a labor approach, recognizing that there can be no “one size fits all” solution. The various components contributing to worker vulnerability can vary from country to country, city to city, and from sector to sector.  Yet some tools – at the international, national, municipal, and workplace level - seem to have the potential to impact the balance of bargaining power between workers and employers in sectors prone to severe labor market exploitation. These include, for example, bilateral agreements on migration, national regulations of labor standards and recruitment practices, worker unionization (including alt-labor), and voluntary corporate codes of conduct. 

Dr. Shamir earned her S.J.D. and LL.M. from Harvard Law School and LL.B. from Tel-Aviv University. Shamir received an European Research Council (ERC) grant to pursue research on a Labor Approach to Human Trafficking, and established TraffLab – labor perspective to human trafficking research project (2018-2023).

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North Korea as a Nuclear Weapons State
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2018, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Case Study Room (S020), CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  Vipin Narang, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Ambassador Nobuyasu Abe, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School; U.N. Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs (2003-06); and Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission (2014-17)
Moderated by Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Studies and Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK	https://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/calendar/upcoming

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CCIS DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER AND CYBERSECURITY SPEAKER SERIES: SIDE CHANNELS IN MULTI-TENANT ENVIRONMENTS 
Tuesday, September 18
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT 
Northeastern, Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex (ISEC), 805 Columbus Avenue, Boston

Speaker: Michael Reiter, Lawrence M. Slifkin Distinguished Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Abstract
Due to the massive adoption of computing platforms that consolidate potentially distrustful tenants’ applications on common hardware—both large (e.g., public clouds) and small (e.g., smartphones)—the security provided by these platforms to their tenants is increasingly being scrutinized.  In this talk we will review highlights from the last several years of research on a long-suspected but, until recently, largely hypothetical attack vector on such platforms, namely side-channel attacks.  In these attacks, one tenant learns sensitive information about another tenant simply by running on the same hardware with it, but without violating the logical access control enforced by the platform’s isolation software (virtual machine monitor or operating system). We will then summarize various strategies we have explored to defend against side-channel attacks in their various forms, both inexpensive defenses against specific attacks and more holistic but expensive protections.

About the Speaker
Michael Reiter is the Lawrence M. Slifkin Distinguished Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  His research interests include all areas of computer and communications security and distributed computing.  His professional responsibilities during his career so far have included Director of Secure Systems Research at Bell Labs; Professor and founding Technical Director of CyLab at Carnegie Mellon University; program chair for the flagship computer security conferences of the IEEE, the ACM, and the Internet Society; and Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Information and System Security, among others.  Dr. Reiter was named an ACM Fellow in 2008 and an IEEE Fellow in 2014, and he received the ACM SIGSAC Outstanding Contributions Award in 2016.

More information at https://www.ccis.northeastern.edu/event/cybersecurity-speaker-series-side-channels-in-multi-tenant-environments/#_ga=2.151371449.1498908976.1536791795-593491830.1457895416

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Sexual Harassment of Women - A Consensus Study Report of NASEM
Tuesday, September 18
3:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, Building 10-250, Huntington Hall, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. A Consensus Study Report of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

Welcome by MIT President L. Rafael Reif 

Panel discussion by: 
Sheila Widnall (Report Co-Chair), aerospace researcher and Institute Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Paula Johnson (Report Co-Chair), President, Wellesley College
Anita Hill, MIT Research Affiliate, Professor, Brandeis University

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Reinforcement Learning Systems at DeepMind
Tuesday, September 18
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Refreshments: 3:45 PM
MIT, Building 32-D463, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: David Budden , DeepMinds 
Abstract: The many recent successes of deep reinforcement learning have resulted from innovation not just in algorithm design, but the co-development of systems capable of scaling to thousands of machines and leveraging specialized hardware.

In this seminar I will cover three topics:
A brief introduction to off-policy reinforcement learning and policy gradient methods
Recent algorithmic improvements underlying the D4PG agent for continuous control and robotics, e.g. distributional RL and prioritized experience replay
Architectures and open research questions in distributing agents across many machines

Constant iteration between algorithm design and systems engineering is a hallmark of the Research Engineering role at DeepMind, and through this seminar I also hope to give a flavor of what this entails day-to-day.

Bio: David Budden is a Research Engineering Team Lead and Tech Lead for DeepMind's Machine Learning team. Before joining DeepMind, he worked as a postdoc in CSAIL with Prof Nir Shavit.

David's research interests include generative models, few-shot imitation and self-supervised learning. His main passion however is the intersection of machine learning research and systems engineering. David prepared and teaches DeepMind's internal training courses on distributed machine learning, and helped develop many of their engineering systems (e.g. Control Suite, ApeX) and state-of-the-art reinforcement learning agents (e.g. D4PG, DQfD).

Contact: Joanne Talbot Hanley, 617-253-6054, joanne at csail.mit.edu

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Mission Zero: Interface's Journey to Zero Negative Environmental Impact
Tuesday, September 18
4:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, Building E40-356 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Interface is a leading global commercial flooring company who since 1994 has been on Mission Zero – their promise to eliminate any negative impact the company has on the environment by the year 2020.  With 2020 in sight and industry leading progress on their goals, Interface has launched its next audacious mission – Climate Take Back – their goal to run the business in a way that reverses global warming.  Interface’s VP of Sustainability for the Americas, Lisa Conway, will share how the billion-dollar public company navigates the pursuit of sustainability while also focusing on the bottom line.

Editorial Comment:  I met Ray Anderson, the Interface CEO who began Mission Zero back in the 1990s.  It will be good to see what they’ve done since then.

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Polling China: Understanding Public Opinion Across China
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2018, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center foyer, 124 Mt Auburn Street, Suite 200 North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Tony Saich, Ash Center Director and Daewoo Professor of International Affairs; Jesse Turiel, a PhD candidate from Boston University; and Ning Leng, Ash Center China Public Policy Postdoctoral Fellow
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	info at ash.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Join us for a conversation with Ash Center Director and Daewoo Professor of International Affairs Tony Saich and Jesse Turiel, a Ph.D. candidate from Boston University as they discuss their groundbreaking public opinion survey project in China. Starting in 2003, Saich developed a series of surveys to measure satisfaction with various levels of government in China. Through 2016, the survey project ultimately captured opinion data from 32,000 individual respondents, making it the most ambitious public opinion research project conducted on a nationwide scale to date in China. Ning Leng, Ash Center China Public Policy Postdoctoral Fellow, will serve as a respondent.
This event is co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.
LINK  https://ash.harvard.edu/event/polling-china-understanding-public-opinion-across-china

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Impostor Syndrome: Why Capable People Suffer and How to Thrive in Spite of It
Tuesday, September 18
4:30–6 p.m. (doors open at 4 p.m.)
BU, Bakst Auditorium, 72 East Concord Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.bu.edu/sph/news-events/signature-programs/diversity-inclusion/impostor-syndrome-why-capable-people-suffer-and-how-to-thrive-in-spite-of-it/

Speaker  Valerie Young, Author and Speaker
From CEOs to PhDs to acclaimed actors, millions of people secretly worry they’re not as bright or as capable as they are perceived to be. This is known as the “Impostor Syndrome.” Valerie Young, author of The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women: Why Capable People Suffer from the Impostor Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It, will discuss the reasons why accomplished individuals feel as though they are “faking it,” and will provide insight and tools on how to eliminate this thought pattern.

Services for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing People Provided

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Augustine's City of God and the Nature of Politics
Tuesday, September 18
5:30pm 
MIT Building 1-190, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

A lecture by Prof. Chad Pecknold (Catholic University of America). 
A self-described "Augustinian-Thomist," Dr. Chad Pecknold received his PhD from the University of Cambridge (UK) and teaches in the areas of fundamental theology, Christian anthropology, and political theology. Pecknold is the author of a number scholarly articles and books including most recently, Christianity and Politics: A Brief Guide to the History (Cascade 2010) and The T&T Clark Companion to Augustine and Modern Theology (Bloomsbury, 2014). Dr. Pecknold is also a frequent contributor to debates in the public square, writing regular columns for First Things and National Review on a range of topics related to the importance and impact of Church teaching on social and political questions. Dr Pecknold is currently writing a book on Augustine’s City of God. 

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Blockchain Technology: Patents vs. Open Source
Tuesday, September 18
5:30pm to 8:30pm
MIT Stata Center, Building 32-124, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.mitforumcambridge.org/event/blockchain-technology-patents-vs-open-source/
Cost:  $0 - $20

A new frontier of innovation has arrived with the advent of cryptocurrencies and the myriad of blockchain use cases. Some folks believe open source and patents have no place together. However, both are integral to the commercialization of blockchain technology.

As blockchain continues to be disruptive in a variety of industries, protecting these innovations value becomes essential. However, value means different things to different people. Some value blockchain technology based on the amount of money it can generate or save. Others value the broad adoption of successful blockchain technologies.

Join us and learn from our panel of innovators in the blockchain technology community as they examine the strategies they use to protect the value of their technologies.

Speakers
Sam Abbasi, Partner, The BUSHIDO Lab
Evan Schwartz, Engineer at Ripple, Co-Inventor of the Interledger Protocol
Tom Serres, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Animal Ventures
Christian Wentz, Founder/CEO, Stealth Mode Startup

Moderator
Keegan M. Caldwell, Managing Member and Founder, Caldwell Intellectual Property

Event Schedule
5:30 - 6:00 pm - Registration & networking (light refreshments served)
6:00 - 7:30 pm - Welcome & panel discussion
7:30 - 8:30 pm - Beer, wine & networking @ Meadhall, 90 Broadway, Cambridge

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Boston New Technology Startup Showcase
Tuesday, September 18
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Foley Hoag LLP, 155 Seaport Boulevard, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-new-technology-startup-showcase-bnt93-21-tickets-48881981322
Price: $15 - $30

21+. Join Boston New Technology on September 18th at law firm Foley Hoag to:
See 7 innovative and exciting local technology demos, presented by startup founders
Network with 200 attendees from the Boston-area startup/tech community
Enjoy dinner with beer, wine and more
Each company presents an overview and demonstration of their product within 5 minutes and discusses questions with the audience.

Please follow @BostonNewTech and support our startups by posting on social media using our #BNT93 hashtag. We'll retweet you!

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PechaKucha Somerville Presents: Volume 1: Trial & Error
Thursday, September 18
8:00 PM – 10:00 PM EDT
Remnant Brewing, Bow Market Way, Second Floor, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pechakucha-somerville-presents-volume-1-trial-error-tickets-49597007986

STORIES ON THE BEAUTY OF MAKING MISTAKES

So what IS PechaKucha Night?
PechaKucha Nights are informal and fun gatherings where creative people get together and share their ideas, works, thoughts, vacation snaps --just about anything, really --in the PechaKucha 20x20 (20 slides, 20 seconds each). This concept has been spreading internationally, and this is our opportunity to start the trend in Somerville!

Interested in Presenting? Contact: Meridith Levy at SCC: mlevy at somervillecdc.org
Learn more about our event at:
www.pechakucha.org/cities/somerville

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Wednesday, September 19
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Boston Sustainability Breakfast
Wednesday, September 19
7:30am
Pret A Manger, 101 Arch Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-sustainability-breakfast-tickets-45868733617

Join us every month for Net Impact Boston's informal breakfast meetup of sustainability professionals for networking, discussion, and moral support. It's important to remind ourselves that we are not the only ones out there in the business world trying to do good! Feel free to drop by any time between 7:30 and 9:00 am.

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Doing Capitalism: The Dark Side of the Three-Player Game
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 19, 2018, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Allison Dining Room (5th Floor Taubman), 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Humanities, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at the Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Bill Janeway, author and Senior Advisor and Managing Director, Warburg Pincus
CONTACT INFO  Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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Deciphering aging: Linking senescence with DNA damage and the cell cycle 
Wednesday, September 19, 2018
12 noon Eastern
Webinar
RSVP at http://view6.workcast.net/register?pak=6690142078453753&referrer=Blast1&et_rid=79557040&et_cid=2328168

Senescence describes the complex cellular response to stress that includes irreversible arrest of the cell cycle and thus prevention of the proliferation of defective or damaged cells. This effect makes senescence a key component in the body’s tumor suppression response and initialization of repair pathways, providing a health-promoting mechanism. Conversely, senescent cells can accumulate in the affected tissues of persons with age-related diseases such as dementias, arthritis, atherosclerosis, and others—such accumulation is considered a hallmark of aging that drives many age-related pathologies. These seemingly contradictory roles make cellular senescence an interesting research target for developing cancer suppression therapies as well as improving health maintenance and extending the human lifespan.

During this webinar, viewers will:
Gain insight into the processes by which senescent cells contribute to tumor suppression
Understand the impact of senescence on age-related dysfunction and chronic disease, and be introduced to potential therapies targeting
Have the opportunity to ask questions during the live broadcast!

Speaker: Sheila A. Stewart, Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO
Speaker: James L. Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
Moderator: Sean Sanders, Ph.D., Science/AAAS, Washington, DC

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Pacific Abyssal Transport and Mixing near the Samoan Passage and Manihiki Plateau
Wednesday, September 19
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT,  Building 54-915/923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Sack Lunch Seminar Series (SLS) - Larry Pratt

About this Series
The Atmosphere, Ocean and Climate Sack Lunch Seminar Series is an informal seminar series within PAOC that focuses on more specialized topics than the PAOC Colloquium. Seminar topics include all research concerning the science of atmosphere, ocean and climate. The seminars usually take place on Wednesdays from 12-1pm in 54-915. The presentations are either given by an invited speaker or by a member of PAOC and can focus on new research or discussion of a paper of particular interest.

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Before the 13th: The Origins of Convict Leasing
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 19, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Michael Ralph, Associate Professor, Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU
COST  Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO  hutchevents at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Michael Ralph is associate professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. He is also Director of the Metropolitan Studies program. Michael has published in Disability Studies Quarterly, Souls, Social Text, Public Culture, South Atlantic Quarterly, the Journal of the History of Sport, and Transforming Anthropology. Michael serves on the editorial boards of Sport in Society and Disability Studies Quarterly. He is a member of the Social Text Editorial Collective and the Souls Editorial Working Group. Michael is Editor-in-Chief of Transforming Anthropology, the flagship journal of the Association of Black Anthropologists.
As a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow for Fall 2018, he will work on Before 13th: The Origins of Convict
LINK  https://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/event/colloquium-michael-ralph-13th-origins-convict-leasing

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PICS Seminar: Selecting the Site for Mars Sample Return for the Mars-2020 Rover Mission
Wednesday, September 19
12:30pm to 1:30pm
MIT, Building 54-517, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Bethany Ehlmann (Caltech/JPL)
Abstract: Mars Sample Return is a major endeavor, involving a mission of in situ exploration and sample caching and then later missions to bring the samples to Earth. Where to go: Igneous rocks or sedimentary rocks? What type of environment is best to look for ancient life on Mars? Should the search for ancient life be prioritized or understanding planetary evolution? Can we do both? These are the current questions facing the Mars-2020 rover mission, which in October 2018 will hold the final community workshop with a choice between 3 finalist sites: a lake delta, an ancient >3.7 Ga stratigraphy, and possible fumarolic/spring deposits. This informal discussion will briefly introduce the major characteristics of the Mars-2020 rover, its mission, sample return architecture, and the finalist sites. We'll have at least 15 minutes of discussion (hopefully more). Those who might want to analyze samples returned from Mars are especially encouraged to attend.

About the Series
The MIT Planetary Lunch Colloquium Series [PlCS] is a weekly seminar series organized within the EAPS department. Colloquia topics span the range of research interests of the department's planetary sciences research program. The seminars usually take place on Tuesdays from 12-1:30 pm in 54-517 unless otherwise noted (term-time only). Speakers include members of the MIT community and visitors. Talks are intended to appeal to graduate students, postdocs, research scientists, and faculty with a background in planetary science. A light lunch is provided.

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Social Impact Investing and Development
Wednesday, September 19
12:30 - 1:45pm
Tufts, Mugar 235, 89-91 Curtis Street, Somerville
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeUZ8q8GRE5GfwH6HWFMlhECef1FLE-2Hc6OE6vbjpIihGjAQ/closedform

By tapping into capital markets, we can achieve some of the world’s most pressing development goals, while simultaneously earning a market return for investors. How? In this seminar we’ll discuss the mechanisms that can bring this about—some of them already deployed today—and also reflect on why it’s so important to move in this direction, and away from traditional philanthropy. 

Paul O’Connell is CEO of Sanolas, LLC, a family office based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Prior to founding Sanolas, he spent over 20 years as President and Managing Partner of FDO Partners, LLC, an institutional asset management firm. He has deep experience in the research and practice of international finance, and has published a variety of articles on related topics including exchange rate behavior, international capital flows and labor migration. He served as a member of the Editorial Board of the Emerging Markets Review and a member of the Review Board for the Research Foundation of the CFA Institute. Paul has spoken at TED about using the capital markets to help fund sustainable development in poor countries. He serves on the Boards of Water.org and WaterEquity, Inc., organizations which work to expand access to clean water and sanitation worldwide, and formerly was Chairman of the GAVI Campaign, which is dedicated to expanding vaccine availability in poor countries. An Irish native, he received his B.A. from Trinity College, Dublin in 1992, and a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1997.

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Igor Istomin: What Drives Russian Foreign Policy?
Wednesday, September 19
12:30 PM – 2:00 PM EDT
Tufts, Crowe Room, Goddard 310, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/igor-istomin-what-drives-russian-foreign-policy-registration-50046443259

What drives Russian foreign policy? Please join the Fletcher Eurasia Club for a lunch conversation with Professor Igor Istomin of MGIMO University, who will analyze the logic of Russia's behavior in international politics and discuss the current state of U.S.-Russia relations. Attendance is by registration only on Eventbrite.
Igor A. Istomin is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Applied Analysis of International Issues at MGIMO University. He holds Ph.D. and M.A. degrees from MGIMO University as well as an undergraduate degree from Saint Petersburg State University. Istomin teaches undergraduate and graduate classes in methods of applied analysis of international affairs. He is an executive editor at International Trends, a leading Russian academic journal. He is also a Visiting Fellow at the School of International and Public Affairs, Jilin University in China. Istomin is the author of more than 50 publications on U.S. foreign policy, relations in the Euro-Atlantic space and international security. His most recent book is The Logic of State Behavior in International Politics (2017). He has also prepared policy reports and papers for the Russian International Affairs Council, the Valdai Club,the Center for Strategic Research in Moscow, and the European Leadership Network.

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Gerrymandering: Can Computing Cut the Gordian Knot?
Wednesday, September 19
3:30 pm to 5:00 pm
BU School of Law, 15th Floor Faculty Lounge, 765 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP to tgabs at bu.edu

Partisan gerrymandering is an issue that just won't go away for the Supreme Court, but so far they also continue declining to address it definitively. Many had hoped that the "efficiency gap," an arithmetic calculation of partisan imbalance, would be the litmus test that the justices were seeking, but this summer's developments make that seem considerably less likely. At the same time, computing approaches have emerged—specifically the comparison of a districting plan to alternatives neutrally generated by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms—that take local law, geography, and demography into account.

In this Cyber Alliance talk, Tufts Prof. Moon Duchin will discuss how the process of sussing out what will happen next is a fascinating look at the role of experts, the court's appetite for statistics and technical details, and the scientific community's ability to make models dovetail with normative arguments.

There will be time for casual conversation and light refreshments before and after the presentation.

Editorial Comment:  Professor Duchin has been the lead person on the mathematical solutions to gerrymandering for a couple of years now.

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Materials in Energy: From Nano to Macro
Wednesday, September 19
4:00PM TO 5:00PM
Harvard, Room 209, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Professor Ju Li, MIT
Li will provide three material examples, reversible Li metal anode in battery [PNAS 115 (2018) 1156], ton-scale radiation-resistant metallic nanocomposite [Advanced Science (2018) 1800115], and thermal shock synthesis of high-entropy-alloy nanoparticle catalysts [Science 359 (2018) 1489], of how fundamental understanding of nanoscale mechanisms can inform and inspire the development of new macroscale materials and devices. Recent advances in nano-manipulation, environmental TEM and MEMS allow us to investigate coupled mechanical and electrochemical phenomena with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. For example, we can now quantitatively characterize liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces at nm-scale. These experiments greatly complement our modeling efforts, and together they help provide insights into how materials are transformed in synthesis and how they behave in service due to combined electrochemical-mechanical forces. Applying theory, modeling and lab-on-a-chip microscopy, together with cost modeling, can judiciously guide the scalable production of high-performance energy materials.

Speaker Bio: Ju Li is BEA Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT. His group (http://Li.mit.edu) performs computational and experimental research on mechanical properties of materials, and energy storage and conversion. Ju obtained a PhD degree in nuclear engineering from MIT in 2000, and Bachelor’s degree in Physics from University of Science and Technology of China in 1994. He was a recipient of the 2005 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, 2006 MRS Outstanding Young Investigator Award, and 2007 TR35 award from Technology Review magazine. Ju was elected Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2014 and Fellow of the Materials Research Society in 2017. In 2016, Ju Li co-founded one of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI) Low-Carbon Energy Centers, the Center for Materials in Energy and Extreme Environments (CME).

Applied Mechanics Colloquium
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/118771

Contact Name:  Jessa Piaia
jpiaia at seas.harvard.edu

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3rd Annual Origins Prize Lecture
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 19, 2018, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Agassiz Theatre, 5 James Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard University - Origins of Life
SPEAKER(S)  Sara Seager (MIT)
COST  Public Lecture
CONTACT INFO	Kelly Colbourn-Moreno 617-309-0084
DETAILS  Please join us on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 for the third annual Origins Prize Lecture. Professor Sara Seager (MIT) will give a talk entitled "Exoplanets and the Search for Biosignature Gases: An Astronomer's Journey through Chemical Space".
Abstract:  Thousands of exoplanets are known to orbit nearby stars and small rocky planets are established to be common. The ambitious goal of searching for “biosignature gases” in a rocky planet atmosphere is within reach. A suitable biosignature gas is not just one that might be produced by life, but one that: can accumulate in an atmosphere against atmospheric radicals and other sinks; has strong atmospheric spectral features; and has limited abiological false positives. The study of biosignature gases, then, becomes one of chemistry. Life on Earth produces thousands of gases, about a quarter of all CHONPS molecules that are in gas form at Earth’s surface temperature and pressure. Which gases might be potential biosignature gases in an as yet unknown range of exoplanetary environments? In trying to answer this question, we stumbled across a fascinating concept in chemical space—--distinctive “gaps” amidst the vast diversity of the chemistry of life on Earth. We embarked on a journey to understand why life avoids certain specific chemical classes of molecules that are chemically flexible, stable, and have wide chemical and structural functionality. I will describe and provide a hypothesis for two of life’s gaps in chemical space. The study of both biosignature gases in context with their planetary environment and investigation of Earth life’s avoidance of certain chemicals may provide fresh insight into life’s evolution through chemical space.
Reception to follow.

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Think You Know the American Electorate?
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 19, 2018, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center Foyer, 124 Mount Auburn Street, Suite 200N, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Laura Quinn, President of Catalist, Ash Center Practice Fellow in American Democracy
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	Info at ash.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Join Laura Quinn, President of Catalist, Ash Center Practice Fellow in American Democracy, for a discussion about her research on new and emerging trends in the American electorate.
LINK	https://ash.harvard.edu/event/do-you-know-american-electorate

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Women Waging Peace
Wednesday, September 19
5:00pm to 6:30pm
Northeastern, Renaissance_Park, 909, 1135 Tremont Street, Boston

Dr. Malcolm Potts, MD, PhD, Professor of the Graduate School, Public Health, University of California Berkeley, will be speaking at the first event in the “Us vs. Them: Taming the Biology of Otherness” speaker series.

Q&A session for this event will be lead by Dr. Neil Maniar, Professor of Public Health Practice and the Director of the Master of Public Health (MPH) program in the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University.

More information at https://cssh.northeastern.edu/internationalcenter/event/women-waging-peace/

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STH Distinguished Alumni Panel: The Three Greatest Challenges Facing Us In the Next Decade
Wednesday, September 19
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
BU, 1 Silber Way, Trustee Lounge, 9th floor, Boston

Join our STH Distinguished Alums and moderator, Teddy Hickman-Maynard, for a discussion about "The Three Greatest Challenges Facing Us In the Next Decade."
The 2018 School of Theology Distinguished Alums are: 
Reverend Laura Jaquith Bartlett (STH 1988, M.S.M.; STH 1990, S.T.M.)
Reverend Dr. Jerome K. Del Pino (STH 1971, Th.M.; GRS 1980, Ph.D.)
Reverend Odette Lockwood-Stewart (STH 1978, M.Div.)

In the category of Emerging Leader:
Dr. David Scott (STH 2007, M.T.S.; GRS 2013, Ph.D.)

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A Foreign Policy Conversation with U.S. Congressman Joaquín Castro
Wednesday, September 19 
5:30 PM 
Tufts, ASEAN Auditorium, Cabot Center, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford

Join Tisch College and the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy for an evening conversation with U.S. Congressman Joaquín Castro (D-TX20) on public service and foreign policy. A third-term Congressman and former member of the Texas House of Representatives, Rep. Castro sits on the House Intelligence and Foreign Affairs Committees and is First Vice Chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. Rep. Castro also serves as Chief Deputy Whip and is a member of the Democratic Steering and Policy Committee. Rep. Castro is also founding co-chair of the Congressional Pre-K Caucus and the U.S.-Japan Caucus, and the Congressional Caucus on ASEAN. Castro also hosts Diplomatic Cable, a foreign policy podcast.

Cosponsored by the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy and the Tisch College of Civic Life. Follow the conversation live at #RepCastroAtTufts

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The Lust for Land and the Roots of King Philip's War
Wednesday, September 19
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Cathedral Church of St. Paul, 138 Tremont Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-lust-for-land-and-the-roots-of-king-philips-war-registration-48612206418

King Philip’s War (1675-1678) was the largest conflict of 17th-century New England and resulted in mass casualties to both Native nations and English settlers.  Underlying the conflict was the English drive towards colonizing Native lands, but in this insightful presentation, we’ll go beyond the usual facts and figures to hear individual people’s stories.  We’ll visit people at every level of early New England’s hierarchies: from Puritan merchants to Harvard-educated Native scholars to Indigenous women leaders, we’ll see how their status played a role in their decisions. We’ll also hear the dramatic saga of the captive Mary Rowlandson in this fascinating talk on the origin, conflicts, resolution, and legacy of King Philip’s War.
The venue for the event, St. Paul’s Cathedral, also has roots in the 17th century. It was built partially on land owned in the 1670s by John Wampus, a member of Nipmuc tribe who one of the first natives to attend Harvard College.
An RSVP for this event is requested but not required.
About the speaker
Lisa Brooks is Professor of English and American Studies at Amherst College and the author of Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War (Yale University Press 2018). Her first book, The Common Pot: The Recovery of Native Space in the Northeast (University of Minnesota Press, 2008), received the Media Ecology Association's Dorothy Lee Award for Outstanding Scholarship in the Ecology of Culture in 2011. Deeply rooted in her Abenaki homeland, Brooks’s work has been widely influential in Indigenous Studies and in Early American literature and history. In 2009, Brooks was elected to the inaugural Council of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA), and from 2013-17, she was Chair of the Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies Program. She has long served on the Advisory Board of Gedakina, an Indigenous-led non-profit organization focused on cultural revitalization, youth and family empowerment, and traditional ecological knowledge in New England.

About the event series
Every fall, in honor of the naming of Boston, the Partnership of Historic Bostons hosts a series of free events exploring an intriguing aspect of Puritan life. This year’s theme is From Theology to Commerce: the First Three Generations of 17th-century Boston.
To see a list of the entire series of FREE events, please visit http://historicbostons.eventbrite.com

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Rising Out of Hatred:  The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist
Wednesday, September 19
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store and Facing History welcome Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist ELI SASLOW for a discussion of his latest book, Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist.

About Rising Out of Hatred
Derek Black grew up at the epicenter of white nationalism. His father founded Stormfront, the largest racist community on the Internet. His godfather, David Duke, was a KKK Grand Wizard. By the time Derek turned nineteen, he had become an elected politician with his own daily radio show - already regarded as the "the leading light" of the burgeoning white nationalist movement. "We can infiltrate," Derek once told a crowd of white nationalists. "We can take the country back."

Then he went to college. Derek had been home-schooled by his parents, steeped in the culture of white supremacy, and he had rarely encountered diverse perspectives or direct outrage against his beliefs. At New College of Florida, he continued to broadcast his radio show in secret each morning, living a double life until a classmate uncovered his identity and sent an email to the entire school. "Derek Black...white supremacist, radio host...New College student???"

The ensuing uproar overtook one of the most liberal colleges in the country. Some students protested Derek's presence on campus, forcing him to reconcile for the first time with the ugliness of his beliefs. Other students found the courage to reach out to him, including an Orthodox Jew who invited Derek to attend weekly Shabbat dinners. It was because of those dinners--and the wide-ranging relationships formed at that table--that Derek started to question the science, history, and prejudices behind his worldview. As white nationalism infiltrated the political mainstream, Derek decided to confront the damage he had done.

Rising Out of Hatred tells the story of how white-supremacist ideas migrated from the far-right fringe to the White House through the intensely personal saga of one man who eventually disavowed everything he was taught to believe, at tremendous personal cost. With great empathy and narrative verve, Eli Saslow asks what Derek's story can tell us about America's increasingly divided nature. This is a book to help us understand the American moment and to help us better understand one another.

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GRAND CANYON FOR SALE:  Public Land versus Private Interest?
Wednesday, September 19
7pm
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Stephen Nash, science and environmental writer laments the fact that America's public lands "will tumble away" unless people act!  
Nash will discuss the precarious future facing our national parks, monuments and wilderness with Michael Brune, the Executive Director of the Sierra Club. Bruce is urging everyone to get active and sign up to "Protect America from Trump" https://www.sierraclub.org.

Given the prospect that climate change will dislocate wildlife populations and vegetation across hundreds of thousands of square miles of the national landscape, what if anything, can we do about it?  Come find out…

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Thursday, September 20, 6:00 PM – Saturday, September 22, 4:00 PM EDT
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Slums: New Visions for an Enduring Global Phenomenon
Thursday, September 20, 6:00 PM – Saturday, September 22,  4:00 PM EDT
Harvard Center for Government and International Studies, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/slums-new-visions-for-an-enduring-global-phenomenon-tickets-48069834168

There are very few signs that slums will transition out of the urban landscape in the foreseeable future. Even after more than one and a half centuries of policy interventions, starting from the effects of industrialization in Europe, slums persist in almost every geography on the planet. Slums are not only visible in the Global South, but are reappearing in old and new manifestations in the Global North. Their persistence can be linked to a number of political and economic failures to effectively address poverty and inequality, distorted land markets, and systemic social exclusion. These failures are, in turn, rooted in the very way policymakers, global media, and intellectuals conceptualize and represent how, why, and by whom slums are produced, maintained, and reproduced. Slums continue to be imagined as urban aberrations, something that falls outside of (or delinked from) urban ecologies.

Slums: New Visions for an Enduring Global Phenomenon is a symposium being held at the Harvard Center for Government and International Studies (CGIS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts from September 20-22, 2018, that challenges its participants to discuss the range of perceptions and systemic changes needed to re-imagine integrative urban and social landscapes, as well as the labor and land markets that most often underpin the formation of slums. Organized by the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, and Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, the symposium seeks to advance new policy, financial, design, and educational tools that both improve existing slums and generate alternatives to future ones.

A diverse group of academic, policy, design & media experts, and community representatives will bridge historically siloed narratives about slums and discuss innovative ways to address them.

Confirmed speakers include: 
Jose Baravelli, Tereza Architechture and Urbanism
Somsook Boonyabancha, Asian Coalition for Housing Rights
Martha Chen, Harvard Kennedy School and WIEGO
Michael Cohen, The New School
Alejandro de Castro Mazarro, Leibniz Institute of Ecological Urban and Regional Development (2019)
Fernando de Mello, URBEM Institute of Urbanism and Studies for the Metropolis
Alejandro Echeverri, Center for Urban and Environmental Studies of EAFIT University; Former Loeb Fellow
Brodwyn Fischer, University of Chicago
George Galster, Wayne State University
Sumila Gulyani, The World Bank
Alejandro Haiek Coll, LAB.PRO.FAB
Christopher Herbert and David Luberoff, Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies
Flávio Higuchi Hirao, Usina Centro de Trabalho para o Ambiente Habitado
Jorge Francisco Liernur, University Torcuato di Tella
Ranjani Mazumdar, Jawaharlal Nehru University
George McCarthy, Robin Hacke, Enrique Silva and Martin O. Smolka, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy
Rahul Mehrotra, Harvard Graduate School of Design and RMA Architects
Sheela Patel, Society for Promotion of Area Resource Centres
Janice Perlman, The Mega-Cities Project
Edgar Pieterse, African Centre for Cities
Lyvia Rodriguez, Executive Director, El Cano Martin Pena ENLACE Project
Michael Uwemedimo, University of Roehampton and Collaborative Media Advocacy Platform
Charlotte Vorms, University of Paris
Peter Ward and Jake Wegmann, University of Texas at Austin
Theresa Williamson, Catalytic Communities
Nicholas You and M. Lorena Zárate, Global Business Alliance

The symposium will be held at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) and the Harvard Center for Government and International Studies (CGIS). It starts on the evening of Thursday, September 20, with a keynote about the representation of slums in film and media at the Harvard GSD and continues on Friday and Saturday, September 21 and 22 at CGIS with full days of presentations and discussions.

For the complete agenda and additional information, please visit the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies website.
Co-sponsored by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Loeb Fellowship, and The Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute.
Join the conversation on Twitter with #SlumsNewVisions

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Thursday, September 20
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Sustainability Festival
Thursday, September 20
11:00am - 2:30pm 
BU, Marsh Plaza, 735 Commonwealth Avenue

Join #BUcityplanning for the 2018 Sustainability Festival at the Charles River Campus where we'll be playing games to test your sustainability knowledge and giving away prizes! Connect with leaders of the BU Environmental Leadership Network—24 clubs, from Net Impact to BU Outing Club. Swap your light bulbs for an LED or get a travel coffee mug for free. Join the Challenge to reduce your environmental footprint; buzz your actions and you could win some great prizes! Bike & Pedestrian Safety: Register your bike or get a free “Ride Ready” safety check by local bike mechanics. Lots of free swag including helmets, lights, and other biking gear. And enter for your chance to win a bike and other great prizes.

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The planet on our plates: The case for incorporating sustainability into dietary guidelines
Thursday, September 20
12:00-1:00pm
Tufts, Multi-purpose Room, Curtis Hall, 474 Boston Avenue, Medford

Nicole Tichenor Blackstone, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University
The foods we eat can have vastly different impacts on the natural environment. National governments commonly provide recommendations to their populations on what ought to be eaten to promote health. These dietary guidelines are an opportunity to promote human and earth system health simultaneously. To date, a small number of countries have incorporated environmental considerations into their dietary guidelines. In the USA, the scientific committee that developed the latest version of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans attempted to include sustainability, but it was ultimately excluded from the final policy. This talk will cover the environmental impacts of foods, the potential role dietary guidance can play in moving food systems toward sustainability, and a case example from the United States.

Dr. Nicole Tichenor Blackstone is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Agriculture, Food, and Environment at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. Prior to joining the Friedman School faculty this summer, Nicole was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Sustainability Institute at the University of New Hampshire. Her research focuses on developing and evaluating strategies to improve food system sustainability. Some of her recent projects include modeling the environmental impacts of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, quantifying the environmental and nutritional costs of food waste, and estimating regional self-reliance and environmental impacts
of livestock in Northeastern US. Nicole earned her Ph.D. and M.S. from the Friedman School. She holds a B.A. in Philosophy and Religious Studies from the University of Kansas. Nicole also has experience in food policy spanning the local to national levels, through previous work with the Douglas County Food Policy Council (KS) and National Family Farm Coalition.

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Get Involved: Enter the Digital Universe of Your Tween/Teen
Thursday, September 20
12:00pm to 1:30pm
MIT, Building 76-156, 500 Main Street, Cambridge

Presenter: Jill Walsh, Ph.D., M.P.A.; Researcher and Lecturer, Boston University
It’s no secret that digital technology and social media have an impact on our tweens and teens. But in what ways and to what effects? Why are they always on their phones? And what exactly is going on with Fortnite?

This seminar will outline the landscape of tween and teen digital media use, and provide insights for parents trying to navigate this world with them. Parents will leave understanding what draws their children to the digital space, and how to engage in productive conversations about technology consumption.

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Displacement Research & Action Network (DRAN) Social
Thursday, September 20
12:30pm to 2:00pm
 MIT, Building 9-450, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

The Displacement Research & Action Network, an initiative of the Program on Human Rights and Justice at MIT, is a global network on displacement and land rights that brings together activists, academics and policy makers to build new theory and evidence of the increase and intensity of mass internal displacement around the world due to development, conflict, or climate disaster.

On Thursday 20th September from 12:30pm to 2pm in 9-450 and find out about DRAN's projects and opportunities for engagement!

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MIT Press Essential Knowledge Book Launch:  Carbon Capture
Thursday, September 20
3:00pm
MIT, Building E18-304, 50 Ames Street, Cambridge
Refreshments will be served; RSVP to Kelley Travers at ktravers at mit.edu to help us plan accordingly. 

Please join us Thursday, September 20th at 3 p.m. in E18-304 for a presentation by Howard Herzog, Senior Research Engineer at the MIT Energy Initiative, on his new MIT Press Essential Knowledge series book, Carbon Capture. His book offers a concise guide to carbon capture, covering basic information as well as the larger context of climate technology and policy. For the full book description, please see below.

The first 30 individuals to arrive at the talk will receive free copies of the book. Herzog will be available for signing after the presentation.

Book Description: 
A concise overview of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), a promising but overlooked climate change mitigation pathway.

The burning of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide (CO2), and these CO2 emissions are a major driver of climate change. Carbon capture offers a path to climate change mitigation that has received relatively little attention. In this volume in the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series, Howard Herzog offers a concise guide to carbon capture, covering basic information as well as the larger context of climate technology and policy. Carbon capture, or carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), refers to a suite of technologies that reduce CO2 emissions by “capturing” CO2 before it is released into the atmosphere and then transporting it to where it will be stored or used. It is the only climate change mitigation technique that deals directly with fossil fuels rather than providing alternatives to them.

Herzog, a pioneer in carbon capture research, begins by discussing the fundamentals of climate change and how carbon capture can be one of the solutions. He explains capture and storage technologies, including chemical scrubbing and the injection of CO2 deep underground. He reports on current efforts to deploy CCS at factories and power plants and attempts to capture CO2 from the air itself. Finally, he explores the policies and politics in play around CCS and argues for elevating carbon capture in the policy agenda.

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Playing to the Crowd (Leading Voices Speaker Series)
Thursday, September 20
3:00pm to 4:30pm
Northeastern, Ryder Hall, 433, 11 Leon Street, Boston

Nancy Baym (Principal Researcher, Microsoft) discusses her new book Playing to the Crowd, about how advancements in digital media and communication have transformed musician-fan relationships - with insights relevant for any industry touched by social media and the gig economy.

The Leading Voices speaker series brings practitioners and scholars at the forefront of their fields to campus to discuss their work and experiences in music. Visit the Department of Music events calendar for upcoming Leading Voices speaker series events, which take place select Thursdays 3-4:30pm: https://camd.northeastern.edu/music/events/

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OEB Seminar Series - "Consilience, Model Lineages, and A Truly Integrative Phylogenetic Biology"
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 20, 2018, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Biological Labs Lecture Hall (1080), 16 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
SPEAKER(S)  Dr. Erika Edwards, Yale University
TICKET INFO  Free and Open to the Public
LINK  https://oeb.harvard.edu/event/oeb-seminar-series-erika-edwards

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Populism and the Future of Liberal Democracy in the West - A Lecture by Sheri Berman
Thursday, September 20
4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Pardee School of Global Studies, 121 Bay State Road, 1st floor, Boston

This talk will analyze various explanations for growing dissatisfaction with liberal democracy and rising populism in the West. It will discuss some of the main causes put forward by scholars and pundits, assess the evidence for these various causes, and suggest some ways the research agenda and our understandings of these crucial phenomena can move forward.

Sheri Berman is a professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University. Her research interests include European history and politics; the development of democracy; populism and fascism; and the history of the left.

Moderated by Cathie Jo Martin, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Study of Europe at Boston University.

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'Circle Up' Film Screening and Discussion
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 20, 2018, 4 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, 2036 Milstein East B, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Film
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice at Harvard Law School
COST  free
DETAILS  Please join us as we launch this year’s Transformative Justice Series of events organized in partnership with the Prison Studies Project and the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Office of Student Affairs. Through interdisciplinary conversations across Harvard University and beyond, we explore justice that transforms—our selves, our relationships, and our communities.
Our first event is a screening of the documentary film "Circle Up," the story of a grieving mother, the men who murdered her son, and the unexpected relationships they create to prevent more violence. Circle Up is a call to action for reframing approaches to crime and punishment through the lens of restorative justice, forgiveness, and accountability.
Following the screening, audience members will have an opportunity to apply some of the principles of restorative justice through circle discussions about the film facilitated by HGSE Equity and Inclusion Fellows.
In attendance will be filmmaker Julie Mallozzi and restorative justice practitioner — and subject of the film — Janet Connors.
LINK	https://charleshamiltonhouston.org/events/circle-film-screening-discussion/

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BlueTech New England: Innovating Oceans & Waterfronts with Cutting-Edge Tech
Thursday, September 20
4:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Cambridge Innovation C Venture Cafe, One Broadway, 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/H2O-Boston-Water-and-Energy-Technology-Meetup/events/253628356/

Is bluetech the next big tech cluster to launch in Boston? The maritime economy is a significant economic driver in New England.
In Massachusetts alone, it generated a total statewide economic impact of $17.336 billion in output (sales), 135,924 jobs, and $6.839 billion in labor income in 2015. Given the role of this ‘blue economy’ on the region and Greater Boston’s tech prowess, there is a tremendous opportunity to take the lead in innovating oceans and waterfronts.

Venture Cafe presents: BlueTech New England - Bringing Innovative Tech to Oceans and Waterfronts ( http://vencaf.org/bluetech/ )
This is a Free Event and also must Register here : https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bluetech-night-tickets-48652768741

The BlueTech Night event will bring technologists, scientists, startups, corporations, governments and other ocean stakeholders to discuss building this new cluster by applying innovative tech like robotics, sensors, AR / VR and others to improve ocean sustainability, coastal resiliency, and the urban coast’s environmental footprint.

AGENDA AT A GLANCE
4:00 PM – 4:30 PM Introduction to BlueTech
Details coming soon.
4:45 PM – 5:45 PM Opportunities to Innovate in BlueTech
Details coming soon.
6:00 PM – 7:15 PM BlueTech Shark Tank
Are you building innovative tech in robotics, sensors, AR / VR that could be applied to ocean sustainability, coastal resiliency, or improving the urban coast’s environmental footprint?
Apply to pitch investors funding in the BlueTech space.
http://bit.ly/vc-bluetech-pitch18
7:30 PM – 8:30 PM BlueTech Reverse Pitch & Industry Break-Outs
Details coming soon.

Complete details coming soon!

What is BlueTech?
The Blue Economy encompasses the economic and intrinsic values generated in and around the ocean. It includes sectors such as fishing & aquaculture, ports and shipping, offshore energy generation, and ocean science. The OECD estimates the size of the global Blue Economy (excluding offshore oil and gas) to be >$1T.

With nearly 40% of humanity living within 100 km of the ocean, the rise of the global middle class, and a world population moving toward 9 billion, mankind’s demand from and impact on the world’s oceans are becoming more acute.

The Blue Economy sectors outlined below represent areas where focused investment will have both strong economic and societal impact. Increasing global awareness and new policies centered on ocean sustainability, combined with advances in technology and digitization now present a double bottom line opportunity that we call bluetech. Many of these opportunities are a result of applying innovations made for other fields, such as data science, robotics, and service business models, into undercapitalized blue economy industries.

A few statistics can illustrate the opportunity:
90% of all global trade is transported by vessel
~3 billion people depend on seafood as a primary source of protein
Near-term potential for 15 GW of new offshore wind power development off the US East Coast
8M tons/yr of plastic are dumped in the ocean
Ship owners will spend >$50B on new systems for preventing transmission of invasive species
The Ports of LA and Long Beach announced spending of $6-13B to reduce emissions

Given the importance that the blue economy has for humanity, there is now an enormous opportunity for cross fertilization of recent technical advances from adjacent industries. Innovations in areas such as robotics and sensors could be leveraged to improve ocean sustainability, coastal resiliency and the urban coast’s environmental footprint. From data science to VR/AR and materials development, enabling technologies have the potential to revolutionize this sector.

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Let Me Be Frank: The Traitorous Turnabout of an Evangelical Heir Apparent
Thursday, September 20
5pm-6:30pm
BU Admissions Auditorium, 233 Bay State Road
RSVP at http://bostonu.imodules.com/s/1759/2-bu/alumniWeekend/interior.aspx?sid=1759&gid=2&pgid=3238&tab=tab3&filter=cas

Let Me Be Frank: The Traitorous Turnabout of an Evangelical Heir Apparent movie screening followed by panel discussion with Nancy Ammerman, Brandon Crowley, and Shelly Rambo will moderate
Frank, the son of influential Evangelicals Francis and Edith Schaeffer, was a filmmaker, writer, speaker and an architect of the religious right in the 1970s. Underneath the exterior of aggressive religiosity, and expected to follow in his famous family’s footsteps, his life was in turmoil. To the surprise of the religious establishment, Frank didn’t step up. He stepped away. This event is free and open to the public. Reception following.
Tune in to watch the panel following the documentary at https://livestream.com/accounts/4958196/events/8360407

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Thomas Allen Harris: “Collective Wisdom” Keynote
Thursday, September 20
5:00pm to 6:50pm
MIT, Building E15, Bartos Theater (Lower Level), 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Thomas Allen Harris is a critically acclaimed, interdisciplinary artist who explores conceptions of family, identity, environmentalism, and spirituality in a participatory practice. Graduate of Harvard College with a degree in Biology and the Whitney Independent Study Program, member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, and published writer/curator, Harris lectures widely on the use of media as a tool for social change with a keen recognition for its potential to organize social movements and impact the biological body. He currently holds a position at Yale University as a Senior Lecturer in African American and Film & Media Studies, where he is teaching courses titled “Family Narratives/Cultural Shifts” and “Archive Aesthetics and Community Storytelling”. He is also working on a new television show, Family Pictures USA, which takes a radical look at neighborhoods and cities of the United States through the lens of family photographs, collaborative performances, and personal testimony sourced from their communities.

Family Pictures USA uses methodologies Harris and his team developed with Digital Diaspora Family Reunion, LLC (DDFR), a socially engaged transmedia project that has incorporated community organizing, performance, virtual gathering spaces, and storytelling into over 60 unique audio-visual events in over 50 cities. Harris will talk about his trajectory as a media artist that led to DDFR and his documentary film work, including Through A Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People, his 2015 film that was developed in tandem with DDFR. Through A Lens Darkly features leading Black cultural figures, scholars, and photographers sharing their archives with Harris in an exploration of the ways photography has been used as a tool of representation and self-representation in history, garnering an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Documentary film, the Fund for Santa Barbara Social Justice Award, and an Africa Movie Academy Award, among others.

In conversation with MIT Professor Vivek Bald, Harris will reveal his process, experiences, and unexpected outcomes working with communities in online and offline shared spaces and places. Immediately following a Q&A, participants will be invited to share images that represent their conceptions of family and engage in a collaborative workshop highlighting the impact of new technologies in community archiving practices.

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PTC & MassChallenge Oktoberfest Party and Tech Showcase
Thursday, September 20
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM EDT
19 Dry Dock Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ptc-masschallenge-oktoberfest-party-and-tech-showcase-tickets-49222573041

Hang on to your lederhosen – it’s the 3rd annual Oktoberfest Party and Tech Showcase! Get your oompah on courtesy of PTC and the MassChallenge.
Join us in the Seaport for this FREE networking event where you'll: 
Enjoy Oktoberfest delights like beer, sausages, and fresh, soft pretzels
Showcase your strength in the stein-hoisting competition with awesome prizes
Meet the best IoT & AR entrepreneurs from the MassChallenge 2018 cohort and alumni
Network with the doers and makers from PTC’s vibrant ecosystem of partners and developers, along with MassChallenge’s alumni, sponsors, and partners
Get hands on with the interactive IoT and Augmented Reality experiences
NOTE:
This event is 21+ and has limited capacity. Registration is required to attend. Register now to secure your ticket
Event is free of any charges – ALL food, beverage, and entertainment are included.

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Gitner Family CAS Lecture: The Opioid Crisis from a Humanist's Perspective
Thursday, September 20
5:30 pm to 7:00 pm
BU, Law Auditorium, 765 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

This year’s Gitner Family Lecture will be a panel, “The Opioid Crisis from a Humanist’s Perspective,” featuring faculty from BU’s departments of history, philosophy, and English departments and covering three aspects of the crisis: markets, ethics, and narratives.The panelists will speak for ten minutes each, and then the moderator, Dr. Richard Saitz, BMC, BUSPH, will provide a summarizing frame before opening to questions from the audience.

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Jeanne S. Chall Lecture and Reception - Teaching Readers, Not Reading: Addressing Students' Individual Differences
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 20, 2018, 5:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Askwith Hall, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Lecture, Reception
TOPIC  Literacy
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  events at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT  Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture
DETAILS  Please RSVP to assist us in planning for attendance numbers.
Teaching Readers, Not Reading: Addressing Students’ Individual Differences
Speaker: Peter Afflerbach, professor, College of Education, University of Maryland
Introduction: Alex Hodges, librarian and director, Monroe C. Gutman Library, HGSE; chair, Jeanne S. Chall Endowment Advisory Board

In this talk, Afflerbach focuses on the myriad individual differences that operate both in children’s reading development and in their acts of reading. Reading and reading development are influenced by cognitive, affective, and conative factors, but approaches to reading instruction often have exclusive focus on the first factor. Afflerbach makes the case for attending to all aspects of students’ reading development, using research from diverse and affiliated fields. This brings us to a perspective that allows us to consider teaching readers, and not teaching reading.

Following Dr. Afflerbach's lecture will be an award presentation of the Jeanne S. Chall Doctoral Student Award to Shireen Al-Adeimi, Ed.M.’16, Ed.D.’18.

A reception from 7–8 p.m. will conclude the event.

Funded through HGSE’s Jeanne S. Chall Endowment, the annual lecture and doctoral student award honor the late Jeanne Chall, who served as a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her seminal work on reading research and instruction influenced scholarship on the teaching of reading in schools and universities throughout the country.

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authors at MIT: Mark Stuart Day, Bits to Bitcoin
Thursday, September 20
6:00pm to 7:00pm
MIT, Building N50, MIT Press Bookstore, 301 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Join the MIT Bookstore in welcoming Mark Stuart Day to discuss his book, Bits to Bitcoin: How Our Digital Stuff Works.

In Bits to Bitcoin, Mark Stuart Day offers an accessible guide to our digital infrastructure, explaining the basics of operating systems, networks, security, and other topics for the general reader. He takes the reader from a single process to multiple processes that interact with each other; he explores processes that fail and processes that overcome failures; and he examines processes that attack each other or defend themselves against attacks.

Mark Stuart Day was Chief Scientist at Riverbed Technology for a decade and is currently Visiting Lecturer at MIT. With more than thirty patented inventions, he has also made technical contributions at Dropbox, IBM, Cisco, Digital, and BBN.

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Congress’ Role in Trump Era Foreign Policy
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 20, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Joaquin Castro, Nicholas Burns (Moderator)
CONTACT INFO	IOP Forum Office, 617-495-1380
DETAILS	A Conversation with:  Joaquin Castro, Member of Congress (D-TX, 20)
Nicholas Burns (Moderator)
Roy and Barbara Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations, Harvard Kennedy School
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/congress’-role-trump-era-foreign-policy

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Breakpoint: Reckoning with America’s Environmental Crises
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 20, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Museum of Natural History
SPEAKER(S)  Jeremy Jackson, Emeritus Professor of Oceanography, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Senior Scientist Emeritus, Smithsonian Institution
COST  Visit hmnh.harvard.edu for cost details
CONTACT INFO  (617) 495-3045, hmnh at hmsc.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Mounting environmental crises — extreme weather events, uncontrollable fires, rising sea levels, droughts, and unsustainable agriculture — are pushing America toward a series of alarming environmental and economic breaking points. Jeremy Jackson will examine the country’s current environmental destruction and highlight both successful and failed attempts by communities to achieve greater environmental stability. With a call to action, he will offer achievable solutions — and optimism — for tackling this multidimensional challenge.
Presentation will be followed by a discussion with Rebecca Henderson, Harvard Business School; John Holdren, Harvard Kennedy School; and Daniel Schrag, Harvard University Center for the Environment.
Lecture, Discussion & Book Signing.
Visit hmnh.harvard.edu for event details
Free parking at the Oxford Street Garage
Presented in collaboration with the Harvard University Center for the Environment
LINK  https://hmnh.harvard.edu/event/breakpoint

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Reception: Teresita Fernández — Wayfinding
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 20, 2018, 6 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Exhibitions
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Art Museums
COST  Free admission, but seating is limited.
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.harvardartmuseums.org/visit/calendar/teresita-fernandez-wayfinding
TICKET INFO  Free admission, but seating is limited. Tickets will be distributed beginning at 5:30pm at the Broadway entrance. One ticket per person.
CONTACT INFO	phone: 617-495-9400
e-mail: am_info at harvard.edu
DETAILS  Teresita Fernández: Wayfinding
In connection with her public installation in Harvard Yard this fall, Autumn (. . . Nothing Personal), artist Teresita Fernández will discuss her practice and ongoing research for this major commission by the Harvard University Committee on the Arts.
On view August 27 through October 1, 2018, Autumn (. . . Nothing Personal) is a site-specific work built for Tercentenary Theatre in Harvard Yard. The title references James Baldwin’s 1964 text Nothing Personal, which was published as a collaborative book with photographer Richard Avedon at the height of the civil rights movement. Fernández’s project centers Baldwin’s text as a collective reading and asks members of the Harvard and local communities to use the sculpture as a social space to read, perform, gather, and debate.
Best known for her prominent public installations, Fernández has produced site-specific commissions for Madison Square Park, New York; Grace Farms, New Canaan, Connecticut; Aspen Art Museum; Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas, Austin; and Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle. Her work is featured in numerous international public and private collections, including the Harvard Art Museums; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Pérez Art Museum, Miami; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.
Appointed by President Barack Obama, Fernández was the first Latina to serve on the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, a 100-year-old federal panel that advises the president and Congress on national matters of design and aesthetics. She was a 2005 MacArthur Foundation Fellow and has received numerous awards, including the Aspen Award for Art in 2013, the 2003 Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Biennial Award in 1999. In 2017, Fernández was named a National Academician by the National Academy Museum and School, New York. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.
Presented by the Harvard Art Museums in partnership with the Harvard University Committee on the Arts.
Autumn (. . . Nothing Personal) is a commission of the Harvard University Committee on the Arts and was made possible with the support of the Johnson-Kulukundis Family President’s Fund for Arts at Harvard University.
The lecture will take place in Menschel Hall, Lower Level. Please enter the museums via the entrance on Broadway. Doors will open at 5:30pm.
Free admission, but seating is limited. Tickets will be distributed beginning at 5:30pm at the Broadway entrance. One ticket per person.
Complimentary parking available in the Broadway Garage, 7 Felton Street, Cambridge.
Support for the lecture is provided by the M. Victor Leventritt Fund, which was established through the generosity of the wife, children, and friends of the late M. Victor Leventritt, Harvard Class of 1935. The purpose of the fund is to present outstanding scholars of the history and theory of art to the Harvard and Greater Boston communities.
Modern and contemporary art programs at the Harvard Art Museums are made possible in part by generous support from the Emily Rauh Pulitzer and Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., Fund for Modern and Contemporary Art.
LINK  https://www.harvardartmuseums.org/visit/calendar/teresita-fernandez-wayfinding

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Resilient Places + People
Thursday, September 20
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street, Rabb Hall, Lower Level, Johnson Building, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/resilient-places-people-tickets-48969224268

An open space vision for Boston’s future
“Breathing Room: Mapping Boston’s Green Spaces,” an exhibition now on view at the Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library, presents an array of historical maps that display Boston’s great tradition of understanding open space as a vital resource for the city and for the region. These 19th century green spaces by the first American landscape architects were created to be functional and beautiful and endure as beloved parks today; landscapes that create wonderful individual moments and work in a system. Frederick Law Olmsted’s Emerald Necklace cleaned a polluted river and famously created a connected series of neighborhood parks in so doing, and is still a model for cities near and far. Charles Eliot’s 1893 “Map of the Metropolitan District of Boston” looked to the region, laying out a vision for natural “reservations,” policy, and funding that crossed municipal boundaries. This vision established Revere Beach, Middlesex Fells, and the Blue Hills (among others); today’s DCR and the Trustees, and together restored a variety of New England natural areas, offering an antidote to Boston’s explosive 19th century growth. In partnership with the Leventhal Center, the Boston Society of Landscape Architects and NBBJ are hosting a conversation to discuss and debate what our priorities should be as we build upon this legacy and look ahead.

Access. Equity. Climate Change. As Boston grapples with the pressing issues of our time, it is essential to recognize the critical role landscape plays in the creation of resilient places. Boston is experiencing higher seas, warmer temperatures, and stronger storms. As they accommodate more water and heat, today’s landscapes must be both functional and beautiful.

The direct connection between health and access to green space has been clearly demonstrated, too. Carefully designed open spaces promote well-being that, in turn, help citizens become resilient. How can we integrate public health policy and design to encourage urban resilience and ensure the benefits of outdoor space are maximized?
Is it time for a Sapphire Necklace?

Christopher Cook, Chief of Environment, Energy, and Open Space & Parks Commissioner, City of Boston, will welcome our speakers. The discussion will be moderated by Dante Ramos, Ideas editor at The Boston Globe.
Panelists include: Kalila Barnett, Climate Resilience Program Officer, Barr Foundation • Bryna Lipper, Loeb Fellow, Harvard Graduate School of Design, and former Senior Vice President, Chief Resilience Advisor, and Cofounder, 100 Resilient Cities, Rockefeller Foundation • Chris Reed, ASLA, Founder and Director, Stoss Landscape Urbanism; Professor in Practice of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design • Brian Swett, Director, Cities and Sustainable Real Estate, Arup • Ellen Watts, AIA, Principal and Co-Founder, Architerra, Inc.

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Synaptic Stories
Thursday, September 20
6:00pm to 8:30pm
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/synaptic-stories-tickets-48891530885
Cost:  $5

Join us for a night of storytelling as we delve into the deepest realms of the mind, wade through our internal wiring, and discover what makes us unique. Hear stories of research, learning, mice, movies, tumors and tapioca pudding, all made possible by the power of our beautiful brains.

Light refreshments will be served

6:00 p.m. Doors open for viewing of Beautiful Brain exhibit
7:00 p.m. Stories begin

This program is presented in partnership with Radius and the MIT Women’s League, and is presented in conjunction with The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal. 

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Making Robots Behave:  Doing for our robots what nature did for us
Thursday, September 20
6:30 - 8pm
Aeronaut, 14 Tyler Street, Somerville

Dr Leslie Kaelbling

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/science-by-the-pint/

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MIT Energy Club Kickoff 2018
Thursday, September 20
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
MIT, 222 Memorial Drive, Memorial Lobby (Lobby 10), Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-energy-club-kickoff-2018-tickets-49820147402

Get involved with the largest club on campus and learn about the different resources available to energy-interested students. Talk one-on-one with students from the Energy Club's communities and flagship events about how you can expand your presence in the energy field beyond the classroom. 
Learn more about the MIT Energy Club’s communities, flagship events, different opportunities offered to students, and how you can get involved as a club member! 
Free food and friendly faces :)

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Ranjani Mazumdar, “The Cinematic Slum"
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 20, 2018, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Conferences, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Harvard University Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Ranjani Mazumdar, Professor of Cinema Studies at the School of Arts & Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University
CONTACT INFO  Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
DETAILS  Please join us for a keynote lecture by Ranjani Mazumdar, Professor of Cinema Studies at the School of Arts & Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Drawing on works from different geographies and periods, this critical analysis of the representation of slums in film and music, will reflect upon the cultural construction and perceptions of slums that lie at the center of the conference.
With commentary by Janice Perlman, President, The Mega-Cities Project and Brodwyn Fisher, Professor of Latin American History, University of Chicago. The discussion will be moderated by George "Mac" McCarthy, President and CEO, the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
This presentation is part of Slums: New Visions for an Enduring Global Phenomenon, a symposium being held at Harvard University from Sept. 20-22, 2018 that will challenge participants to discuss the range of perceptions and systemic changes needed to re-imagine integrative urban and social landscapes, as well as the labor and land markets that most often underpin the formation of slums. Organized by the Harvard Graduate School of Design Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, and Lincoln Institute of Land Policy., the symposium seeks to advance new policy, financial, design, and educational tools that can both improve existing slums and generate alternatives to future ones.
LINK  https://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/ranjani-mazumdar-slums-in-the-cultural-imaginary/

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Viewing of the movie Chasing Coral, followed by panel discussion
Thursday, September 20
6:30pm - 9pm
NE Aquarium, Simons IMAX
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=107745&view=Detail

Panelists:
James W. Porter, Professor of Ecology, Emeritus, University of Georgia, and Scientific Advisor and Principal Cast Member, Chasing Coral
Zackery Rago, Youth Outreach Manager, Exposure Labs’ Chasing Coral Impact Campaign
William S. Spitzer, Ph.D., Vice President, Programs, Exhibits, and Planning, New England Aquarium

The Peabody and Sundance Award-winning film Chasing Coral taps into the collective will and wisdom of an ad man, a self-proclaimed coral nerd, top-notch camera designers, and renowned marine biologists as they invent the first time-lapse camera to record bleaching events as they happen. Unfortunately, the effort is anything but simple, and the team doggedly battles technical malfunctions and the force of nature in pursuit of their holy grail: documenting the indisputable and tragic transformation below the waves. With its breathtaking photography, nail-biting suspense, and startling emotion, Chasing Coral is a dramatic revelation that won’t have audiences sitting idle for long.

The runtime for the movie is 93 minutes to be followed by a 30-minute panel discussion.

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Social Media Panel Online vs Reality
Thursday, September 20
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
The Spot Boston, 437 Boylston Street, 3rd Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-media-panel-online-vs-reality-with-anthony-quintal-and-maddie-dragsbaek-tickets-50146962916

Listen to Anthony Quintal and Maddie Dragsbaek speak out about what its like living your life online and how it differs from reality.
THIS IS A FREE EVENT
DOORS: 6:30PM /// SHOW 7PM

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Big Game: The NFL in Dangerous Times
Thursday, September 20
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes National Magazine Award–winning writer MARK LEIBOVICH—bestselling author of This Town—for a discussion of his latest book, Big Game: The NFL in Dangerous Times.

About Big Game
Like millions of Americans, Mark Leibovich has spent more of his life tuned into pro football than he'd care to admit. Being a lifelong New England Patriots fan meant growing up on a steady diet of lovable loserdom. That is, until the Tom Brady/Bill Belichick era made the Pats the most ruthlessly efficient and polarizing sports dynasty of the modern NFL, and its fans the most irritating in all of Pigskin America. Leibovich kept his obsession quiet, making a nice career for himself covering that other playground for rich and overgrown children, American politics. Still, every now and then Leibovich would reach out to Tom Brady to gauge his willingness to subject himself to a profile. He figured that the chances of Brady agreeing were a Hail Mary at best, but Brady returned Mark's call in summer 2014 and kept on returning his calls through epic Patriots Super Bowl victory and defeat, and a scandal involving Brady—Deflategate—whose grip on sports media was as profound as its true significance was ridiculous. 

So began a four-year odyssey that took Mark Leibovich deeper inside the NFL than anyone has gone before. From the owners' meeting to the draft to the sidelines of crucial games, he takes in the show at the elbow of everyone from Brady to big-name owners to the cordially despised NFL Commissioner, Roger Goodell. Ultimately, Big Game is a chronicle of "peak football"—the high point of the sport's economic success and cultural dominance, but also the time when the dark side began to show. It is an era of explosive revenue growth, but also one of creeping existential fear. Players have long joked that NFL stands for "not for long," but as the true impact of concussions becomes inescapable background noise, it's increasingly difficult to enjoy the simple glory of football without the buzz-kill of its obvious consequences.

And that was before Donald Trump. In 2016, Mark's day job caught up with him, and the NFL slammed headlong into America's culture wars. Big Game is a journey through an epic storm. Through it all, Leibovich always keeps one eye on Tom Brady and his beloved Patriots, through to the 2018 Super Bowl. Pro football, this hilarious and enthralling book proves, may not be the sport America needs, but it is most definitely the sport we deserve.

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Betraying Big Brother
Thursday, September 20
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

On the eve of International Women's Day in 2015, the Chinese government arrested five feminist activists and jailed them for thirty-seven days. The Feminist Five became a global cause celebre, with Hillary Clinton speaking out on their behalf and activists inundating social media with #FreetheFive messages. But the Five are only symbols of a much larger feminist movement of university students, civil rights lawyers, labor activists, performance artists, and online warriors prompting an unprecedented awakening among China's educated, urban women. In Betraying Big Brother, journalist and scholar Leta Hong Fincher argues that the popular, broad-based movement poses the greatest threat to China's authoritarian regime today.

Through interviews with the Feminist Five and other leading Chinese activists, Hong Fincher illuminates both the challenges they face and their "joy of betraying Big Brother," as Wei Tingting--one of the Feminist Five--wrote of the defiance she felt during her detention. Tracing the rise of a new feminist consciousness now finding expression through the #MeToo movement, and describing how the Communist regime has suppressed the history of its own feminist struggles, Betraying Big Brother is a story of how the movement against patriarchy could reconfigure China and the world.

Leta Hong Fincher is a journalist who has written for New York Times, The Guardian, Ms. Magazine, BBC and CNN, and is the author of Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China.

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The Science and the Engineering of Intelligence with Tomaso Poggio
Thursday, September 20
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
MIT, Building 32-G449 (Kiva - Stata Center), 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Deep learning and reinforcement learning are discoveries in neuroscience which contributed to recent successes in AI: AlphaGo and Mobileye.

To create artifacts as intelligent as we are, we need additional breakthroughs. Beginning with discussion of what they may be and where they may come from. I will argue that at the level of the hardware, biophysical properties of dendritic trees suggest more powerful nonlinearities than today's Rectified Linear Units (RELUs). At the level of the computation, basic aspects of visual intelligence require architectures beyond supervised and unsupervised learning. In the second half of the talk, I will sketch recent theoretical results, based on classical machine learning, to explain why deep networks work as well as they do.

Tomaso Poggio is one of the founders of computational neuroscience. He pioneered models of the fly's visual system and of human stereovision, introduced regularization theory to computational vision, made key contributions to the biophysics of computation and to learning theory, developed an influential model of recognition in the visual cortex and more recently a theory of invariant representations in sensory cortex.

He is the Eugene McDermott Professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). He is a founding member of the McGovern Institute, and is the director of the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines (CBMM), a multi-institutional collaboration headquartered at the McGovern Institute. He joined the MIT faculty in 1981, after ten years at the Max Planck Institute for Biology and Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany. He received a Ph.D. in 1970 from the University of Genoa. Poggio is a Foreign Member of the Italian Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was awarded the 2014 Swartz Prize for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience.

The research in the Poggio Lab is guided by the belief that learning is at the core of the problem of intelligence, both biological and artificial. Learning is thus the gateway to understanding how the human brain works and for making intelligent machines. Thus, Poggio Lab studies the problem of learning within a multidisciplinary approach.

Current research in the Poggio Lab is relevant not only for understanding higher brain function, but also for the mathematical and computer applications of statistical learning. Three basic directions of research in his group are: mathematics of statistical learning theory, engineering applications (in computer vision, computer graphics, bioinformatics and intelligent search engines) and neuroscience of visual learning. (1) In the theory domain, he has focused on the foundations of learning theory and on a formal characterization of necessary and sufficient conditions for predictivity of learning. (2) The engineering applications include bioinformatics projects, computer vision for scene recognition and trainable, man-machines interfaces. (3) In the computational neuroscience area, his research is centered on object recognition and, in particular, on a quantitative theory of the ventral stream in the visual cortex underlying object recognition and object categorization. The theory and its computer implementation has become a tool for analyzing, interpreting and planning experiments in extensive collaborations with experimental neuro-scientists. This should lead to a better and more coherent understanding of the neural mechanisms of visual recognition and of the normal and abnormal functions of the cortex.

This talk will be webcast on the MIT CSAIL Youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYs2iUgksAhgoidZwEAimmg/live beginning at 7pm.

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The Knife Edge of Value Alignment in AI: Utopia or Extinction
Monday, October 1
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Doors open @ 6pm -- Come early and meet other Long Now thinkers -- Presentations start @ 7pm
Café ArtScience, 650 East Kendall Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-knife-edge-of-value-alignment-in-ai-utopia-or-extinction-tickets-50020496652
Cost: $15.00 /per person

A Long Now Boston Community Conversation with
Richard Mallah and Lucas Perry of The Future of Life Institute [FLi]
Summary:
AI: Artificial Intelligence is one of this century’s most misunderstood buzzwords. In Kurzweil's “Singularity”, it represents a glorious future where human toil and suffering is ended. In The Matrix, it conjures a future dominated by malevolent supermachines feeding on the energies of human slaves. In reality, AI is fast becoming the ubiquitous hand-maiden of human invention and ingenuity for much of what we relish in our day to day. From search engines to the energy grid; autonomous vehicles to life support systems; food production to weather forecasting; data security to anti-ballistic missile guidance. The list of AI processes we can no longer get by without grows daily.

AI programming ultimately relies on simple, digital decision chains, but they are at the point where machines can teach themselves. The Intelligence may be artificial and “inhuman”, but is increasingly more capable than our own. In the world of zeroes and ones, a near perfection of logical functioning can be achieved, with AI systems that are free of human foibles and the slowness of biological systems, free of human attributes like emotion, intuition, love, or a sense of right and wrong. Or are they?

What happens when we ask the algorithms to make decisions for us - decisions that may have life and death consequences? And what happens if, or when, their intelligence begins to match or exceed our own - the level of Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) where we can no longer tell if an agent is human or machine? Autonomous decision-making and human level agency will require moral and ethical guidance. Do our AI programmers have the perspective — historical, philosophical, moral — to be the arbiters of that guidance? Or do we let the algorithms themselves learn human morality by emulating humans? How do we properly align the values of our inventions, to achieve the goal of a beneficent future for all?

The Long Now Boston Conversation Series hosts the Future of Life Institute's Robert Mallah and Lucas Perry to share their research on the frontiers of Value Alignment and the implications for the future of AI and AGI.

Join the conversation and be part of the solution.

$15 in advance // $20 at the door. Students w/ID admitted free.
Audience participation is encouraged.

The [FLI] is one of the world’s leading organizations exploring the potential existential challenges and solutions of technology in the fields of AI, Biotech, Nuclear Weapons and Climate Change.

Richard Mallah, Director of AI Projects FLI, has over fifteen years of experience leading AI research and AI product teams in industry, lending an appreciation for tradeoffs at all AI product lifecycle stages. Richard holds a degree in computer science, AI, and machine learning from Columbia University, and is well read in natural philosophy.

Lucas Perry, Project Coordinator FLI, focuses on enabling and delivering existential risk mitigation efforts ranging from direct interventions, to advocacy, and enabling research. He studied philosophy at Boston College and has been working in AI safety and existential risk ever since.

We’re proud and excited to welcome Richard and Lucas to the Long Now Boston community.

$15 in advance // $20 at the door. Students w/ID admitted free.

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A Documentary History of the United States
Thursday, September 20
8:00 PM – 9:30 PM EDT
Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/alexander-b-heffner-in-discussion-with-yascha-mounk-a-documentary-history-of-the-united-tickets-47191625422

Here, in a single volume, are the documents, speeches, and letters that have forged American history, now updated with new content such as Trump's inaugural address.
Accompanied by interpretations of their significance by noted historian Richard D. Heffner and journalist Alexander Heffner, this book includes important documents such as:
The complete text of the Declaration of Independence
The complete Constitution of the United States
The Monroe Doctrine
The Emancipation Proclamation
Woodrow Wilson's War Message to Congress
Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" Speech
John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address
Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" Speech
Ronald Reagan's Inaugural Addresses
Documents relating to September 11, 2001 and the Iraq War
This edition has been expanded and updated to include a chapter on the Presidency of Donald Trump.

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 Friday, September 21, 9 a.m. – Saturday, September 22, 3 p.m.
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Changing Middle Classes: Comparative and Global Perspectives
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 21, 9 a.m. – Saturday, Sep. 22, 2018, 3 p.m.
WHERE   Harvard, CGIS South Building, Belfer Case Study Room (S020), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Presented by the Weatherhead Research Cluster on Comparative Inequality and Inclusion, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs
SPEAKER(S)  Multiple panels with speakers over the two-day conference.
Keynote Address: “The Geopolitics of Inequality: The Remaking of Elites and Middle Classes”
Mike Savage, Martin White Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, London School of Economics.
COST  No registration required. Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	Amy Stockton
astockton at wcfia.harvard.edu
DETAILS	
Our cluster's goal is to gain a more fine-grained understanding of the many complex processes that feed both inequality and inclusion. We consider in particular how to reduce recognition gaps in advanced industrial societies.
LINK	https://wcfia.harvard.edu/conferences/18-changing-middle-classes-comparative-and-global-perspectives

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Friday, September 21
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Parking Day
Friday, September 21
all over Cambridge
More information at http://www.cambridgema.gov/CDD/Projects/Transportation/parkingday

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Molecular Robotics, 9th Annual Wyss International Symposium
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 21, 2018, 8:15 a.m. – 5:15 p.m.
WHERE  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Health Sciences, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Wyss Institute
SPEAKER(S)	
David Baker 
George Church 
Itai Cohen 
Hendrik Dietz 
Don Ingber 
Yamuna Krishnan 
Lulu Qian 
Khalid Salaita 
Rebecca Schulman 
William Shih 
Justin Werfel 
Wesley Wong 
Hao Yan 
Peng Yin 
David Zhang 
COST  Free
TICKET WEB LINK  http://events.wyss.harvard.edu
CONTACT INFO	events at wyss.harvard.edu
DETAILS	
The 9th International Wyss Symposium will focus on new advances in the emerging field of Molecular Robotics, with the goal of sharing recent progress at the intersection of DNA nanotechnology, synthetic biology, robotics, and computer science, that could lead to programmable molecular machines as novel solutions for research and medicine.

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So You’re a Multicellular Microbe...
Friday, September 21
8:30AM TO 9:30AM
Harvard, Classroom 375 (formerly Room 310), 3rd floor, Geo Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Nick Lyons (HMS-MBIB) will present and lead a discussion on "" Coffee, tea, and pastries will be served. 

Contact Name:  Monica McCallum
mmccallum at fas.harvard.edu

MSI Chalk-Talk
http://www.msi.harvard.edu/events/fridays.html

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Being Bold: The Implementation of BU’s Climate Action Plan
Friday, September 21
9:30 am to 11:00 am
BU, TBD

Join us during Alumni Weekend for an overview of how BU plans to reduce direct greenhouse gas emissions to zero on BU’s campuses by 2040. BU is working towards making buildings more energy-efficient and resilient to flooding, and shifting away from fossil fuels to wind and solar sources. The Climate Action Plan Task Force is pleased to present an overview of the five-point Climate Action Plan and recommendations based on assessing science and long-term fiscal responsibility. Hear about how BU’s Task Force aims to elevate the University’s position as a leader in addressing the challenges of climate change in its educational programs, research, operations, finance, and community engagement. An overview of the power purchase agreement will also be presented.

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Gutman Library Book Talk: Educational Goods
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 21, 2018, 12:15 – 1:45 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gutman Conference Center - Area 3, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Gutman Library
SPEAKER(S)  Susanna Loeb, Harry Brighouse
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a5xfWpV4LBvQBvL
TICKET INFO  Please RSVP
DETAILS  We spend a lot of time arguing about how schools might be improved. But we rarely take a step back to ask what we as a society should be looking for from education — what exactly should those who make decisions be trying to achieve?
Lunch will be served! 
LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a5xfWpV4LBvQBvL

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Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?
Friday, September 21
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes renowned human rights lawyer and Harvard scholar and professor JACQUELINE BHABHA for a discussion of her latest book, Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?.

About Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?
Every minute 24 people are forced to leave their homes and over 65 million are currently displaced worldwide. Small wonder that tackling the refugee and migration crisis has become a global political priority.

But can this crisis be resolved and if so, how? In this compelling essay, Jacqueline Bhabha explains why forced migration demands compassion, generosity and a more vigorous acknowledgment of our shared dependence on human mobility as a key element of global collaboration. Unless we develop humane 'win-win' strategies for tackling the inequalities and conflicts driving migration and for addressing the fears fuelling xenophobia, she argues, both innocent lives and cardinal human rights principles will be squandered in the service of futile nationalism and oppressive border control.

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Network Science – A Network of Sciences 
Friday, September 21
3:00pm-4:00pm – Refreshments at 2:45pm
BU, 8 St. Mary’s Street, PHO 211, Boston

Ariel Orda, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology
Network Science is a newly emerging discipline with applications in a variety of domains, such as Communication Networks, Power Grid Networks, Transportation Networks, Social Networks and Biological Networks. Focusing on communication networks, we shall discuss what network science should be and what it should consist of. The talk will also feature some historical anecdotes, tracing back to ancient times.

Ariel Orda is the Herman & Gertrude Gross Professor at the Technion. He received his BSc (summa cum laude), MSc and PhD at the Technion. He is an IEEE Fellow. During 1.1.2014-12.31.2017, he served as the Dean of the Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion. His research interests include network routing, the application of game theory to networking, survivability, QoS provisioning and wireless networks. He received several awards for research, teaching, and service.

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Global Income Inequality
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 21, 2018, 4:15 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, S050, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Asia Center Seminar Series
SPEAKER(S)Speaker: Sudhir Anand, Associate
Harvard University Asia Center; Professor of Economics, University of Oxford
Chair: Amartya Sen, Thomas W. Lamont University Professor, Department of Economics, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences

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No Property in Man:  Slavery and Antislavery at the Nation's Founding
Friday, September 21
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store and the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research welcome award-winning author and Princeton professor SEAN WILENTZ for a discussion of his latest book, No Property in Man: Slavery and Antislavery at the Nation's Founding.

About No Property in Man
Americans revere the Constitution even as they argue fiercely over its original toleration of slavery. Some historians have charged that slaveholders actually enshrined human bondage at the nation’s founding. The acclaimed political historian Sean Wilentz shares the dismay but sees the Constitution and slavery differently. Although the proslavery side won important concessions, he asserts, antislavery impulses also influenced the framers’ work. Far from covering up a crime against humanity, the Constitution restricted slavery’s legitimacy under the new national government. In time, that limitation would open the way for the creation of an antislavery politics that led to Southern secession, the Civil War, and Emancipation.
Wilentz’s controversial and timely reconsideration upends orthodox views of the Constitution. He describes the document as a tortured paradox that abided slavery without legitimizing it. This paradox lay behind the great political battles that fractured the nation over the next seventy years. As Southern Fire-eaters invented a proslavery version of the Constitution, antislavery advocates, including Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, proclaimed antislavery versions based on the framers’ refusal to validate what they called “property in man.”

No Property in Man invites fresh debate about the political and legal struggles over slavery that began during the Revolution and concluded with the Confederacy’s defeat. It drives straight to the heart of the most contentious and enduring issue in all of American history.

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Lessons from Nature for Edible Ecosystems and Human Societies with Dave Jacke
Friday, September 21
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
First Church In Jamaica Plain, 6 Eliot Street, Jamaica Plain
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Boston-Permaculture/events/253550729/

Healthy forests maintain, fertilize, and renew themselves, naturally. Imagine having an ecosystem like that in your own yard, but it grows your food! Imagine meeting our own needs while regenerating healthy ecosystems at the same time…. Edible forest gardens mimic the structures and functions of natural forests while growing food, fuel, fiber, fodder, fertilizers, farmaceuticals, and fun. This talk introduces the vision of forest gardening with some scientific background, a few living examples, and a sampling of some useful perennial edibles you can use in your own garden. We’ll focus on understanding the social structures of ecosystems, and see what lessons these have for our gardens, and for the ways we organize and understand ourselves as human beings.

Dave Jacke, primary author of the award winning two-volume book Edible Forest Gardens, has studied ecology and design since the 1970s. An engaging designer and educator, Dave has consulted on, designed, built, and planted landscapes, homes, farms, and communities all over the U.S., and overseas. He holds a M.A. in Landscape Design from the Conway School of Landscape Design (1984).

Friday event is free and open to the public, invite your friends!

Please note that the In-depth Saturday day-long workshop explores the specific ecological theories and practical design processes behind polyculture design through exercises and games. Participants will observe, evaluate, and redesign a perennial polyculture. Pre-registration for Saturday workshop is required - Space is limited.
Participant Fee $100 (some scholarships available, please contact Orion at bostonfoodforest.org)

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Leadership:  In Turbulent Times
Friday, September 21
8:00 PM  (Doors at 7:30)
Memorial Church, 1 Harvard Yard, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/doris_kearns_goodwin1/
Cost:  $8 - $32.00 (book included)

Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome Pulitzer Prize–winning biographer and historian DORIS KEARNS GOODWIN—the bestselling author of Team of Rivals and The Bully Pulpit—for a discussion of her highly anticipated latest book, Leadership: In Turbulent Times

About Leadership
Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from? How does adversity affect the growth of leadership? Does the leader make the times or do the times make the leader?

In Leadership, Goodwin draws upon the four presidents she has studied most closely—Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson (in civil rights)—to show how they recognized leadership qualities within themselves and were recognized as leaders by others. By looking back to their first entries into public life, we encounter them at a time when their paths were filled with confusion, fear, and hope.

Leadership tells the story of how they all collided with dramatic reversals that disrupted their lives and threatened to shatter forever their ambitions. Nonetheless, they all emerged fitted to confront the contours and dilemmas of their times.

No common pattern describes the trajectory of leadership. Although set apart in background, abilities, and temperament, these men shared a fierce ambition and a deep-seated resilience that enabled them to surmount uncommon hardships. At their best, all four were guided by a sense of moral purpose. At moments of great challenge, they were able to summon their talents to enlarge the opportunities and lives of others.

This seminal work provides an accessible and essential roadmap for aspiring and established leaders in every field. In today’s polarized world, these stories of authentic leadership in times of apprehension and fracture take on a singular urgency.

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Saturday, September 22, 8:45am to 6pm, and Sunday, September 23, 12 noon to 6pm
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Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) Two-Day Basic Level Workshop
Saturday, September 22, 8:45am to 6pm, and Sunday, September 23, 12 noon to 6pm
Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) Two-Day Basic Level Workshop
Beacon Hill Friends House, 6 Chestnut Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/alternatives-to-violence-project-avp-two-day-basic-level-workshop-tickets-49532580281

The Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) began in 1975. An inmate group at Green Haven Prison in New York sought assistance from local Quakers to reduce inmate violence. From this partnership of inmates and Quakers, AVP was born. AVP is in demand in schools, prisons and youth groups. AVP conducts programs in 35 US states and over 45 countries. AVP has shaped the Reconciliation process in South Africa and in Rwanda.
About the Basic Level Workshop
AVP is an experiential program, helping people change their lives. The basic level AVP workshop is an intensive learning experience that teaches interpersonal conflict resolution skills. These experiences in small groups and in one-to-one interactions help build a sense of community. Role plays also provide an opportunity to explore, to learn, and practice creative ways to respond to real life conflicts in our lives.

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Saturday, September 22
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Lynn Wind & Water Tour
Saturday, September 22
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM EDT
2 Circle Avenue, Lynn
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lynn-wind-water-tour-tickets-49482266792

Go inside a wind turbine, then take a tour of a water treatment plant!
It's not everyday that you can get up close to a wind turbine and learn about how it can turn a breeze into the electricity we need to power our homes. As a special bonus, the Lynn turbine is part of the wastewater treatment facility, so you can see how energy and water infrastructure can work together sustainably.
Our Green Powered program supports the Lynn turbine.

Questions? Contact us!
If you have questions, please do not hesitate to call 800-287-3950 x5 or email hello at greenenergyconsumers.org.
Thank you, and we look forward to seeing you!

This tour is free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please RSVP.

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Gardening Like the Forest: Designing Plant Guilds and Perennial Polycultures
Saturday, September 22
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan
RSVP at http://bostonfoodforest.org/events/saturday-work-day-with-dave-jacke-designing-plant-guilds-and-perennial-polycultures/

Ecosystem agriculture attempts to mimic the structure and function of natural ecosystems in food-producing ecologies.  At the most practical level, this entails designing guilds of plants, often in the form of polycultures. Effective polycultures combine useful plants in ways that minimize competition, create additive yields, and minimize the gardener’s work and outside inputs (e.g., water, fertilizer). Polyculture design is the most interesting and challenging part of the garden design process.  Building off the Friday evening lecture, this one-day workshop explores the specific ecological theories and practical design processes behind polyculture design through exercises and games. Participants will observe, evaluate, and redesign a perennial polyculture at the Boston Nature Center Food Forest during class.

Dave Jacke, primary author of the award winning two-volume book Edible Forest Gardens, has studied ecology and design since the 1970s. An engaging designer and educator, Dave has consulted on, designed, built, and planted landscapes, homes, farms, and communities all over the U.S., and overseas. He holds a M.A. in Landscape Design from the Conway School of Landscape Design (1984).

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED – SPACE IS LIMITED
Participant Fee $100 (some scholarships available, please contact Orion at bostonfoodforest.org)

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Homes For All Assembly: Build a People's Plan!
September, September 22
12:00pm - 4:00pm
First Church Roxbury, 10 Putnam Street, Roxbury
RSVP at https://righttothecityboston.salsalabs.org/homesforallassemblybuildapeoplesplan/index.html

Build real solutions to Boston’s displacement crisis, led by the people most impacted.
  
HOUSING IS A HUMAN RIGHT. Housing should be built & maintained to meet the needs of communities and provide stability for families and individuals, not create enormous profit for corporations.

THE PEOPLE MOST IMPACTED MUST LEAD! We believe that to win homes for all we need to overturn centuries of racist, sexist, classist and oppressive housing and economic policies that have impacted low-income and working-class communities, Black, Indigenous, Latinxs and Asian communities, women and LGBTQ communities the most. We believe our movement will be strongest when these people, who have seen the impacts of the crisis first hand, are leading the way to transform our world.

LAND & HOUSING SHOULD BE COLLECTIVELY-CONTROLLED BY COMMUNITIES AND SUSTAINED FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.
We believe communities must control the resources – including land and housing – in our neighborhoods. We should relate to land and our earth as stewards, respecting the land with future generations in mind.

JOIN US for a Boston assembly to build a people’s plan for good development and an end to displacement.

light lunch / childcare / interpretation

Hosted by Right to the City Boston and our Homes For All local partners and allies: Action for Equity, Alternatives for Community and Environment, Boston Tenant Coalition, Chinese Progressive Association, City Life/Vida Urbana, Dorchester Not for Sale, Keep It 100 for Real Affordable Housing and Racial Justice, New England United for Justice, and Reclaim Roxbury. 

Build our movement for Homes For All in Boston!
Register Today!

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Symbiotic Earth: How Lynn Margulis Started a Scientific Revolution!
Saturday, September 22
1:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Geological Lecture Hall, Harvard University, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Film and panel discussion. Meet Lynn's colleagues and learn about one of the best-loved revolutionaries in the history of science!

Please sign up at https://bio4climate.org/symbiotic-earth/

Editorial Comment:  I was lucky enough to spend some time with Lynn Margulis.  She had an incendiary brilliance that was lovely.  I always thought she should have won the Nobel Prize but she died much too soon.

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Fluff the 13th
Saturday, September 22 (rain date: Sunday, September 23)
3pm-7pm
Union Square, Somerville

The 13th annual “What the Fluff” Festival will feature musical performances, a cooking contest, Fluff-themed games, activities, antics and fun for every age, and Fluff treats of every sort. Stay tuned for more details to come.

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Sunday, September 23
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FARM KICKOFF WITH GREEN CAMBRIDGE
Sunday, September 23
12:00 PM
Hurley Street Neighborhood Farm, 213 Hurley Street, Cambridge

Kickoff Climate Preparedness Week at Green Cambridge's Hurley St. Farm! We'll be working and discussing how urban farms and local food sources can increase community resilience to climate change.

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Jazz Along The Charles: A Walkable Concert
Sunday, September 23
2:00-4:00pm 
Charles River Esplanade, Boston

25 Jazz Bands: 1 Concert 
Join us on September 23 for Jazz Along The Charles, a gathering of 25 jazz ensembles who will perform the same set list as part of a series of connected, walkable locations along the Charles River Esplanade.

Stroll along the Charles River and discover new songs, artists, and areas of the Esplanade. 

The bands will interpret a curated list of Boston-related tunes in one collective concert that celebrates the great jazz community in Boston. These 25 jazz ensembles will play simultaneously to interpret the same set list in their own styles.

Jazz Along the Charles is a free public event, part of Celebrity Series’ commitment to free public performance experiences for the people of Boston. Come enjoy an afternoon of music and discovery!

Learn more about Jazz Along The Charles and the 25 ensembles, who together showcase the diverse and talented jazz community of Boston:  https://www.celebrityseries.org/live-performances/public-performance-projects/jazz-along-the-charles/

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United Nations International Day of Peace 2018 - Boston
Sunday, September 23
2 - 4pm
Boston Common near the Park Street MBTA Station
Church on the Hill, 140 Bowdoin St, Boston, MA 02108 (rain location)

The United Nations has established "The Right to Peace - The Universal Declaration of Human Rights at 70" as the theme for this year's International Day of Peace. Join CMM, Friends Meeting at Cambridge and the St Paul AME Church, along with other partners, on the Boston Common in a day of music, dance, song, poetry, artwork and peace education.

Proclamations from Mayor Walsh's office and Governor Baker's office to be read.

This year's program will include: Issa Bibbins, Rodney Dailey, Dawn Duncan, Kaeza Fearn, Darrell Hamilton, Ian Harrington, Miranda Henne, Marla Marcum, National Liturgical Dance Network - Massachusetts Chapter, Maria Soledad Del Villar Tagle and more to be announced!

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FarmFarm UnBrunch Potluck Party
Sunday, September 23
2:00 PM – 7:00 PM EDT
Urban Farming Institute Headquarters, 487 Norfolk Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/farmfarm-unbrunch-potluck-party-tickets-50180630617

Please join us for a fundraiser "unbrunch," a brunch style potluck gathering from 2pm-7pm on Sunday, September 23rd! We will have delicious food, an open mic, activities for kids, and vendors gathering to host an amazing event intended to raise money for the 2018 UFI Farm Apprentices to attend the Black Urban Growers Conference in Durham, NC.

If you would like to make your donation towards this event at the time of registration, or cannot attend this event, please go to our GoFundMe page: https://www.gofundme.com/farmfam-trip-to-durham-nc .
Thank you so much for your support and we lok forward to seeing you for this fabulous event!

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Monday, September 24 - Sunday, September 30
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Cambridge Climate Preparedness Week
More information at https://www.climatecrew.org/prep_week?locale=en

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Monday, September 24
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African Sustainable Development Conference
Monday, September 24
8:30am to 5:00pm
MIT Building E25, Room 401 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://umrp.mit.edu/events/

Convened by the Université Mohammed VI Polytechnique--MIT Research Program (UMRP) this is a working meeting of international experts in sustainable urbanization, climate & water, precision agriculture, green chemistry and industrial optimization with the focus on sustainable development in Morocco and across Africa.

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The Growing Need for Precision in LED Lighting
Monday, September 24
11:00 AM EDT 
Webcast
RSVP at https://event.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1208524&tp_key=d42691ab08&sti=em1&pwhid=0beb49962b0fb21a6183688926627a3ec671ab97d62876c0441344491e8e0e3ac348e5a4a661a895ca527e4488a0a8ef9e73070666160d9fb43490bb78753cbd

The Growing Need for Precision in LED Lighting looks at three main trends in machine vision lighting, specifically, the need for lights with nanosecond response times versus today’s millisecond trigger/rise/fall times; the need to manage multiple lights, whether it be for multispectral applications or large-area, vision-guided-robotics multi-light installations. Finally, the optical performance of new classes of high performance lights requires a multidisciplinary light design approach that includes electronic, optical, and mechanical engineering skillsets to optimize and balance the performance of each component within the lighting solution design.

Presented by:
Paul Powers, Director of Sales - Americas, Smart Vision Lights

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Kristen Soltis Anderson
Monday, September 24
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Rubenstein Building, Room 414ABDavid T. Ellwood Democracy Lab, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

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PAOC Colloquium - Paul Wennberg (Caltech)
Monday, September 24
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-915/923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Paul Wennberg (Caltech)

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars generally take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged.

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State Policies and Wholesale Electricity Markets
Monday, September 24
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Travis Fisher, Adviser to the Chief of Staff, FERC

Lunch will be served.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar
https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/energyconsortium/seminars

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Immigrants Making America Great Again: Lessons from an Undocumented Immigrant Turned Lawyer
Monday, September 24
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Northeastern, 240 Dockser Hall, 65 Forsyth Street, Boston

Fall 2018 Daynard Visiting Fellow: Prerna Lal, Staff Attorney/Clinical Supervisor, Immigration Practice, East Bay Community Law Center

Prerna Lal was born in the Fiji Islands, came to the United States with their parents when they were 14, and then lived in the San Francisco East Bay area.

Formerly an undocumented immigrant, Lal was integral to establishing United We DREAM and the DreamActivist network, both led by undocumented youth. The organizations mobilized thousands of undocumented immigrants to push for the federal DREAM Act in 2010, ending the deportations of undocumented youth, and securing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program under the Obama Administration. A mobilizer and social media strategist, Lal has also helped with the creation of many local immigrant youth groups, providing direct support, mentorship and advocacy to individuals caught up in the immigration dragnet.

As an undocumented law school graduate, Lal was among the first in the country to obtain a license to practice law. As a result of Lal’s high-spirited activism, the US government sought to deport them. Law won lawful permanent residency after a long court battle, and in April 2018, Lal became a United States citizen.

As a nonprofit policy attorney in Washington, DC, Lal worked at Asian Americans Advancing Justice  (AAJC), spearheading initiatives related to extending DACA, Deferred Action for Parents of Americans, Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Nepal and parole-in-place for family members of Filipino war veterans. Through a partnership between the East Bay Community Law Center and UC Berkeley’s Undocumented Student Program, Lal provided immigration legal services for more than 500 students and their family members. As an immigration attorney, clinical supervisor and lecturer at a clinic of UC Berkeley School of Law, Lal mentored a new generation of public interest law students.

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Invasive plant challenges and opportunities in the U.S.
Monday, September 24
12:10p
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Jenica Allen, Affiliate Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire

More information at https://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

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Not-so-big Data and Ebola Virus Disease
Monday, September 24
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd7VGUkAvTU655Dub2FTGSNMjpVs6f8Qbu0kpmXh6oz11MgFw/viewform

Eugene T. Richardson, Harvard, HMS

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to via the online form by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

sts at hks.harvard.edu

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

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Science, Religion, and Out-of-Body Experiences
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 3 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CSWR Conference Room, 42 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Religion
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Center for the Study of World Religions
SPEAKER(S)  Kurt Leland has written on astral projection, near-death experiences, and the transcendent possibilities of composing, performing, and listening to music. In 2007, What Is Enlightenment? magazine numbered him among “the world’s foremost OBE experts.” In 2017, his book Rainbow Body: A History of the Western Chakra System from Blavatsky to Brennan was a finalist for the Benjamin Franklin Award from the Independent Book Publishers Association in the Body, Mind & Spirit category. As well as being a National Lecturer for the Theosophical Society in America, he is a Boston-based classical musician and award-winning composer and maintains a consulting and teaching practice called Spiritual Orienteering.
DETAILS  Out-of-Body Experiences (OBEs, also known as astral projection), in which people apparently separate their consciousness from the physical body and move about independently in nearby and remote real-world locations and far-out nonphysical locales, have been noted in religious and mystical contexts since the beginning of recorded history, especially in connection with close calls with death (Near-Death Experiences, also known as NDEs). Often, these experiences are used as proof of the existence of paranormal abilities, survival of physical death, and the possibility of exploring invisible worlds, other dimensions, or subtle planes of existence. During the last fifteen years, scientific researchers have devised a number of experiments suggesting that OBEs and NDEs originate in the brain and strongly resemble experiences produced by natural and synthetic hallucinogens. What are the implications of this research for spiritual seekers, esoteric movements, and the history of religions?
LINK  https://cswr.hds.harvard.edu/news/upcoming-events#/?i=1

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Land-use Regimes and the Future of New England’s Forest Carbon
Monday, September 24
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Jonathan Thompson, Harvard Forest
With a reception to follow.

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Reflections on a lifetime effort to bring peace to the Middle East: An Interview with Herbert C. Kelman
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Classroom 2004, 1585 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Herbert C. Kelman Seminar on International Conflict Analysis and Resolution, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Herbert C. Kelman, Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics Emeritus, Harvard University
CONTACT INFO	elizabethflanagan at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Herbert C. Kelman is the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics Emeritus, at Harvard University and was (from 1993 to 2003) director of the Program on International Conflict Analysis and Resolution at Harvard's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. He received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Yale University in 1951. He is past president of the International Studies Association, the International Society of Political Psychology, the Interamerican Society of Psychology, and several other professional associations. He is recipient of many awards, including the Socio-Psychological Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1956), the Kurt Lewin Memorial award (1973), the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest (1981), the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order (1997), the Austrian Medal of Honor for Science and Art (1998), and the Gold Medal of Honor of the Federal Capital of Vienna (2012). His major publications include "International Behavior: A Social-Psychological Analysis" (editor; 1965), "A Time to Speak: On Human Values and Social Research" (1968), and "Crimes of Obedience: Toward a Social Psychology of Authority and Responsibility" (with V. Lee Hamilton; 1989).
Prof Kelman has been engaged for many years in the development of interactive problem solving, an unofficial third party approach to the resolution of international and intercommunal conflicts, and in its application to the Arab-Israeli conflict, with special emphasis on its Israeli-Palestinian component.
Unless otherwise noted in the event description, CMES events are open to the public (no registration required), and off the record. Please note that events may be filmed and photographed by CMES for record-keeping and for use on the CMES website and publications.
LINK	https://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/reflections-lifetime-effort-bring-peace-middle-east-interview-herbert-c-kelman

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The Future of Food and Nutrition: Implications for Science, Dietary Guidelines, and Food Policy
Monday, September 24 
4:30 – 6:00 pm
Museum of Science, Cahners Auditorium, 1 Science Park, Boston

Join us for the awarding of the 2018 Walker Prize to Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH
The Walker Prize recognizes "meritorious published scientific investigation and discovery" in any scientific field. The recipient must be a noted scientist, professor, or researcher who is a superb science communicator via the written word and is well known for superlative work in her / his field. The prize was established in 1864 by Dr. William Johnson Walker, one of the most eminent surgeons of his era and a generous benefactor of the Boston Society of Natural History, the Museum's founding organization.

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Science Sounds Strange: Ether Waves, Espionage, and the Theremin’s Odyssey
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 5 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Music, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Dorit Chrysler, musicologist and composer; directory, NY Theremin Society; founder, KidCoolThereminSchool
John Huth, Donner Professor of Science, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Little did Léon Theremin realize that his Soviet-sponsored spy research into electromagnetic waves and proximity sensors would lead to the creation of a new and strange musical instrument. Classical music composers — as well as Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones — have written for the eerie-sounding theremin, a musical instrument that plays without every actually being touched. Come hear a performance of this extraordinary instrument and the cautionary tale of a physicist-turned-music-pioneer, whose inventions became steeped in politics and whose life story reads like a spy novel. Register online.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-john-huth-and-dorit-chrysler-lecture

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Boston's Creative Economy Mingle
Monday, September 24
5:30 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Boston Athenæum, 10 ½ Beacon St, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bostons-creative-economy-mingle-tickets-48895229949

The Creative Economy (CE) and the people it employs stimulate innovation, strengthen America's competitiveness in the global marketplace, and play an important role in building and sustaining economic vibrancy. The Creative Industries include the interlocking industry sectors that provide creative services such as advertising, architecture, or creating and promoting intellectual property products such as arts, film, computer games, multimedia or design. Within Massachusetts, over 17,000 creative economy businesses, employ more than 75,000 people, representing 4.3 percent of the total number of businesses and 2.1 percent of the people they employ. Boston currently exceeds both national and state statistics for the sector. As of 2014, City of Boston reported over 2000 CE businesses and a combined CE workforce (payroll & self employed) of over 36,000. This represents nearly 5.4% of total businesses, and nearly 5 percent of all employment.

SPARK Boston, in partnership with the Mayor's Officeof Arts and Culture, the Office of Small Business Development, the Office of Diversity, the Office of Resilience & Racial Equity, ArtsBoston, Network of Arts Administrators of Color (NAAC), Powerful Pathways and Boston Athenæum is hosting a networking event focused on bringing together millennials of color working or aspiring toward employment across creative industries in Boston. This is for individual artists and arts administrators, to small creative business owners, entrepreneurs, and employees of larger greater Boston-based creative businesses. Bring plenty of business cards and get ready to find your next great opportunity.

The evening will feature facilitated networking, performances, and free food. Bring plenty of business cards and a spirit for networking! This event is free and open to the public, but is intended and programmed for millennials of color. We'd also like to let our guests know that the Boston Athenæum has a locker policy for items such as large purses, backpacks and luggage, wheeled containers, etc. Only small personal items, such as wallets, eyeglasses, phones, and keys are permitted inside the premises. Lockers are free and security will check bags upon departure.

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Conflict and the Global Threat of Pandemics
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE   Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Health Sciences, Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Museum of Natural History
SPEAKER(S)  Michele Barry, Professor of Medicine; Senior Associate Dean of Global Health, Director, Center for Innovation in Global Health, Stanford University
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO  (617) 495-3045, hmnh at hmsc.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Detection and control of emerging infections in conflict zones is a major public health challenge. The breakdown of civil society often leads to the collapse of health systems and sanitation, food insecurity, poor coordination among humanitarian agencies, and the subsequent emergence of diseases that can proliferate into global pandemics. Michele Barry will discuss how Ebola, polio, yellow fever, cholera, and Lassa fever have emerged during conflict in fragile states and what has been learned from the outbreaks to better predict and control other potential epidemics.
Lecture. Reservations are strongly encouraged.
Free parking at the Oxford Street Garage
Presented in collaboration with the Harvard Global Health Institute, as part of OUTBREAK WEEK 2018, a University-wide effort to commemorate the 1918 influenza pandemic.
LINK  https://hmnh.harvard.edu/event/conflict-and-global-threat-pandemics

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Solar Access Celebration
Monday, September 24
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
DBEDC’s Bornstein & Pearl Facility, 200 Quincy Street, Boston 
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/solar-access-celebration-tickets-49744476067

In recognition of the launch of the Solar Access Program, we would like to invite you to join us and Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation (DBEDC) the evening of Monday, September 24th to kick off Climate Week at Bornstein and Pearl. The Solar Access Program is a solar program designed by Resonant Energy — in partnership with DBEDC and SunWealth — to make solar accessible to low-income households and nonprofits. Come celebrate this huge milestone in the clean energy movement with us, learn how you can be involved and grab a bite to eat!
Address: 200 Quincy St, Boston, MA 02121
Time: 6 PM - 7:30 PM
6:00 - 6:30: Food and Arrival
6:30 - 7:00: Speakers
7:00 - 7:30: Music and Conversation
Food: The event will highlight CommonWealth Kitchen vendors and feature a variety of foods available for purchase.

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Sheila Remes, "The Future is Built Here”
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gund Hall, Room 124, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Master in Design Engineering at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Sheila Remes, Vice President of Strategy for Commercial Airplanes, Boeing
Sheila Remes is vice president of Strategy for Commercial Airplanes and also leads Boeing’s Cabin Vertical Integration team. In these roles, Remes oversees cross-functional efforts to define Boeing’s strategic direction and address complex, enterprise-wide business decisions. These include greater life-cycle value for customers and internal capabilities for Boeing, growth opportunities such as services and intellectual property control, product and propulsion strategy, and environment and aviation policy. She is also responsible for international business development strategy and serves on the Boeing International leadership team. Outside of Boeing, Remes serves on the World Affairs Council of Seattle Board of Directors.
COST  Free
DETAILS  Boeing is the global leader in helping to connect, protect, explore and inspire the world. A city the size of Chicago flies on a commercial airliner somewhere every day and that number is expected to double in the next 20 years. One-third of the value of global goods also moves by air. Yet fewer than one in five people have ever flown and aviation transports just 1 percent of all trade.
As we look deeper into our second century, we’re inspired by the opportunity to sharpen and accelerate our history of innovation to connect more of the world than ever before. By fundamentally changing the economics and ecosystem of flight, we can meet the increasing demand for safe, efficient, affordable and sustainable air travel.
In addition to continuing to serve large commercial passenger and cargo markets, Boeing will bring air transport to new markets. Our flight plan, the future is built here, focuses on key areas to support Boeing’s mission to connect the world through aerospace innovation, as well as be the best in aerospace and an enduring global industrial champion.
LINK  https://mde.harvard.edu/sheila-remes-future-built-here

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Tales from an Uncertain World
Monday, September 24
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

So far, humanity hasn’t done very well in addressing the ongoing climate catastrophe. Veteran science educator L. S. Gardiner believes we can learn to do better by understanding how we’ve dealt with other types of environmental risks in the past and why we are dragging our feet in addressing this most urgent emergency. Weaving scientific facts and research together with humor and emotion, Gardiner explores human responses to erosion, earthquakes, fires, invasive species, marine degradation, volcanic eruptions, and floods in order to illuminate why we find it so challenging to deal with climate change. Insight emerges from unexpected places—a mermaid exhibit, a Magic 8 Ball, and midcentury cartoons about a future that never came to be. 

Instead of focusing on the economics and geopolitics of the debate over climate change, this book brings large-scale disaster to a human scale, emphasizing the role of the individual. We humans do have the capacity to deal with disasters. When we face threatening changes, we don’t just stand there pretending it isn’t so, we do something. But because we’re human, our responses aren’t always the right ones the first time—yet we can learn to do better. This book is essential reading for all who want to know how we can draw on our strengths to survive the climate catastrophe and forge a new relationship with nature.

L. S. Gardiner is the author of two and illustrator of nine children's books about science. She works at the UCAR Center for Science Education, and resides in Boulder, Colorado.

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Tuesday, September 25
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By the People: Revolutionizing the Democratic Process to Ensure Full Participation by Millennials and People of Color
A Special Event hosted as part of City Awake’s Fierce Urgency of Now Festival
Tuesday, September 25
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM EDT
BUild Innovation Lab @ Boston University, 730 Commonwealth, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/by-the-people-revolutionizing-the-democratic-process-to-ensure-full-participation-by-millennials-tickets-48583679092

About Fierce Urgency of Now:
Join Amplify Latinx in collaboration with the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and City Awake, for a six days FUN festival of conversation and celebration of Boston's Millennials of Color. The Boston Foundation and City Awake’s City of Millennials report shows that Greater Boston’s millennial population is more racially and ethnically diverse and more educated than ever before. However, it also exposed the many barriers that population faces in Boston as well. That is why Fierce Urgency of Now is so important. A 6-day festival September 20-25 dedicated to talking about these issues and convening young Bostonians of color to share their experiences. We are proud to partner with City Awake for this cause. Learn more at #FUNinBOS.

Description:  The most impactful movements in history have been set in motion at the grassroots level. Join us for a trendsetting dialogue on inclusive voting models and learn about innovative strategies to overcome barriers to civic engagement. Walk away with a toolkit that will equip you to educate voters on a system that drives voter participation.

Black and Latino voters could make a sizable difference in this Fall’s mid-term elections. The Millennial and Latinx population will grow more than 55% in the next two decades to 90 million -- representing more than a quarter of all Americans. This demographic shift presents a key opportunity to invest in outreach and new voting processes to ensure strong turn out by this large, yet disengaged electorate. 

In this forum led by expert speakers, we will hear success stories around online voter registration, early voting, pre-registration of high school age students, and automatic voter registration. We will also explore how we can disrupt voter access by implementing engagement strategies such as ranked choice voting and clean “citizen funded” elections to increase candidate access and voter participation by traditionally under-represented communities.

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Intro to PassivHaus
Tuesday, September 25
8:30 AM – 10:00 AM EDT
50 Milk Street, "Edison" Conference Room, 16th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-passivhaus-tickets-49357157587
Cost:  $30 – $45

PassivHaus, Passive House or PH for short: we know you have been hearing about it, if you subscribe to high-performance building. This well-known standard has made its way to the Americas and now is growing roots in Massachusetts. Come connect with the leaders at Passive House Massachusetts and learn the basics of the system.
Passive House comprises a set of design principles used to obtain a quantifiable and rigorous level of energy efficiency and building comfort. Where did the Passive House standard come from and how has it evolved over the years? In this session, participants will learn the history of Passive House as a building concept and the differences between the national and international standards as well as how they relate to LEED and other building standards. A great opportunity to learn the basics of Passive House and get your questions answered.
Learning Objectives:
Learn the basics of Passive House principles
Introduce yourself to Passive House Massachusetts and how you can learn more in upcoming sessions
Find out how Passive House is being integrated into code in different areas nationally and internationally
Network with other Passive House practitioners and those interested in the practice

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Sustainability Festival
Tuesday, September 25
11:00 am to 2:30 pm
BU Medical School, Talbot Green, 45 Stoughton Street, Boston

Join the challenge to reduce your environmental footprint; buzz your actions and you could win some great prizes! Swap your light bulbs for an LED or get a travel coffee mug for free. Learn about biking in Boston and get involved in student and staff community organizations!

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Eugene Scott
Tuesday, September 25
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Wexner Building, Room 434AB, Wexner Conference Room, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

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Neighborhood Matters: a Screening of Invisible Crisis and Conversation with Patricia Montes
Tuesday, September 25
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Northeastern, Snell Library 90, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Featuring Special Guest  Patricia Montes, Executive Director, Centro Presente.
Established in 1981, Centro Presente is a member-driven, statewide Latin American immigrant organization dedicated to the self-determination and self-sufficiency of the Latin American immigrant community of Massachusetts. Operated and led primarily by Central American immigrants, Centro Presente struggles for immigrant rights and for economic and social justice. Through the integration of community organizing, leadership development and basic services, Centro Presente strives to give our members a voice and build community power.

Patricia Montes is the Executive Director of Centro Presente, an immigrant rights organization in Massachusetts. Patricia is a recognized immigrant rights leader and a tireless advocate for just economic and social policies, including a just U.S. immigration policy. She serves on the Executive Board of the National Alliance of Latin American and Caribbean Communities (NALACC), and is a board member of The Boston Women’s Fund and the Women’s Pipeline for Change, a group that is trying to build a sustainable infrastructure to support progressive women of color as they enter, navigate and move up the pipeline to political leadership.

Patricia Montes es la Directora Ejecutiva de Centro Presente, una organización que lucha por la defensa de los derechos de los inmigrantes en Massachusetts. Montes es una líder en los derechos de los inmigrantes y defensora de políticas económicas y sociales justas, incluyendo la reforma migratoria en EEUU. Montes es parte del Consejo Ejecutivo de National Alliance of Latin American and Caribbean Communities (NALACC), y también es miembro de la junta de The Boston Women’s Fund and the Women’s Pipeline for Change, un grupo que busca construir una plataforma para apoyar a las mujeres pertenecientes a grupos minoritarios que desean entrar en el mundo de liderazgo político.

Free and open to the public; lunch will be served. Co-sponsored by Northeastern City and Community Affairs

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"Click Here to Kill Everybody"
Tuesday, Sep 25
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2018-09-25/click-here-kill-everybody

Bruce Schneier
Computer security is no longer about data; it's about life and property. This change makes an enormous difference, and will shake up our industry in many ways. First, data authentication and integrity will become more important than confidentiality. And second, our largely regulation-free Internet will become a thing of the past. Soon we will no longer have a choice between government regulation and no government regulation. Our choice is between smart government regulation and stupid government regulation. Given this future, it's vital that we look back at what we've learned from past attempts to secure these systems, and forward at what technologies, laws, regulations, economic incentives, and social norms we need to secure them in the future.

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FORUM: VULNERABILITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Tuesday, September 25
12pm – 1:30pm
Cathedral Church of St. Paul's, 138 Tremont Street, Boston

Join us at St. Paul's to hear a panel of local leaders speak on how community members can help vulnerable populations before, during, and after an extreme weather event.

Aaron Troncoso 
aaron at climatecrew.org 
(617) 945-5242

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Achieving Access: Professional Movements and the Politics of Health Universalism
Tuesday, September 25
12:00 - 1:30 pm 
BU, Pardee Center, 67 Bay State Road, Boston
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07efo921gm11735836&oseq=&c=&ch=

The Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future and the Institute for Health System Innovation & Policy invite you to attend an upcoming seminar with Joseph Harris, an Assistant Professor of Sociology and a Pardee Center Faculty Research Fellow.

In the book, published by Cornell University Press in 2017, Prof. Harris explores dynamics that made landmark universal healthcare and AIDS treatment policies possible in Thailand and Brazil but which led to prolonged struggle and contestation in South Africa. While conventional wisdom suggests that democratization empowers the masses, Harris draws attention to an under-appreciated dynamic: that democratization empowers elites from esteemed professions - frequently doctors and lawyers - who forge progressive change on behalf of those in need.

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What Makes a Climate Leader? The Politics of Climate Policy in California and Germany
Tuesday, September 25
12:30pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building 9-451, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

As California hosts the Global Climate Action Summit this month, ambitions to tackle climate change fly high—the US federal government’s opposition notwithstanding. The wave of aspiration is welcome, but it is far from clear whether climate goals will in fact be implemented as effective policy. We may like to think that it all depends on voters. Yet the history of climate politics has shown that all too often powerful business lobbies capture climate policy, even if voters are in favor of action. This suggests an important truth: How governments manage vested interests shapes if climate ambitions turn into climate actions. Take the story of California and Germany, which led the world with ambitious emission reduction goals for 2020. While California reached its target ahead of time, Merkel’s administration has admitted that Germany will miss its goal by a wide margin. A key reason for California’s success lies in how little the climate policy process opened the door to lobbyists, compared to Germany.  In particular, the division of labor between the bureaucracy and the legislature mattered. Drawing on these two cases, the talk will explore how policy process shapes opportunities for regulatory capture and draw lessons for implementing climate policy. 

Please join us for the first Environmental Policy and Planning lunch of the fall 2018 term with guest speaker Jonas Meckling (UC Berkeley). 

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Outbreak Week - Global Disease Outbreaks: Shaping public health infrastructure and investments
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 3 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Kresge Cafeteria, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Exhibitions, Health Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Global Health Institute
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
SPEAKER(S)  Dean Michelle Williams
Ashish Jha
Allan Brandt
Marcia Castro
Gabriela Soto Laveaga
Emmanuel K. Akyeampong
Jesse Bump
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6PeeciSUnsCa49D
TICKET INFO  All events are free and registration is required.
CONTACT INFO	outbreakweek at harvard.edu
DETAILS  Professor Allan Brandt will provide a keynote address, followed by a panel discussion on how historical disease outbreaks in Central America, South America, and Africa have shaped investments in public health infrastructure. These discussions will be followed by a reception showcasing original and customized panels from the Smithsonian Museum’s recent Outbreak exhibit.
LINK  https://globalhealth.harvard.edu/outbreakweek-sept24

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Books at Baker with Nancy Koehn
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 3:30 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Business School, Aldrich Hall 210, Soldiers Field Road, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Baker Library
SPEAKER(S)  Nancy Koehn, James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  schurch at hbs.edu
DETAILS  In "Forged in Crisis," HBS historian Nancy Koehn examines five masters of crisis: explorer Ernest Shackleton; Abraham Lincoln; abolitionist Frederick Douglass; Nazi-resisting clergyman Dietrich Bonhoeffer; and environmental crusader Rachel Carson. What do such disparate figures have in common? Why do their extraordinary stories continue to amaze and inspire? Koehn offers a remarkable template by which to measure our aspirations and to judge those in our time to whom we've given our trust.
Koehn begins each section by showing her protagonist on the precipice of a great crisis. Readers then learn about each person’s childhood and see the individual growing — step by step — into the person he or she will ultimately become. Significantly, as we follow each leader’s against-all-odds journey, we begin to glean an essential truth: leaders are not born but made. In a book dense with epiphanies, the most galvanizing one may be that the power and courage to lead resides in each of us.
Q&A with the author; books available for signing.
LINK  https://www.library.hbs.edu/Articles/Books-Baker

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Resiliency with Microgrids: A Peek Inside
Tuesday, September 25
4:00pm to 6:00pm
Schneider Electric Boston One Campus 800 Federal Street, Andover
RSVP at http://www.mitforumcambridge.org/event/microgrid-tour/
Cost:  $5 - $30

A microgrid is an electrical distribution network with underground wires that serves two or more buildings in a local area. Microgrids can enter ‘island mode’ and separate from the larger electrical grid when there is a major outage - self supplying with locally generated energy.

A string of extreme weather events - think Hurricane Sandy’s impact on New York and New Jersey and Hurricane Maria’s devastating impact on Puerto Rico - have highlighted the need to create a more resilient power grid. Microgrids that use on-site renewables and energy storage support resiliency while being clean and green.  Communities are looking to microgrids to keep critical services going during power outages. Companies are looking to microgrids to avoid costly power outages and reduce costs through demand-side efficiencies.   Microgrids help facilities earn money through participation in demand response programs and, in the future, by providing services to the grid.

There are opportunities for startups in this market to offer microgrids and their components, like battery storage, fuel cells and controllers.  Last September, New York’s Urban Future Lab announced $50,000 awards plus incubation guidance for microgrid startups. An Indiana startup built their business providing microgrids to the military and is moving on to build a commercial resilience business. Plus, peer to peer power exchanges using blockchain are popping up in conjunction with microgrids.

After experiencing outages, Schneider Electric decided to “be their own customer” and install a microgrid at their North American headquarters in Andover, MA. 440kW of power is provided by solar arrays backed up with a 400kW natural gas generator.  The system provides 500kW of capacity and 1MWhr of energy.  An advanced cloud-based energy management system combined with an energy control center orchestrates supply and demand and enables the microgrid to safely island.  What is unique about this microgrid is that it is built using an Energy as a Service business model – a third-party investor owns the microgrid assets, so there is no capital outlay. Costs associated with the maintenance and operation are eliminated.  Energy-as-a service provides more predictable energy costs, increased sustainability and robust resilience for Schneider Electric’s Boston One Campus.

Join us as we peek inside to see how this works first hand!  You will get a chance to tour the facilities, and learn about the potential of microgrid technology, innovative business models and creative partnerships

Agenda:
Introduction and overview of the Microgrid
Tour of the facilities
Networking

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Starr Forum: The Assault on Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies
Tuesday, September 25
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building 10-250, 222 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

A book talk with Michael Hayden, former director of the NSA
Michael Hayden is a retired United States Air Force four-star general and former director of the National Security Agency, principal deputy director of National Intelligence, and director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Hayden currently co-chairs the Bipartisan Policy Center's Electric Grid Cyber Security Initiative.

Joining the conversation is Joel Brenner, former head of counterintelligence under the director of National Intelligence.

Brenner is former head of counterintelligence under the director of National Intelligence and was senior counsel at the National Security Agency. He is a research affiliate at the MIT Center for International Studies. 

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Gotta Get Down to It: Conversations with musician David Crosby
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 5 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theater, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Learning from Performers program and the Harvard University Department of Music.
SPEAKER(S)  Renate van Orden, Dwight P. Robinson Jr. Professor of Music at Harvard and Ingrid Monson, Quincy Jones Professor of African-American Music at Harvard.
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	617-495-8676
DETAILS  Join the legendary musician David Crosby in discussion forum with a group of Harvard student musicians and poets curated by host Kate van Orden, Dwight P. Robinson Jr. Professor of Music at Harvard, followed by a conversation between Crosby and Ingrid Monson, Quincy Jones Professor of African-American Music at Harvard.
LINK  https://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/event/musician-david-crosby-at-Harvard

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DUSP [Department of Urban Studies and Planning] Lightning Talks
Tuesday, September 25
5:30pm to 8:00pm
MIT, Building E14: Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Kick-off the semester with the ever-popular "DUSP Lightning Talks.” Faculty and PhD students will have *three minutes* to explain *one research project* in layperson's language. Each presentation will be followed by a question from the audience, to be answered in no more than two minutes.

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What’s New? What’s Next? Cultural and Structural Threats to the Constitutional Order of the United States and Western Europe
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Seminar on Cultural Politics, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Chair: Prof. Panagiotis Roilos
SPEAKER(S)  Jennifer Hochschild, Faculty Associate. Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government; Chair, Department of Government; Professor of African and African American Studies, Department of African and African American Studies, Harvard University; Harvard College Professor.

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Outbreak Week - Emerging Infections Then and Now: From the Influenza Pandemic to the Antibiotic Resistance Crisis
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Lahey Room, Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street #3, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Environmental Sciences, Exhibitions, Health Sciences, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Global Health Institute
Harvard Medical School (Department of Global Health and Social Medicine)
Center for the History of Medicine
SPEAKER(S)  Dan Lucey
Scott Podolsky
Eugene Richardson
Michele Barry
Ramanan Laxminarayan
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6KXIVkKTGWlsLZ3
TICKET INFO  All events are free and registration is required.
CONTACT INFO	outbreakweek at harvard.edu
DETAILS  Opening remarks will be provided by Dr. Scott Podolsky and Dr. Daniel Lucey, followed by an expert panel discussion on the emerging risks of antimicrobial resistance, historical emerging infections, big data, and contemporary outbreaks. This discussion will be followed by an exhibition curated by the Countway Medical Library, as well as exhibition material from the Smithsonian Museum’s recent Outbreak exhibit.
LINK   https://globalhealth.harvard.edu/outbreakweek-sept24

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On the Other Side of Freedom:  The Case for Hope
Tuesday, September 25
7:00 PM (Doors at 6:30)
Old South Church, 645 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/deray_mckesson/
Cost:  $26.75 (book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed civil rights activist and community organizer DERAY MCKESSON—host of Pod Save the People—for a discussion of his debut book, On the Other Side of Freedom: The Case for Hope.

About On the Other Side of Freedom
In August of 2014, twenty-nine-year-old activist DeRay Mckesson stood with hundreds of others on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, to push a message of justice and accountability. These protests, and others like them in cities across the country, resulted in the birth of the Black Lives Matter movement. Now, in his first book, Mckesson lays out the intellectual, pragmatic political framework for a new liberation movement. Continuing a conversation about activism, resistance, and justice that embraces our nation's complex history, he dissects how deliberate oppression persists, how racial injustice strips our lives of promise, and how technology has added a new dimension to mass action and social change. He argues that our best efforts to combat injustice have been stunted by the belief that racism's wounds are history, and suggests that intellectual purity has curtailed optimistic realism. The book offers a new framework and language for understanding the nature of oppression. With it, we can begin charting a course to dismantle the obvious and subtle structures that limit freedom.

Honest, courageous, and imaginative, On the Other Side of Freedom is a work brimming with hope. Drawing from his own experiences as an activist, organizer, educator, and public official, Mckesson exhorts all Americans to work to dismantle the legacy of racism and to imagine the best of what is possible. Honoring the voices of a new generation of activists, On the Other Side of Freedom is a visionary's call to take responsibility for imagining, and then building, the world we want to live in.

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Black Flags, Blue Waters
Tuesday, September 25
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Set against the backdrop of the Age of Exploration, Black Flags, Blue Waters reveals the dramatic and surprising history of American piracy’s “Golden Age”—spanning the late 1600s through the early 1700s—when lawless pirates plied the coastal waters of North America and beyond. Best-selling author Eric Jay Dolin illustrates how American colonists at first supported these outrageous pirates in an early display of solidarity against the Crown, and then violently opposed them. Through engrossing episodes of roguish glamour and extreme brutality, Dolin depicts the star pirates of this period, among them towering Blackbeard, ill-fated Captain Kidd, and sadistic Edward Low, who delighted in torturing his prey. Also brilliantly detailed are the pirates’ manifold enemies, including colonial governor John Winthrop, evangelist Cotton Mather, and young Benjamin Franklin. Upending popular misconceptions and cartoonish stereotypes, Dolin provides this wholly original account of the seafaring outlaws whose raids reflect the precarious nature of American colonial life.

Eric Jay Dolin is the best-selling author of Leviathan and Brilliant Beacons. He and his family live in Marblehead, Massachusetts, from which the pirate John Quelch departed in 1703, and returned to in 1704.

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Dancing with the Future
Tuesday, September 25
7 pm
Harvard, Farkas Hall, 12 Holyoke Street, Cambridge

On 25 September at 7pm, five dancers and two scientists will take to the stage of Harvard University’s Farkas Hall and push the boundaries of art and science, fusing dance, evolutionary dynamics, and an interactive game.

Dancing with the Future is a collaboration between the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics of Harvard University and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. The performance explores mechanisms of cooperation and investigates a question that is at the heart of all sustainable development, yet remains widely elusive as it entails a moral component that cannot easily be assessed: Are humans able to cooperate with future generations? In other words, what kind of planet are we willing to leave behind for the people who come after us? To enable broad access, tickets for the premiere can be purchased for a nominal fee of US$ 10 (general admission) / US$ 5 (with Student ID) through the Harvard Box Office at https://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=evolutionary

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Boston Science for the People chapter meeting
Tuesday, September 25
7:00-9:00 p.m.
MIT, Cambridge, room to be determined

More information available from wkyih at yahoo.com

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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, September 26
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Media in the Age of Contagions: Part of Outbreak Week at Harvard University
Wednesday, September 26
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM 
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West (2019), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cDco6m1ZT8qgbtz

Led by HGHI, Outbreak Week is a University-wide effort to commemorate the 1918 influenza pandemic that killed more than 50 million people around the globe.

At this symposium on "Media in the Age of Contagions," journalists who have covered public and global health for print, television, radio, and digital media outlets including NPR, PBS, the New York Times, the Washington Post, STAT, and more will discuss the role of the media when an outbreak occurs, and the dangers of rumors and disinformation.

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Defying Borders and Binaries: Legal Resistance and Civil Disobedience During the Rise of White Nationalism
Wednesday, September 26
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Northeastern, 240 Dockser Hall, 65 Forsyth Street, Boston

Fall 2018 Daynard Visiting Fellow: Prerna Lal, Founder and Managing Attorney, Lal Legal

Prerna Lal was born in the Fiji Islands, came to the United States with their parents when they were 14, and then lived in the San Francisco East Bay area.

Formerly an undocumented immigrant, Lal was integral to establishing United We DREAM and the DreamActivist network, both led by undocumented youth. The organizations mobilized thousands of undocumented immigrants to push for the federal DREAM Act in 2010, ending the deportations of undocumented youth, and securing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program under the Obama Administration. A mobilizer and social media strategist, Lal has also helped with the creation of many local immigrant youth groups, providing direct support, mentorship and advocacy to individuals caught up in the immigration dragnet.

As an undocumented law school graduate, Lal was among the first in the country to obtain a license to practice law. As a result of Lal’s high-spirited activism, the US government sought to deport them. Law won lawful permanent residency after a long court battle, and in April 2018, Lal became a United States citizen.

As a nonprofit policy attorney in Washington, DC, Lal worked at Asian Americans Advancing Justice (AAJC), spearheading initiatives related to extending DACA, Deferred Action for Parents of Americans, Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Nepal and parole-in-place for family members of Filipino war veterans. Through a partnership between the East Bay Community Law Center and UC Berkeley’s Undocumented Student Program, Lal provided immigration legal services for more than 500 students and their family members. As an immigration attorney, clinical supervisor and lecturer at a clinic of UC Berkeley School of Law, Lal mentored a new generation of public interest law students.

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Hidden Atrocities: Japanese Germ Warfare and American Obstruction of Justice at the Tokyo Trial
Wednesday, September 26
12:00-1:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496, Pye Room, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Jeanne Guillemin, M.I.T.
In the aftermath of World War II, the Allied intent to bring Axis crimes to light led to both the Nuremberg trials and their counterpart in Tokyo, the International Military Tribunal of the Far East. Yet the Tokyo Trial failed to prosecute imperial Japanese leaders for the worst of war crimes: inhumane medical experimentation, including vivisection and open-air pathogen and chemical tests, which rivaled Nazi atrocities, as well as mass attacks using plague, anthrax, and cholera that killed thousands of Chinese civilians. In Hidden Atrocities (New York: Columbia University Press, 2017), Jeanne Guillemin goes behind the scenes at the trial to reveal the American obstruction that denied justice to Japan's victims.

Bio: Jeanne Guillemin's training in medical sociology and anthropology at Harvard and Brandeis Universities has led to her involvement in issues regarding unusual infectious diseases (including anthrax, SARS, the Ebola virus, and MERS) and biological and chemical weapons. In addition to consulting and lecturing, Guillemin was a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on WMD (2009-13), served on the board of Transaction Books, and is an associate of the Harvard-Sussex Program on chemical and biological weapons disarmament.

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Almost Lost Detroit: African Americans, Racialized Individualism and Social Resilience in the Context of Public Sector Contraction
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Jessica Welburn Paige, Assistant Professor, Sociology and African American Studies, University of Iowa
COST  Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	hutchevents at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Jessica Welburn Paige is an assistant professor of Sociology and African American Studies at the University of Iowa. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University in November 2011. From 2011-12 she was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Center for Institutional Diversity at the University of Michigan and from 2012-14 she was a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the experiences of African Americans in the post-Civil Rights Era including their experiences navigating racism and discrimination and their attitudes about social mobility. Her work has been published in Ethnic and Racial Studies, The Journal for African American Studies, The DuBois Review for Social Science Research and in edited book volumes. In addition, in 2016 she co-authored the book Getting Respect: Responding to Stigma and Discrimination in the United States, Brazil and Israel with Michèle Lamont, Graziela Silva, Joshua Guetzkow, Nissim Mizrahi, Hannah Herzog and Elisa Reis (Princeton University Press).
As a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow for Fall 2018, she will work on Die Hard City: Public Sector Contraction and the Experiences of African Americans in Detroit.
LINK  https://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/event/colloquium-jessica-welburn-paige-almost-lost-detroit-african-americans-racialized

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xTalk with Ryan Baker:  The Dynamics of Affect in Online Learning
Wednesday, September 26
1:30am to 2:30am
MIT, Building 66-144, 25 Ames Street, Cambridge

Student affect develops in complex ways as students use online and blended learning systems. In this talk,  Prof. Ryan Baker will discuss his lab's work to understand the development of learner affect over time. This work has several dimensions -- how long an affective state persists once it begins, how frequently one affective state transitions into another state, how affect impacts learner behaviors and study habits, and the impact on long-term student outcomes.

Baker will discuss these issues using data from a range of online learning systems, from intelligent tutoring systems to simulations, and across both micro (second-by-second) and macro (8 year) time scales. He will discuss how automated log file detection of affect is emerging as a key method for studying affect dynamics as well as more traditional methods such as classroom observation and video coding.

Ryan Baker is Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and Director of the Penn Center for Learning Analytics. His lab conducts research on engagement and robust learning within online and blended learning, seeking to find actionable indicators that can be used today but which predict future student outcomes. He was the founding president of the International Educational Data Mining Society, is currently serving as Associate Editor of two journals, was the first technical director of the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center DataShop, and currently serves as Co-Director of the MOOC Replication Framework (MORF).

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Edge, Fog and Cloud
Wednesday, September 26
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
BU, PHO 906, 8 St Marys Stewwr, Boston
RSVP at http://www.bu.edu/eng/files/2018/08/DLSFlyer_MungChiang.png

Edge, Fog and Cloud Abstract: Decomposition of network functions along the cloud-to-things continuum is leading to new questions on what can be done on network edge. We explore the opportunities and discuss the challenges of fog computing, through examples in mobile networks, IoT and dispersive AI. 

Bio: Mung Chiang is the John A. Edwardson Dean of the College of Engineering at Purdue University. Previously he was the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. His research on net- working received the 2013 Alan T. Waterman Award, the highest honor to US young scientists and engineers. His textbooks and online courses reached over 250,000 students since 2012. He founded the Princeton EDGE Lab in 2009, which bridges the theory-practice gap in edge networking research by spanning from proofs to prototypes. He also co-founded a few startup companies in mobile data, IoT and AI, and co-founded the global nonprofit Open Fog Consortium.

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Dr. Joy DeGruy
Wednesday, September 26
4:00pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building E14: Media Lab, 3rd Floor Atrium, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Dr. Joy DeGruy is a nationally and internationally renowned researcher, educator, author and presenter. She is an ambassador for healing and a voice for those who’ve struggled in search of the past, and continue to struggle through the present. Dr. Joy is the acclaimed author of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome — America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing,  Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: The Study Guide, with a second book in the works, Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome Part 2: Be The Healing.

Her MIT presentation will be on Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome, followed by a book signing.

Sponsored by: WGS, ICEO, Intercultural Engagement, LBGT at MIT, Libraries, Media Lab, OME, SA&P, Sloan Student Life, T9BR

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The Trump Administration's Rollback of Climate Policy
Wednesday, September 26
4:00PM TO 6:00PM
Harvard, Austin East (Austin Hall 101), HLS, 1515 Mass Avenue, Cambridge

The Harvard University Center for the Environment presents a special lecture
With:
Jody Freeman, Archibald Cox Professor of Law; Director, Environmental Law Program, Harvard Law School
Richard Lazarus, Howard J. and Katherine W. Aibel Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Moderated By:
Daniel Schrag, Hooper Professor of Geology; Professor, Harvard Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Director, Harvard University Center for the Environment

Jody Freeman is the Archibald Cox Professor of Law and the founding director of the Harvard Law School Environmental Law and Policy Program. She is a leading scholar of both administrative law and environmental law. Professor Freeman’s book, GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND U.S. LAW (co-edited with Michael Gerrard) was published in 2015.

Professor Freeman served in the White House as Counselor for Energy and Climate Change in 2009-10, where she was the architect of the president’s historic agreement with the auto industry to double fuel efficiency standards, launching the administration’s greenhouse gas program under the Clean Air Act. In her role, she also contributed to a host of initiatives on renewable energy, energy efficiency, transmission policy and oil and gas drilling, as well as the administration’s effort to pass legislation placing a market based cap on carbon.

After leaving the administration, Freeman served as an independent consultant to the President's bipartisan Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. She has been appointed to the Administrative Conference of the United States, the government think tank for improving the administrative and regulatory process, and elected the American College of Environmental Lawyers. In 2012, Professor Freeman was elected as an outside director of ConocoPhillips, where she serves on the public policy and compensation committees. 

Professor Freeman has written for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Guardian and Los Angeles Times.

Richard Lazarus is the Howard and Katherine Aibel Professor of Law at Harvard University, where he teaches environmental law, natural resources Law, Supreme Court advocacy, and torts. Professor Lazarus has represented the United States, state and local governments, and environmental groups in the United States Supreme Court in 40 cases and has presented oral argument in 13 of those cases. His primary areas of legal scholarship are environmental and natural resources law, with particular emphasis on constitutional law and the Supreme Court. He has published two books, The Making of Environmental Law (U. Chicago 2004), and Environmental Law Stories (Aspen Press, co-edited with O. Houck 2005). He was also the principal author of Deep Water - The Gulf Oil Disaster and the Future of Offshore Drilling (GPO 2011), which is the Report to the President of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling Commission, for which he served as the Executive Director. The Commission was charged with investigating the root causes of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and recommending changes in law and policy to reduce the risk of future spills and to mitigate their impacts. Prior to joining the Harvard law faculty, Professor Lazarus was the Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., Professor of Law at Georgetown University, where he also founded the Supreme Court Institute. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1979 and has a B.S. in chemistry and a B.A. in economics from the University of Illinois.

Daniel P. Schrag is the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology at Harvard University, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment. Schrag studies climate and climate change over the broadest range of Earth history. He is particularly interested in how information on climate change from the geologic past can lead to better understanding of anthropogenic climate change in the future. In addition to his work on geochemistry and climatology, Schrag studies energy technology and policy, including carbon capture and storage and low-carbon synthetic fuels. Schrag served on President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Among various honors, he is the recipient of the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union and a MacArthur Fellowship. Schrag earned a B.S. in geology and geophysics and political science from Yale University and his Ph.D. in geology from the University of California at Berkeley. He came to Harvard in 1997 after teaching at Princeton.

Contact Name:  Laura Hanrahan
laura_hanrahan at harvard.edu

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The Incidence of Coarse Certification: Evidence from the Energy Star Program
Wednesday, September 26
4:15PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard, Room L-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/44157
“” with Sebastien Houde, ETH Zurich. 

Support from Enel Endowment for Environmental Economics and the Department of Economics is Gratefully Acknowledged.

Contact Name: casey_billings at hks.harvard.edu

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Richard Montanez: The Importance of Diversity in Sparking Innovation
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Office of Career Services
COST  Event is free. Tickets Required. Limit of 2 tickets per person . Tickets valid until 4:15PM. Available by phone and internet for a fee. Call 617-496-2222 or reserve on line at www.boxoffice.harvard.edu
TICKET WEB LINK  http://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu
TICKET INFO  The Harvard Box Office 617-496-2222
DETAILS  Richard Montañez is an inspirational speaker.  His story of pushing through adversity and battling issues of inclusion and belonging in the workplace will amaze you. His entrepreneurial and innovative spirit is infectious.  As the creator of the cultural phenomenon, “Flamin’ Hot Cheetos,” he notes, “There was something special about being different.” Come learn from him how to prepare yourself to “walk through different doors.” Don’t miss hearing his riveting, personal story of growing up in a migrant farm camp to now living in Beverly Hills.  Meet him in person before Fox Searchlight Pictures releases their biopic movie “Flamin’ Hot.”

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Learning Using Statistical Invariants (Revision of Machine Learning Problem)
Wednesday, September 26
4:30pm to 5:30pm
MIT, Kirsch Auditorium, Building 32-123 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Dertouzos Distinguished Lecture: Vladimir Vapnik
ABSTRACT:  This talk covers a new learning paradigm. In the classical paradigm, the learning machine uses a data-driven model of learning. In the LUSI paradigm, the learning machine computes statistical invariants that are specific for the problem, and then minimizes the expected error in a way that preserves these invariants; it is thus both data- and intelligent-driven learning. Mathematically, methods of the new paradigm employ both strong and weak convergence mechanisms, increasing the rate of convergence. LUSI describes a complete theory of learning and can be considered as a mathematical alternative to "deep learning" heuristic. The talk includes content from a paper published in Machine Learning, Springer 2018.

BIO:  Vladimir Vapnik has taught and researched in computer science, theoretical and applied statistics for over 30 years. His major achievements include a general theory of minimizing the expected risk using empirical data, and a new type of learning machine called Support Vector that possesses a high level of generalization ability. These techniques have been used in constructing intelligent machines.

Prof. Vapnik gained his Masters Degree in Mathematics in 1958 at Uzbek State University, Samarkand, USSR, received his master's degree in mathematics from the Uzbek State University in 1958, and completed his Ph.D in statistics at the Institute of Control Sciences, Moscow in 1964, where he became Head of the Computer Science Research Department, before he joined AT&T Bell Laboratories, NJ.
He holds a Professor of Computer Science and Statistics position at Royal Holloway, University of London since 1995, and a position as Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, New York City since 2003.

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Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: The Sooner the Better
Wednesday, September 26 
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
MIT Weisner Building, Build E15, Bartos Theater, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.mitforumcambridge.org/event/artificial-intelligence-in-healthcare-the-sooner-the-better/
Cost:  $5 - $45

As healthcare organizations leverage digital platforms for patient care, it is important to understand how Artificial Intelligence can use patient data to improve patient outcomes. Deep learning can drive early disease detection, drive early intervention in critical patient events, and predict epidemics. Our panel of experts will discuss where AI can positively impact the lives of patients, and where the industry needs to move in order to make this a reality.

Join us to learn:
How is Artificial Intelligence impacting healthcare already?
What business challenges impede wider adoption of AI?
What legal implications lie ahead with clinical datasets?
How AI can improve early disease detection
AI’s place in precision medicine

Moderator:
Phillip Machnik, Senior Technical Application Analyst at Patient Keeper
Confirmed Speakers:
Jonathan Bickel MD, IT Physician Lead, Senior Director Business Intelligence and Clinical Research Informatics, Boston Children’s Hospital
Hunter Elliott, Director of Machine Learning Research, PathAI
Catherine Kreatsoulas Ph.D, Research Fellow, Harvard School of Public Health
Dan Rudoy Ph.D, Associate, Electrical and Computer Technologies, Wolf Greenfield

Event Schedule
Registration & Networking: 5:30 PM
Program: 6:00 - 8:00 PM
Cocktails & Light Refreshments: 8:00 - 9:00 PM

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Transform educational technology with powerful tools from the science of learning
Wednesdday, September 26 
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
LearnLaunch, 281 Summer Street. Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/transform-educational-technology-with-powerful-tools-from-the-science-of-learning-tickets-48281123139
Cost:  $12

When building the world’s next great educational app, you should probably know the most up-to-date research on cognitive science. Join Pooja Agarwal, Ph.D., for an update on that research at LearnLaunch.

In this session, participants will:
Learn how to optimize learning strategies in their products
Gain a working knowledge of the vocabulary of modern cognitive science to communicate with educators and researchers
Review the major players in the world of learning research
Agenda

6:00-6:30 PM – Arrival, networking, snacks
6:30-6:35 PM – Introductions
6:35-8:00 PM – Research update

Who is this session for?

Education technology entrepreneurs, product managers, curriculum developers, instructional designers, educators

Bio
Pooja K. Agarwal, Ph.D. is an expert in the field of cognitive science, passionate about bridging gaps between education and the science of learning. She has conducted research on learning in K-12 public schools for more than 15 years and she is co-authoring a forthcoming book with a K-12 teacher, entitled Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning.

Pooja’s research has been published in leading peer-reviewed psychology journals; featured in the New York Times, Education Week, and Scientific American; and highlighted in numerous books, podcasts, and videos.

In addition to founding RetrievalPractice.org, Pooja is an Assistant Professor at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, teaching psychological science to exceptional undergraduate musicians. She also serves as a consultant and facilitates professional development workshops on the science of learning around the world. Pooja received her Ph.D. from Washington University in St. Louis, under the mentorship of distinguished memory scholar Henry L. Roediger, III, author of Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.

https://www.poojaagarwal.com/

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The Comparative Study of the Abrahamic Religions: Heuristic Gains and Cognitive Pitfalls
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Religion
SPONSOR	Center for the Study of World Religions, John Paul II Center for Interreligious Dialogue, Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
CONTACT	CSWR, 617.495.4476
DETAILS  How is the comparative scholarship on Judaism, Christianity, and Islam possible? What are its presuppositions, and what does it entail? How can the history of religions help interfaith understanding? These are some of the questions this lecture will address.
Lecture by Guy Stroumsa, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Oxford University
Response by Jon Levenson, Harvard Divinity School
Opening Remarks by Charles Stang, Harvard Divinity School, and Adam Afterman, Tel-Aviv University
Guy Stroumsa’s research focuses on the dynamics of encounters between religious traditions and institutions in the Roman Empire and in Late Antiquity, in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. He has studied the crystallization of the Abrahamic traditions in late antiquity, as a background to Islam. He sees Gnosis, Manichaeism and Early Christianity as a unique laboratory for understanding religious transformations in late antiquity. In his studies, Stroumsa seeks in his work to cross traditional interdisciplinary boundaries in order to study religious phenomena from a comparative perspective. This approach permits him to understand the mechanisms behind the religious revolution of Late Antiquity, a period which saw the cessation of a number of widespread aspects of ancient religion (such as blood sacrifice) and the development of new systems, which stand at the basis of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Stroumsa also works on the history of scholarship on religion, from early modern times to the twentieth century.  Stroumsa is the author of fourteen books, and the editor or co-editor of some twenty books. He has published more than a hundred and thirty articles.
John Levenson, Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies, began teaching at Harvard in 1988. His work concentrates on the interpretation of the Hebrew Bible, including its reinterpretations in the "rewritten Bible" of Second Temple Judaism and rabbinic midrash. Professor Levenson has a strong interest in the philosophical and theological issues involved in biblical studies, especially the relationship of premodern modes of interpretation to modern historical criticism. Much of his work centers on the relationship of Judaism and Christianity, both in antiquity and in modernity, and he has long been active in Jewish-Christian dialogue. His book Resurrection and the Restoration of Israel: The Ultimate Victory of the God of Life (Yale University Press, 2006) won a National Jewish Book Award and the Biblical Archaeology Society Publication Award in the category of Best Book Relating to the Hebrew Bible published in 2005 or 2006. Choice, a publication of the American Library Association, listed Inheriting Abraham: The Legacy of the Patriarch in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam (Princeton University Press, 2012) as one of the Outstanding Academic Titles for 2013. His new book is The Love of God: Divine Gift, Human Gratitude, and Mutual Faithfulness in Judaism (Princeton University Press, 2015).

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AMERICA: THE FAREWELL TOUR
Wednesday, September 26
7:00 pm
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Veteran journalist, best-selling author and activist, Chris Hedges returns to the Forum as he attempts to jolt us out of our complacency about the current state of world affairs, while we still have time.

"It is impossible for any doomed population to grasp how fragile the decayed financial, social and political system is on the eve of implosion."

We are delighted to have Chris Lydon, producer and presenter of WBUR's "Open Source" to act as moderator.

Are things really as bad as they seem?

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Kerstin and the Giant Manta Rays: Film screening and Q & A
Wednesday, September 26
6:30pm
NE Aquarium, Simons IMAX
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=107765&view=Detail

Kerstin Forsberg, Founder and Director, Planeta Océano; New England Aquarium Marine Conservation Action Fund Fellow; and Rolex Laureate

Note: The film screening will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed by the Q & A

The film Kerstin and the Giant Manta Rays features Peruvian marine scientist and social entrepreneur Kerstin Forsberg and her pioneering efforts to protect giant oceanic manta rays in Peru. To save these enigmatic species, which are globally threatened by overfishing and bycatch, Forsberg and her team at Planeta Océano garnered the help of local fishing communities, government officials, and international organizations. She also engaged teachers and schoolchildren throughout Peru in raising awareness and building appreciation for these gentle giants as flagship species of their country. Through leading these collaborative efforts, Forsberg brought about the full protection of manta rays in Peru in 2015. She received international recognitions for her work including, a prestigious Whitley Award, and was named as a Rolex Laureate and a New England Aquarium Marine Conservation Action Fund Fellow. Yet Forsberg notes there is so much more to be done to continue this conservation success story and ensure a bright future for this iconic species.

The runtime for the movie is 53 minutes followed by a 20 minute Q and A with Kerstin Forsberg.

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Thursday, September 27 - Friday, September 28
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Science Diplomacy Dissertation Enhancement Workshop
Thursday, September 27,9:00am to 6:00pm through September 28
MIT, Building 9-255, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://scienceimpact.mit.edu/2018-boston-science-diplomacy-workshop

Are you interested in advocating for better use of science in national and international policy-making? As a scientist, do you feel you lack the negotiation skills needed to succeed in a diplomatic context? Are you thinking about a possible career in Science Diplomacy?

The 2018 Boston Science Diplomacy Workshop can help. Building up on the first-ever workshop of its kind in the Boston area in 2017, the two-day workshop aims to provide participants with 1) an understanding of science diplomacy theory & practice and 2) soft skills such as negotiation and dispute resolution techniques in relation to scientific issues in national and international settings. 

This year's workshop will be held September 27 - 28, 2018.

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Thursday, September 27
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Robotic Cars, Stoned Drivers, and Deadly Airbags: Managing Risk, Uncertainty, and Rapidly Changing Technologies in Cooperative Federalism
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Regulatory Policy Program at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, HKS
SPEAKER(S)  Heidi King, Deputy Administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
CONTACT INFO	Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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A Digital Edition of D’Arcy Thompson’s Glossary of Greek Birds:  New Technologies Help Reconstruct Ancient Stories
Thursday, September 27
12:00-1:00pm 
Tufts, Multi-purpose Room, Curtis Hall, 474 Boston Avenue, Medford

Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Associate Professor, Department of Classics, Tufts University
Our interdisciplinary team seeks to revitalize D’Arcy Thompson’s Glossary of Greek Birds (first published 1896). In this work, Thompson combines his expertise in biology with his passion for the classics by matching ancient Greek bird names with modern scientific identifications. In doing so, Thompson explores the mythology and folklore attached to each bird in ancient culture through the original Greek and Latin texts. We are producing an open-source digital version of the work along with short films highlighting specific bird stories. In addition, we are conducting data- driven analyses that will help make the work more accessible for today’s audiences as well as reveal new patterns and connections within the materials so as to answer questions about Thompson’s methods and potential biases.
View the project homepage at https://sites.tufts.edu/ancientbirds/

Marie-Claire Beaulieu’s work in classics focuses on ancient mythology and religion. Dr. Beaulieu is interested in the relationship the ancients had with their environment and the mental constructs they associated with natural phenomena and animals. Her recent book, The Sea in the Greek Imagination (University of Pennsylvania Press 2016) explores the Greek mythological representation of the sea as a cosmological space of transition between the living, the dead, and the gods. She pays particular attention to marine animals that embody this function of the sea such as dolphins and aquatic birds which frequently serve as world-passers in mythology and iconography.

With the Perseids Project, Dr. Beaulieu has engaged in many interdisciplinary teaching initiatives, in particular with the departments of Religion and Computer Science, and her own classes make frequent use of technology to involve students in the process of research. In general, Dr. Beaulieu is interested in fostering greater public engagement with the ancient world through the study of language, art, and myth.

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Initiative on Cities Lecture: The Latino City
Thursday, September 27
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
BU, Initiative on Cities, 75 Bay State Road, Boston
RSVP at http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07efl82cojec7a1967&llr=sgxoeyrab

What makes a city uniquely Latino? In Latino-majority cities like Lawrence, MA and Santa Ana, CA, what does the "American Dream" look like? Join the Initiative on Cities (IOC) in welcoming SUNY Assistant Professor Llana Barber and CA State University Professor Erualdo González to campus with BU Assistant Professor Jonathan Calvillo to discuss their research and recent publications including Barber's Latino City: Immigration and Urban Crisis in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1945–2000 and González's Latino City: Urban Planning, Politics, and the Grassroots. This event is cosponsored by the Boston University Center for Latin American Studies.

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Robotics Connect 2018
Thursday, September 27 
2:59 PM - 8:00 PM
Venture Cafe at Cambridge Innovation Center, 5th floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge

More information at http://www.vencaf.org/calendar

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Equity and Social Justice Series: Native American Health Forum
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 4 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Tosteson Medical Education Center, Room 227, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership, Harvard Medical School
SPEAKER(S)  Keynote Presentation: “American Indian Health Policy and Social Justice”
Speaker: Donald Warne, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Indians Into Medicine (INMED) Program Director, and Professor of Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of North Dakota; Senior Policy Advisor to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board; Member of the Oglala Lakota tribe, Pine Ridge, S.D.
Panel Discussion:
Cheryl Frye-Cromwell, Tribal Council, Health and Human Services Liaison, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe
Tom Peteet, MD, MPH, Rural Health Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital
Thomas Sequist, MD, MPH, Chief Quality and Safety Officer, Partners HealthCare; Associate Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, and the Division of General Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Lisa Sockabasin, MS, BS, Public Health and Health Systems Consultant, Public Health Research Institute (PHRI), the Penobscot Indian Nation, and the Maine Tribal Public Health District;
Trustee, Maine Health Access Foundation
COST  free
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ESJ_9-27-18
CONTACT INFO	christine_colacino at hms.harvard.edu or phone: 617-432-2922
DETAILS  Equity and Social Justice Series: Native American Health Forum
Keynote Presentation: “American Indian Health Policy and Social Justice”
Speaker: Donald Warne, MD, MPH, Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Indians Into Medicine (INMED) Program Director, and Professor of Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of North Dakota; Senior Policy Advisor to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board; Member of the Oglala Lakota tribe, Pine Ridge, SD
Panel Discussion:
Cheryl Frye-Cromwell, Tribal Council, Health and Human Services Liaison, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe
Tom Peteet, MD, MPH, Rural Health Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital
Thomas Sequist, MD, MPH, Chief Quality and Safety Officer, Partners HealthCare; Associate Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, and the Division of General Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Lisa Sockabasin, MS, BS, Public Health and Health Systems Consultant, Public Health Research Institute (PHRI), the Penobscot Indian Nation, and the Maine Tribal Public Health District; Trustee, Maine Health Access Foundation
Moderator:  Lyle Ignace, MD, MPH, Executive Director and Physician, The Gerald L. Ignace Indian Health Center, Inc.
Commentator:  Patrik Johansson, MD MPH, Associate Professor, Department of Health Promotion, Social & Behavioral Health, Director, Rural Health Education Network, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center
LINK  https://mfdp.med.harvard.edu

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Visual Storytelling, Visual Communication
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Education, Humanities, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Scott McCloud, Cartoonist and Comics Theorist
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  We rely on our eyes like never before: to navigate not only the physical world, but also the narrative and information landscapes we increasingly inhabit. In a fast-moving cascade of images and ideas, the author and cartoonist Scott McCloud shares why there are no neutral visual decisions, why all pictures are words, and why an era of misinformation calls for a new approach to visual education. Register online.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-scott-mccloud-lecture

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2018 Global Teacher Prize Winner: Andria Zafirakou
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Community Programming, Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Arts in Education Program, International Education Policy, Prevention Science and Practice, Students and Alumni, Teacher Education Program
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Kristin Ponte
CONTACT EMAIL  events at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-496-8705
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT  Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
FEATURED EVENT	Askwith Forums
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture, Special Events
DETAILS  Speaker: Andria Zafirakou, recipient, 2018 Global Teacher Prize, Varkey Foundation; Arts and Textiles teacher, Alperton Community School in northwest London, England. 
Introduction by: Steve Seidel, The Patricia Bauman and John Landrum Bryant Senior Lecturer on Arts in Education, Faculty Director, Arts in Education, HGSE
Andria Zafirakou, winner of the 2018 Global Teacher Prize, will speak about her experiences as an educator in the inner city borough of Brent, an ethnically diverse place with 130 languages spoken in the schools. Its pupils come from some of the poorest families in Britain, many sharing one house with five other families, many exposed to gang violence. 
Held in conjunction with MIT Open Learning. 

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Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 5 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  TBD
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
SPEAKER(S)  Glen Well
CONTACT INFO  Vickie Aldin, ejsafraevents at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society
Many blame free markets for rising inequalities and social divisions. Radical Markets turns this conventional wisdom on its head, arguing that dramatically expanded markets can be an emancipatory egalitarian force, but only if we have the courage to challenge fundamental social institutions that stand in the way of truly free competition. Challenging everything from private property to one-person-one-vote, Radical Markets lays out a bold vision that embraces technological change and diversity as engines of widely shared prosperity.
LINK  https://ethics.harvard.edu/event/public-lecture-glen-weyl

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Collective Intelligence
Thursday, September 27
5:00pm to 6:30pm
MIT Building 56-114, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Featuring Agnieszka Kurant, Stefan Helmreich, Adam Haar Horowitz and Caroline Jones
Moderated by Nick Montfort
 
Comparative Media Studies/Writing Lecture Series

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The Public Practice of the Abrahamic Religions
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	 Religion
SPONSOR	Center for the Study of World Religions, John Paul II Center for Interreligious Dialogue, Religions and the Practice of Peace
CONTACT	CSWR, 617.495.4476
DETAILS  It is commonplace today to group the three monotheistic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—under the category of the “Abrahamic.” Scholars have investigated the roots, ancient and modern, for this category, and continue to debate its contemporary merits. Meanwhile, practitioners are doing significant work in the wider world under the aegis of the “Abrahamic.” This panel will explore the public practice of the Abrahamic Religions. Panelists will reflect on their work in light of this category, including its strengths and limitations.
Panel:  5:30–7:30 PM, Sperry Room
RPP Dinner:  7:30–8:30pm, Braun Room
Both events are open to all, but space is limited. Please RSVP for the panel and dinner.
Chair:  Dulce Murphy, Track Two: An Institute for Citizen Democracy
Panelists:  Huda Abuarquob, Alliance for Middle East Peace
Joseph Montville, George Mason University
Stephanie Saldaña, The Abraham Path
Dulce Murphy is a social enterprise leader and expert in Russian-American relations. Murphy began working at Esalen Institute in 1970 and served on its Board of Directors from 1973 to 1975. She co-founded the Esalen Soviet American Exchange Program in 1980, traveling to and from the Soviet Union each year to establish relationships, undertake collaborations and build a citizen-to citizen network. In the spring of 2004, the program evolved to an independent organization and changed its name to Track Two: An Institute for Citizen Diplomacy, with the mandate to expand to other regions of conflict including the Middle East and the North Pacific Rim.  Murphy, frequently cited as an expert in Russian and Middle Eastern diplomacy, has spent over thirty-seven years on the cutting edge of nongovernmental relations and Track Two diplomacy. Murphy speaks at university conferences on Russia and the Middle East while continuing the day-to-day management of Track Two where she currently serves as President and Chairman of its Board of Directors.
Huda Abuarqoub is Regional Director of the Alliance for Middle East Peace (ALLMEP), a network of civil society organizations working in conflict transformation, development, and coexistence in the Middle East among Israelis, Palestinians, Arabs, and Jews.  She has years of experience in conflict resolution, NGO leadership, and social change education and activism, as well as a life-long commitment to building strong people-to-people Israeli-Palestinian relations. She is a well-known speaker on issues related to Middle East politics and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. After studying conflict transformation and peace studies as a Fulbright scholar, she worked as an executive director, a program director, and an NGO consultant to a number of organizations in the U.S., Israel, and Palestine. She is a co-founder of the Center for Transformative Education (CTE) and has taught and trained hundreds of students in Israel and the U.S. She has long been an active leader in grassroots Palestinian initiatives focused on women’s empowerment and people-to-people diplomacy. Previously, Huda worked as a teacher, trainer, and consultant for the Palestinian Ministry of Education for fifteen years. She earned her M.A. in conflict transformation and peace studies from Eastern Mennonite University and her B.A. in education for social change from Al-Quds Open University in Jerusalem.
Joseph Montville is Director of the Program on Healing Historical Memory, and chair of the Center for World Religions, Diplomacy, and Conflict Resolution in the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University. He is also a Senior Associate and Chair of the Goldziher Prize Committee in the Center for the Study of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Relations at Merrimack College in N. Andover, MA. Montville is also director of the Abrahamic Family Reunion, the Esalen Institute project to promote Muslim-Christian-Jewish reconciliation. He is a member of the board of Track II: An Institute for Citizen Diplomacy, a non-profit organization associated with Esalen Institute, and president of the American Friends of Combatants for Peace, an Israeli-Palestinian peace organization composed of former Israeli army and Palestinian fighters.  Montville founded the preventive diplomacy program at Washington, DC’s Center for Strategic and International Studies in 1994 and directed it until 2003. Before that he spent 23 years as a diplomat with posts in the Middle East and North Africa. He also worked in the State Department’s Bureaus of Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs and Intelligence and Research, where he was chief of the Near East Division and director of the Office of Global Issues. Montville has held non-resident faculty appointments at the Harvard and University of Virginia Medical Schools. He defined the concept of “Track Two,” nonofficial diplomacy. Educated at Lehigh, Harvard, and Columbia Universities, Montville is the editor of Conflict and Peacemaking in Multiethnic Societies (Lexington Books, 1990) and editor (with Vamik Volkan and Demetrios Julius) of The Psychodynamics of International Relationships (Lexington Books, 1990 [vol. I], 1991 [vol. II]). His most recent book is History as Prelude: Muslims and Jews in the Medieval Mediterranean (Lexington Books, 2011). In 2008, the International Society of Political Psychology gave Montville its Nevitt Sanford Award for “distinguished professional contribution to political psychology,” at its 31st annual scientific meeting in Paris.
Stephanie Saldaña grew up in Texas and received a B.A. from Middlebury College and an M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School, where she focused on the relationship between Islam and Christianity. In 2004 she went to Damascus, Syria to study the Prophet Jesus in Islam on a Fulbright scholarship, where she worked with both Muslim and Christian leaders engaged in dialogue. It was there that she encountered the community of Al-Khalil, or Abraham, a Christian monastic community dedicated to dialogue with Islam, an event that would profoundly impact her future research in the region.  Saldaña has written two books, The Bread of Angels: A Journey to Love and Faith , about her time in Syria, and A Country Between: Making a Home Where Both Sides of Jerusalem Collide, about her years living in East Jerusalem. She has also taught at Al-Quds Bard College for Arts and Sciences.  She is the founder of  Mosaic Stories, an ongoing project to preserve the threatened cultural heritage of the Middle East through research and storytelling.  She currently writes and lectures about refugees, disappearing diversity in the Middle East, and the challenges of preserving intangible cultural heritage in Iraq and Syria.
The RPP Colloquium Series is organized with generous support from the Reverend Karen Vickers Budney, MDiv ’91, and Mr. Albert J. Budney, Jr., MBA ’74, as well as Farley Urmston and Karl Bandtel.
LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0odXY2NfOQ94vOJ

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authors at MIT: Roberto Simanowski, Waste A New Media Primer
Thursday, September 27
6:00pm to 7:00pm
MIT, Building N50, MIT Press Bookstore, 301 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Join the MIT Bookstore in welcoming Roberto Simanowski to discuss his book, Waste: A New Media Primer.

Simanowski, who has been studying the Internet and social media since the 1990s, goes deeper than the conventional wisdom. With these engaging and provocative essays, Roberto Simanowski considers what new media has done to us. Why is digital privacy being eroded and why does society seem not to care? Why do we escape from living and loving the present into capturing, sharing and liking it? And how did we arrive at a selfie society without self-consciousness?

Roberto Simanowski is a scholar of media and cultural studies and the author of Digital Art and Meaning, Data Love, Facebook Society, Waste: A New Media Primer, andThe Death Algorithm and Other Digital Dilemmas (the last two published by the MIT Press).

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The Roots of Happiness
Thursday, September 27
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Harvard, Pound 101 Classroom, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-roots-of-happiness-tickets-49895745518

Smiling Tears is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting awareness and appreciation of nature's love and wisdom through dialog and discourse. Nature's Wisdom Series workshops are the organization's signature programs and present to you this year's talk.

Abstract: Happiness is the essence of life, yet it is also one of the most elusive human emotions. Often, we fail to experience happiness arguably because we focus our efforts on finding routes to happiness rather than the roots of happiness and we chase perceived means to happiness instead of the perennial source of happiness. Drawing inspiration from nature, the speaker, Dr. Sriram Gajula, offers fresh insights into the crux of happiness. He discusses nature’s principles such as dualism, gain in loss, domestication of desire, education of ego, the importance of noun over adjective, acceptance of right and ripe time, and benevolence of cosmic connectedness, and inevitability of problems as a source of joy. He emphasizes that understanding and living in tune with these nature’s laws is an essential requirement for sustained happiness.
Speaker's Bio: Dr. Sriram Gajula is an eminent spiritual scientist, philosopher, author, speaker, seer, and sage. He holds a BS in Science and Ph.D. in English from Osmania University, India. He is well read and well informed by his extensive travels around the world. He is a much-sought-after advisor and speaker globally. His philosophical discourses and writings cover such complex and intriguing subjects as the divinity in nature, smiling tears, cosmic communism, evil, and freewill.
Date: Thursday, September 27, 2019
Time: Talk: 6:00 P.M - 7:00 P.M Followed by Q&A from 7:00 P.M - 8:00 P.M
Location: Pound 101 Classroom, Harvard Law School, Harvard University, 1563 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138
Cost: FREE
Registration is mandatory, limited seats are available.

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MIT IDEAS Fall Generator Dinner 2018
Thursday, September 27
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
MIT, Morss Hall, Walker Memorial, 142 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-ideas-fall-generator-dinner-2018-tickets-48681850726

Are you interested in learning more about innovation and social entrepreneurship opportunities at MIT?
Working on a project to help underserved communities? Need funding? Want to recruit new team members?
Want to get involved, but don't yet have an idea?

Join us for dinner. Pitch an idea. Find a team.
The IDEAS Generator Dinner is one of the best venues to find a team to join, pitch your idea to woo and recruit teammates, or pitch your skills to get hired onto a team. 

Event Program
6:45 Doors Open - Dinner
7:05 IDEAS Program Updates & Overview
7:30 Sixty-second Pitches
8:00 Networking
9:00 Event Ends
Pitch Your Idea or Skill

During the event, we will have openings for 20-30 sixty-second pitches from attendees. To be considered for a slot, submit your pitch to using the Eventbrite question. 
Sign up to pitch an idea or your skills when you register for this event. Those selected to pitch will be contacted before the event with instructions on the process.Note: Pitching is optional! If you don’t want to pitch, just attend to mix and mingle, meet potential teammates, or hear about some of the exciting projects already underway. 

About the Competition
Teams must be led by a full-time MIT student with MIT students making significant contributions to the project’s innovation. However, if you are not an MIT student, you are still welcome to attend the Generator Dinner to pitch an idea or get hired on a team. For full competition criteria and guidelines, please visit our website: http://ideas.mit.edu/
If you are interested in receiving our newsletter, please subscribe here.
What is MIT IDEAS?

The MIT IDEAS program provides students with an opportunity to develop their innovative ideas and make positive changes in the world. As an annual innovation and social entrepreneurship competition run by the MIT Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center, the IDEAS Global Challenge enables students to apply their MIT education in real-world situations to tackle quality of life issues for people around the world. 
IDEAS projects can address issues in one or more sectors, such as health, education, agriculture, energy and environment, water, finance and entrepreneurship, mobile technology, and housing and transportation. Teams are created and led by MIT undergraduate and graduate students, but they can include anyone from around the world. If you are looking to join an IDEAS team that needs your skill set or are simply interested in learning more about how to get involved, join the conversation and help move ideas towards realization. 
Remember to submit your pitch here to be considered for a slot at this year's Generator Dinner!

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Friday, September 28
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Climate Adaptation Forum:  Law and Governance Meets Climate Adaptation
Friday, September 28
7:15 AM to 11:45 AM EDT 
UMass Club, One Beacon Street, 32nd Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07efmaujmh299cf316&oseq=&c=&ch=
Cost:  $15 - $45

Adapting legal and governance systems to dramatic change in climate trends poses a challenge at least as difficult as the financial and design challenges. This Forum presents speakers on the front lines of developing new rules, regulations, institutions, and forms of governance related to climate change adaptation.

This Forum will:
Provide examples of developing the political will to enact change;
Discuss impediments from existing regulatory programs designed to protect the existing conditions;
Present the findings of the Governance and Climate Adaptation Report prepared by UMass Boston Sustainable Solutions Lab on governance;
And report on Resilient Rhody, the 2018 the Statewide Climate Resilience Action Strategy developed for the State of Rhode Island.

Keynote Presentation:  Achieving Legislative Change
Representative Kristin Diane Jacobs, Florida House of Representatives
Forum Chair
Ralph Child, Member, Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C.
Confirmed Speakers
David W. Cash, Ph.D., Dean, John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston
Janet Coit, Director, Department of Environmental Management, State of Rhode Island
Iram Farooq, AICP, LEED-AP, Assistant City Manager for Community Development, City of Cambridge, MA
Barbara Kessner Landau, Counsel, Noble, Wickersham & Heart LLP
Stephanie Kruel, Senior Environmental Planner, VHB

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The Oceans' Turn
Friday, September 28
8am - 5:30pm
Tufts, Fletcher School, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://sites.tufts.edu/theoceansturn/

The ocean covers 71% over the earth’s surface, far, far greater than any land mass. Directly or indirectly, it touches every piece of life on earth and every aspect of human society. The ocean feeds nations, transports goods, and provides energy across the globe.

The Fletcher School at Tufts University aims to convene an important conference in September 2018 entitled "The Ocean’s Turn?" With this one-day event, we will look at the role of the ocean as an avenue, an arena, and a source, and examine it all through the lenses of geopolitics, sustainability, and an overarching notion of innovation.

The conference will bring together thought leaders from around the globe and examine the critical issues facing the world’s oceans today. Through engaging keynotes, TED-style talks, and panel discussions, we will explore the maritime sphere from the perspectives of science, business, law and politics, investment and the economy, security, and international relations.

The purpose of the conference is to evaluate important maritime sectors, such as global shipping, the food industry, and the energy sector, and will dive into geopolitics, BlueTech, maritime security and policy, environmental imperatives, and other vital issues. Major themes will include technology and innovation of a "connected ocean," geopolitical and transnational legal factors, and imperatives driven by sustainability needs, concerns, and opportunities.

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Dawnland: Screening and Panel Discussion
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 28, 2018, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Film, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Adam Mazo, codirector, “Dawnland,” and director, Upstander Project
Esther Anne, codirector, Maine-Wabanaki REACH
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  For much of the 20th century, child welfare authorities removed Native American children from their tribal homes, devastating parents and denying children their traditions, culture, and identity. The feature-length documentary "Dawnland" chronicles the first official truth and reconciliation commission in the United States for Native Americans and explores the possibilities of healing and reconciliation. A panel conversation and a Q&A session follow the screening. Register online.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-dawnland-screening

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Saturday, September 29
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Harvard Symposium on Technology-Assisted Meditation
WHEN  Saturday, Sep. 29, 2018, 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard University Science Center, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Education, Exhibitions, Lecture, Special Events, Wellness/Work Life
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CHA Center for Mindfulness and Compassion (Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School), Harvard Center for Wellness and Health Promotion, and Dharmakaya Center for Wellbeing
SPEAKER(S)  Headspace; UMass Medical School; Brown University; University of Toronto Mississauga; Boston Medical Center; Dharmakaya Center for Wellbeing; Spire; Harvard Medical School; Muse + more
DIRECTED BY  Moderated by CHA Center for Mindfulness and Compassion
COST  $175. Continuing Education credits for social workers, psychologists, and nurses will be available for an additional $25. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Student, minority, and need-based scholarships available - please apply at: www.chacmc.org/scholarship
TICKET WEB LINK  https://technology.my-trs.com
CONTACT INFO  Bridget Kiley: 617-591-6132 or cmc at challiance.org
DETAILS	  Join us for an experiential and collaborative day that embodies connection, discovery, and awareness.
This symposium will showcase innovation and research in the fast-growing field of technology-assisted meditation and include panel and group discussions, movement, reflection and interactive experiences.
LINK  https://www.chacmc.org/technology

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11th Annual Walk for Literacy
WHEN  Saturday, Sep. 29, 2018, 9 – 11 a.m.
WHERE  Cambridge Common, Waterhouse St. & Mass. Ave., Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Special Events, Support/Social, Volunteer Opportunities, Wellness/Work Life
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Sponsored by Irving House at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  No speakers
COST  Registration $30.00 includes Breakfast, Lunch and a T-Shirt
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.charityfootprints.com/eventdetails?id=202
CONTACT INFO	Sana Saeed
sana_saeed at mail.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Barakat’s Walk for Literacy is an annual event that raises both awareness and funds for our important mission of educating and empowering children and women in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Barakat is dedicated to providing exemplary basic education in Afghanistan and Pakistan: we advance literacy and increase access to secondary education, particularly for girls and women.The walk is a fun and unique event, where a diverse community of walkers come together to support a worthy cause – educating thousands of women and children without access to quality basic education! In 2016–17, more than 3,000 children (over 40 percent of them girls) enrolled in Barakat's five schools. An additional 300 girls and women attended our lower-level and higher-level literacy programs in Afghanistan. Since its inception in 2008, the Walk has grown to attract almost 1,200 walkers and has raised over $120,000.
The virtual walk began on Aug. 6 so even if you aren't able to participate on Sept. 29 you can still raise funds to make a difference. All participants will be mailed a t-shirt so while taking steps forward for education you can share that your walk is making a difference.  Wear a Fitbit?
Just sync your steps taken throughout the day and you can participate! Don't worry if you don't, just take your smartphone with you and use the Charity Footprints app.  Together you can help us walk from Islamabad, Pakistan all the way to our programs in Andkhoy, Afghanistan. Along the way you'll pass through the home of our Pakistan schools in Attock, Pakistan and the capital city of Afghanistan, Kabul. We would love for you to participate with us on Sept. 29 so we can all come together to take a step forward for education.  11th Annual Walk for Literacy, Cambridge, Mass.: Join us for the 11th Annual Walk for Literacy on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. Walk check in begins at 9 a.m. EST, and participants are released to start walking at 10 a.m. EST from Cambridge Common Park in Harvard Square. All walkers will receive breakfast, lunch and a free t-shirt.
Pre–registration is $30.
Registration at the door is $40. Once you register, set a fundraising goal for yourself or for a team of friends, family, classmates, or colleagues.
LINK  http://barakatworld.org

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Sunday, September 30
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Capitalism Redefined: Wealth, Inequality & Ethics
Sunday, September 30
1:30 PM to 3:30 PM
MIT, Building 34-101, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/HarvardHumanist/events/254449671/

The Humanist Hub is delighted to honor Nick Hanauer as our 2018 Harvard and MIT Humanist of the Year, on September 30.

Hanauer, a Seattle-based venture capitalist and entrepreneur, has for the past decade become one of the world’s boldest voices for progressive economic activism, including his famous warnings of the “pitchforks” coming for his “fellow zillionaires.”

An early investor in Amazon and the successful founder, funder or manager of businesses across a range of technologies and industries, Hanauer is a critic of rising economic inequality, writing several books and articles on the topic, including national bestsellers The True Patriot and The Garden of Democracy (with Eric Liu), as well as two TED talks, each with more than one million views.

For all of this and more, we at the Humanist Hub believe Hanauer may well be America’s most humanistic plutocrat.

Humanism requires us to apply critical thinking and compassion to the work of creating economies that influence the lives of billions of human beings, and it’s not hard to recognize that things have gone awry in this endeavor. In order to move forward, we need influential capitalists to speak truth to their powerful peers. Hanauer can serve as a healthy example of success for students who hope to gain influence through technology and business, and his message of progressive economics is relevant to all who care about humanist philosophy today.

“It is an honor both to receive this award, and to join the Humanist Hub in helping to change the way we think and talk about the economy,” said Hanauer. “It turns out that most people get capitalism wrong. Capitalism works best when it works for everybody, not just for zillionaires like me.”

Other recipients of this award have included filmmaker Seth MacFarlane; “Cosmos” creator Ann Druyan; human rights heroes Gen. Romeo Dallaire and Taslima Nasreen; and world-renowned scientists Steven Pinker and E.O. Wilson.

The ceremony - our “relaunch” event after recently expanding to also serve MIT after 40 years at Harvard - will be part of a major event spotlighting the ethics of wealth.

The event will include a short speech from and extended dialogue with Hanauer; as well as music from 2017 Women of the World Poetry Slam champion Oopma; remarks from author Matthew Stewart (author of recent Atlantic cover story on the “9.9 Percent” as the “New American Aristocracy;” Associate Dean and BU Professor of Law Khiara Bridges; award-winning filmmaker Lauren Greenfield (“Generation Wealth”), and more.

September 30, 1:30 PM: MIT Building 34 (50 Vassar Street), Room 101. Visit humanisthub.org for more information.

This event is free and open to the public - we recommend arriving early to get a good seat.


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Be the Change: Writers Without Margins
Sunday, September 30
3:00pm to 5:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

This Be The Change presentation traces the origins of Writers Without Margins, a nonprofit dedicated to the fusion of art and advocacy offering free creative writing workshops in Boston's homeless shelters, community health centers, youth services agencies and prison reentry and addiction recovery programs.  Learn about its recent feature in the upcoming documentary, In Their Shoes: Unheard Stories of Reentry and Recovery, and find out ways to be involved.

Cheryl Buchanan, co-founder of Writers Without Margins, is an attorney who learned the power of storytelling and silence-breaking when she worked for a decade on over 500 cases of childhood sexual abuse in Los Angeles. She has taught in a wide range of university and college classrooms, from law school to undergraduate Communication Studies and Creative Writing, as well as written for a variety of audiences from college texts to network television. She earned her MFA at Emerson College. Cheryl has been the recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize, the Boston Mayor’s Poetry Prize and the Naugatuck River Review Narrative Poetry Award as well as nominated for a 2016 Pushcart Prize and twice for Best New Poets. She was the recipient of the 2018 National Association for Poetry Therapy’s Poetry and Social Justice Award and serves as Editor of Writers Without Margins: A Journal of Poetry and Prose.

20% of sales from 3-5PM will be donated to Writers Without Margins.

Learn more about Be the Change at https://www.portersquarebooks.com/announcing-be-change

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Monday, October 1
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PAOC Colloquium - Robin Wordsworth (Harvard)
Monday, October 1
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT,  Building 54-915/923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Robin Wordsworth (Harvard)
 
About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars generally take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged.

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Using Big Data to Quantify the Economic Impacts of Climate Change
Monday, October 1
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Trevor Houser, Partner, Rhodium Group, and Co-Director, Climate Impact Lab

Lunch will be served.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar
https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/energyconsortium/seminars

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The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World
Monday, October 1
12:00 - 1:30 PM 
Northeastern University School of Law, 250 Dockser Hall, 65 Forsyth Street, Boston

On Monday, October 1, 2018, Jennifer Rothman, Professor of Law and the Joseph Scott Fellow at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, will visit campus to talk about her new book, The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World.

Who controls how one’s identity is used by others? This legal question, centuries old, demands greater scrutiny in the Internet age. Jennifer Rothman uses the right of publicity—a little-known law, often wielded by celebrities—to answer that question, not just for the famous but for everyone. In challenging the conventional story of the right of publicity’s emergence, development, and justifications, Rothman shows how it transformed people into intellectual property, leading to a bizarre world in which you can lose ownership of your own identity. This shift and the right’s subsequent expansion undermine individual liberty and privacy, restrict free speech and suppress artistic works.

The Right of Publicity traces the right’s origins back to the emergence of the right of privacy in the late 1800s. The central impetus for the adoption of privacy laws was to protect people from “wrongful publicity.” This privacy-based protection was not limited to anonymous private citizens but applied to famous actors, athletes, and politicians. Beginning in the 1950s, the right transformed into a fully transferable intellectual property right, generating a host of legal disputes, from control of dead celebrities like Prince, to the use of student athletes’ images by the NCAA, to lawsuits by users of Facebook and victims of revenge porn.

The right of publicity has lost its way. Rothman proposes returning the right to its origins and in the process reclaiming privacy for a public world.

Sponsored by the Center for Law, Innovation and Creativity (CLIC)
and the faculty colloquium committee at Northeastern University School of Law 

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Animals as Patients, Models, and Infrastructure in Precision Bioscience
Monday, October 1
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

Declan Kuch, University of New South Wales, Environmental Humanities
The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to via the online form by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

sts at hks.harvard.edu
STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

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Why Immigration Restrictions are Unjust and Why It Matters
Monday, October 1 
1:35pm to 2:40pm
Northeastern,

Dr. Javier Hidalgo, Associate Professor of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond
States heavily restrict immigration. Are these immigration restrictions morally acceptable? This paper will give an argument against immigration restrictions. My argument is that states systematically balance the reasons for and against immigration restrictions in the wrong way. They ignore or discount the moral reasons to allow immigration and exaggerate the reasons in favor of restrictions. Because of this bias, states restrict immigration more than they should. We can infer from these claims that actual immigration restrictions are unjust. I’ll also explore some implications of this conclusion for the individual ethics of immigration—how individual actors should respond to the injustice of immigration restrictions.

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Compton Lecture by Thomas L. Friedman
Monday, October 1
4:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, Building W16: Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Lecture title TBA
Thomas L. Friedman, an internationally known author and journalist, has won the Pulitzer Prize three times for his work at The New York Times. His foreign affairs column in The New York Times reports on US domestic politics and foreign policy, Middle East conflicts, international economics, environment, biodiversity, and energy.

For his coverage of the Middle East, Mr. Friedman was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and 1988 for international reporting. He was awarded the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Commentary for “his clarity of vision…in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat.” In 2004, he was awarded the Overseas Press Club Award for lifetime achievement and the honorary title, Order of the British Empire (OBE), by Queen Elizabeth II.

Mr. Friedman is the author of From Beirut to Jerusalem, which won both the National Book and the Overseas Press Club Awards in 1989, and The Lexus and the Olive Tree, winner of the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for best non-fiction book on foreign policy. Longitudes and Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11, issued in 2002, consists of columns Mr.  Friedman published about September 11. The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century, issued in April 2005 and updated in 2006 and 2007, received the inaugural Goldman Sachs/Financial Times Business Book of the Year Award. In 2008 he brought out Hot, Flat, and Crowded, which was published in a revised edition a year later. His sixth book, That Used to Be Us: How American Fell Behind in the World We Invented and How We Can Come Back, co-written with Michael Mandelbaum, was released in 2011. Mr. Friedman’s new book, Thank you For Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations 2.0, was updated and released 2017.

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Harvard 2018 Science and Cooking Lecture Series with Clover founder/CEO Ayr Muir
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 1, 2018, 7 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Education, Health Sciences, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)
SPEAKER(S)  Ayr Muir, founder/CEO of Clover Food Lab
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2018/08/2018-science-and-cooking-lecture-series-serves-up-smorgasbord-of-innovative-presentations
CONTACT INFO	azewe at seas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Clover Food Lab founder/CEO Ayr Muir joins famed chefs like Massimo Bottura and Wylie Dufresne as part of the 2018 Science and Cooking public lecture series at Harvard University. His focus? Using material science to build more flavorful bread.
Muir, who received degrees in Material Sciences and Engineering from MIT, and went on to found the cult-favorite Clover Food Lab restaurant chain, will speak about innovative approaches to baking more flavorful bread.
Muir's lecture, "Gluten vs Fiber: Innovative Approaches to Baking More Flavorful Bread" will happen Oct. 1 at 7 p.m. at the Harvard Science Center.
Muir will follow the lecture by co-hosting a roundtable for local chefs and bakers on Oct. 15, 4 p.m. at CloverFIN (160 Federal St., Boston) with Maine Grains. The purpose of the roundtable will be to educate local chefs about the flavor benefits of local grains. If you are interested in attending this event, please RSVP to press at cloverfoodlab.com
LINK  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2018/08/2018-science-and-cooking-lecture-series-serves-up-smorgasbord-of-innovative-presentations

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Tuesday, October 2
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Fix It Clinic
Tuesday, October 2
11AM–2PM
Cabot Science Library, Harvard University, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

HOW: Register at goo.gl/qTzh9J then
Bring your broken item with all parts necessary to recreate the symptoms (carry-in only: no oversize items)
Bring any parts and tools you already own that might be helpful (e.g. hand tools, sewing supplies)
Come ready to describe what’s wrong and what you’ve tried
Come ready to learn and to share your knowledge with others
WHO: All ages welcome: a family-friendly event: accompanied children are heartily invited! 
COST: Free!
WHY: To make friends, learn and teach how to fix things, and have fun!

Celebrating repair by conveying basic troubleshooting skills, Fixit Clinics are do-it-together hands-on fix-n-learn community-based exploration and discovery workshops staffed by volunteer Fixit Coaches who generously share their time, tools and expertise to consult with you on the disassembly, troubleshooting, and repair of items.

So bring your broken, non-functioning things -- electronic gadgets, appliances, computers, toys, sewing machines, bicycles, fabric items, etc.-- for assessment, disassembly, and possible repair. Fixit Coaches (and helpful neighbors) will be available for consultation on broken items: we'll provide workspace, specialty tools, and guidance to help you disassemble and troubleshoot your item. Whether you fix it or not, you'll learn more about how it was manufactured and how it worked, ready to share your new-found confidence and insight with your friends, neighbors, and the community at large.

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Jazmine Ulloa
Tuesday, October 2
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Wexner Building, Room 434AB, Wexner Conference Room, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

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Software for the Social Good 
Tuesday, October 2
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Sebastian Diaz
Hal Roberts
The Berkman Klein Center geeks primarily engage in specific project support, software development and data science, and other ad-hoc technology activities at the Center. They also build amazing tools to support projects and center wide goals. Join us to learn more about the types of tools we produce.

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Professor Michael Meltsner in Conversation With Daniel Medwed
Tuesday, October 2
6:30pm to 8:30pm
Cambridge Public Library, Lecture Hall, 449 Broadway, Cambridge

Growing up in a depression battered family, one tangled by a mortal secret, With Passion tells the improbable story of an unsung hero of the civil rights movement who thought of himself as a “miscast” lawyer but ended up defending peaceful protesters, representing Mohammad Ali, suing Robert Moses, counseling Lenny Bruce, bringing the case that integrated hundreds of southern hospitals, and named “the principal architect of the death penalty abolition movement in the United States.” More than a meditation on often frustrating legal efforts to fight inequality and racism, Michael Meltsner—also a novelist and playwright—vividly recounts the life of a New York kid, struggling to make sense of coming of age amid the tumult of vast demographic and cultural changes in the city.

Professor Meltsners will be in conversation with Daniel Medwed. Professor Medwed teaches Criminal Law, Evidence, and Advanced Criminal Procedure: Wrongful Convictions and Post-Conviction Remedies. His research and pro bono activities revolve around the topic of wrongful convictions. His book, Prosecution Complex: America’s Race to Convict and Its Impact on the Innocent (New York University Press, 2012), explores how even well-meaning prosecutors may contribute to wrongful convictions because of cognitive biases and an overly-deferential regime of legal and ethical rules. His recently published Wrongful Convictions and the DNA Revolution: Twenty-Five Years of Freeing the Innocent (Cambridge University Press, 2017), discusses the lessons learned from a quarter century of DNA exonerations. Professor Medwed is the legal analyst for WGBH News, Boston’s local NPR and PBS affiliate.

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Opportunity
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Announcing Destination 2040: The next long-range transportation plan for the Boston region

How would you improve the Boston region’s transportation system? That’s the question at the heart of the MPO’s preparations for Destination 2040, which the MPO expects to adopt in the spring of 2019.

Every four years, the MPO identifies the system’s strengths and weaknesses; forecasts changes in population, employment, and land use; and creates a plan to address existing and future mobility needs. The resulting long-range transportation plan (LRTP) allocates funding for major projects in the Boston region and guides the MPO’s funding of capital investment programs and studies.

Use the new Destination 2040 website at http://ctps.org/lrtp-dev to explore the state of the system; learn how the MPO will identify needs, revisit its vision and goals, and prioritize its investments; and share your own interests, concerns, and ideas.

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Resource
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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://somervilleyogurtmakingcoop.wordpress.com

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 41 (up from 27 in 2016) and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
Solidarity Network Economy:  https://ussolidarityeconomy.wordpress.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://calendar.mit.edu
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 11 AM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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