[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - September 23, 2018

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Sep 23 11:40:12 PDT 2018


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) EventsGeo
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

----------------------------------------------------------
*******************************************

Details of these events are available when you scroll past the index

******
——— 
Index
——— 
******

———————————————————————
Monday, September 24 - Sunday, September 30
———————————————————————

Cambridge Climate Preparedness Week

———————————
Monday, September 24
———————————

8:30am  African Sustainable Development Conference
11am  The Growing Need for Precision in LED Lighting
12pm  Midterms, Polls, and the Future of the Republican Party
12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Paul Wennberg (Caltech)
12pm  State Policies and Wholesale Electricity Markets
12pm  Immigrants Making America Great Again: Lessons from an Undocumented Immigrant Turned Lawyer
12:10pm  Invasive plant challenges and opportunities in the U.S.
12:15pm  Not-so-big Data and Ebola Virus Disease
3pm  Science, Religion, and Out-of-Body Experiences
3:30pm  Land-use Regimes and the Future of New England’s Forest Carbon
4:30pm  Reflections on a lifetime effort to bring peace to the Middle East: An Interview with Herbert C. Kelman
4:30pm  The Future of Food and Nutrition: Implications for Science, Dietary Guidelines, and Food Policy
5pm  Science Sounds Strange: Ether Waves, Espionage, and the Theremin’s Odyssey
5:30pm  Boston's Creative Economy Mingle
6pm  Conflict and the Global Threat of Pandemics
6pm  Solar Access Celebration
6pm  Social Media for Scientists
6:30pm  Sheila Remes, "The Future is Built Here”
7pm  Tales from an Uncertain World

———————————— 
Tuesday, September 25
————————————

8am  By the People: Revolutionizing the Democratic Process to Ensure Full Participation by Millennials and People of Color
8:30am  Intro to PassivHaus
11am  Sustainability Festival
11am  Skills for Cities Boston
12pm  The Role of Identity Politics in the Midterm Elections and Beyond
12pm  MIT WATER Lunch & Learn Series:  Recovering Resources Embedded in Wastewater
12pm  Neighborhood Matters: a Screening of Invisible Crisis and Conversation with Patricia Montes
12pm  "Click Here to Kill Everybody”
12pm  FORUM: VULNERABILITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE
12pm  Achieving Access: Professional Movements and the Politics of Health Universalism
12:30pm  What Makes a Climate Leader? The Politics of Climate Policy in California and Germany
12:30pm  When Revolutions Fail: Japan's 1960 Protests and the Contemporary World
3pm  Outbreak Week - Global Disease Outbreaks: Shaping public health infrastructure and investments
3:30pm  Books at Baker with Nancy Koehn
4pm  Resiliency with Microgrids: A Peek Inside
4:30pm  Starr Forum: The Assault on Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies
4:30pm  Hammer and Silicon: The Soviet Diaspora in the U.S. Innovation Economy
5pm  Gotta Get Down to It: Conversations with musician David Crosby
5:30pm  DUSP [Department of Urban Studies and Planning] Lightning Talks
6pm  What’s New? What’s Next? Cultural and Structural Threats to the Constitutional Order of the United States and Western Europe
6pm  Boston Green Drinks - September 2018 Happy Hour
6pm  Beat the Drum with Women's Global Education Project and World Education
6:30pm  Outbreak Week - Emerging Infections Then and Now: From the Influenza Pandemic to the Antibiotic Resistance Crisis
7pm  On the Other Side of Freedom:  The Case for Hope
7pm  Black Flags, Blue Waters
7pm  Dancing with the Future
7pm  New England Apple Agriculture with David Dolginow
7pm  Boston Science for the People chapter meeting
7:30pm  Film Screening: Conservation of Matter

————————————— 
Wednesday, September 26
————————————— 

10am  Media in the Age of Contagions: Part of Outbreak Week at Harvard University
12pm  U.S. Drug Prices: Why Are They So High?
12pm  Defying Borders and Binaries: Legal Resistance and Civil Disobedience During the Rise of White Nationalism
12pm  Hidden Atrocities: Japanese Germ Warfare and American Obstruction of Justice at the Tokyo Trial
12pm  Almost Lost Detroit: African Americans, Racialized Individualism and Social Resilience in the Context of Public Sector Contraction
12pm  Accompanying Unaccompanied Child Refugees: The Challenges Facing Advocates and Activists
1:15pm  The Humanitarian Crisis in Venezuela - A Conversation with José Miguel Vivanco
1:30pm  xTalk with Ryan Baker:  The Dynamics of Affect in Online Learning
3:30pm  Edge, Fog and Cloud
4pm  Dr. Joy DeGruy
4pm  The Trump Administration's Rollback of Climate Policy
4:15pm  The Incidence of Coarse Certification: Evidence from the Energy Star Program
4:30pm  Richard Montanez: The Importance of Diversity in Sparking Innovation
4:30pm  Learning Using Statistical Invariants (Revision of Machine Learning Problem)
5:30pm  Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: The Sooner the Better
6pm  John Woman:  A Novel
6pm  China’s Anti-Poverty Miracle?
6pm  The National and Personal Toll of the Opioid Epidemic: A Conversation with Maureen Cavanagh
6pm  Protecting the Charter: Strategic Resistance in 17th-century Boston
6pm  Transform educational technology with powerful tools from the science of learning
6pm  Inside Innovation 
6pm  The Future of Brewing: Panel Discussion and Tasting Event
6:30pm  The Comparative Study of the Abrahamic Religions: Heuristic Gains and Cognitive Pitfalls
6:30pm  Kerstin and the Giant Manta Rays: Film screening and Q & A
6:30pm  Fairmount Innovation Lab's Grand Re-Opening 
7pm  AMERICA: THE FAREWELL TOUR
7pm  Adam Smith:  Father of Economics
7pm  Medicare For All Talk 
7pm  Extremophiles: Life on the Edge of our Planet
7pm  The Poison Squad

———————————————————————
Thursday, September 27 - Friday, September 28
———————————————————————

Science Diplomacy Dissertation Enhancement Workshop

————————————
Thursday, September 27
————————————

10am  Veteran's Energy Seminar
11:45am  Sustainability Lunch Series: Speed Networking
11:45am  Robotic Cars, Stoned Drivers, and Deadly Airbags: Managing Risk, Uncertainty, and Rapidly Changing Technologies in Cooperative Federalism
12pm  A Digital Edition of D’Arcy Thompson’s Glossary of Greek Birds:  New Technologies Help Reconstruct Ancient Stories
12pm  Initiative on Cities Lecture: The Latino City
3pm  Robotics Connect 2018
3:30pm  The Current Changing Landscape at NSF with Focus on Geosciences
4pm  Lecture and Q&A - Balancing Green When to Embrace Sustainability in a Business (and When Not To)
4pm  Equity and Social Justice Series: Native American Health Forum
4:15pm  Strongman Politics in the 21st Century
4:15pm  Visual Storytelling, Visual Communication
4:30pm  2018 Global Teacher Prize Winner: Andria Zafirakou
5pm  Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society
5pm  Collective Intelligence
5:30pm  The Public Practice of the Abrahamic Religions
6pm  authors at MIT: Roberto Simanowski, Waste A New Media Primer
6pm  Boston Climate Action Network Meeting
6pm  The Roots of Happiness
7pm  The Browns of California:  The Family Dynasty that Transformed a State and Shaped a Nation
7pm  MIT IDEAS Fall Generator Dinner 2018

———————————————————————
Friday, September 28 – Saturday, September 29
——————————————————————— 

Valued Voices: Perspectives on Immigration 

———————————
Friday, September 28
———————————

7:15am  Climate Adaptation Forum:  Law and Governance Meets Climate Adaptation
8am  The Oceans’ Turn
1:30pm  VR, Sound and Cinema: Implications for Storytelling and Learning
1:30pm  Belonging: The Challenges of Reentry
3pm  Some Recent Advances on the Application of Game Theory to Networking 
3pm  Trust:  Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries
3:30pm  Drug$: The Price We Pay' Film Screening & Discussion
5:30pm  Dawnland: Screening and Panel Discussion
6pm  CAN AMERICAN CAPITALISM SURVIVE?: Why Greed Is Not Good, Opportunity Is Not Equal, and Fairness Won't Make Us Poor
7pm  How to Be a Good Creature:  A Memoir in Thirteen Animals

————————————
Saturday, September 29
————————————

8:30am  Harvard Symposium on Technology-Assisted Meditation
9am  11th Annual Walk for Literacy

———————————
Sunday, September 30
———————————

1:30pm  Capitalism Redefined: Wealth, Inequality & Ethics
3pm  Be the Change: Writers Without Margins

—————————
Monday, October 1
—————————

12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Robin Wordsworth (Harvard)
12pm  Using Big Data to Quantify the Economic Impacts of Climate Change
12pm  The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World
12:15pm  Animals as Patients, Models, and Infrastructure in Precision Bioscience
1:35pm  Why Immigration Restrictions are Unjust and Why It Matters
4pm  Compton Lecture by Thomas L. Friedman:  Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations
5pm  CEE C.C. Mei Distinguished Speaker Series:  Fear, Greed and Financial Crisis 10 Years Later
5pm  ComMIT and Harvard Science in the News Mixer
5:30pm  Your Vote Counts: Education, Voting, and the Midterms
6pm  Amazon Robotics - Company Presentation
7pm  Harvard 2018 Science and Cooking Lecture Series with Clover founder/CEO Ayr Muir
7pm  Heartland:  A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth
7pm  The Fame of C.S. Lewis: A Controversialist's Reception in Britain and America
7pm  Killing Cancer with Cannabis
7pm  The Knife Edge of Value Alignment in AI: Utopia or Extinction

——————————
Tuesday, October 2
——————————

11am  Fix It Clinic
12pm  Jazmine Ulloa
12pm  How to Increase Bipartisan Leadership on Climate Change
12pm  NEURAL CIRCUITS OF DEXTERITY
12pm  Software for the Social Good 
12:30pm  PICS Seminar:  Impact Chemistry and the Origin of Life
4:30pm  Current State of U.S. Immigration: Trends, Policy Issues, and Public Opinion
5pm  Tara Oceans: Cells, Embryos, and the Origins of Complexity in Life
5pm  Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup: A Special Evening with Author John Carreyrou
5:30pm  Careers in Sustainability: The Evolution of the Sustainability Professional
6pm  The Politics of Dignity: Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Bus Boycott
6pm  Farsighted:  How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most
6pm  AI and Human Augmentation in Healthcare
6pm  The Future of (Sustainable) Work
6:30pm  Professor Michael Meltsner in Conversation With Daniel Medwed
9pm  People who are changing the world & those who want to help them [video call]


*******************************************

My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com


*******************************************

———————————————————————
Monday, September 24 - Sunday, September 30
———————————————————————

Cambridge Climate Preparedness Week
More information at https://www.climatecrew.org/prep_week?locale=en

———————————
Monday, September 24
———————————

African Sustainable Development Conference
Monday, September 24
8:30am to 5:00pm
MIT Building E25, Room 401 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://umrp.mit.edu/events/

Convened by the Université Mohammed VI Polytechnique--MIT Research Program (UMRP) this is a working meeting of international experts in sustainable urbanization, climate & water, precision agriculture, green chemistry and industrial optimization with the focus on sustainable development in Morocco and across Africa.

—————————————— 

The Growing Need for Precision in LED Lighting
Monday, September 24
11:00 AM EDT 
Webcast
RSVP at https://event.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1208524&tp_key=d42691ab08&sti=em1&pwhid=0beb49962b0fb21a6183688926627a3ec671ab97d62876c0441344491e8e0e3ac348e5a4a661a895ca527e4488a0a8ef9e73070666160d9fb43490bb78753cbd

The Growing Need for Precision in LED Lighting looks at three main trends in machine vision lighting, specifically, the need for lights with nanosecond response times versus today’s millisecond trigger/rise/fall times; the need to manage multiple lights, whether it be for multispectral applications or large-area, vision-guided-robotics multi-light installations. Finally, the optical performance of new classes of high performance lights requires a multidisciplinary light design approach that includes electronic, optical, and mechanical engineering skillsets to optimize and balance the performance of each component within the lighting solution design.

Presented by:
Paul Powers, Director of Sales - Americas, Smart Vision Lights

—————————————— 

Midterms, Polls, and the Future of the Republican Party
Monday, September 24
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Rubenstein Building, Room 414ABDavid T. Ellwood Democracy Lab, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Kristen Soltis Anderson

——————————————

PAOC Colloquium - Paul Wennberg (Caltech)
Monday, September 24
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-915/923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Paul Wennberg (Caltech)

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars generally take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged.

——————————————

State Policies and Wholesale Electricity Markets
Monday, September 24
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Travis Fisher, Adviser to the Chief of Staff, FERC

Lunch will be served.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar
https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/energyconsortium/seminars

—————————————— 

Immigrants Making America Great Again: Lessons from an Undocumented Immigrant Turned Lawyer
Monday, September 24
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Northeastern, 240 Dockser Hall, 65 Forsyth Street, Boston

Fall 2018 Daynard Visiting Fellow: Prerna Lal, Staff Attorney/Clinical Supervisor, Immigration Practice, East Bay Community Law Center

Prerna Lal was born in the Fiji Islands, came to the United States with their parents when they were 14, and then lived in the San Francisco East Bay area.

Formerly an undocumented immigrant, Lal was integral to establishing United We DREAM and the DreamActivist network, both led by undocumented youth. The organizations mobilized thousands of undocumented immigrants to push for the federal DREAM Act in 2010, ending the deportations of undocumented youth, and securing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program under the Obama Administration. A mobilizer and social media strategist, Lal has also helped with the creation of many local immigrant youth groups, providing direct support, mentorship and advocacy to individuals caught up in the immigration dragnet.

As an undocumented law school graduate, Lal was among the first in the country to obtain a license to practice law. As a result of Lal’s high-spirited activism, the US government sought to deport them. Law won lawful permanent residency after a long court battle, and in April 2018, Lal became a United States citizen.

As a nonprofit policy attorney in Washington, DC, Lal worked at Asian Americans Advancing Justice  (AAJC), spearheading initiatives related to extending DACA, Deferred Action for Parents of Americans, Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Nepal and parole-in-place for family members of Filipino war veterans. Through a partnership between the East Bay Community Law Center and UC Berkeley’s Undocumented Student Program, Lal provided immigration legal services for more than 500 students and their family members. As an immigration attorney, clinical supervisor and lecturer at a clinic of UC Berkeley School of Law, Lal mentored a new generation of public interest law students.

——————————————

Invasive plant challenges and opportunities in the U.S.
Monday, September 24
12:10p
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill, 1300 Centre Street, Boston

Jenica Allen, Affiliate Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire

More information at https://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/research/research-talks/

——————————————

Not-so-big Data and Ebola Virus Disease
Monday, September 24
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd7VGUkAvTU655Dub2FTGSNMjpVs6f8Qbu0kpmXh6oz11MgFw/viewform

Eugene T. Richardson, Harvard, HMS

The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to via the online form by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

sts at hks.harvard.edu

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

——————————————

Science, Religion, and Out-of-Body Experiences
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 3 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CSWR Conference Room, 42 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Religion
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Center for the Study of World Religions
SPEAKER(S)  Kurt Leland has written on astral projection, near-death experiences, and the transcendent possibilities of composing, performing, and listening to music. In 2007, What Is Enlightenment? magazine numbered him among “the world’s foremost OBE experts.” In 2017, his book Rainbow Body: A History of the Western Chakra System from Blavatsky to Brennan was a finalist for the Benjamin Franklin Award from the Independent Book Publishers Association in the Body, Mind & Spirit category. As well as being a National Lecturer for the Theosophical Society in America, he is a Boston-based classical musician and award-winning composer and maintains a consulting and teaching practice called Spiritual Orienteering.
DETAILS  Out-of-Body Experiences (OBEs, also known as astral projection), in which people apparently separate their consciousness from the physical body and move about independently in nearby and remote real-world locations and far-out nonphysical locales, have been noted in religious and mystical contexts since the beginning of recorded history, especially in connection with close calls with death (Near-Death Experiences, also known as NDEs). Often, these experiences are used as proof of the existence of paranormal abilities, survival of physical death, and the possibility of exploring invisible worlds, other dimensions, or subtle planes of existence. During the last fifteen years, scientific researchers have devised a number of experiments suggesting that OBEs and NDEs originate in the brain and strongly resemble experiences produced by natural and synthetic hallucinogens. What are the implications of this research for spiritual seekers, esoteric movements, and the history of religions?
LINK  https://cswr.hds.harvard.edu/news/upcoming-events#/?i=1

—————————————— 

Land-use Regimes and the Future of New England’s Forest Carbon
Monday, September 24
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
BU, CAS 132, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Jonathan Thompson, Harvard Forest
With a reception to follow.

——————————————

Reflections on a lifetime effort to bring peace to the Middle East: An Interview with Herbert C. Kelman
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Classroom 2004, 1585 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Herbert C. Kelman Seminar on International Conflict Analysis and Resolution, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Herbert C. Kelman, Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics Emeritus, Harvard University
CONTACT INFO	elizabethflanagan at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Herbert C. Kelman is the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics Emeritus, at Harvard University and was (from 1993 to 2003) director of the Program on International Conflict Analysis and Resolution at Harvard's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. He received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Yale University in 1951. He is past president of the International Studies Association, the International Society of Political Psychology, the Interamerican Society of Psychology, and several other professional associations. He is recipient of many awards, including the Socio-Psychological Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1956), the Kurt Lewin Memorial award (1973), the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest (1981), the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order (1997), the Austrian Medal of Honor for Science and Art (1998), and the Gold Medal of Honor of the Federal Capital of Vienna (2012). His major publications include "International Behavior: A Social-Psychological Analysis" (editor; 1965), "A Time to Speak: On Human Values and Social Research" (1968), and "Crimes of Obedience: Toward a Social Psychology of Authority and Responsibility" (with V. Lee Hamilton; 1989).
Prof Kelman has been engaged for many years in the development of interactive problem solving, an unofficial third party approach to the resolution of international and intercommunal conflicts, and in its application to the Arab-Israeli conflict, with special emphasis on its Israeli-Palestinian component.
Unless otherwise noted in the event description, CMES events are open to the public (no registration required), and off the record. Please note that events may be filmed and photographed by CMES for record-keeping and for use on the CMES website and publications.
LINK	https://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/reflections-lifetime-effort-bring-peace-middle-east-interview-herbert-c-kelman

——————————————
	
The Future of Food and Nutrition: Implications for Science, Dietary Guidelines, and Food Policy
Monday, September 24 
4:30 – 6:00 pm
Museum of Science, Cahners Auditorium, 1 Science Park, Boston

Join us for the awarding of the 2018 Walker Prize to Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH
The Walker Prize recognizes "meritorious published scientific investigation and discovery" in any scientific field. The recipient must be a noted scientist, professor, or researcher who is a superb science communicator via the written word and is well known for superlative work in her / his field. The prize was established in 1864 by Dr. William Johnson Walker, one of the most eminent surgeons of his era and a generous benefactor of the Boston Society of Natural History, the Museum's founding organization.

————————————— 

Science Sounds Strange: Ether Waves, Espionage, and the Theremin’s Odyssey
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 5 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Music, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Dorit Chrysler, musicologist and composer; directory, NY Theremin Society; founder, KidCoolThereminSchool
John Huth, Donner Professor of Science, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Little did Léon Theremin realize that his Soviet-sponsored spy research into electromagnetic waves and proximity sensors would lead to the creation of a new and strange musical instrument. Classical music composers — as well as Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones — have written for the eerie-sounding theremin, a musical instrument that plays without every actually being touched. Come hear a performance of this extraordinary instrument and the cautionary tale of a physicist-turned-music-pioneer, whose inventions became steeped in politics and whose life story reads like a spy novel. Register online.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-john-huth-and-dorit-chrysler-lecture

——————————————

Boston's Creative Economy Mingle
Monday, September 24
5:30 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Boston Athenæum, 10 ½ Beacon St, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bostons-creative-economy-mingle-tickets-48895229949

The Creative Economy (CE) and the people it employs stimulate innovation, strengthen America's competitiveness in the global marketplace, and play an important role in building and sustaining economic vibrancy. The Creative Industries include the interlocking industry sectors that provide creative services such as advertising, architecture, or creating and promoting intellectual property products such as arts, film, computer games, multimedia or design. Within Massachusetts, over 17,000 creative economy businesses, employ more than 75,000 people, representing 4.3 percent of the total number of businesses and 2.1 percent of the people they employ. Boston currently exceeds both national and state statistics for the sector. As of 2014, City of Boston reported over 2000 CE businesses and a combined CE workforce (payroll & self employed) of over 36,000. This represents nearly 5.4% of total businesses, and nearly 5 percent of all employment.

SPARK Boston, in partnership with the Mayor's Officeof Arts and Culture, the Office of Small Business Development, the Office of Diversity, the Office of Resilience & Racial Equity, ArtsBoston, Network of Arts Administrators of Color (NAAC), Powerful Pathways and Boston Athenæum is hosting a networking event focused on bringing together millennials of color working or aspiring toward employment across creative industries in Boston. This is for individual artists and arts administrators, to small creative business owners, entrepreneurs, and employees of larger greater Boston-based creative businesses. Bring plenty of business cards and get ready to find your next great opportunity.

The evening will feature facilitated networking, performances, and free food. Bring plenty of business cards and a spirit for networking! This event is free and open to the public, but is intended and programmed for millennials of color. We'd also like to let our guests know that the Boston Athenæum has a locker policy for items such as large purses, backpacks and luggage, wheeled containers, etc. Only small personal items, such as wallets, eyeglasses, phones, and keys are permitted inside the premises. Lockers are free and security will check bags upon departure.

——————————————

Conflict and the Global Threat of Pandemics
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE   Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Health Sciences, Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Museum of Natural History
SPEAKER(S)  Michele Barry, Professor of Medicine; Senior Associate Dean of Global Health, Director, Center for Innovation in Global Health, Stanford University
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO  (617) 495-3045, hmnh at hmsc.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Detection and control of emerging infections in conflict zones is a major public health challenge. The breakdown of civil society often leads to the collapse of health systems and sanitation, food insecurity, poor coordination among humanitarian agencies, and the subsequent emergence of diseases that can proliferate into global pandemics. Michele Barry will discuss how Ebola, polio, yellow fever, cholera, and Lassa fever have emerged during conflict in fragile states and what has been learned from the outbreaks to better predict and control other potential epidemics.
Lecture. Reservations are strongly encouraged.
Free parking at the Oxford Street Garage
Presented in collaboration with the Harvard Global Health Institute, as part of OUTBREAK WEEK 2018, a University-wide effort to commemorate the 1918 influenza pandemic.
LINK  https://hmnh.harvard.edu/event/conflict-and-global-threat-pandemics

———————————————

Solar Access Celebration
Monday, September 24
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
DBEDC’s Bornstein & Pearl Facility, 200 Quincy Street, Boston 
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/solar-access-celebration-tickets-49744476067

In recognition of the launch of the Solar Access Program, we would like to invite you to join us and Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation (DBEDC) the evening of Monday, September 24th to kick off Climate Week at Bornstein and Pearl. The Solar Access Program is a solar program designed by Resonant Energy — in partnership with DBEDC and SunWealth — to make solar accessible to low-income households and nonprofits. Come celebrate this huge milestone in the clean energy movement with us, learn how you can be involved and grab a bite to eat!
Address: 200 Quincy St, Boston, MA 02121
Time: 6 PM - 7:30 PM
6:00 - 6:30: Food and Arrival
6:30 - 7:00: Speakers
7:00 - 7:30: Music and Conversation
Food: The event will highlight CommonWealth Kitchen vendors and feature a variety of foods available for purchase.

——————————————— 

Social Media for Scientists
Monday, September 24
6:00pm to 7:30pm
MIT, Building 4-145, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Join ComMIT for a social media workshop led by Lindsay Brownell (science writer at the Weiss Institute) and Gabi Serrato Marks. We'll go over do's and don'ts, how to choose what platform to use, and answer your questions about social media. Bring a device (computer, phone, etc.) so that you can practice what you learn! 

The entire MIT community is welcome, though the guidance will be tailored for researchers and educators.

——————————————— 

Sheila Remes, "The Future is Built Here”
WHEN  Monday, Sep. 24, 2018, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gund Hall, Room 124, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Master in Design Engineering at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  Sheila Remes, Vice President of Strategy for Commercial Airplanes, Boeing
Sheila Remes is vice president of Strategy for Commercial Airplanes and also leads Boeing’s Cabin Vertical Integration team. In these roles, Remes oversees cross-functional efforts to define Boeing’s strategic direction and address complex, enterprise-wide business decisions. These include greater life-cycle value for customers and internal capabilities for Boeing, growth opportunities such as services and intellectual property control, product and propulsion strategy, and environment and aviation policy. She is also responsible for international business development strategy and serves on the Boeing International leadership team. Outside of Boeing, Remes serves on the World Affairs Council of Seattle Board of Directors.
COST  Free
DETAILS  Boeing is the global leader in helping to connect, protect, explore and inspire the world. A city the size of Chicago flies on a commercial airliner somewhere every day and that number is expected to double in the next 20 years. One-third of the value of global goods also moves by air. Yet fewer than one in five people have ever flown and aviation transports just 1 percent of all trade.
As we look deeper into our second century, we’re inspired by the opportunity to sharpen and accelerate our history of innovation to connect more of the world than ever before. By fundamentally changing the economics and ecosystem of flight, we can meet the increasing demand for safe, efficient, affordable and sustainable air travel.
In addition to continuing to serve large commercial passenger and cargo markets, Boeing will bring air transport to new markets. Our flight plan, the future is built here, focuses on key areas to support Boeing’s mission to connect the world through aerospace innovation, as well as be the best in aerospace and an enduring global industrial champion.
LINK  https://mde.harvard.edu/sheila-remes-future-built-here

——————————————— 

Tales from an Uncertain World
Monday, September 24
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

So far, humanity hasn’t done very well in addressing the ongoing climate catastrophe. Veteran science educator L. S. Gardiner believes we can learn to do better by understanding how we’ve dealt with other types of environmental risks in the past and why we are dragging our feet in addressing this most urgent emergency. Weaving scientific facts and research together with humor and emotion, Gardiner explores human responses to erosion, earthquakes, fires, invasive species, marine degradation, volcanic eruptions, and floods in order to illuminate why we find it so challenging to deal with climate change. Insight emerges from unexpected places—a mermaid exhibit, a Magic 8 Ball, and midcentury cartoons about a future that never came to be. 

Instead of focusing on the economics and geopolitics of the debate over climate change, this book brings large-scale disaster to a human scale, emphasizing the role of the individual. We humans do have the capacity to deal with disasters. When we face threatening changes, we don’t just stand there pretending it isn’t so, we do something. But because we’re human, our responses aren’t always the right ones the first time—yet we can learn to do better. This book is essential reading for all who want to know how we can draw on our strengths to survive the climate catastrophe and forge a new relationship with nature.

L. S. Gardiner is the author of two and illustrator of nine children's books about science. She works at the UCAR Center for Science Education, and resides in Boulder, Colorado.

————————————
Tuesday, September 25
————————————

By the People: Revolutionizing the Democratic Process to Ensure Full Participation by Millennials and People of Color
A Special Event hosted as part of City Awake’s Fierce Urgency of Now Festival
Tuesday, September 25
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM EDT
BUild Innovation Lab @ Boston University, 730 Commonwealth, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/by-the-people-revolutionizing-the-democratic-process-to-ensure-full-participation-by-millennials-tickets-48583679092

About Fierce Urgency of Now:
Join Amplify Latinx in collaboration with the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and City Awake, for a six days FUN festival of conversation and celebration of Boston's Millennials of Color. The Boston Foundation and City Awake’s City of Millennials report shows that Greater Boston’s millennial population is more racially and ethnically diverse and more educated than ever before. However, it also exposed the many barriers that population faces in Boston as well. That is why Fierce Urgency of Now is so important. A 6-day festival September 20-25 dedicated to talking about these issues and convening young Bostonians of color to share their experiences. We are proud to partner with City Awake for this cause. Learn more at #FUNinBOS.

Description:  The most impactful movements in history have been set in motion at the grassroots level. Join us for a trendsetting dialogue on inclusive voting models and learn about innovative strategies to overcome barriers to civic engagement. Walk away with a toolkit that will equip you to educate voters on a system that drives voter participation.

Black and Latino voters could make a sizable difference in this Fall’s mid-term elections. The Millennial and Latinx population will grow more than 55% in the next two decades to 90 million -- representing more than a quarter of all Americans. This demographic shift presents a key opportunity to invest in outreach and new voting processes to ensure strong turn out by this large, yet disengaged electorate. 

In this forum led by expert speakers, we will hear success stories around online voter registration, early voting, pre-registration of high school age students, and automatic voter registration. We will also explore how we can disrupt voter access by implementing engagement strategies such as ranked choice voting and clean “citizen funded” elections to increase candidate access and voter participation by traditionally under-represented communities.

——————————————— 

Intro to PassivHaus
Tuesday, September 25
8:30 AM – 10:00 AM EDT
50 Milk Street, "Edison" Conference Room, 16th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-passivhaus-tickets-49357157587
Cost:  $30 – $45

PassivHaus, Passive House or PH for short: we know you have been hearing about it, if you subscribe to high-performance building. This well-known standard has made its way to the Americas and now is growing roots in Massachusetts. Come connect with the leaders at Passive House Massachusetts and learn the basics of the system.
Passive House comprises a set of design principles used to obtain a quantifiable and rigorous level of energy efficiency and building comfort. Where did the Passive House standard come from and how has it evolved over the years? In this session, participants will learn the history of Passive House as a building concept and the differences between the national and international standards as well as how they relate to LEED and other building standards. A great opportunity to learn the basics of Passive House and get your questions answered.
Learning Objectives:
Learn the basics of Passive House principles
Introduce yourself to Passive House Massachusetts and how you can learn more in upcoming sessions
Find out how Passive House is being integrated into code in different areas nationally and internationally
Network with other Passive House practitioners and those interested in the practice

—————————————

Sustainability Festival
Tuesday, September 25
11:00 am to 2:30 pm
BU Medical School, Talbot Green, 45 Stoughton Street, Boston

Join the challenge to reduce your environmental footprint; buzz your actions and you could win some great prizes! Swap your light bulbs for an LED or get a travel coffee mug for free. Learn about biking in Boston and get involved in student and staff community organizations!

————————————— 

Skills for Cities Boston
Tuesday, September 25
11:00 AM – 7:00 PM EDT
The Boston Fed, 600 Atlantic Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/skills-for-cities-boston-tickets-49552411597

Use Your Talent as a Force for Good! 
Join corporate volunteers, local leaders and impactful nonprofits at the first-of-its-kind day of skilled volunteer service for the city of Boston to make a difference in your community and help deliver on the UN Sustainable Development Goals! 
Skills-based volunteering helps connect professionals with expertise in areas like marketing, finance, HR, operations and technology to nonprofits looking to develop their teams and build capacity for their organization.
Volunteers from some of Boston's best-known corporations will team up with local nonprofit leaders to help solve some of the community's most critical challenges, such as access to quality education and economic opportunity for all. 
We invite you to attend our opening panel, observe events for the day and network with local leaders at the evening cocktail reception. 

Agenda:
11:00 am - Registration & Networking
12:00 pm - Panel Discussion: Citywide Opportunities for Impact 
Join us for a special panel discussion that will include local leaders discussing key challenges for the Boston community and examples of how skilled volunteerism can support solutions for the social sector. Panelists include Lauren Ryan, Employee Community Engagement & Strategic Partnerships, State Street and Cara Press, Director of Career Connections, Bottom Line
1:15 pm - Pick-up Boxe Lunches
1:30 pm - Consulting Session 1: Discovery
2:45 pm - Consulting Session 2: Incubation Tank
3:45 pm - Consulting Session 3: Design
5:00 pm - Event Wrap-Up
6:00 pm - Cocktail Reception with remarks from Steve Neff, Head of Technology and Global Services, Fidelity Investments
Join a movement.
Build your professional toolkit.
Invest your talent in Boston.

—————————————

The Role of Identity Politics in the Midterm Elections and Beyond
Tuesday, September 25
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Wexner Building, Room 434AB, Wexner Conference Room, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Eugene Scott

—————————————

MIT WATER Lunch & Learn Series:  Recovering Resources Embedded in Wastewater - Jeanette Brown
Tuesday, September 25
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, 1-134, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Jeanette Brown has over 30 years of professional experience as an environmental engineer and has expertise in biological nitrogen removal and biosolids management. She serves as Adjunct Faculty in Environmental Engineering at Manhattan College (Riverdale, NY), and has served as the Executive Director of the Stamford Water Pollution Control Authority (Stamford, CT) and as president of the Water Environment Federation (WEF). She is also an active member the of New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA), the American Academy of Environmental Engineers (AAEE), the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and their Environmental & Water Resources Institute (EWRI), and the International Water Association.

————————————— 

Neighborhood Matters: a Screening of Invisible Crisis and Conversation with Patricia Montes
Tuesday, September 25
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Northeastern, Snell Library 90, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Featuring Special Guest  Patricia Montes, Executive Director, Centro Presente.
Established in 1981, Centro Presente is a member-driven, statewide Latin American immigrant organization dedicated to the self-determination and self-sufficiency of the Latin American immigrant community of Massachusetts. Operated and led primarily by Central American immigrants, Centro Presente struggles for immigrant rights and for economic and social justice. Through the integration of community organizing, leadership development and basic services, Centro Presente strives to give our members a voice and build community power.

Patricia Montes is the Executive Director of Centro Presente, an immigrant rights organization in Massachusetts. Patricia is a recognized immigrant rights leader and a tireless advocate for just economic and social policies, including a just U.S. immigration policy. She serves on the Executive Board of the National Alliance of Latin American and Caribbean Communities (NALACC), and is a board member of The Boston Women’s Fund and the Women’s Pipeline for Change, a group that is trying to build a sustainable infrastructure to support progressive women of color as they enter, navigate and move up the pipeline to political leadership.

Patricia Montes es la Directora Ejecutiva de Centro Presente, una organización que lucha por la defensa de los derechos de los inmigrantes en Massachusetts. Montes es una líder en los derechos de los inmigrantes y defensora de políticas económicas y sociales justas, incluyendo la reforma migratoria en EEUU. Montes es parte del Consejo Ejecutivo de National Alliance of Latin American and Caribbean Communities (NALACC), y también es miembro de la junta de The Boston Women’s Fund and the Women’s Pipeline for Change, un grupo que busca construir una plataforma para apoyar a las mujeres pertenecientes a grupos minoritarios que desean entrar en el mundo de liderazgo político.

Free and open to the public; lunch will be served. Co-sponsored by Northeastern City and Community Affairs

————————————— 

"Click Here to Kill Everybody"
Tuesday, Sep 25
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2018-09-25/click-here-kill-everybody

Bruce Schneier
Computer security is no longer about data; it's about life and property. This change makes an enormous difference, and will shake up our industry in many ways. First, data authentication and integrity will become more important than confidentiality. And second, our largely regulation-free Internet will become a thing of the past. Soon we will no longer have a choice between government regulation and no government regulation. Our choice is between smart government regulation and stupid government regulation. Given this future, it's vital that we look back at what we've learned from past attempts to secure these systems, and forward at what technologies, laws, regulations, economic incentives, and social norms we need to secure them in the future.

————————————— 

FORUM: VULNERABILITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Tuesday, September 25
12pm – 1:30pm
Cathedral Church of St. Paul's, 138 Tremont Street, Boston

Join us at St. Paul's to hear a panel of local leaders speak on how community members can help vulnerable populations before, during, and after an extreme weather event.

Aaron Troncoso 
aaron at climatecrew.org 
(617) 945-5242

—————————————

Achieving Access: Professional Movements and the Politics of Health Universalism
Tuesday, September 25
12:00 - 1:30 pm 
BU, Pardee Center, 67 Bay State Road, Boston
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07efo921gm11735836&oseq=&c=&ch=

The Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future and the Institute for Health System Innovation & Policy invite you to attend an upcoming seminar with Joseph Harris, an Assistant Professor of Sociology and a Pardee Center Faculty Research Fellow.

In the book, published by Cornell University Press in 2017, Prof. Harris explores dynamics that made landmark universal healthcare and AIDS treatment policies possible in Thailand and Brazil but which led to prolonged struggle and contestation in South Africa. While conventional wisdom suggests that democratization empowers the masses, Harris draws attention to an under-appreciated dynamic: that democratization empowers elites from esteemed professions - frequently doctors and lawyers - who forge progressive change on behalf of those in need.

—————————————

What Makes a Climate Leader? The Politics of Climate Policy in California and Germany
Tuesday, September 25
12:30pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building 9-451, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

As California hosts the Global Climate Action Summit this month, ambitions to tackle climate change fly high—the US federal government’s opposition notwithstanding. The wave of aspiration is welcome, but it is far from clear whether climate goals will in fact be implemented as effective policy. We may like to think that it all depends on voters. Yet the history of climate politics has shown that all too often powerful business lobbies capture climate policy, even if voters are in favor of action. This suggests an important truth: How governments manage vested interests shapes if climate ambitions turn into climate actions. Take the story of California and Germany, which led the world with ambitious emission reduction goals for 2020. While California reached its target ahead of time, Merkel’s administration has admitted that Germany will miss its goal by a wide margin. A key reason for California’s success lies in how little the climate policy process opened the door to lobbyists, compared to Germany.  In particular, the division of labor between the bureaucracy and the legislature mattered. Drawing on these two cases, the talk will explore how policy process shapes opportunities for regulatory capture and draw lessons for implementing climate policy. 

Please join us for the first Environmental Policy and Planning lunch of the fall 2018 term with guest speaker Jonas Meckling (UC Berkeley). 

————————————— 

When Revolutions Fail: Japan's 1960 Protests and the Contemporary World
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  Nick Kapur, Assistant Professor of History, Rutgers University
Moderated by Andrew Gordon, Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Professor of History, Harvard University
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK  https://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/calendar/upcoming

————————————— 

Outbreak Week - Global Disease Outbreaks: Shaping public health infrastructure and investments
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 3 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Kresge Cafeteria, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Exhibitions, Health Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Global Health Institute
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
SPEAKER(S)  Dean Michelle Williams
Ashish Jha
Allan Brandt
Marcia Castro
Gabriela Soto Laveaga
Emmanuel K. Akyeampong
Jesse Bump
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6PeeciSUnsCa49D
TICKET INFO  All events are free and registration is required.
CONTACT INFO	outbreakweek at harvard.edu
DETAILS  Professor Allan Brandt will provide a keynote address, followed by a panel discussion on how historical disease outbreaks in Central America, South America, and Africa have shaped investments in public health infrastructure. These discussions will be followed by a reception showcasing original and customized panels from the Smithsonian Museum’s recent Outbreak exhibit.
LINK  https://globalhealth.harvard.edu/outbreakweek-sept24

—————————————

Books at Baker with Nancy Koehn
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 3:30 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Business School, Aldrich Hall 210, Soldiers Field Road, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Education
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Baker Library
SPEAKER(S)  Nancy Koehn, James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  schurch at hbs.edu
DETAILS  In "Forged in Crisis," HBS historian Nancy Koehn examines five masters of crisis: explorer Ernest Shackleton; Abraham Lincoln; abolitionist Frederick Douglass; Nazi-resisting clergyman Dietrich Bonhoeffer; and environmental crusader Rachel Carson. What do such disparate figures have in common? Why do their extraordinary stories continue to amaze and inspire? Koehn offers a remarkable template by which to measure our aspirations and to judge those in our time to whom we've given our trust.
Koehn begins each section by showing her protagonist on the precipice of a great crisis. Readers then learn about each person’s childhood and see the individual growing — step by step — into the person he or she will ultimately become. Significantly, as we follow each leader’s against-all-odds journey, we begin to glean an essential truth: leaders are not born but made. In a book dense with epiphanies, the most galvanizing one may be that the power and courage to lead resides in each of us.
Q&A with the author; books available for signing.
LINK  https://www.library.hbs.edu/Articles/Books-Baker

——————————————

Resiliency with Microgrids: A Peek Inside
Tuesday, September 25
4:00pm to 6:00pm
Schneider Electric Boston One Campus 800 Federal Street, Andover
RSVP at http://www.mitforumcambridge.org/event/microgrid-tour/
Cost:  $5 - $30

A microgrid is an electrical distribution network with underground wires that serves two or more buildings in a local area. Microgrids can enter ‘island mode’ and separate from the larger electrical grid when there is a major outage - self supplying with locally generated energy.

A string of extreme weather events - think Hurricane Sandy’s impact on New York and New Jersey and Hurricane Maria’s devastating impact on Puerto Rico - have highlighted the need to create a more resilient power grid. Microgrids that use on-site renewables and energy storage support resiliency while being clean and green.  Communities are looking to microgrids to keep critical services going during power outages. Companies are looking to microgrids to avoid costly power outages and reduce costs through demand-side efficiencies.   Microgrids help facilities earn money through participation in demand response programs and, in the future, by providing services to the grid.

There are opportunities for startups in this market to offer microgrids and their components, like battery storage, fuel cells and controllers.  Last September, New York’s Urban Future Lab announced $50,000 awards plus incubation guidance for microgrid startups. An Indiana startup built their business providing microgrids to the military and is moving on to build a commercial resilience business. Plus, peer to peer power exchanges using blockchain are popping up in conjunction with microgrids.

After experiencing outages, Schneider Electric decided to “be their own customer” and install a microgrid at their North American headquarters in Andover, MA. 440kW of power is provided by solar arrays backed up with a 400kW natural gas generator.  The system provides 500kW of capacity and 1MWhr of energy.  An advanced cloud-based energy management system combined with an energy control center orchestrates supply and demand and enables the microgrid to safely island.  What is unique about this microgrid is that it is built using an Energy as a Service business model – a third-party investor owns the microgrid assets, so there is no capital outlay. Costs associated with the maintenance and operation are eliminated.  Energy-as-a service provides more predictable energy costs, increased sustainability and robust resilience for Schneider Electric’s Boston One Campus.

Join us as we peek inside to see how this works first hand!  You will get a chance to tour the facilities, and learn about the potential of microgrid technology, innovative business models and creative partnerships

Agenda:
Introduction and overview of the Microgrid
Tour of the facilities
Networking

————————————

Starr Forum: The Assault on Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies
Tuesday, September 25
4:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building 10-250, 222 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

A book talk with Michael Hayden, former director of the NSA
Michael Hayden is a retired United States Air Force four-star general and former director of the National Security Agency, principal deputy director of National Intelligence, and director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Hayden currently co-chairs the Bipartisan Policy Center's Electric Grid Cyber Security Initiative.

Joining the conversation is Joel Brenner, former head of counterintelligence under the director of National Intelligence.

Brenner is former head of counterintelligence under the director of National Intelligence and was senior counsel at the National Security Agency. He is a research affiliate at the MIT Center for International Studies. 

————————————— 

Hammer and Silicon: The Soviet Diaspora in the U.S. Innovation Economy
Tuesday, September 25
4:30 PM – 6:00 PM EDT
Tufts, Murrow Room, Goddard 210, The Fletcher School, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hammer-and-silicon-the-soviet-diaspora-in-the-us-innovation-economy-registration-49999894029

Please join the Russia and Eurasia Program at The Fletcher School for a talk by Sheila M. Puffer (Northeastern University), Daniel J. McCarthy (Northeastern University), Daniel M. Satinsky (Business Development Consultant and MALD 1990) on their new book Hammer and Silicon: The Soviet Diaspora in the U.S. Innovation Economy - Immigration, Innovation, Institutions, Imprinting, and Identity (2018). Refreshments will be provided. Attendance is by registration only on Eventbrite.

This deeply personal book tells the untold story of the significant contributions of technical professionals from the former Soviet Union to the U.S. innovation economy, particularly in the sectors of software, social media, biotechnology, and medicine. Drawing upon in-depth inteiviews, it channels the voices and stories of more than 150 professionals who emigrated from 11 of the 15 former Soviet republics between the 1970s and 2015, and who currently work in the innovation hubs of Silicon Valley and Boston. Using the social science theories of institutions, imprinting, and identity, the authors analyze the political, social, economic, and educational forces that have characterized Soviet immigration over the past 40 years, showing how the particularities of the Soviet context may have benefited or challenged interviewees' work and social lives. The resulting mosaic of perspectives provides valuable insight into the impact of immigration on U.S. economic development, specifically in high technology and innovation.

Daniel J. McCarthy is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus and the Alan S. McKim and Richard A. D'Amore Distinguished Professor of Global Management and Innovation at the D’Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University and is also an Associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University. He is cofounder, codirector and Chair of the strategy advisory council of Northeastern University’s Center for Entrepreneurship Education. Additionally, he is cofounder of the Northeastern University Venture Mentoring Network and a member of the Steering committee, as well as a Board member for IDEA, the Northeastern University Venture Accelerator. McCarthy has more than 110 publications, including Business Policy and Strategy (1987), The Russian Capitalist Experiment (2000), and Corporate Governance in Russia(2005). He served until 2016 as the lead director of Clean Harbors, Inc., a multi-billion dollar NYSE-listed company, and has consulted in North America and Europe for more than 40 companies. McCarthy holds AB and MBA degrees from Dartmouth College and the Tuck School of Business, and a DBA from Harvard University.

Sheila M. Puffer is University Distinguished Professor at Northeastern University, where she is a professor of international business at the D’Amore-McKim School of Business. She is also an Associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University and has served as program director of the Gorbachev Foundation of North America. In 2015, she was a visiting research professor at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University where she studied entrepreneurs and other technical professionals from the former Soviet Union. Puffer was recognized in 2005 as the top scholar internationally in business and management in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe by the Journal of International Business Studies. She has more than 160 publications, including over 80 refereed articles and 11 books. She served as the editor of The Academy of Management Executive as well as a member of the Academy’s Board of Governors (1999-2002). She worked for six years as an administrator in the Government of Canada and has consulted for a number of private and nonprofit organizations. Puffer earned a diploma from the executive management program at the Plekhanov Institute of the National Economy in Moscow, and holds B.A. (Slavic Studies) and MBA degrees from the University of Ottawa, Canada, and a Ph.D. in business administration from the University of California, Berkeley.
Daniel Satinsky is a Business Development Consultant and Independent Scholar. For more than 20 years, Daniel has been engaged in technology-related international business projects and building practical business networks, with a concentration on Russia-related projects. He collaborated with Sheila Puffer and Daniel McCarthy on the journal article “Emerging Innovation in an Emerging Economy: Can Institutional Reforms Help Russia Break through Historical Barriers.” Other past publications include: co-author of Yaroslavl Roadmap 10-15-20, a New York Academy of Sciences study of worldwide innovation best practices, author of Buyer’s Guide to the Russian IT Outsourcing Industry; co-author of Perm Innovation Roadmap and author of Industrial Giants, Entrepreneurs and Regional Government-The Changing Business Environment in the Yaroslavl’ Oblast 1991-98. He was President of the Board of the U.S.-Russia Chamber of Commerce of New England for more than 15 years and is an Associate of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies of Harvard University. He holds a Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy degree from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, a Juris Doctor degree from Northeastern University Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from James Madison College of Michigan State University.

————————————— 

Gotta Get Down to It: Conversations with musician David Crosby
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 5 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theater, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Learning from Performers program and the Harvard University Department of Music.
SPEAKER(S)  Renate van Orden, Dwight P. Robinson Jr. Professor of Music at Harvard and Ingrid Monson, Quincy Jones Professor of African-American Music at Harvard.
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	617-495-8676
DETAILS  Join the legendary musician David Crosby in discussion forum with a group of Harvard student musicians and poets curated by host Kate van Orden, Dwight P. Robinson Jr. Professor of Music at Harvard, followed by a conversation between Crosby and Ingrid Monson, Quincy Jones Professor of African-American Music at Harvard.
LINK  https://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/event/musician-david-crosby-at-Harvard

————————————— 

DUSP [Department of Urban Studies and Planning] Lightning Talks
Tuesday, September 25
5:30pm to 8:00pm
MIT, Building E14: Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Kick-off the semester with the ever-popular "DUSP Lightning Talks.” Faculty and PhD students will have *three minutes* to explain *one research project* in layperson's language. Each presentation will be followed by a question from the audience, to be answered in no more than two minutes.

————————————— 

What’s New? What’s Next? Cultural and Structural Threats to the Constitutional Order of the United States and Western Europe
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Seminar on Cultural Politics, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Chair: Prof. Panagiotis Roilos
SPEAKER(S)  Jennifer Hochschild, Faculty Associate. Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government; Chair, Department of Government; Professor of African and African American Studies, Department of African and African American Studies, Harvard University; Harvard College Professor.

—————————————

Boston Green Drinks - September 2018 Happy Hour
Tuesday, September 25
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Warehouse Bar & Grille, 40 Broad Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-green-drinks-september-2018-happy-hour-tickets-50419132984

For September's Happy Hour, we will be joined by Peak Organic Brewing Company! A representative will join us, with swag in-hand (Pint glasses, etc), to discuss their beers and their mission, which aligns nicely with Green Drinks! 
 
Join the conversation with sustainability professionals and hobbyists.  Enjoy a drink and build your connection with our green community! Boston Green Drinks builds a community of sustainably-minded Bostonians, provides a forum for exchange of sustainability career resources, and serves as a central point of information about emerging green issues.  We support the exchange of ideas and resources about sustainable energy, environment, food, health, education.
 
Why Warehouse?
They are currently in the process of updating their food & beverage menu, as well as their business practices, to put a focus on more sustainable and ethical items! Green Drinks celebrates their efforts to become a Certified Green Restaurant®, and thus let's raise a glass they own, to their success! 
What are they trying?
1.  Recycling food waste in partnership with Agri Cycle Clean Energy.  They essentially turn the food waste & packaging scraps into energy - www.agricycleenergy.com
2.  Adding all sorts of vegan options, including the Impossible Burger https://www.impossiblefoods.com/burger/.  As Cliff, their owner, puts it: The movement towards a plant-based diet is here and we're trying to meet the demands of our customers.  There's no denying the detrimental impact that animal agriculture has on the environment so we're attempting to shift our menu to food that is more sustainable.
3.  Growing their own herbs in house, cutting down on transportation & packaging costs of having them delivered.  Basil, cilantro and oregano are their first three and the hope is to start to grow their own salad greens as well.
4.  Continuing best efforts to minimize utility consumption by using low flow toilets, LED light bulbs and energy star rated cooking & refrigeration equipment.  They were lucky enough to build our space brand new so took advantage of some energy efficient programs the state offers restaurants.
5.  In partnership with our trash provider - Used cardboard boxes are recycled.
6.  In partnership with our beer distributors - Glass bottles & alumni cans are recycled.
7.  They're exploring ways to eliminate use of plastic straws.  

————————————— 

Beat the Drum with Women's Global Education Project and World Education
Tuesday September 25
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
Chase Young Gallery, 450 Harrison Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/beat-the-drum-with-womens-global-education-project-and-world-education-tickets-49346509739

Join Amy Maglio, the founder and executive director of Women's Global Education Project, and Barbara Borgese, the program officer for the Africa division of World Education, for a conversation on what it will take to ensure access to education for women and girls everywhere.

This evening will feature conversation, cocktails, and networking for change makers who care about the future of women and and girls from Cambridge to Kenya. The evening will feature a drum performance by local artist, Drum Connection.

———————————— 

Outbreak Week - Emerging Infections Then and Now: From the Influenza Pandemic to the Antibiotic Resistance Crisis
WHEN  Tuesday, Sep. 25, 2018, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Lahey Room, Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street #3, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Environmental Sciences, Exhibitions, Health Sciences, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Global Health Institute
Harvard Medical School (Department of Global Health and Social Medicine)
Center for the History of Medicine
SPEAKER(S)  Dan Lucey
Scott Podolsky
Eugene Richardson
Michele Barry
Ramanan Laxminarayan
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6KXIVkKTGWlsLZ3
TICKET INFO  All events are free and registration is required.
CONTACT INFO	outbreakweek at harvard.edu
DETAILS  Opening remarks will be provided by Dr. Scott Podolsky and Dr. Daniel Lucey, followed by an expert panel discussion on the emerging risks of antimicrobial resistance, historical emerging infections, big data, and contemporary outbreaks. This discussion will be followed by an exhibition curated by the Countway Medical Library, as well as exhibition material from the Smithsonian Museum’s recent Outbreak exhibit.
LINK   https://globalhealth.harvard.edu/outbreakweek-sept24

————————————— 

On the Other Side of Freedom:  The Case for Hope
Tuesday, September 25
7:00 PM (Doors at 6:30)
Old South Church, 645 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/deray_mckesson/
Cost:  $26.75 (book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed civil rights activist and community organizer DERAY MCKESSON—host of Pod Save the People—for a discussion of his debut book, On the Other Side of Freedom: The Case for Hope.

About On the Other Side of Freedom
In August of 2014, twenty-nine-year-old activist DeRay Mckesson stood with hundreds of others on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, to push a message of justice and accountability. These protests, and others like them in cities across the country, resulted in the birth of the Black Lives Matter movement. Now, in his first book, Mckesson lays out the intellectual, pragmatic political framework for a new liberation movement. Continuing a conversation about activism, resistance, and justice that embraces our nation's complex history, he dissects how deliberate oppression persists, how racial injustice strips our lives of promise, and how technology has added a new dimension to mass action and social change. He argues that our best efforts to combat injustice have been stunted by the belief that racism's wounds are history, and suggests that intellectual purity has curtailed optimistic realism. The book offers a new framework and language for understanding the nature of oppression. With it, we can begin charting a course to dismantle the obvious and subtle structures that limit freedom.

Honest, courageous, and imaginative, On the Other Side of Freedom is a work brimming with hope. Drawing from his own experiences as an activist, organizer, educator, and public official, Mckesson exhorts all Americans to work to dismantle the legacy of racism and to imagine the best of what is possible. Honoring the voices of a new generation of activists, On the Other Side of Freedom is a visionary's call to take responsibility for imagining, and then building, the world we want to live in.

——————————————

Black Flags, Blue Waters
Tuesday, September 25
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Set against the backdrop of the Age of Exploration, Black Flags, Blue Waters reveals the dramatic and surprising history of American piracy’s “Golden Age”—spanning the late 1600s through the early 1700s—when lawless pirates plied the coastal waters of North America and beyond. Best-selling author Eric Jay Dolin illustrates how American colonists at first supported these outrageous pirates in an early display of solidarity against the Crown, and then violently opposed them. Through engrossing episodes of roguish glamour and extreme brutality, Dolin depicts the star pirates of this period, among them towering Blackbeard, ill-fated Captain Kidd, and sadistic Edward Low, who delighted in torturing his prey. Also brilliantly detailed are the pirates’ manifold enemies, including colonial governor John Winthrop, evangelist Cotton Mather, and young Benjamin Franklin. Upending popular misconceptions and cartoonish stereotypes, Dolin provides this wholly original account of the seafaring outlaws whose raids reflect the precarious nature of American colonial life.

Eric Jay Dolin is the best-selling author of Leviathan and Brilliant Beacons. He and his family live in Marblehead, Massachusetts, from which the pirate John Quelch departed in 1703, and returned to in 1704.

———————————————

Dancing with the Future
Tuesday, September 25
7 pm
Harvard, Farkas Hall, 12 Holyoke Street, Cambridge

On 25 September at 7pm, five dancers and two scientists will take to the stage of Harvard University’s Farkas Hall and push the boundaries of art and science, fusing dance, evolutionary dynamics, and an interactive game.

Dancing with the Future is a collaboration between the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics of Harvard University and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. The performance explores mechanisms of cooperation and investigates a question that is at the heart of all sustainable development, yet remains widely elusive as it entails a moral component that cannot easily be assessed: Are humans able to cooperate with future generations? In other words, what kind of planet are we willing to leave behind for the people who come after us? To enable broad access, tickets for the premiere can be purchased for a nominal fee of US$ 10 (general admission) / US$ 5 (with Student ID) through the Harvard Box Office at https://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=evolutionary

——————————————— 

New England Apple Agriculture with David Dolginow
Tuesday, September 25
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Harvard, CGIS Knafel Building - K354, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/new-england-apple-agriculture-with-david-dolginow-tickets-49427470896

Apple agriculture has roots in New England dating back to the 17th century. The apples of America's early cider tradition have been lost for a number of reasons, but the team at Shacksbury Cider started seeking out these lost varieties in Vermont five years ago. To date, they’ve sampled thousands of apples, made cider from over 150 unique trees and selected 12 varieties to propagate. They’ve grafted these 12 varieties to over a thousand trees, marking the beginning of the “Lost Apple Orchard.” Sample a few lost apple varieties and learn about the future of New England apple agriculture from David Dolginow, Co-founder of Shacksbury Cider.

———————————————

Boston Science for the People chapter meeting
Tuesday, September 25
7:00-9:00 p.m.
MIT, Building 4-231, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Join us for the monthly chapter meeting on Tuesday, September 25 from 7 to 9 PM at MIT (Room 4-231). Nathan Foster will be leading a discussion entitled Selling Space, about ongoing efforts to increase private-sector involvement in US space programs. You can find some short readings on the topic here:

Koren, M. (2018). "What Should We Do About the International Space Station?”. The Atlantic.
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/06/trump-nasa-international-space-station-bridenstine/562076/

Davenport, C. (2018). "Why NASA’s next rockets might say Budweiser on the side”. The Washington Post.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2018/09/10/why-nasas-next-rockers-might-say-budweiser-side/

Besides this, we’ll be sharing information on upcoming events, discussing our Boston-area SftP lecture/panel series for the next year, and settling details on the workings of future meetings.

Looking forward to meeting you all there!

More information available from wkyih at yahoo.com

———————————————— 

Film Screening: Conservation of Matter
Tuesday, September 25
7:30 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
Loring Greenough House, 12 South Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/film-screening-conservation-of-matter-tickets-49700635940
Cost:  $0 – $5

Join us at the Loring-Greenough House for Tuesday in the Parlor, our homage to the early days of the Jamaica Plain Tuesday Club, and their monthly events. This month, we’re hosting a September Cinema Series! Transport yourself into a different era and a different time, watching films on transportation itself!

Tuesday, Sept. 25th, 7:30pm: Conservation of Matter: The Fall and Rise of Boston’s Elevated Subway

Join us for the conclusion of our two part September Cinema Series! “Conservation of Matter” explores the rise and ultimate fall of Boston’s elevated subway that served the city of nearly a century. Spanning two continents, the subsequent reuse of the subway’s steel takes us on a surprising journey of architecture, history, and even astrophysics. 

Length: 30 minutes

FREE for members; $5 for non-members. Popcorn and beverages will be served.

————————————— 
Wednesday, September 26
————————————— 

Media in the Age of Contagions: Part of Outbreak Week at Harvard University
Wednesday, September 26
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM 
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West (2019), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cDco6m1ZT8qgbtz

Led by HGHI, Outbreak Week is a University-wide effort to commemorate the 1918 influenza pandemic that killed more than 50 million people around the globe.

At this symposium on "Media in the Age of Contagions," journalists who have covered public and global health for print, television, radio, and digital media outlets including NPR, PBS, the New York Times, the Washington Post, STAT, and more will discuss the role of the media when an outbreak occurs, and the dangers of rumors and disinformation.

——————————————— 

U.S. Drug Prices: Why Are They So High?
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  The Leadership Studio, 677 Huntington Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
SPEAKER(S)  EXPERT PARTICIPANTS
Leemore Dafny, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
Richard Frank, Professor of Health Economics in the Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School
Aaron Kesselheim, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Director of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL)
Steven Pearson, President of the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review
MODERATOR  Caroline Humer, Correspondent, Reuters
TICKET WEB LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eQz7hVzWras1ukJ
CONTACT INFO	theforum at hsph.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Americans pay more money – sometimes much more money – for prescriptions than consumers in many other wealthy countries. Why? The drivers are many and complicated. Pharmaceutical companies, employers, health care providers, patients, lawmakers, and pharmacy benefit managers all play a role. Calls to make prescriptions more affordable have prompted new efforts, including at the federal level. Last May, for example, President Trump introduced a plan intended to help reduce drug prices. This Forum event aims to demystify the prescription drug pricing process. Experts will weigh issues such as regulation, price negotiation and competitive market pressures, ultimately asking why prescription costs matter for public health.
LINK	https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/events/u-s-drug-prices/

——————————————— 

Defying Borders and Binaries: Legal Resistance and Civil Disobedience During the Rise of White Nationalism
Wednesday, September 26
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Northeastern, 240 Dockser Hall, 65 Forsyth Street, Boston

Fall 2018 Daynard Visiting Fellow: Prerna Lal, Founder and Managing Attorney, Lal Legal

Prerna Lal was born in the Fiji Islands, came to the United States with their parents when they were 14, and then lived in the San Francisco East Bay area.

Formerly an undocumented immigrant, Lal was integral to establishing United We DREAM and the DreamActivist network, both led by undocumented youth. The organizations mobilized thousands of undocumented immigrants to push for the federal DREAM Act in 2010, ending the deportations of undocumented youth, and securing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program under the Obama Administration. A mobilizer and social media strategist, Lal has also helped with the creation of many local immigrant youth groups, providing direct support, mentorship and advocacy to individuals caught up in the immigration dragnet.

As an undocumented law school graduate, Lal was among the first in the country to obtain a license to practice law. As a result of Lal’s high-spirited activism, the US government sought to deport them. Law won lawful permanent residency after a long court battle, and in April 2018, Lal became a United States citizen.

As a nonprofit policy attorney in Washington, DC, Lal worked at Asian Americans Advancing Justice (AAJC), spearheading initiatives related to extending DACA, Deferred Action for Parents of Americans, Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Nepal and parole-in-place for family members of Filipino war veterans. Through a partnership between the East Bay Community Law Center and UC Berkeley’s Undocumented Student Program, Lal provided immigration legal services for more than 500 students and their family members. As an immigration attorney, clinical supervisor and lecturer at a clinic of UC Berkeley School of Law, Lal mentored a new generation of public interest law students.

——————————————

Hidden Atrocities: Japanese Germ Warfare and American Obstruction of Justice at the Tokyo Trial
Wednesday, September 26
12:00-1:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496, Pye Room, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Jeanne Guillemin, M.I.T.
In the aftermath of World War II, the Allied intent to bring Axis crimes to light led to both the Nuremberg trials and their counterpart in Tokyo, the International Military Tribunal of the Far East. Yet the Tokyo Trial failed to prosecute imperial Japanese leaders for the worst of war crimes: inhumane medical experimentation, including vivisection and open-air pathogen and chemical tests, which rivaled Nazi atrocities, as well as mass attacks using plague, anthrax, and cholera that killed thousands of Chinese civilians. In Hidden Atrocities (New York: Columbia University Press, 2017), Jeanne Guillemin goes behind the scenes at the trial to reveal the American obstruction that denied justice to Japan's victims.

Bio: Jeanne Guillemin's training in medical sociology and anthropology at Harvard and Brandeis Universities has led to her involvement in issues regarding unusual infectious diseases (including anthrax, SARS, the Ebola virus, and MERS) and biological and chemical weapons. In addition to consulting and lecturing, Guillemin was a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on WMD (2009-13), served on the board of Transaction Books, and is an associate of the Harvard-Sussex Program on chemical and biological weapons disarmament.

———————————————

Almost Lost Detroit: African Americans, Racialized Individualism and Social Resilience in the Context of Public Sector Contraction
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research
SPEAKER(S)  Jessica Welburn Paige, Assistant Professor, Sociology and African American Studies, University of Iowa
COST  Free and open to the public.
CONTACT INFO	hutchevents at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Jessica Welburn Paige is an assistant professor of Sociology and African American Studies at the University of Iowa. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University in November 2011. From 2011-12 she was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Center for Institutional Diversity at the University of Michigan and from 2012-14 she was a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the experiences of African Americans in the post-Civil Rights Era including their experiences navigating racism and discrimination and their attitudes about social mobility. Her work has been published in Ethnic and Racial Studies, The Journal for African American Studies, The DuBois Review for Social Science Research and in edited book volumes. In addition, in 2016 she co-authored the book Getting Respect: Responding to Stigma and Discrimination in the United States, Brazil and Israel with Michèle Lamont, Graziela Silva, Joshua Guetzkow, Nissim Mizrahi, Hannah Herzog and Elisa Reis (Princeton University Press).
As a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow for Fall 2018, she will work on Die Hard City: Public Sector Contraction and the Experiences of African Americans in Detroit.
LINK  https://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/event/colloquium-jessica-welburn-paige-almost-lost-detroit-african-americans-racialized

———————————————

Accompanying Unaccompanied Child Refugees: The Challenges Facing Advocates and Activists
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 12 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South Building, Doris and Ted Lee Gathering Room (S030), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The HOME Project
Harvard FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
The Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs
Middle East Initiative, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Jacqueline Bhabha, Faculty Associate. Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Department of Global Health and Population; Director of Research, François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Jeremiah Smith Jr. Lecturer on Law, Harvard Law School.
Vidur Chopra, Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Graduate School of Education.
Sofia Kouvelaki, Executive Director, The Home Project, Athens, Greece.
Chaired by:  Melani Cammett, Chair, The Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies; Faculty Associate. Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs, Department of Government, Harvard University; Professor, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO	Sarah Banse
sarahbanse at wcfia.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The HOME Project is a unifying initiative set up to address the needs of refugees and refugee children in particular who have arrived in Greece alone. Through its programs it looks to provide relief from suffering to all those affected by the crisis and to give hope out of despair. The HOME Project exists to bring these people to safe haven. It provides security, dignity, and decent living conditions for the most vulnerable. It serves to recognize our common humanity and to do something for those who need it most. At the HOME Project, we Help, Overcome, Motivate, Empower. Together we hope to build a better future.
LINK  https://wcfia.harvard.edu/event/special-event-panel-discussion-9-26-18

———————————— 

The Humanitarian Crisis in Venezuela - A Conversation with José Miguel Vivanco
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 1:15 – 2:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Center for International Development at Harvard University
SPEAKER(S)  José Miguel Vivanco, Executive Director of Americas division, Human Rights Watch
CONTACT INFO	camila_lobo at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The current exodus of Venezuelans has generated the largest migration crisis of its kind in recent Latin American history, as Human Rights Watch has pointed out in its most recent report. More than 2.3 million Venezuelans have left their country since 2014, according to the United Nations, and many others have left whose cases have not been registered by authorities. Venezuelans are fleeing their country for multiple reasons, which includes: Severe shortages of medicine, medical supplies, and food; extremely high rates of violent crime; hyperinflation; and thousands of arbitrary arrests, torture and other abuses against detainees. The director of Human Rights Watch's Americas division, Jose Miguel Vivanco, will talk about this exodus, its causes and consequences, and the Need for a Regional Response to face the crisis.
LINK	https://growthlab.cid.harvard.edu/event/cid-speaker-series

——————————————

xTalk with Ryan Baker:  The Dynamics of Affect in Online Learning
Wednesday, September 26
1:30am to 2:30am
MIT, Building 66-144, 25 Ames Street, Cambridge

Student affect develops in complex ways as students use online and blended learning systems. In this talk,  Prof. Ryan Baker will discuss his lab's work to understand the development of learner affect over time. This work has several dimensions -- how long an affective state persists once it begins, how frequently one affective state transitions into another state, how affect impacts learner behaviors and study habits, and the impact on long-term student outcomes.

Baker will discuss these issues using data from a range of online learning systems, from intelligent tutoring systems to simulations, and across both micro (second-by-second) and macro (8 year) time scales. He will discuss how automated log file detection of affect is emerging as a key method for studying affect dynamics as well as more traditional methods such as classroom observation and video coding.

Ryan Baker is Associate Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and Director of the Penn Center for Learning Analytics. His lab conducts research on engagement and robust learning within online and blended learning, seeking to find actionable indicators that can be used today but which predict future student outcomes. He was the founding president of the International Educational Data Mining Society, is currently serving as Associate Editor of two journals, was the first technical director of the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center DataShop, and currently serves as Co-Director of the MOOC Replication Framework (MORF).

————————————— 

Edge, Fog and Cloud
Wednesday, September 26
3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
BU, PHO 906, 8 St Marys Stewwr, Boston
RSVP at http://www.bu.edu/eng/files/2018/08/DLSFlyer_MungChiang.png

Edge, Fog and Cloud Abstract: Decomposition of network functions along the cloud-to-things continuum is leading to new questions on what can be done on network edge. We explore the opportunities and discuss the challenges of fog computing, through examples in mobile networks, IoT and dispersive AI. 

Bio: Mung Chiang is the John A. Edwardson Dean of the College of Engineering at Purdue University. Previously he was the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. His research on net- working received the 2013 Alan T. Waterman Award, the highest honor to US young scientists and engineers. His textbooks and online courses reached over 250,000 students since 2012. He founded the Princeton EDGE Lab in 2009, which bridges the theory-practice gap in edge networking research by spanning from proofs to prototypes. He also co-founded a few startup companies in mobile data, IoT and AI, and co-founded the global nonprofit Open Fog Consortium.

————————————— 

Dr. Joy DeGruy
Wednesday, September 26
4:00pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building E14: Media Lab, 3rd Floor Atrium, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Dr. Joy DeGruy is a nationally and internationally renowned researcher, educator, author and presenter. She is an ambassador for healing and a voice for those who’ve struggled in search of the past, and continue to struggle through the present. Dr. Joy is the acclaimed author of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome — America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing,  Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: The Study Guide, with a second book in the works, Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome Part 2: Be The Healing.

Her MIT presentation will be on Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome, followed by a book signing.

Sponsored by: WGS, ICEO, Intercultural Engagement, LBGT at MIT, Libraries, Media Lab, OME, SA&P, Sloan Student Life, T9BR

————————————— 

The Trump Administration's Rollback of Climate Policy
Wednesday, September 26
4:00PM TO 6:00PM
Harvard, Austin East (Austin Hall 101), HLS, 1515 Mass Avenue, Cambridge

The Harvard University Center for the Environment presents a special lecture
With:
Jody Freeman, Archibald Cox Professor of Law; Director, Environmental Law Program, Harvard Law School
Richard Lazarus, Howard J. and Katherine W. Aibel Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Moderated By:
Daniel Schrag, Hooper Professor of Geology; Professor, Harvard Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Director, Harvard University Center for the Environment

Jody Freeman is the Archibald Cox Professor of Law and the founding director of the Harvard Law School Environmental Law and Policy Program. She is a leading scholar of both administrative law and environmental law. Professor Freeman’s book, GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND U.S. LAW (co-edited with Michael Gerrard) was published in 2015.

Professor Freeman served in the White House as Counselor for Energy and Climate Change in 2009-10, where she was the architect of the president’s historic agreement with the auto industry to double fuel efficiency standards, launching the administration’s greenhouse gas program under the Clean Air Act. In her role, she also contributed to a host of initiatives on renewable energy, energy efficiency, transmission policy and oil and gas drilling, as well as the administration’s effort to pass legislation placing a market based cap on carbon.

After leaving the administration, Freeman served as an independent consultant to the President's bipartisan Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. She has been appointed to the Administrative Conference of the United States, the government think tank for improving the administrative and regulatory process, and elected the American College of Environmental Lawyers. In 2012, Professor Freeman was elected as an outside director of ConocoPhillips, where she serves on the public policy and compensation committees. 

Professor Freeman has written for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Guardian and Los Angeles Times.

Richard Lazarus is the Howard and Katherine Aibel Professor of Law at Harvard University, where he teaches environmental law, natural resources Law, Supreme Court advocacy, and torts. Professor Lazarus has represented the United States, state and local governments, and environmental groups in the United States Supreme Court in 40 cases and has presented oral argument in 13 of those cases. His primary areas of legal scholarship are environmental and natural resources law, with particular emphasis on constitutional law and the Supreme Court. He has published two books, The Making of Environmental Law (U. Chicago 2004), and Environmental Law Stories (Aspen Press, co-edited with O. Houck 2005). He was also the principal author of Deep Water - The Gulf Oil Disaster and the Future of Offshore Drilling (GPO 2011), which is the Report to the President of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling Commission, for which he served as the Executive Director. The Commission was charged with investigating the root causes of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and recommending changes in law and policy to reduce the risk of future spills and to mitigate their impacts. Prior to joining the Harvard law faculty, Professor Lazarus was the Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., Professor of Law at Georgetown University, where he also founded the Supreme Court Institute. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1979 and has a B.S. in chemistry and a B.A. in economics from the University of Illinois.

Daniel P. Schrag is the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology at Harvard University, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment. Schrag studies climate and climate change over the broadest range of Earth history. He is particularly interested in how information on climate change from the geologic past can lead to better understanding of anthropogenic climate change in the future. In addition to his work on geochemistry and climatology, Schrag studies energy technology and policy, including carbon capture and storage and low-carbon synthetic fuels. Schrag served on President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Among various honors, he is the recipient of the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union and a MacArthur Fellowship. Schrag earned a B.S. in geology and geophysics and political science from Yale University and his Ph.D. in geology from the University of California at Berkeley. He came to Harvard in 1997 after teaching at Princeton.

Contact Name:  Laura Hanrahan
laura_hanrahan at harvard.edu

—————————————— 

The Incidence of Coarse Certification: Evidence from the Energy Star Program
Wednesday, September 26
4:15PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard, Room L-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/44157
“” with Sebastien Houde, ETH Zurich. 

Support from Enel Endowment for Environmental Economics and the Department of Economics is Gratefully Acknowledged.

Contact Name: casey_billings at hks.harvard.edu

————————————————

Richard Montanez: The Importance of Diversity in Sparking Innovation
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Office of Career Services
COST  Event is free. Tickets Required. Limit of 2 tickets per person . Tickets valid until 4:15PM. Available by phone and internet for a fee. Call 617-496-2222 or reserve on line at www.boxoffice.harvard.edu
TICKET WEB LINK  http://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu
TICKET INFO  The Harvard Box Office 617-496-2222
DETAILS  Richard Montañez is an inspirational speaker.  His story of pushing through adversity and battling issues of inclusion and belonging in the workplace will amaze you. His entrepreneurial and innovative spirit is infectious.  As the creator of the cultural phenomenon, “Flamin’ Hot Cheetos,” he notes, “There was something special about being different.” Come learn from him how to prepare yourself to “walk through different doors.” Don’t miss hearing his riveting, personal story of growing up in a migrant farm camp to now living in Beverly Hills.  Meet him in person before Fox Searchlight Pictures releases their biopic movie “Flamin’ Hot.”

————————————————

Learning Using Statistical Invariants (Revision of Machine Learning Problem)
Wednesday, September 26
4:30pm to 5:30pm
MIT, Kirsch Auditorium, Building 32-123 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Dertouzos Distinguished Lecture: Vladimir Vapnik
ABSTRACT:  This talk covers a new learning paradigm. In the classical paradigm, the learning machine uses a data-driven model of learning. In the LUSI paradigm, the learning machine computes statistical invariants that are specific for the problem, and then minimizes the expected error in a way that preserves these invariants; it is thus both data- and intelligent-driven learning. Mathematically, methods of the new paradigm employ both strong and weak convergence mechanisms, increasing the rate of convergence. LUSI describes a complete theory of learning and can be considered as a mathematical alternative to "deep learning" heuristic. The talk includes content from a paper published in Machine Learning, Springer 2018.

BIO:  Vladimir Vapnik has taught and researched in computer science, theoretical and applied statistics for over 30 years. His major achievements include a general theory of minimizing the expected risk using empirical data, and a new type of learning machine called Support Vector that possesses a high level of generalization ability. These techniques have been used in constructing intelligent machines.

Prof. Vapnik gained his Masters Degree in Mathematics in 1958 at Uzbek State University, Samarkand, USSR, received his master's degree in mathematics from the Uzbek State University in 1958, and completed his Ph.D in statistics at the Institute of Control Sciences, Moscow in 1964, where he became Head of the Computer Science Research Department, before he joined AT&T Bell Laboratories, NJ.
He holds a Professor of Computer Science and Statistics position at Royal Holloway, University of London since 1995, and a position as Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, New York City since 2003.

———————————————

Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: The Sooner the Better
Wednesday, September 26 
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
MIT Weisner Building, Build E15, Bartos Theater, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.mitforumcambridge.org/event/artificial-intelligence-in-healthcare-the-sooner-the-better/
Cost:  $5 - $45

As healthcare organizations leverage digital platforms for patient care, it is important to understand how Artificial Intelligence can use patient data to improve patient outcomes. Deep learning can drive early disease detection, drive early intervention in critical patient events, and predict epidemics. Our panel of experts will discuss where AI can positively impact the lives of patients, and where the industry needs to move in order to make this a reality.

Join us to learn:
How is Artificial Intelligence impacting healthcare already?
What business challenges impede wider adoption of AI?
What legal implications lie ahead with clinical datasets?
How AI can improve early disease detection
AI’s place in precision medicine

Moderator:
Phillip Machnik, Senior Technical Application Analyst at Patient Keeper
Confirmed Speakers:
Jonathan Bickel MD, IT Physician Lead, Senior Director Business Intelligence and Clinical Research Informatics, Boston Children’s Hospital
Hunter Elliott, Director of Machine Learning Research, PathAI
Catherine Kreatsoulas Ph.D, Research Fellow, Harvard School of Public Health
Dan Rudoy Ph.D, Associate, Electrical and Computer Technologies, Wolf Greenfield

Event Schedule
Registration & Networking: 5:30 PM
Program: 6:00 - 8:00 PM
Cocktails & Light Refreshments: 8:00 - 9:00 PM

———————————— 

John Woman:  A Novel
Wednesday, September 26
6:00 PM  (Doors at 5:30)
Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/walter_mosley/
Cost:  $6 - $27.75 (book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes celebrated novelist WALTER MOSLEY for a discussion of his latest novel, John Woman.

About John Woman
A convention-defying novel by bestselling writer Walter Mosley, John Woman recounts the transformation of an unassuming boy named Cornelius Jones into John Woman, an unconventional history professor―while the legacy of a hideous crime lurks in the shadows.

At twelve years old, Cornelius, the son of an Italian-American woman and an older black man from Mississippi named Herman, secretly takes over his father’s job at a silent film theater in New York’s East Village. Five years later, as Herman lives out his last days, he shares his wisdom with his son, explaining that the person who controls the narrative of history controls their own fate. After his father dies and his mother disappears, Cornelius sets about reinventing himself―as Professor John Woman, a man who will spread Herman’s teachings into the classrooms of his unorthodox southwestern university and beyond. But there are other individuals who are attempting to influence the narrative of John Woman, and who might know something about the facts of his hidden past.

Engaging with some of the most provocative ideas of recent intellectual history, John Woman is a compulsively readable, deliciously unexpected novel about the way we tell stories, and whether the stories we tell have the power to change the world.

Editorial Comment:  I believe Walter Mosley to be one of the most clear-sighted people writing about the USA and the world today.

————————————

China’s Anti-Poverty Miracle?
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE   Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Lu Mai, Rohini Pande, Anthony Saich, Graham Allison (Moderator)
CONTACT INFO	IOP Forum Office, 617-495-1380
DETAILS	
Lu Mai, Secretary General, China Development Research Foundation
Rohini Pande, Rafik Hariri Professor of International Political Economy, Harvard Kennedy School
Anthony Saich, Daewoo Professor of International Affairs and Director, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School
Graham Allison (Moderator), Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School
LINK	http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/china’s-anti-poverty-miracle

———————————— 

The National and Personal Toll of the Opioid Epidemic: A Conversation with Maureen Cavanagh
Wednesday, September 26
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Old South Church, 645 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-national-and-personal-toll-of-the-opioid-epidemic-a-conversation-with-sam-quinones-and-maureen-tickets-50000596129

For National Recovery Month, we're partnering with RIZE Massachusetts to host the Mayor's Recovery Month Book Club, a series of events focusing on substance abuse, addiction and recovery. 

Join us for the culminating event on September 26, where Mayor Walsh will lead a discussion with Sam Quinones, author of "Dreamland," and Maureen Cavanagh, author of "If You Love Me," on the national and personal toll of the opioid epidemic. This free event is open to the public, and will be held at Old South Church on September 26 from 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Both authors will be available for book signings following the discussion. 

Learn more about the Mayor's Recovery Month Book Club at boston.gov/recovery-month.

———————————— 

Protecting the Charter: Strategic Resistance in 17th-century Boston
Wednesday, September 26
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
First Church Boston - chapel, 66 Marlborough Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/protecting-the-charter-strategic-resistance-in-17th-century-boston-registration-48648479913

17th-century English kings repeatedly tried to shape Massachusetts Bay into a colony that would bring wealth and an abundant supply of resources to their emerging empire.
The colonists, however, thought differently. They thought the state should conform to the needs of the people and the church, not the other way around – as Puritans, they argued that status should be linked to piety rather than wealth or class.
And so in the 1660s, colonists mobilized to protect the liberties set out in their original charter, and they did so by engaging in strategic forms of resistance. They successfully defied four royal commissioners who came to the colonies to enforce Charles II’s demands. Then in the 1680s under James II, the royal governor Edmund Andros tried again to curtail their liberties...and the colonists rebelled by imprisoning Andros! 
Throughout these events, the men and women of Massachusetts developed a constitutional culture that prioritized consent and also limitations on arbitrary rule. 
This compelling talk by Dr. Weimer uncovers the earliest acts of colonist resistance to the English crown.
An RSVP for this event is requested but not required.

About the speaker
Adrian Chastain Weimer is Associate Professor of History at Providence College. Her first book, Martyrs' Mirror: Persecution and Holiness in Early New England (Oxford, 2011) explores how puritans, Baptists, and Quakers imagined themselves within historical narratives of persecution, especially the stories in John Foxe’s “Book of Martyrs.” Recent articles include “Elizabeth Hooton and the Lived Politics of Toleration in Massachusetts Bay” (William & Mary Quarterly, 2017) and “Huguenot Refugees and the Meaning of Charity in Early New England” (Church History, 2017). Her work has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and most recently through 2017-2018 NEH Long-term Research Fellowships from the Massachusetts Historical Society and the American Antiquarian Society.
About the event series
Every fall, in honor of the naming of Boston, the Partnership of Historic Bostons hosts a series of free events exploring an intriguing aspect of Puritan life. This year’s theme is From Theology to Commerce: the First Three Generations of 17th-century Boston.
To see a list of the entire series of FREE events, please visit http://historicbostons.eventbrite.com

————————————

Transform educational technology with powerful tools from the science of learning
Wednesdday, September 26 
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
LearnLaunch, 281 Summer Street. Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/transform-educational-technology-with-powerful-tools-from-the-science-of-learning-tickets-48281123139
Cost:  $12

When building the world’s next great educational app, you should probably know the most up-to-date research on cognitive science. Join Pooja Agarwal, Ph.D., for an update on that research at LearnLaunch.

In this session, participants will:
Learn how to optimize learning strategies in their products
Gain a working knowledge of the vocabulary of modern cognitive science to communicate with educators and researchers
Review the major players in the world of learning research
Agenda

6:00-6:30 PM – Arrival, networking, snacks
6:30-6:35 PM – Introductions
6:35-8:00 PM – Research update

Who is this session for?

Education technology entrepreneurs, product managers, curriculum developers, instructional designers, educators

Bio
Pooja K. Agarwal, Ph.D. is an expert in the field of cognitive science, passionate about bridging gaps between education and the science of learning. She has conducted research on learning in K-12 public schools for more than 15 years and she is co-authoring a forthcoming book with a K-12 teacher, entitled Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning.

Pooja’s research has been published in leading peer-reviewed psychology journals; featured in the New York Times, Education Week, and Scientific American; and highlighted in numerous books, podcasts, and videos.

In addition to founding RetrievalPractice.org, Pooja is an Assistant Professor at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, teaching psychological science to exceptional undergraduate musicians. She also serves as a consultant and facilitates professional development workshops on the science of learning around the world. Pooja received her Ph.D. from Washington University in St. Louis, under the mentorship of distinguished memory scholar Henry L. Roediger, III, author of Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.

https://www.poojaagarwal.com/

—————————————

Inside Innovation 
Wednesday, September 26
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Harvard Innovation Labs, 125 Western Avenue, Allston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/inside-innovation-tickets-48846259477

Inside Innovation is a must-attend event for any Harvard student with a big idea or a big interest in understanding the world of Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

The event is a highly interactive exploration of why innovation matters – both to us and to the world. In two hours you’ll get inspired, get connected, and get educated on all the ways the Harvard Innovation Labs can help you find your way through the Innovation and Startup woods. We offer a wide variety of resources to those interested in innovation from a high-level and/or those looking to become an entrepreneur at any point.

No matter where you are in your innovator’s journey – we can help. The only thing you need to bring is a little courage and your Harvard ID. And your appetite, because light apps will be served.

—————————————

The Future of Brewing: Panel Discussion and Tasting Event
Wednesday, September 26
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Lighthouse, 20th floor, CIC Boston, 50 Milk, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-future-of-brewing-tickets-46586423246
Cost:  $15
 
The global beer industry faces its greatest challenge in 50 years. According to McKinsey & Company, all at once, there is falling consumer demand, increasingly competitive products, heightened requirements by retailers and consumers, and tougher market access. This confluence of challenging developments is not merely creating temporary roadblocks for large beer manufacturers – it marks the beginning of a difficult era for the entire industry.
So what does the future of the industry look like?
Greater Boston's brewing scene is bubbling! Local companies are disrupting the industry and creating unique experiences, flavors, and combinations that rival the oldest brands.

On Wednesday, September 26th, Branchfood is teaming up with Wolf & Company PC and CIC to chat about the business of brewing and understand the past, present, and future of the industry. Join us for a panel of experts from local breweries - large, small, and in between - who will tell us how they got started, where they found funding, and how they brew, market, package, sell, and distribute their product, and where the industry is going.
Come thirsty AND hungry!

About the Speakers
Rob Burns, President at Massachusetts Brewers Guild, Co-Founder and President at Nightshift Brewing
Rob is a Co-Founder and President of Nightshift Brewing and President of the Massachusetts Brewers Guild. From its humble beginnings as a homebrewing operation, to its first home in a small warehouse in Everett, to its more recent life as a massive production and distribution operation with an extremely popular taproom, Night Shift Brewing has come a long way since its founding in 2012 by 3 Bowdin graduates.  

Maureen Fabry, Founder at CraftRoots Brewing
CraftRoots Brewing is Milford's first brewery! It is also the first 100% woman-owned "brick-and-mortar" brewery in the history of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The company is a 7-barrel brewery with taproom, serving eight different beer styles daily. With sustainability at its core, CraftRoots Brewing is grounded in a truly grassroots idea: connect the circle between farmers, maltsters, brewers and beer lovers. CraftRoots opened in 2014 as an LLC and brewed its first batch of beer in 2015. In March 2017, the brewery opened in a warehouse in Milford.From 2016 to 2017, the brewery grew by 1,440 percent, from 20 barrels produced in 2016 to 308 in 2017. In 2017 it was named the fastest growing craft brewery in the USA.

Bruce Downes, Head of Marketing at Willie's Superbrew
Bruce leads marketing efforts for Willie's Superbrew, a craft beverage startup founded by a group of friends and graduates from Brown University. Willie’s Superbrew is creating an entirely new category for the alcoholic beverage industry. Superbrew is a cross between hard cider and spiked seltzer, made with all-natural, real ingredients at the Guild in Pawtucket. Two flavors, sparkling ginger and lemon and the new sparkling pomegranate and acai, combine superfoods in a refreshing drink that’s perfect for summertime sipping.

Jim Dumas, Founder and Creative Director at Fat Basset Design
Jim is the founder and creative director at Fat Basset Design, a small graphic design firm located in Scituate. Fat Basset Design believes in challenging the small business owner to think differently about graphic design, and making their brand stand out through visual elements that reflect the passion that owner has for what they do. Some examples of these visual elements include label and packaging design, logo design, and point-of-sale design. In following these beliefs Jim has been fortunate enough to work with a number of Massachusetts breweries including Medusa Brewing, Burke’s Alewerk’s, Battle Road Brewing, Indie Firm and Samuel Adams.

Schedule
Tasting starts at 6:00 pm
Panel Discussion starts at 6:30 pm
Q&A Session at 7:30 pm
Event ends at 8:30 pm

————————————— 

The Comparative Study of the Abrahamic Religions: Heuristic Gains and Cognitive Pitfalls
WHEN  Wednesday, Sep. 26, 2018, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Religion
SPONSOR	Center for the Study of World Religions, John Paul II Center for Interreligious Dialogue, Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
CONTACT	CSWR, 617.495.4476
DETAILS  How is the comparative scholarship on Judaism, Christianity, and Islam possible? What are its presuppositions, and what does it entail? How can the history of religions help interfaith understanding? These are some of the questions this lecture will address.
Lecture by Guy Stroumsa, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Oxford University
Response by Jon Levenson, Harvard Divinity School
Opening Remarks by Charles Stang, Harvard Divinity School, and Adam Afterman, Tel-Aviv University
Guy Stroumsa’s research focuses on the dynamics of encounters between religious traditions and institutions in the Roman Empire and in Late Antiquity, in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. He has studied the crystallization of the Abrahamic traditions in late antiquity, as a background to Islam. He sees Gnosis, Manichaeism and Early Christianity as a unique laboratory for understanding religious transformations in late antiquity. In his studies, Stroumsa seeks in his work to cross traditional interdisciplinary boundaries in order to study religious phenomena from a comparative perspective. This approach permits him to understand the mechanisms behind the religious revolution of Late Antiquity, a period which saw the cessation of a number of widespread aspects of ancient religion (such as blood sacrifice) and the development of new systems, which stand at the basis of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Stroumsa also works on the history of scholarship on religion, from early modern times to the twentieth century.  Stroumsa is the author of fourteen books, and the editor or co-editor of some twenty books. He has published more than a hundred and thirty articles.
John Levenson, Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies, began teaching at Harvard in 1988. His work concentrates on the interpretation of the Hebrew Bible, including its reinterpretations in the "rewritten Bible" of Second Temple Judaism and rabbinic midrash. Professor Levenson has a strong interest in the philosophical and theological issues involved in biblical studies, especially the relationship of premodern modes of interpretation to modern historical criticism. Much of his work centers on the relationship of Judaism and Christianity, both in antiquity and in modernity, and he has long been active in Jewish-Christian dialogue. His book Resurrection and the Restoration of Israel: The Ultimate Victory of the God of Life (Yale University Press, 2006) won a National Jewish Book Award and the Biblical Archaeology Society Publication Award in the category of Best Book Relating to the Hebrew Bible published in 2005 or 2006. Choice, a publication of the American Library Association, listed Inheriting Abraham: The Legacy of the Patriarch in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam (Princeton University Press, 2012) as one of the Outstanding Academic Titles for 2013. His new book is The Love of God: Divine Gift, Human Gratitude, and Mutual Faithfulness in Judaism (Princeton University Press, 2015).

—————————————

Kerstin and the Giant Manta Rays: Film screening and Q & A
Wednesday, September 26
6:30pm
NE Aquarium, Simons IMAX
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=107765&view=Detail

Kerstin Forsberg, Founder and Director, Planeta Océano; New England Aquarium Marine Conservation Action Fund Fellow; and Rolex Laureate

Note: The film screening will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed by the Q & A

The film Kerstin and the Giant Manta Rays features Peruvian marine scientist and social entrepreneur Kerstin Forsberg and her pioneering efforts to protect giant oceanic manta rays in Peru. To save these enigmatic species, which are globally threatened by overfishing and bycatch, Forsberg and her team at Planeta Océano garnered the help of local fishing communities, government officials, and international organizations. She also engaged teachers and schoolchildren throughout Peru in raising awareness and building appreciation for these gentle giants as flagship species of their country. Through leading these collaborative efforts, Forsberg brought about the full protection of manta rays in Peru in 2015. She received international recognitions for her work including, a prestigious Whitley Award, and was named as a Rolex Laureate and a New England Aquarium Marine Conservation Action Fund Fellow. Yet Forsberg notes there is so much more to be done to continue this conservation success story and ensure a bright future for this iconic species.

The runtime for the movie is 53 minutes followed by a 20 minute Q and A with Kerstin Forsberg.

—————————————— 

Fairmount Innovation Lab's Grand Re-Opening 
Wednesday, September 26
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
Fairmount Innovation Lab, 594 Columbia Road, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fairmount-innovation-labs-grand-re-opening-tickets-49759896189

Join us at Fairmount Innovation Lab's Grand Re-Opening on Wednesday, September 26, 2018 at 6:30 pm!
Meet FIL’s co-working members, staff and alums. Re-connect with friends and supporters of FIL. Tour our newly renovated, expanded co-working and community space. And learn more about upcoming events and FIL's Launchpad program for creative and social entrepreneurs!

There will also be a special announcement of The Liora Beer Scholarship for Entrepreneurs in the Arts, in memory of FIL's beloved founder. 

Appetizers and drinks will be served. We look forward to celebrating with you!

——————————————

AMERICA: THE FAREWELL TOUR
Wednesday, September 26
7:00 pm
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Veteran journalist, best-selling author and activist, Chris Hedges returns to the Forum as he attempts to jolt us out of our complacency about the current state of world affairs, while we still have time.

"It is impossible for any doomed population to grasp how fragile the decayed financial, social and political system is on the eve of implosion."

We are delighted to have Chris Lydon, producer and presenter of WBUR's "Open Source" to act as moderator.

Are things really as bad as they seem?

——————————————

Adam Smith:  Father of Economics
Wednesday, September 26
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome political philosopher and United Kingdom MP JESSE NORMAN for a discussion of his latest book, Adam Smith: Father of Economics. He will be joined in conversation by Harvard political philosophy professor MICHAEL SANDEL.

About Adam Smith
Adam Smith (1723-1790) is now widely regarded as the greatest economist of all time. But what he really thought, and the implications of his ideas, remain fiercely contested. Was he an eloquent advocate of capitalism and individual freedom? A prime mover of "market fundamentalism"? An apologist for human selfishness? Or something else entirely?
In Adam Smith, political philosopher Jesse Norman dispels the myths and caricatures and provides a far more complex portrait of the man. Offering a highly engaging account of Smith's life and times, Norman explores his work as a whole and traces his influence over two centuries to the present day. Finally, he shows how a proper understanding of Smith can help us address the problems of modern capitalism. The Smith who emerges from this book is not only the greatest of all economists but a pioneering theorist of moral philosophy, culture, and society.

——————————————

Medicare For All Talk 
Wednesday, September 26
7:00pm
Trident Booksellers, 338 Newbury Street, Boston

Timothy Faust is a single-payer activist with the Democratic Socialists of America. Over the past year, he has driven ten thousand miles to speak about single-payer to groups of activists, med students, law students, and general assemblies—32 states so far. With his partner he hosts HEAVY MEDICAL, a podcast about health policy and metal music. 

His book HEALTH JUSTICE NOW: Single Payer And What Comes Next will be published by Melville House in 2019.

———————————————

Extremophiles: Life on the Edge of our Planet
Wednesday, September 26 
7 to 9:00 p.m. 
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium (in Goldenson Hall), 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

——————————————— 

The Poison Squad
Wednesday, September 26 
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Museum of Science, Cahners Theatre, 1 Museum of Science Driveway, Boston
RSVP at https://www.mos.org/public-events/the-poison-squad

Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times-bestselling author Deborah Blum tells the true David and Goliath tale of how food was made safe in the United States and the heroes, led by the inimitable Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, who fought for change. Book signing to follow.

Here's what people are saying about the The Poison Squad:

“The Poison Squad offers a gripping history of the more than 20 years it took to pass the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. Harvey Washington Wiley arrived on the scene when virtually no protections existed, and he is the hero of Deborah Blum’s riveting, stomach-turning new book.” --  Science Magazine

“Wiley’s 'poison squad' was made up of young, healthy, male government workers who consumed capsules of borax, formaldehyde, and other preservatives alongside their daily meals. The trials’ shocking results led to the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and eventually to the creation of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), transforming what the nation eats in the process.” --  The Atlantic

This program is for audiences 18+.

———————————————————————
Thursday, September 27 - Friday, September 28
———————————————————————

Science Diplomacy Dissertation Enhancement Workshop
Thursday, September 27,9:00am to 6:00pm through September 28
MIT, Building 9-255, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://scienceimpact.mit.edu/2018-boston-science-diplomacy-workshop

Are you interested in advocating for better use of science in national and international policy-making? As a scientist, do you feel you lack the negotiation skills needed to succeed in a diplomatic context? Are you thinking about a possible career in Science Diplomacy?

The 2018 Boston Science Diplomacy Workshop can help. Building up on the first-ever workshop of its kind in the Boston area in 2017, the two-day workshop aims to provide participants with 1) an understanding of science diplomacy theory & practice and 2) soft skills such as negotiation and dispute resolution techniques in relation to scientific issues in national and international settings. 

This year's workshop will be held September 27 - 28, 2018.

————————————
Thursday, September 27
————————————

Veteran's Energy Seminar
Thursday, September 27
10:00 AM – 4:00 PM EDT
BU, Questrom School of Business, 525 Commonwealth Avenue, Classrooms 414/419, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/veterans-energy-seminar-boston-92718-tickets-45986038479?aff=eac2
Cost:  $25 – $50

The Veteran’s Energy Seminar educates veterans, reservists, and military spouses on global energy security challenges to inspire continued service to the country through careers in the energy industry, policy, and entrepreneurship. Learn more at www.vetsenergyseminar.org


PROGRAM
The Veteran's Energy Seminar includes classroom lectures and panels with local experts from business, government, and academia. The program is based on training by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Energy Resources which introduces Foreign Service Officers to the fundamentals of energy fuels, markets, and regional conflicts.

ELIGIBILITY
The Veteran's Energy Seminar is open to veterans, reservists, active duty, and military spouses from all ranks and branches of service. No specific work experience in energy is required, only an interest in learning more about energy security. Students and non-military energy professionals are encouraged to attend to network and represent their business or organization.

TICKETS
Student and Military Ticket ($25) admission to event with coffee, lunch, and reception for active duty, veterans, reservists, and military spouses
Energy Professional ($50) admission to event with coffee, lunch, and reception for non-military energy professionals

DONATIONS
The Veteran's Energy Seminar is a 100% volunteer effort. Donations supplement ticket sales for event space rental, lunch and reception catering, materials such as textbooks and name tags, and services such as transportation, photography, travel scholarships, and advertising. Become a sponsor by visiting www.vetsenergyseminar.org/donate

————————————— 

Sustainability Lunch Series: Speed Networking
Thursday, September 27
11:45am to 12:45pm
MIT, Building E62-276, 100 Main Street, Cambridge

Join the Sustainability Initiative and Net Impact to network with other impact-minded students!

———————————— 

Robotic Cars, Stoned Drivers, and Deadly Airbags: Managing Risk, Uncertainty, and Rapidly Changing Technologies in Cooperative Federalism
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Regulatory Policy Program at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, HKS
SPEAKER(S)  Heidi King, Deputy Administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
CONTACT INFO	Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

—————————————

A Digital Edition of D’Arcy Thompson’s Glossary of Greek Birds:  New Technologies Help Reconstruct Ancient Stories
Thursday, September 27
12:00-1:00pm 
Tufts, Multi-purpose Room, Curtis Hall, 474 Boston Avenue, Medford

Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Associate Professor, Department of Classics, Tufts University
Our interdisciplinary team seeks to revitalize D’Arcy Thompson’s Glossary of Greek Birds (first published 1896). In this work, Thompson combines his expertise in biology with his passion for the classics by matching ancient Greek bird names with modern scientific identifications. In doing so, Thompson explores the mythology and folklore attached to each bird in ancient culture through the original Greek and Latin texts. We are producing an open-source digital version of the work along with short films highlighting specific bird stories. In addition, we are conducting data- driven analyses that will help make the work more accessible for today’s audiences as well as reveal new patterns and connections within the materials so as to answer questions about Thompson’s methods and potential biases.
View the project homepage at https://sites.tufts.edu/ancientbirds/

Marie-Claire Beaulieu’s work in classics focuses on ancient mythology and religion. Dr. Beaulieu is interested in the relationship the ancients had with their environment and the mental constructs they associated with natural phenomena and animals. Her recent book, The Sea in the Greek Imagination (University of Pennsylvania Press 2016) explores the Greek mythological representation of the sea as a cosmological space of transition between the living, the dead, and the gods. She pays particular attention to marine animals that embody this function of the sea such as dolphins and aquatic birds which frequently serve as world-passers in mythology and iconography.

With the Perseids Project, Dr. Beaulieu has engaged in many interdisciplinary teaching initiatives, in particular with the departments of Religion and Computer Science, and her own classes make frequent use of technology to involve students in the process of research. In general, Dr. Beaulieu is interested in fostering greater public engagement with the ancient world through the study of language, art, and myth.

——————————————

Initiative on Cities Lecture: The Latino City
Thursday, September 27
12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
BU, Initiative on Cities, 75 Bay State Road, Boston
RSVP at http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07efl82cojec7a1967&llr=sgxoeyrab

What makes a city uniquely Latino? In Latino-majority cities like Lawrence, MA and Santa Ana, CA, what does the "American Dream" look like? Join the Initiative on Cities (IOC) in welcoming SUNY Assistant Professor Llana Barber and CA State University Professor Erualdo González to campus with BU Assistant Professor Jonathan Calvillo to discuss their research and recent publications including Barber's Latino City: Immigration and Urban Crisis in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1945–2000 and González's Latino City: Urban Planning, Politics, and the Grassroots. This event is cosponsored by the Boston University Center for Latin American Studies.

—————————————— 

Robotics Connect 2018
Thursday, September 27 
2:59 PM - 8:00 PM
Venture Cafe at Cambridge Innovation Center, 5th floor, 1 Broadway, Cambridge

More information at http://www.vencaf.org/calendar

——————————————

The Current Changing Landscape at NSF with Focus on Geosciences
Thursday, September 27
3:30-5 pm
BU, Trustee Lounge, 1 Silber Way, 9th Floor, Boston
RSVP at http://www.bu.edu/research/news-events/featured-events-2/the-current-changing-landscape-at-nsf-with-focus-on-geosciences/

Please join us for a talk by Dr. William E. Easterling, III, Assistant Director of Geosciences at the National Science Foundation.

A Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Dr. Easterling was previously the dean of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences and professor of geography and earth system science at Penn State. He was trained as an economic geographer and climatologist and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in geography and history, a Master of Arts degree in geography-industrial location economics, and a doctorate in geography-climatology, all from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Before joining the Penn State faculty in 1997 as an associate professor of geography and earth system science, he held posts at the Illinois State Water Survey, Resources for the Future, Inc., and the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He is a faculty affiliate in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences’ Earth and Environmental Systems Institute and a member of The Graduate School. Before his appointment as dean in July 2007, he served as the founding director of the Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment from 2001 to 2007.

He is an internationally recognized expert on how climate change likely will affect the Earth’s food supply and was nominated by the White House to serve as a convening lead author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report’s Chapter on Food, Fibre, Forestry, and Fisheries. The lead authors of the IPCC Assessment Report were co-awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with former Vice President Al Gore.

In the area of food and climate, he has testified before Congress, given invited briefings to committees and sub-committees of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, delivered numerous invited presentations and keynote speeches, and authored more than 80 refereed scientific publications. He has chaired or served on various international and national committees, including those of the United Nations, National Research Council, National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, and many other federal agencies.

——————————————— 

Lecture and Q&A - Balancing Green When to Embrace Sustainability in a Business (and When Not To)
Thursday, September 27
4:00pm to 5:30pm
Northeastern, 310 Behrakis Center,  30 Leon Street, Boston

Please join the Supply Chain and Information Management Group in welcoming Yossi Sheffi, Elisha Gray II Professor, Engineering Systems; Director, Center for Transportation and Logistics, Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT, who will be discussing his book.

Prof. Sheffi will offer a pragmatic take on how businesses of all sizes balance the competing demands of profitability and employment with sustainability. Prof. Sheffi's book will be available for purchase and signing at the end of the program.

————————————— 

Equity and Social Justice Series: Native American Health Forum
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 4 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Tosteson Medical Education Center, Room 227, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Health Sciences, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership, Harvard Medical School
SPEAKER(S)  Keynote Presentation: “American Indian Health Policy and Social Justice”
Speaker: Donald Warne, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Indians Into Medicine (INMED) Program Director, and Professor of Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of North Dakota; Senior Policy Advisor to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board; Member of the Oglala Lakota tribe, Pine Ridge, S.D.
Panel Discussion:
Cheryl Frye-Cromwell, Tribal Council, Health and Human Services Liaison, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe
Tom Peteet, MD, MPH, Rural Health Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital
Thomas Sequist, MD, MPH, Chief Quality and Safety Officer, Partners HealthCare; Associate Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, and the Division of General Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Lisa Sockabasin, MS, BS, Public Health and Health Systems Consultant, Public Health Research Institute (PHRI), the Penobscot Indian Nation, and the Maine Tribal Public Health District;
Trustee, Maine Health Access Foundation
COST  free
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ESJ_9-27-18
CONTACT INFO	christine_colacino at hms.harvard.edu or phone: 617-432-2922
DETAILS  Equity and Social Justice Series: Native American Health Forum
Keynote Presentation: “American Indian Health Policy and Social Justice”
Speaker: Donald Warne, MD, MPH, Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Indians Into Medicine (INMED) Program Director, and Professor of Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of North Dakota; Senior Policy Advisor to the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board; Member of the Oglala Lakota tribe, Pine Ridge, SD
Panel Discussion:
Cheryl Frye-Cromwell, Tribal Council, Health and Human Services Liaison, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe
Tom Peteet, MD, MPH, Rural Health Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital
Thomas Sequist, MD, MPH, Chief Quality and Safety Officer, Partners HealthCare; Associate Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, and the Division of General Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Lisa Sockabasin, MS, BS, Public Health and Health Systems Consultant, Public Health Research Institute (PHRI), the Penobscot Indian Nation, and the Maine Tribal Public Health District; Trustee, Maine Health Access Foundation
Moderator:  Lyle Ignace, MD, MPH, Executive Director and Physician, The Gerald L. Ignace Indian Health Center, Inc.
Commentator:  Patrik Johansson, MD MPH, Associate Professor, Department of Health Promotion, Social & Behavioral Health, Director, Rural Health Education Network, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center
LINK  https://mfdp.med.harvard.edu

———————————————

Strongman Politics in the 21st Century
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard University Asia Center,
Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies,
Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School,
Weatherhead Center for International Affairs,
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies
Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Speakers:
Elsa Clavé, Harvard University Asia Center
Ayşe Kadıoğlu, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University
Rod MacFarquhar, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University
Valerie Sperling, Clark University
Moderator:  Thomas Vallely, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	fairbankcenter at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  As the role of "strongman" leaders on the world stage appears to be on the rise, this panel examines "strongman politics" in a comparative context.
LINK  https://fairbank.fas.harvard.edu/events/panel-discusison-strong-man-politics-in-the-21st-century/

——————————————— 

Visual Storytelling, Visual Communication
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Education, Humanities, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Scott McCloud, Cartoonist and Comics Theorist
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  We rely on our eyes like never before: to navigate not only the physical world, but also the narrative and information landscapes we increasingly inhabit. In a fast-moving cascade of images and ideas, the author and cartoonist Scott McCloud shares why there are no neutral visual decisions, why all pictures are words, and why an era of misinformation calls for a new approach to visual education. Register online.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-scott-mccloud-lecture

———————————————

2018 Global Teacher Prize Winner: Andria Zafirakou
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Community Programming, Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Arts in Education Program, International Education Policy, Prevention Science and Practice, Students and Alumni, Teacher Education Program
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Kristin Ponte
CONTACT EMAIL  events at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-496-8705
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT  Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED	No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
FEATURED EVENT  Askwith Forums
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture, Special Events
DETAILS  Speaker: Andria Zafirakou, recipient, 2018 Global Teacher Prize, Varkey Foundation; Arts and Textiles teacher, Alperton Community School in northwest London, England. 
Introduction by: Steve Seidel, The Patricia Bauman and John Landrum Bryant Senior Lecturer on Arts in Education, Faculty Director, Arts in Education, HGSE
Andria Zafirakou, winner of the 2018 Global Teacher Prize, will speak about her experiences as an educator in the inner city borough of Brent, an ethnically diverse place with 130 languages spoken in the schools. Its pupils come from some of the poorest families in Britain, many sharing one house with five other families, many exposed to gang violence. 
Held in conjunction with MIT Open Learning. 

————————————————

Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 5 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Fong Auditorium, Boylston Hall, Harvard Yard, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR  Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
SPEAKER(S)  Glen Well
CONTACT INFO  Vickie Aldin, ejsafraevents at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society
Many blame free markets for rising inequalities and social divisions. Radical Markets turns this conventional wisdom on its head, arguing that dramatically expanded markets can be an emancipatory egalitarian force, but only if we have the courage to challenge fundamental social institutions that stand in the way of truly free competition. Challenging everything from private property to one-person-one-vote, Radical Markets lays out a bold vision that embraces technological change and diversity as engines of widely shared prosperity.
LINK  https://ethics.harvard.edu/event/public-lecture-glen-weyl

————————————————

Collective Intelligence
Thursday, September 27
5:00pm to 6:30pm
MIT Building 56-114, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Featuring Agnieszka Kurant, Stefan Helmreich, Adam Haar Horowitz and Caroline Jones
Moderated by Nick Montfort

Comparative Media Studies/Writing Lecture Series

—————————————————

The Public Practice of the Abrahamic Religions
WHEN  Thursday, Sep. 27, 2018, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	 Religion
SPONSOR	Center for the Study of World Religions, John Paul II Center for Interreligious Dialogue, Religions and the Practice of Peace
CONTACT	CSWR, 617.495.4476
DETAILS  It is commonplace today to group the three monotheistic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—under the category of the “Abrahamic.” Scholars have investigated the roots, ancient and modern, for this category, and continue to debate its contemporary merits. Meanwhile, practitioners are doing significant work in the wider world under the aegis of the “Abrahamic.” This panel will explore the public practice of the Abrahamic Religions. Panelists will reflect on their work in light of this category, including its strengths and limitations.
Panel:  5:30–7:30 PM, Sperry Room
RPP Dinner:  7:30–8:30pm, Braun Room
Both events are open to all, but space is limited. Please RSVP for the panel and dinner.
Chair:  Dulce Murphy, Track Two: An Institute for Citizen Democracy
Panelists:  Huda Abuarquob, Alliance for Middle East Peace
Joseph Montville, George Mason University
Stephanie Saldaña, The Abraham Path
Dulce Murphy is a social enterprise leader and expert in Russian-American relations. Murphy began working at Esalen Institute in 1970 and served on its Board of Directors from 1973 to 1975. She co-founded the Esalen Soviet American Exchange Program in 1980, traveling to and from the Soviet Union each year to establish relationships, undertake collaborations and build a citizen-to citizen network. In the spring of 2004, the program evolved to an independent organization and changed its name to Track Two: An Institute for Citizen Diplomacy, with the mandate to expand to other regions of conflict including the Middle East and the North Pacific Rim.  Murphy, frequently cited as an expert in Russian and Middle Eastern diplomacy, has spent over thirty-seven years on the cutting edge of nongovernmental relations and Track Two diplomacy. Murphy speaks at university conferences on Russia and the Middle East while continuing the day-to-day management of Track Two where she currently serves as President and Chairman of its Board of Directors.
Huda Abuarqoub is Regional Director of the Alliance for Middle East Peace (ALLMEP), a network of civil society organizations working in conflict transformation, development, and coexistence in the Middle East among Israelis, Palestinians, Arabs, and Jews.  She has years of experience in conflict resolution, NGO leadership, and social change education and activism, as well as a life-long commitment to building strong people-to-people Israeli-Palestinian relations. She is a well-known speaker on issues related to Middle East politics and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. After studying conflict transformation and peace studies as a Fulbright scholar, she worked as an executive director, a program director, and an NGO consultant to a number of organizations in the U.S., Israel, and Palestine. She is a co-founder of the Center for Transformative Education (CTE) and has taught and trained hundreds of students in Israel and the U.S. She has long been an active leader in grassroots Palestinian initiatives focused on women’s empowerment and people-to-people diplomacy. Previously, Huda worked as a teacher, trainer, and consultant for the Palestinian Ministry of Education for fifteen years. She earned her M.A. in conflict transformation and peace studies from Eastern Mennonite University and her B.A. in education for social change from Al-Quds Open University in Jerusalem.
Joseph Montville is Director of the Program on Healing Historical Memory, and chair of the Center for World Religions, Diplomacy, and Conflict Resolution in the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University. He is also a Senior Associate and Chair of the Goldziher Prize Committee in the Center for the Study of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Relations at Merrimack College in N. Andover, MA. Montville is also director of the Abrahamic Family Reunion, the Esalen Institute project to promote Muslim-Christian-Jewish reconciliation. He is a member of the board of Track II: An Institute for Citizen Diplomacy, a non-profit organization associated with Esalen Institute, and president of the American Friends of Combatants for Peace, an Israeli-Palestinian peace organization composed of former Israeli army and Palestinian fighters.  Montville founded the preventive diplomacy program at Washington, DC’s Center for Strategic and International Studies in 1994 and directed it until 2003. Before that he spent 23 years as a diplomat with posts in the Middle East and North Africa. He also worked in the State Department’s Bureaus of Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs and Intelligence and Research, where he was chief of the Near East Division and director of the Office of Global Issues. Montville has held non-resident faculty appointments at the Harvard and University of Virginia Medical Schools. He defined the concept of “Track Two,” nonofficial diplomacy. Educated at Lehigh, Harvard, and Columbia Universities, Montville is the editor of Conflict and Peacemaking in Multiethnic Societies (Lexington Books, 1990) and editor (with Vamik Volkan and Demetrios Julius) of The Psychodynamics of International Relationships (Lexington Books, 1990 [vol. I], 1991 [vol. II]). His most recent book is History as Prelude: Muslims and Jews in the Medieval Mediterranean (Lexington Books, 2011). In 2008, the International Society of Political Psychology gave Montville its Nevitt Sanford Award for “distinguished professional contribution to political psychology,” at its 31st annual scientific meeting in Paris.
Stephanie Saldaña grew up in Texas and received a B.A. from Middlebury College and an M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School, where she focused on the relationship between Islam and Christianity. In 2004 she went to Damascus, Syria to study the Prophet Jesus in Islam on a Fulbright scholarship, where she worked with both Muslim and Christian leaders engaged in dialogue. It was there that she encountered the community of Al-Khalil, or Abraham, a Christian monastic community dedicated to dialogue with Islam, an event that would profoundly impact her future research in the region.  Saldaña has written two books, The Bread of Angels: A Journey to Love and Faith , about her time in Syria, and A Country Between: Making a Home Where Both Sides of Jerusalem Collide, about her years living in East Jerusalem. She has also taught at Al-Quds Bard College for Arts and Sciences. She is the founder of  Mosaic Stories, an ongoing project to preserve the threatened cultural heritage of the Middle East through research and storytelling.  She currently writes and lectures about refugees, disappearing diversity in the Middle East, and the challenges of preserving intangible cultural heritage in Iraq and Syria.
The RPP Colloquium Series is organized with generous support from the Reverend Karen Vickers Budney, MDiv ’91, and Mr. Albert J. Budney, Jr., MBA ’74, as well as Farley Urmston and Karl Bandtel.
LINK  https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0odXY2NfOQ94vOJ

—————————————

authors at MIT: Roberto Simanowski, Waste A New Media Primer
Thursday, September 27
6:00pm to 7:00pm
MIT, Building N50, MIT Press Bookstore, 301 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Join the MIT Bookstore in welcoming Roberto Simanowski to discuss his book, Waste: A New Media Primer.

Simanowski, who has been studying the Internet and social media since the 1990s, goes deeper than the conventional wisdom. With these engaging and provocative essays, Roberto Simanowski considers what new media has done to us. Why is digital privacy being eroded and why does society seem not to care? Why do we escape from living and loving the present into capturing, sharing and liking it? And how did we arrive at a selfie society without self-consciousness?

Roberto Simanowski is a scholar of media and cultural studies and the author of Digital Art and Meaning, Data Love, Facebook Society, Waste: A New Media Primer, andThe Death Algorithm and Other Digital Dilemmas (the last two published by the MIT Press).

——————————————

Boston Climate Action Network Meeting
Thursday, September 27
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
First Baptist Church, 633 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-climate-action-network-meeting-tickets-39329046236?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

We're working towards fighting climate change through improved energy policy and education at the local level in Boston. The BCAN Action Team meeting is a great way to get directly involved in the effort to combat climate change in the era of Trump. We gather twice per month on the 2nd and 4th Thursday from 6-8pm at First Baptist Church in Jamaica Plain.
Come meet the Communications Team, the Arts Team, and other dedicated climate campaigners to learn how you can help us plan outreach for the Community Choice Energy campaign:  https://communitychoiceboston.org

—————————————— 

The Roots of Happiness
Thursday, September 27
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Harvard, Pound 101 Classroom, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-roots-of-happiness-tickets-49895745518

Smiling Tears is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting awareness and appreciation of nature's love and wisdom through dialog and discourse. Nature's Wisdom Series workshops are the organization's signature programs and present to you this year's talk.

Abstract: Happiness is the essence of life, yet it is also one of the most elusive human emotions. Often, we fail to experience happiness arguably because we focus our efforts on finding routes to happiness rather than the roots of happiness and we chase perceived means to happiness instead of the perennial source of happiness. Drawing inspiration from nature, the speaker, Dr. Sriram Gajula, offers fresh insights into the crux of happiness. He discusses nature’s principles such as dualism, gain in loss, domestication of desire, education of ego, the importance of noun over adjective, acceptance of right and ripe time, and benevolence of cosmic connectedness, and inevitability of problems as a source of joy. He emphasizes that understanding and living in tune with these nature’s laws is an essential requirement for sustained happiness.
Speaker's Bio: Dr. Sriram Gajula is an eminent spiritual scientist, philosopher, author, speaker, seer, and sage. He holds a BS in Science and Ph.D. in English from Osmania University, India. He is well read and well informed by his extensive travels around the world. He is a much-sought-after advisor and speaker globally. His philosophical discourses and writings cover such complex and intriguing subjects as the divinity in nature, smiling tears, cosmic communism, evil, and freewill.
Date: Thursday, September 27, 2019
Time: Talk: 6:00 P.M - 7:00 P.M Followed by Q&A from 7:00 P.M - 8:00 P.M
Location: Pound 101 Classroom, Harvard Law School, Harvard University, 1563 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138
Cost: FREE
Registration is mandatory, limited seats are available.

——————————————

The Browns of California:  The Family Dynasty that Transformed a State and Shaped a Nation
Thursday, September 27
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist MIRIAM PAWEL for a discussion of her latest book, The Browns of California: The Family Dynasty that Transformed a State and Shaped a Nation. She will be joined in conversation by MARSHALL GANZ, Senior Lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard University.

About The Browns of California
Even in the land of reinvention, the story is exceptional: Pat Brown, the beloved father who presided over California during an era of unmatched expansion; Jerry Brown, the cerebral son who became the youngest governor in modern times—and then returned three decades later as the oldest.

In The Browns of California, journalist and scholar Miriam Pawel weaves a narrative history that spans four generations, from August Schuckman, the Prussian immigrant who crossed the Plains in 1852 and settled on a northern California ranch, to his great-grandson Jerry Brown, who reclaimed the family homestead one hundred forty years later. Through the prism of their lives, we gain an essential understanding of California and an appreciation of its importance.

The magisterial story is enhanced by dozens of striking photos, many published for the first time. This book gives new insights to those steeped in California history, offers a corrective for those who confuse stereotypes and legend for fact, and opens new vistas for readers familiar with only the sketchiest outlines of a place habitually viewed from afar with a mix of envy and awe, disdain, and fascination.

—————————————— 

MIT IDEAS Fall Generator Dinner 2018
Thursday, September 27
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
MIT, Morss Hall, Walker Memorial, 142 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-ideas-fall-generator-dinner-2018-tickets-48681850726

Are you interested in learning more about innovation and social entrepreneurship opportunities at MIT?
Working on a project to help underserved communities? Need funding? Want to recruit new team members?
Want to get involved, but don't yet have an idea?

Join us for dinner. Pitch an idea. Find a team.
The IDEAS Generator Dinner is one of the best venues to find a team to join, pitch your idea to woo and recruit teammates, or pitch your skills to get hired onto a team. 

Event Program
6:45 Doors Open - Dinner
7:05 IDEAS Program Updates & Overview
7:30 Sixty-second Pitches
8:00 Networking
9:00 Event Ends
Pitch Your Idea or Skill

During the event, we will have openings for 20-30 sixty-second pitches from attendees. To be considered for a slot, submit your pitch to using the Eventbrite question. 
Sign up to pitch an idea or your skills when you register for this event. Those selected to pitch will be contacted before the event with instructions on the process.Note: Pitching is optional! If you don’t want to pitch, just attend to mix and mingle, meet potential teammates, or hear about some of the exciting projects already underway. 

About the Competition
Teams must be led by a full-time MIT student with MIT students making significant contributions to the project’s innovation. However, if you are not an MIT student, you are still welcome to attend the Generator Dinner to pitch an idea or get hired on a team. For full competition criteria and guidelines, please visit our website: http://ideas.mit.edu/
If you are interested in receiving our newsletter, please subscribe here.
What is MIT IDEAS?

The MIT IDEAS program provides students with an opportunity to develop their innovative ideas and make positive changes in the world. As an annual innovation and social entrepreneurship competition run by the MIT Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center, the IDEAS Global Challenge enables students to apply their MIT education in real-world situations to tackle quality of life issues for people around the world. 
IDEAS projects can address issues in one or more sectors, such as health, education, agriculture, energy and environment, water, finance and entrepreneurship, mobile technology, and housing and transportation. Teams are created and led by MIT undergraduate and graduate students, but they can include anyone from around the world. If you are looking to join an IDEAS team that needs your skill set or are simply interested in learning more about how to get involved, join the conversation and help move ideas towards realization. 
Remember to submit your pitch here to be considered for a slot at this year's Generator Dinner!

———————————————————————
Friday, September 28 – Saturday, September 29
——————————————————————— 

Valued Voices: Perspectives on Immigration 
Friday, September 28, 5:00 PM – Saturday, September 29, 2:30 PM EDT
HI Boston Hostel, 19 Stuart Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/valued-voices-perspectives-on-immigration-tickets-49230157727

The immigration debate is impacting us all- locally, nationally and globally. This program will enable participants to learn more about immigration legislation and the political climate in Massachusetts, discussing issues including asylum, refugees, and  changing  civil society strategies. It will also create a safe, shared space through facilitated dialogue for participants to explore their own perspectives  and identities surrounding  these issues. 
Join HI Boston and members of the local community in this learning sessionand facilitated dialogue around immigration in Massachusetts. Learn about the evolving context and policies from knowledgeable presenters working in the field, hear others stories and experiences, and enrich your understanding through dialogue. 
This program is FREE and open to anyone. All participants will receive a free stay at the HI Boston hostel (the night of Friday September 28th). In addition, all meal are provided during the program. 

Program Schedule:
Friday  Sept 28
5-5:30 pm –  Welcome to HI Boston reception 
5:45- 7:00 pm – Panel: Perspectives on Immigration 
7:15- 8:45 pm – Dinner for participants and panelists, debrief for following day’s workshop  
*Dorm Overnight stay at HI Boston for all program participants  

Saturday  Sept 29
8:00 -9:15 am - Breakfast 
9:30am –11:30 am - Facilitated workshop: Perspectives on Immigration 
Break 
11:45- 12:15 – Workshop debrief and introduction to community facilitation  
12:15pm to close (2:30pm) – Final participant  lunch  and closing thoughts

———————————
Friday, September 28
———————————

Climate Adaptation Forum:  Law and Governance Meets Climate Adaptation
Friday, September 28
7:15 AM to 11:45 AM EDT 
UMass Club, One Beacon Street, 32nd Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07efmaujmh299cf316&oseq=&c=&ch=
Cost:  $15 - $45

Adapting legal and governance systems to dramatic change in climate trends poses a challenge at least as difficult as the financial and design challenges. This Forum presents speakers on the front lines of developing new rules, regulations, institutions, and forms of governance related to climate change adaptation.

This Forum will:
Provide examples of developing the political will to enact change;
Discuss impediments from existing regulatory programs designed to protect the existing conditions;
Present the findings of the Governance and Climate Adaptation Report prepared by UMass Boston Sustainable Solutions Lab on governance;
And report on Resilient Rhody, the 2018 the Statewide Climate Resilience Action Strategy developed for the State of Rhode Island.

Keynote Presentation:  Achieving Legislative Change
Representative Kristin Diane Jacobs, Florida House of Representatives
Forum Chair
Ralph Child, Member, Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C.
Confirmed Speakers
David W. Cash, Ph.D., Dean, John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston
Janet Coit, Director, Department of Environmental Management, State of Rhode Island
Iram Farooq, AICP, LEED-AP, Assistant City Manager for Community Development, City of Cambridge, MA
Barbara Kessner Landau, Counsel, Noble, Wickersham & Heart LLP
Stephanie Kruel, Senior Environmental Planner, VHB

——————————————

The Oceans' Turn
Friday, September 28
8am - 5:30pm
Tufts, Fletcher School, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://sites.tufts.edu/theoceansturn/

The ocean covers 71% over the earth’s surface, far, far greater than any land mass. Directly or indirectly, it touches every piece of life on earth and every aspect of human society. The ocean feeds nations, transports goods, and provides energy across the globe.

The Fletcher School at Tufts University aims to convene an important conference in September 2018 entitled "The Ocean’s Turn?" With this one-day event, we will look at the role of the ocean as an avenue, an arena, and a source, and examine it all through the lenses of geopolitics, sustainability, and an overarching notion of innovation.

The conference will bring together thought leaders from around the globe and examine the critical issues facing the world’s oceans today. Through engaging keynotes, TED-style talks, and panel discussions, we will explore the maritime sphere from the perspectives of science, business, law and politics, investment and the economy, security, and international relations.

The purpose of the conference is to evaluate important maritime sectors, such as global shipping, the food industry, and the energy sector, and will dive into geopolitics, BlueTech, maritime security and policy, environmental imperatives, and other vital issues. Major themes will include technology and innovation of a "connected ocean," geopolitical and transnational legal factors, and imperatives driven by sustainability needs, concerns, and opportunities.

—————————————— 

VR, Sound and Cinema: Implications for Storytelling and Learning
Friday, September 28
1:30pm to 6:00pm
MIT,  Building 32-141, Ray and Maria Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/vr-sound-and-cinema-implications-for-storytelling-and-learning-tickets-50408529268

This event hosted by MIT Open Learning will explore the future of storytelling and learning through virtual and augmented reality. We’ll examine human perception and the senses, haptics, and embodiment: the ways in which we express and experience ourselves and others through many forms of media.

The event starts with a panel of faculty and industry experts in virtual and augmented reality, cinema, and storytelling. The second half of the event features an interactive deep dive into 3D audio and psychoacoustics of sound spatialization with pioneers in the field Edgar Choueiri and Mark Mangini.

Join us at MIT on Friday, September 28th to explore the future of:
Storytelling and Immersive Learning
Human perception and the senses
Haptics and embodiment
Psychoacoustics and 3D audio

Agenda
The symposium will be held on Friday, September 28th at MIT from 1:30 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT):
1:30 - 2:45 pm: VR, Sound, and Cinema - Implications for Storytelling and Learning
Speakers: Sanjay Sarma, Vice President for Open Learning; D. Fox Harrell,Professor of Digital Media and AI; Shekhar Kapur, Academy Award-winning Film Director; Susan Rogers, Berklee/McGill expert in music cognition and psychoacoustics
2:45 - 3:15 pm: Break
3:15- 6 pm: Deep Dive: The Science and Art of 3D Audio
Speakers: Edgar Choueiri, Professor of Applied Physics at Princeton University; and Mark Mangini, Academy Award-winning Sound Designer
We think of music, and the enjoyment of music, depend on the perception of melody, rhythm, timbre, dynamics, color, and orchestration, yet in nature the perception of sound has another important component that, due to practical reasons only, has for centuries eluded the palette of the composer, musician and sound designers: the spatial localization of sound. Composers as diverse as Palestrina, Monteverdi, Tallis, Ives, Varèse Stockhausen and Brant experimented ingeniously with, albeit limited, spatialization as an aesthetic element of the musical experience, despite the practical difficulties of implementing moving sound sources. Recent advances in psychoacoustics, 3D audio and virtual reality technologies promise to make this most natural and least exploited element of the musical experience, full 3D sound spatialization, an integral element of sound design and the composition and enjoyment of music.

The Oscar-winning sound designer, Mark Mangini, and one of the pioneering scientists in 3D audio research, Edgar Choueiri, will describe the basic principles of 3D audio, the powerful emerging software tools, and how these tools are starting to be used in creative sound design and in enhancing the emotional impact of sound.

The talks will be followed by a demonstration of 3D audio using new software tools.

About the Speakers
Shekhar Kapur is an Indian film director, actor, and producer, known for his works in Hindi cinema and international cinema. He gained international recognition with the 1994 Bollywood film Bandit Queen, which won the National Film Award for Best Feature Film in Hindi and Filmfare Critics Awards for Best Movie and Best Direction for that year. His historical biopics on Queen Elizabeth, Elizabeth (1998) and Elizabeth: The Golden Age(2007), won the BAFTA Award for Best Film and two Academy Awards.
D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., is Professor of Digital Media & AI in both the Comparative Media Studies Program and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. He founded and directs the MIT Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE Lab). His research explores the relationship between imaginative cognition and computation. He develops new forms of computational narrative, gaming, social media, and related digital media based in computer science, cognitive science, and digital media arts. He aims to push the boundaries of how computers can be used for creative expression and social empowerment.
Susan Rogers holds a doctoral degree in experimental psychology from McGill University (2010). Prior to her science career, Susan was a multiplatinum-earning record producer, recording engineer, audio mixer and technician, working with a roster that includes: Prince, Barenaked Ladies, David Byrne, Jeff Black, Crosby, Stills, & Nash, Tricky, The Jacksons, and many more. She is currently a Professor at Berklee College of Music, Boston, teaching music cognition, psychoacoustics, and record production. She is the director of the Berklee Music Perception & Cognition Laboratory where she studies auditory processing in musicians.
Edgar Choueiri is professor of Applied Physics at Princeton University where he is Director of two research laboratories: The Electric Prolusion and Plasma Dynamics Propulsion Laboratory (where he works on advanced electric rockets for deep space spacecraft), and the 3D Audio and Applied Acoustics (3D3A) where he works on spatial audio. He is the author of more than 250 scientific articles and publications and the recipient of numerous awards, including a knighthood. More detailed bio at https://mae.princeton.edu/people/faculty/choueiri
Mark Mangini is an Academy Award-winning Sound Designer, Musician, Re-recording mixer and Lecturer. He has made his life's work creating unimagined aural worlds and fabricating sonic realities for theatrical motion pictures. Born in the suburbs of Boston, Mark dropped out of college at 19 to move to Los Angeles and pursue a career in film. His first job was as a cartoon sound editor at Hanna Barbera Studios followed by a 25 year run as owner and operator of the successful Post Production Sound Company, Weddington Productions Inc. His studio is part of the Formosa Group, in Hollywood. Mark has worked on such notable films as: Raiders of the Lost Ark, Gremlins, Die Hard, Star Trek, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Fifth Element, The Green Mile, Warrior and Jack the Giant Slayer. He is currently (2015) a Governor of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences representing the Sound Branch.

————————————— 

Belonging: The Challenges of Reentry
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 28, 2018, 1:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Philosophy Department
Hutchins Center 
Edmond J. Safra Center 
Charles Warren Center
SPEAKER(S)  Danielle Allen (Opening Remarks)
Kaia Stern (Chair)
Elizabeth Hinton (Chair)
Tommie Shelby
Imani Perry
Tommy Curry
Rima Vesely-Flad
LaDray Gilbert
Nathaniel Pollock
Laurence Justice Jr.
Angel Sanchez
Jerry Short
Christopher Connolly
DETAILS	
This conference will focus on the challenges facing those who have been incarcerated when they re-enter society. It will be open to the public and will consist of two panel sessions, each lasting an hour and a half.  Each panel session will consist of a conversation between academics whose work is relevant to the topic, activists or social practitioners, and returning citizens.

———————————— 

Some Recent Advances on the Application of Game Theory to Networking 
Friday, September 28
3:00pm-4:00pm – Refreshments at 2:45pm
BU, 8 St. Mary’s Street, PHO 211, Boston

Ariel Orda, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Resident Scholar
Research on the application of game theory in the context of networking has focused on non-cooperative games, where the selfish agents cannot reach a binding agreement on the way they would share the infrastructure. Many approaches have been proposed for mitigating the typically inefficient operating points. However, in a growing number of networking scenarios selfish agents are able to communicate and reach an agreement. Hence, the degradation of performance should be considered at an operating point of a cooperative game, e.g., the Nash bargaining solution, core or nucleolus. In the first part of  the talk we shall describe a body of work that attempts to lay foundations for the application of cooperative game theory to fundamental problems in networking, with a focus on routing. Depending on the scenario, we will reach conclusions on how cooperation among agents affects their own performance as well as that of the system. We will discuss network design guidelines that follow from our findings.

In the second part of the talk we shall consider game theory as a tool for analyzing and predicting the evolution of the Internet topology. We study the structure and evolution of the Internet’s Autonomous System (AS) interconnection topology as a game with heterogeneous players that incorporate reliability considerations. We also consider the case where utility (or monetary) transfers are allowed between the players. In this network formation game, the utility of a player depends on the network structure, e.g., the distances between nodes and the cost of links. We analyze static properties of the game, such as the prices of anarchy and stability, as well as the (novel) price of reliability, and provide explicit results concerning the generated topologies. Furthermore, we provide dynamical analysis of topological quantities, demonstrate linear convergence rate and explain the prevalence of some “network motifs”, i.e., sub-graphs that appear frequently in the network. Through real-world data, we provide encouraging support to our predictions.

Ariel Orda is the Herman & Gertrude Gross Professor at the Technion. He received his BSc (summa cum laude), MSc and PhD at the Technion. He is an IEEE Fellow. During 1.1.2014-12.31.2017, he served as the Dean of the Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion. His research interests include network routing, the application of game theory to networking, survivability, QoS provisioning and wireless networks. He received several awards for research, teaching, and service.

——————————————

Trust:  Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries
Friday, September 28
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store and the Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute welcome TARUN KHANNA—the Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor at the Harvard Business School—for a discussion of his latest book, Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries.

About Trust
Entrepreneurial ventures often fail in the developing world because of the lack of something taken for granted in the developed world: trust. Over centuries, the developed world has built customs and institutions such as enforceable contracts, an impartial legal system, and credible regulatory bodies—and even unofficial but respected sources of information such as Yelp and Consumer Reports—that have created a high level of what scholar and entrepreneur Tarun Khanna calls "ambient trust." 
This is not the case in the developing world. But Khanna shows that rather than become casualties of mistrust, smart entrepreneurs can adopt the mindset that, like it or not, it's up to them to weave their own independent web of trust—with their employees, their partners, their clients, their customers, and society as a whole. This can be challenging, and it requires innovative approaches in places where the level of societal mistrust is so high that an official certification of quality simply arouses suspicion—and lowers sales! Using vivid examples from Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and elsewhere, Khanna's stories show how entrepreneurs can build on existing customs and practices instead of trying to push against them. He highlights the role new technologies can play (but cautions that these are not panaceas) and explains how entrepreneurs can find dependable partners in national and local governments to create impact at scale.

As far back as the 18th century, Adam Smith recognized trust as what Khanna calls "the hidden engine of economic progress." "Frankness and openness conciliate confidence," Smith wrote. "We trust the man who seems willing to trust us." That kind of confidence is critical to entrepreneurial success, but in the developing world, entrepreneurs have to establish it through their own efforts. As Khanna puts it, "The entrepreneur must not just create, she must create the conditions to create."

—————————————— 

Drug$: The Price We Pay' Film Screening & Discussion
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 28, 2018, 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Martin Conference Center Amphitheater, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Education, Ethics, Film, Health Sciences, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Science, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics
COST  Free, registration required
TICKET WEB LINK  https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07efmpblqd3a02457f&oseq=&c=&ch=
CONTACT INFO	HMS Center for Bioethics, 617-432-2570
DETAILS  A story that unpacks the mystery of modern medicine’s skyrocketing price tag and how it affects the people struggling to stay alive.
Narrated by Academy Award® Winner J.K. Simmons, “DRUG$” is a feature-length documentary about the soaring price of medicines in the U.S., featuring interviews with academics, patients, advocates and political leaders, including Senator Bernie Sanders and Congressman Elijah Cummings. In a titanic struggle against corporate greed, see how a diverse group of concerned Americans is fighting back to keep lifesaving medicines affordable for us all.
Watch the trailer here: drugsthefilm.com
LINK	http://bioethics.hms.harvard.edu/news/drug-price-we-pay

——————————————

Dawnland: Screening and Panel Discussion
WHEN  Friday, Sep. 28, 2018, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Film, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Adam Mazo, codirector, “Dawnland,” and director, Upstander Project
Esther Anne, codirector, Maine-Wabanaki REACH
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO  events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  For much of the 20th century, child welfare authorities removed Native American children from their tribal homes, devastating parents and denying children their traditions, culture, and identity. The feature-length documentary "Dawnland" chronicles the first official truth and reconciliation commission in the United States for Native Americans and explores the possibilities of healing and reconciliation. A panel conversation and a Q&A session follow the screening. Register online.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-dawnland-screening

———————————————— 

CAN AMERICAN CAPITALISM SURVIVE?: Why Greed Is Not Good, Opportunity Is Not Equal, and Fairness Won't Make Us Poor
Friday, September 28
6:00pm
Trident Booksellers, 338 Newbury Street, Boston

About the Book: Steve turns his keen eye to America’s economic system and argues that our thirty-year experiment in unfettered markets has undermined core values required to make capitalism and democracy work. Having written on economics for The Washington Post for decades, Steve is skilled at making big concepts accessible. 

Despite the fact that the stock market is currently doing well, many people have a nagging suspicion that something is off. They're not wrong. In his book, Pearlstein contends that our economic system has run off the moral rails, undermining our politics, our trust in each other and our future prosperity. Trust and social capital are at an all-time low due in large part to our free market capitalism that puts "maximizing shareholder value" above all. Pearlstein maintains that the most successful economies are those in which greed and self-interest are tempered by empathy, cooperation, and mutual support—qualities hard-wired into our nature by biology and culture.

Pearlstein offers a set of radical but commonsense ideas that could restore the moral legitimacy of American capitalism and the vitality of American democracy. He proposes we limit special interest money in politics (from both sides of the aisle), institute a universal basic income paired with mandatory national service, encourage companies to share profits with their employees, and equalize educational opportunities.

About the Author: Steven Pearlstein is a Pulitzer prize-winning business and economic columnist for The Washington Post and the Robinson Professor of Public Affairs at George Mason University. He was awarded the Pulitzer for Commentary in 2008 for columns anticipating and explaining the financial crisis and global economic downturn. In 2006 he won the Gerald R. Loeb Award for business and financial commentary, and in 2011 the Loeb Award for lifetime achievement. He lives in Washington with his wife, Wendy Gray.

————————————————

How to Be a Good Creature:  A Memoir in Thirteen Animals
Friday, September 28
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed naturalist and author SY MONTGOMERY—whose book The Soul of an Octopus was a National Book Award finalist—for a discussion of her latest book, How to Be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals. She will be joined in conversation by award-winning wildlife writer VICKI CONSTANTINE CROKE.
About How to Be a Good Creature

Understanding someone who belongs to another species can be transformative. No one knows this better than author, naturalist, and adventurer Sy Montgomery. To research her books, Sy has traveled the world and encountered some of the planet’s rarest and most beautiful animals. From tarantulas to tigers, Sy’s life continually intersects with and is informed by the creatures she meets.
This restorative memoir reflects on the personalities and quirks of thirteen animals—Sy’s friends—and the truths revealed by their grace. It also explores vast themes: the otherness and sameness of people and animals; the various ways we learn to love and become empathetic; how we find our passion; how we create our families; coping with loss and despair; gratitude; forgiveness; and most of all, how to be a good creature in the world.

————————————
Saturday, September 29
————————————

Harvard Symposium on Technology-Assisted Meditation
WHEN  Saturday, Sep. 29, 2018, 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard University Science Center, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Education, Exhibitions, Lecture, Special Events, Wellness/Work Life
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	CHA Center for Mindfulness and Compassion (Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School), Harvard Center for Wellness and Health Promotion, and Dharmakaya Center for Wellbeing
SPEAKER(S)  Headspace; UMass Medical School; Brown University; University of Toronto Mississauga; Boston Medical Center; Dharmakaya Center for Wellbeing; Spire; Harvard Medical School; Muse + more
DIRECTED BY  Moderated by CHA Center for Mindfulness and Compassion
COST  $175. Continuing Education credits for social workers, psychologists, and nurses will be available for an additional $25. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Student, minority, and need-based scholarships available - please apply at: www.chacmc.org/scholarship
TICKET WEB LINK  https://technology.my-trs.com
CONTACT INFO  Bridget Kiley: 617-591-6132 or cmc at challiance.org
DETAILS  Join us for an experiential and collaborative day that embodies connection, discovery, and awareness.
This symposium will showcase innovation and research in the fast-growing field of technology-assisted meditation and include panel and group discussions, movement, reflection and interactive experiences.
LINK  https://www.chacmc.org/technology

——————————————

11th Annual Walk for Literacy
WHEN  Saturday, Sep. 29, 2018, 9 – 11 a.m.
WHERE  Cambridge Common, Waterhouse St. & Mass. Ave., Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Special Events, Support/Social, Volunteer Opportunities, Wellness/Work Life
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Sponsored by Irving House at Harvard
SPEAKER(S)  No speakers
COST  Registration $30.00 includes Breakfast, Lunch and a T-Shirt
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.charityfootprints.com/eventdetails?id=202
CONTACT INFO	Sana Saeed
sana_saeed at mail.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Barakat’s Walk for Literacy is an annual event that raises both awareness and funds for our important mission of educating and empowering children and women in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Barakat is dedicated to providing exemplary basic education in Afghanistan and Pakistan: we advance literacy and increase access to secondary education, particularly for girls and women.The walk is a fun and unique event, where a diverse community of walkers come together to support a worthy cause – educating thousands of women and children without access to quality basic education! In 2016–17, more than 3,000 children (over 40 percent of them girls) enrolled in Barakat's five schools. An additional 300 girls and women attended our lower-level and higher-level literacy programs in Afghanistan. Since its inception in 2008, the Walk has grown to attract almost 1,200 walkers and has raised over $120,000.
The virtual walk began on Aug. 6 so even if you aren't able to participate on Sept. 29 you can still raise funds to make a difference. All participants will be mailed a t-shirt so while taking steps forward for education you can share that your walk is making a difference.  Wear a Fitbit?
Just sync your steps taken throughout the day and you can participate! Don't worry if you don't, just take your smartphone with you and use the Charity Footprints app.  Together you can help us walk from Islamabad, Pakistan all the way to our programs in Andkhoy, Afghanistan. Along the way you'll pass through the home of our Pakistan schools in Attock, Pakistan and the capital city of Afghanistan, Kabul. We would love for you to participate with us on Sept. 29 so we can all come together to take a step forward for education.  11th Annual Walk for Literacy, Cambridge, Mass.: Join us for the 11th Annual Walk for Literacy on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. Walk check in begins at 9 a.m. EST, and participants are released to start walking at 10 a.m. EST from Cambridge Common Park in Harvard Square. All walkers will receive breakfast, lunch and a free t-shirt.
Pre–registration is $30.
Registration at the door is $40. Once you register, set a fundraising goal for yourself or for a team of friends, family, classmates, or colleagues.
LINK  http://barakatworld.org

———————————
Sunday, September 30
———————————

Capitalism Redefined: Wealth, Inequality & Ethics
Sunday, September 30
1:30 PM to 3:30 PM
MIT, Building 34-101, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/HarvardHumanist/events/254449671/

The Humanist Hub is delighted to honor Nick Hanauer as our 2018 Harvard and MIT Humanist of the Year, on September 30.

Hanauer, a Seattle-based venture capitalist and entrepreneur, has for the past decade become one of the world’s boldest voices for progressive economic activism, including his famous warnings of the “pitchforks” coming for his “fellow zillionaires.”

An early investor in Amazon and the successful founder, funder or manager of businesses across a range of technologies and industries, Hanauer is a critic of rising economic inequality, writing several books and articles on the topic, including national bestsellers The True Patriot and The Garden of Democracy (with Eric Liu), as well as two TED talks, each with more than one million views.

For all of this and more, we at the Humanist Hub believe Hanauer may well be America’s most humanistic plutocrat.

Humanism requires us to apply critical thinking and compassion to the work of creating economies that influence the lives of billions of human beings, and it’s not hard to recognize that things have gone awry in this endeavor. In order to move forward, we need influential capitalists to speak truth to their powerful peers. Hanauer can serve as a healthy example of success for students who hope to gain influence through technology and business, and his message of progressive economics is relevant to all who care about humanist philosophy today.

“It is an honor both to receive this award, and to join the Humanist Hub in helping to change the way we think and talk about the economy,” said Hanauer. “It turns out that most people get capitalism wrong. Capitalism works best when it works for everybody, not just for zillionaires like me.”

Other recipients of this award have included filmmaker Seth MacFarlane; “Cosmos” creator Ann Druyan; human rights heroes Gen. Romeo Dallaire and Taslima Nasreen; and world-renowned scientists Steven Pinker and E.O. Wilson.

The ceremony - our “relaunch” event after recently expanding to also serve MIT after 40 years at Harvard - will be part of a major event spotlighting the ethics of wealth.

The event will include a short speech from and extended dialogue with Hanauer; as well as music from 2017 Women of the World Poetry Slam champion Oopma; remarks from author Matthew Stewart (author of recent Atlantic cover story on the “9.9 Percent” as the “New American Aristocracy;” Associate Dean and BU Professor of Law Khiara Bridges; award-winning filmmaker Lauren Greenfield (“Generation Wealth”), and more.

September 30, 1:30 PM: MIT Building 34 (50 Vassar Street), Room 101. Visit humanisthub.org for more information.

This event is free and open to the public - we recommend arriving early to get a good seat.

——————————————— 

Be the Change: Writers Without Margins
Sunday, September 30
3:00pm to 5:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

This Be The Change presentation traces the origins of Writers Without Margins, a nonprofit dedicated to the fusion of art and advocacy offering free creative writing workshops in Boston's homeless shelters, community health centers, youth services agencies and prison reentry and addiction recovery programs.  Learn about its recent feature in the upcoming documentary, In Their Shoes: Unheard Stories of Reentry and Recovery, and find out ways to be involved.

Cheryl Buchanan, co-founder of Writers Without Margins, is an attorney who learned the power of storytelling and silence-breaking when she worked for a decade on over 500 cases of childhood sexual abuse in Los Angeles. She has taught in a wide range of university and college classrooms, from law school to undergraduate Communication Studies and Creative Writing, as well as written for a variety of audiences from college texts to network television. She earned her MFA at Emerson College. Cheryl has been the recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize, the Boston Mayor’s Poetry Prize and the Naugatuck River Review Narrative Poetry Award as well as nominated for a 2016 Pushcart Prize and twice for Best New Poets. She was the recipient of the 2018 National Association for Poetry Therapy’s Poetry and Social Justice Award and serves as Editor of Writers Without Margins: A Journal of Poetry and Prose.

20% of sales from 3-5PM will be donated to Writers Without Margins.

Learn more about Be the Change at https://www.portersquarebooks.com/announcing-be-change

—————————
Monday, October 1
—————————

PAOC Colloquium - Robin Wordsworth (Harvard)
Monday, October 1
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT,  Building 54-915/923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Robin Wordsworth (Harvard)

About this Series
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars generally take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged.

—————————————

Using Big Data to Quantify the Economic Impacts of Climate Change
Monday, October 1
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Trevor Houser, Partner, Rhodium Group, and Co-Director, Climate Impact Lab

Lunch will be served.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar
https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/energyconsortium/seminars

—————————————

The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World
Monday, October 1
12:00 - 1:30 PM 
Northeastern University School of Law, 250 Dockser Hall, 65 Forsyth Street, Boston

On Monday, October 1, 2018, Jennifer Rothman, Professor of Law and the Joseph Scott Fellow at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, will visit campus to talk about her new book, The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World.

Who controls how one’s identity is used by others? This legal question, centuries old, demands greater scrutiny in the Internet age. Jennifer Rothman uses the right of publicity—a little-known law, often wielded by celebrities—to answer that question, not just for the famous but for everyone. In challenging the conventional story of the right of publicity’s emergence, development, and justifications, Rothman shows how it transformed people into intellectual property, leading to a bizarre world in which you can lose ownership of your own identity. This shift and the right’s subsequent expansion undermine individual liberty and privacy, restrict free speech and suppress artistic works.

The Right of Publicity traces the right’s origins back to the emergence of the right of privacy in the late 1800s. The central impetus for the adoption of privacy laws was to protect people from “wrongful publicity.” This privacy-based protection was not limited to anonymous private citizens but applied to famous actors, athletes, and politicians. Beginning in the 1950s, the right transformed into a fully transferable intellectual property right, generating a host of legal disputes, from control of dead celebrities like Prince, to the use of student athletes’ images by the NCAA, to lawsuits by users of Facebook and victims of revenge porn.

The right of publicity has lost its way. Rothman proposes returning the right to its origins and in the process reclaiming privacy for a public world.

Sponsored by the Center for Law, Innovation and Creativity (CLIC)
and the faculty colloquium committee at Northeastern University School of Law 

————————————

Animals as Patients, Models, and Infrastructure in Precision Bioscience
Monday, October 1
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

Declan Kuch, University of New South Wales, Environmental Humanities
The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to via the online form by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

sts at hks.harvard.edu
STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

————————————

Why Immigration Restrictions are Unjust and Why It Matters
Monday, October 1 
1:35pm to 2:40pm
Northeastern, 909 Renaissance Park, 1135 Tremont Street, Boston

Dr. Javier Hidalgo, Associate Professor of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond
States heavily restrict immigration. Are these immigration restrictions morally acceptable? This paper will give an argument against immigration restrictions. My argument is that states systematically balance the reasons for and against immigration restrictions in the wrong way. They ignore or discount the moral reasons to allow immigration and exaggerate the reasons in favor of restrictions. Because of this bias, states restrict immigration more than they should. We can infer from these claims that actual immigration restrictions are unjust. I’ll also explore some implications of this conclusion for the individual ethics of immigration—how individual actors should respond to the injustice of immigration restrictions.

—————————————

Compton Lecture by Thomas L. Friedman:  Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations
Monday, October 1
4:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, Building W16: Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Lecture title TBA
Thomas L. Friedman, an internationally known author and journalist, has won the Pulitzer Prize three times for his work at The New York Times. His foreign affairs column in The New York Times reports on US domestic politics and foreign policy, Middle East conflicts, international economics, environment, biodiversity, and energy.

For his coverage of the Middle East, Mr. Friedman was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and 1988 for international reporting. He was awarded the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Commentary for “his clarity of vision…in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat.” In 2004, he was awarded the Overseas Press Club Award for lifetime achievement and the honorary title, Order of the British Empire (OBE), by Queen Elizabeth II.

Mr. Friedman is the author of From Beirut to Jerusalem, which won both the National Book and the Overseas Press Club Awards in 1989, and The Lexus and the Olive Tree, winner of the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for best non-fiction book on foreign policy. Longitudes and Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11, issued in 2002, consists of columns Mr.  Friedman published about September 11. The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century, issued in April 2005 and updated in 2006 and 2007, received the inaugural Goldman Sachs/Financial Times Business Book of the Year Award. In 2008 he brought out Hot, Flat, and Crowded, which was published in a revised edition a year later. His sixth book, That Used to Be Us: How American Fell Behind in the World We Invented and How We Can Come Back, co-written with Michael Mandelbaum, was released in 2011. Mr. Friedman’s new book, Thank you For Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations 2.0, was updated and released 2017.

—————————————

CEE C.C. Mei Distinguished Speaker Series:  Fear, Greed and Financial Crisis 10 Years Later
Monday, October 1
5:00pm to 6:00pm
MIT, Building 1-190, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Prof. Andrew Lo 
Abstract:  2018 marks the 10-year anniversary of the worst financial crisis that we have experienced in our lifetimes. What have we learned? How likely are we to see another crisis? And what can we do to prevent it from happening again? To answer these questions, we need to develop a deeper understanding of the origin of financial crises and this can best be done through the perspective of evolutionary models of human behavior. This perspective points to a critical mismatch between the increasing speed of technological innovation and the much slower pace of human adaptation to such innovation, leading to oscillations between states of financial excess and regulatory over-reach. By recognizing this dynamic and measuring its drivers, we might one day be able to break free from its never-ending cycles to reach a more stable equilibrium.

Bio: Andrew W. Lo is the Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, the director of MIT’s Laboratory for Financial Engineering, a principal investigator at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, a research associate of the NBER, and an external faculty member of the Santa Fe Institute.  He received a B.A. in economics from Yale University and an A.M. and Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.  His most recent research focuses on systemic risk in the financial system, evolutionary models of investor behavior, and applying financial engineering to develop new funding models for biomedical innovation. He has published extensively in academic journals (see alo.mit.edu) and his most recent book is Adaptive Markets: Financial Evolution at the Speed of Thought.  His awards include Sloan and Guggenheim Fellowships, the Paul A. Samuelson Award, the Harry M. Markowitz Award, the Eugene F. Fama Prize, teaching awards from Wharton and MIT, and election to Academia Sinica, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and the Society for Financial Econometrics.

—————————————

ComMIT and Harvard Science in the News Mixer
Monday, October 1
5:00pm to 7:00pm
MIT, Building 56-154
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfylAOZK12IJbotsd9_uLJk80hL0HVvDfuxEM2c4rpEC5fciQ/viewform
Please RSVP here to help with the food order

Join us for the first-ever joint meeting of Science in the News and Communicating Science at MIT. Dinner will be provided!

Co-sponsored by the MIT Graduate Student Council Funding Board and Science in the News. The MIT and Harvard communities are welcome to attend. 

—————————————— 

Your Vote Counts: Education, Voting, and the Midterms
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 1, 2018, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Graduate School of Education, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT	Community Programming, Forum, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Askwith Forum, Students and Alumni
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith at gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT	Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE	This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED	No
FEATURED EVENT  Askwith Forums
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
DETAILS  Panelists include:
Meira Levinson, professor of education, HGSE 
Archon Fung, member of the faculty of education, HGSE; Winthrop Laflin McCormack Professor of Citizenship and Self-Government, HKS 
Moderator: Paul Reville, Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration, HGSE
The panelists will discuss how education may factor in the upcoming midterm election. Topics will include voting rights, civic participation, and how we might use education to help strengthen democracy in these challenging times. 
HGSE is participating in the Harvard Votes Challenge, a university-wide effort that is challenging Harvard schools to do their part to increase voter registration and participation among eligible students.

—————————————— 

Amazon Robotics - Company Presentation
Monday, October 1
6:00pm to 7:30pm
MIT, Building  3-270, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

—————————————— 

Harvard 2018 Science and Cooking Lecture Series with Clover founder/CEO Ayr Muir
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 1, 2018, 7 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Science Center Lecture Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Conferences, Education, Health Sciences, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)
SPEAKER(S)  Ayr Muir, founder/CEO of Clover Food Lab
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2018/08/2018-science-and-cooking-lecture-series-serves-up-smorgasbord-of-innovative-presentations
CONTACT INFO	azewe at seas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Clover Food Lab founder/CEO Ayr Muir joins famed chefs like Massimo Bottura and Wylie Dufresne as part of the 2018 Science and Cooking public lecture series at Harvard University. His focus? Using material science to build more flavorful bread.
Muir, who received degrees in Material Sciences and Engineering from MIT, and went on to found the cult-favorite Clover Food Lab restaurant chain, will speak about innovative approaches to baking more flavorful bread.
Muir's lecture, "Gluten vs Fiber: Innovative Approaches to Baking More Flavorful Bread" will happen Oct. 1 at 7 p.m. at the Harvard Science Center.
Muir will follow the lecture by co-hosting a roundtable for local chefs and bakers on Oct. 15, 4 p.m. at CloverFIN (160 Federal St., Boston) with Maine Grains. The purpose of the roundtable will be to educate local chefs about the flavor benefits of local grains. If you are interested in attending this event, please RSVP to press at cloverfoodlab.com
LINK  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2018/08/2018-science-and-cooking-lecture-series-serves-up-smorgasbord-of-innovative-presentations

——————————————— 

Heartland:  A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth
Monday, October 1
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridg

Harvard Book Store welcomes journalist SARAH SMARSH—a Joan Shorenstein Fellow at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government—for a discussion of her debut book, Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth.

About Heartland
During Sarah Smarsh’s turbulent childhood in Kansas in the 1980s and 1990s, the forces of cyclical poverty and the country’s changing economic policies solidified her family’s place among the working poor. By telling the story of her life and the lives of the people she loves, Smarsh challenges us to look more closely at the class divide in our country and examine the myths about people thought to be less because they earn less. Her personal history affirms the corrosive impact intergenerational poverty can have on individuals, families, and communities, and she explores this idea as lived experience, metaphor, and level of consciousness.

Smarsh was born a fifth generation Kansas wheat farmer on her paternal side and the product of generations of teen mothers on her maternal side. Through her experiences growing up as the daughter of a dissatisfied young mother and raised predominantly by her grandmother on a farm thirty miles west of Wichita, we are given a unique and essential look into the lives of poor and working-class Americans living in the heartland. Combining memoir with powerful analysis and cultural commentary, Heartland is an uncompromising look at class, identity, and the particular perils of having less in a country known for its excess.

——————————————— 

The Fame of C.S. Lewis: A Controversialist's Reception in Britain and America
Monday, October 1
7:00pm
Trident Booksellers, 338 Newbury Street, Boston

C. S. Lewis, long renowned for his children's books as well as his Christian apologetics, has been the subject of wide interest since he first stepped-up to the BBC's microphone during the Second World War. Until now, however, the reasons why this medievalist began writing books for a popular audience, and why these books have continued to be so popular, had not been fully explored. In fact Lewis, who once described himself as by nature an 'extreme anarchist', was a critical controversialist in his time-and not to everyone's liking. Yet, somehow, Lewis's books directed at children and middlebrow Christians have continued to resonate in the decades since his death in 1963. Stephanie L. Derrick considers why this is the case, and why it is more true in America than in Lewis's home-country of Britain.

The story of C. S. Lewis's fame is one that takes us from his childhood in Edwardian Belfast, to the height of international conflict during the 1940s, to the rapid expansion of the paperback market, and on to readers' experiences in the 1980s and 1990s, and, finally, to London in November 2013, where Lewis was honoured with a stone in Poet's Corner in Westminster Abbey. Derrick shows that, in fact, the author himself was only one actor among many shaping a multi-faceted image. The Fame of C. S. Lewis is the most comprehensive account of Lewis's popularity to date, drawing on a wealth of fresh material and with much to interest scholars and C. S. Lewis admirers alike.

About the author:  Dr. Stephanie L. Derrick is a historian of religion in the modern era, with a special interest in the intellectual and print cultures of British and American Christianity.  She also investigates the ways in which technology and globalization are shaping religious experience in the twenty-first century.  She did her PhD in History at the University of Stirling (Scotland) and now lives in Los Angeles, California.

——————————————— 

Killing Cancer with Cannabis
Monday, October 1 
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Museum of Science, Cahners Theatre, 1 Museum of Science Driveway, Boston
RSVP at https://www.mos.org/public-events/killing-cancer-with-cannabis

Success stories of cannabis curing cancer are not new, but they’ve often been anecdotal. The precise cannabinoids that kill specific cancer cells have not been identified – until now. David (Dedi) Meiri, PhD, is discovering which combinations of the cannabis compounds are able to destroy which specific cancer types. Find out about Meiri’s game-changing research and the promise that medical marijuana may hold in the battle against cancer. Reception to follow.

In conversation with Kara Miller, host and executive editor of WGBH’s Innovation Hub

This program is for audiences 18+.

——————————————— 

The Knife Edge of Value Alignment in AI: Utopia or Extinction
Monday, October 1
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
Cafe ArtScience, 650 E Kendall Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-knife-edge-of-value-alignment-in-ai-utopia-or-extinction-tickets-50020496652
Cost:  $0 – $15

Doors open @ 6pm -- Come early and meet other Long Now thinkers -- Presentations start @ 7pm
If Eventbrite tickets sell out, seating for walk-ups will be unlikely to be available due to room size. 
A Long Now Boston Community Conversation with
Richard Mallah and Lucas Perry, The Future of Life Institute [FLi]
Summary:
AI: Artificial Intelligence is one of this century’s most misunderstood buzzwords. In Kurzweil's “Singularity”, it represents a glorious future where human toil and suffering is ended. In The Matrix, it conjures a future dominated by malevolent supermachines feeding on the energies of human slaves. In reality, AI is fast becoming the ubiquitous hand-maiden of human invention and ingenuity for much of what we relish in our day to day. From search engines to the energy grid; autonomous vehicles to life support systems; food production to weather forecasting; data security to anti-ballistic missile guidance. The list of AI processes we can no longer get by without grows daily.
AI programming ultimately relies on simple, digital decision chains, but they are at the point where machines can teach themselves. The Intelligence may be artificial and “inhuman”, but is increasingly more capable than our own. In the world of zeroes and ones, a near perfection of logical functioning can be achieved, with AI systems that are free of human foibles and the slowness of biological systems, free of human attributes like emotion, intuition, love, or a sense of right and wrong. Or are they?
What happens when we ask the algorithms to make decisions for us - decisions that may have life and death consequences? And what happens if, or when, their intelligence begins to match or exceed our own - the level of Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) where we can no longer tell if an agent is human or machine? Autonomous decision-making and human level agency will require moral and ethical guidance. Do our AI programmers have the perspective — historical, philosophical, moral — to be the arbiters of that guidance? Or do we let the algorithms themselves learn human morality by emulating humans? How do we properly align the values of our inventions, to achieve the goal of a beneficent future for all?
The Long Now Boston Conversation Series hosts the Future of Life Institute's Robert Mallah and Lucas Perry to share their research on the frontiers of Value Alignment and the implications for the future of AI and AGI. 
Join the conversation and be part of the solution.
$15 in advance // $20 at the door. Students w/ID admitted free.
Audience participation is encouraged. 
The Future of Life Institute [FLI] is one of the world’s leading organizations exploring the potential existential challenges and solutions of technology in the fields of AI, Biotech, Nuclear Weapons and Climate Change.
Richard Mallah is the Director of AI Projects, Future of Life Institute. Richard has over fifteen years of experience leading AI research and AI product teams in industry, lending an appreciation for tradeoffs at all AI product lifecycle stages. As Director of AI Projects at the Future of Life Institute, Richard does meta-research, analysis, advocacy, research organization, community building, and technical direction of projects related to the safety, ethics, robustness, and beneficence of future AI systems in order to minimize their risks and maximize their benefits globally. Richard was the lead author of FLI's landmark Landscape of Technical AI Safety Research, and he has given dozens of invited talks on safety, ethics, robustness, and beneficence of advanced AI. Within IEEE's Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems, Richard is a former chair of the committee on autonomous weapons, a current co-chair of the committee on AGI safety and beneficence, and a member of the executive committee. Richard holds a degree in computer science, AI, and machine learning from Columbia University, and is well read in natural philosophy.
Lucas Perry works as Project Coordinator for the Future of Life Institute. He focuses on enabling and delivering existential risk mitigation efforts ranging from direct interventions, to advocacy, and enabling research. Lucas was an organizer of the Beneficial AI 2017 conference, worked on a nuclear weapons divestment campaign, and has spoken at a number of universities and EA events. His AI activities have included grant making in the field of AI safety, a podcast on AI safety and value alignment, and work on the conceptual landscape of the value alignment problem. He studied philosophy at Boston College and has been working in AI safety and existential risk ever since.
We’re proud and excited to welcome Richard and Lucas to the Long Now Boston community.

——————————
Tuesday, October 2
——————————

Fix It Clinic
Tuesday, October 2
11AM–2PM
Cabot Science Library, Harvard University, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

HOW: Register at goo.gl/qTzh9J then
Bring your broken item with all parts necessary to recreate the symptoms (carry-in only: no oversize items)
Bring any parts and tools you already own that might be helpful (e.g. hand tools, sewing supplies)
Come ready to describe what’s wrong and what you’ve tried
Come ready to learn and to share your knowledge with others
WHO: All ages welcome: a family-friendly event: accompanied children are heartily invited! 
COST: Free!
WHY: To make friends, learn and teach how to fix things, and have fun!

Celebrating repair by conveying basic troubleshooting skills, Fixit Clinics are do-it-together hands-on fix-n-learn community-based exploration and discovery workshops staffed by volunteer Fixit Coaches who generously share their time, tools and expertise to consult with you on the disassembly, troubleshooting, and repair of items.

So bring your broken, non-functioning things -- electronic gadgets, appliances, computers, toys, sewing machines, bicycles, fabric items, etc.-- for assessment, disassembly, and possible repair. Fixit Coaches (and helpful neighbors) will be available for consultation on broken items: we'll provide workspace, specialty tools, and guidance to help you disassemble and troubleshoot your item. Whether you fix it or not, you'll learn more about how it was manufactured and how it worked, ready to share your new-found confidence and insight with your friends, neighbors, and the community at large.

—————————————

Jazmine Ulloa
Tuesday, October 2
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Wexner Building, Room 434AB, Wexner Conference Room, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

————————————— 

How to Increase Bipartisan Leadership on Climate Change
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Online
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Voices in Leadership webcast program
SPEAKER(S)  Representative Bob Inglis and moderator Gina McCarthy, Director of Harvard C-CHANGE
COST  free
CONTACT INFO	Alison Barron - abarron at hsph.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Join us for the next “Voices in Leadership” event of the fall semester, featuring Rep. Bob Inglis, former U.S. Representative for South Carolina. Rep. Inglis was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1992, having never run for office before. In 2011, Inglis went full-time into promoting free enterprise action on climate change and launched the Energy and Enterprise Initiative (“E&EI”) at George Mason University in July 2012. In the fall of 2014, E&EI rebranded to become republicEn.org. republicEn is a growing grassroots community of over 5,000 Americans educating the country about free-enterprise solutions to climate change. Gina McCarthy, Director of Harvard C-CHANGE, will moderate. For lottery and live webcast details, visit hsph.me/inglis or contact Alison Barron.
LINK	https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/voices/events/bob-inglis-former-u-s-representative-for-south-carolina/

—————————————

NEURAL CIRCUITS OF DEXTERITY
Tuesday, October 2 
12:00pm
Harvard, BioLabs Building, Room 1080, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Adam Hantman 
Dexterous movements serve the major functions of the brain, perception and manipulation of the world. Considering the range of possible actions and the complexity of musculoskeletal arrangements, control of the hand is an amazing achievement of the nervous system. Dexterous behavior involves understanding objects in the world, developing appropriate plans, converting those plans into appropriate motor commands, and adaptively reacting to feedback. The myriad of these underlying operations is likely performed by a diverse set of neural circuits. By combining anatomy, physiology, and specific (genetic and temporal) manipulations, my lab hopes to identify and understand the neural elements responsible for dexterous motor control. Currently, we focus on the role of the cortico-cerebellar loop in a skilled reach-grab-eat task in the rodent.

————————————— 

Software for the Social Good 
Tuesday, October 2
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Sebastian Diaz
Hal Roberts
The Berkman Klein Center geeks primarily engage in specific project support, software development and data science, and other ad-hoc technology activities at the Center. They also build amazing tools to support projects and center wide goals. Join us to learn more about the types of tools we produce.

————————————

PICS Seminar:  Impact Chemistry and the Origin of Life
Tuesday, October 2
12:30pm to 1:30pm
MIT, Building 54- 517, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

H. J. Melosh (Purdue)
Abstract: Most discussions of global environmental effects of large impacts focus on changes deleterious to extant life. However, impacts may also produce changes that enhance or even create conditions beneficial to the origin of life. Many other authors have discussed impact delivery of organic molecules, and some have shown the shock synthesis of prebiotic molecules such as amino acids during impact. My former student Abby Sheffer's and my past work on the chemistry of impacts demonstrated that strong chemical reduction occurs in impact melt ejecta (spherules and melt droplets; tektites). Here I focus on the element phosphorus (P), whose role is crucial in biology as the backbone of DNA and RNA, and in metabolic biochemical energy transfer. Matt Pasek previously showed that reduced P readily enters into interesting biological compounds with organic molecules in aqueous solution, and that these reduced P compounds may generate structures similar to sugar phosphates, which are critical to life as we know it. In this talk I argue that impact reduction of P transforms terrestrial and meteoritic phosphates bearing an oxidation state of +5 to the lower redox states of +3 (phosphites) and 0 as an alloy with metal (phosphides). I base this argument on studies of fulgurites—glasses formed by cloud- to-ground lightning—that bear phosphides and phosphites as major carriers of P. Fulgurite chemistry frequently parallels that of impact glasses. Additionally, thermodynamic calculations show that separation of an O-rich vapor from a melt readily results in the transformation of phosphate to phosphites and metal phosphides. These results are confirmed by the presence of metal phosphides within tektites. The impact reduction of phosphates followed by global dispersal of reduced P in the form of glassy droplets likely played a major role in the origin of life on Earth and perhaps on other young planets. 

About the Speaker: H. J. Melosh is a Distinguished Professor of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Science at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN.  He also holds appointments in the departments of Physics and Astronomy and Aeronautical and Aerospace Engineering at Purdue. 

He received an AB degree in Physics from Princeton University in 1969 and a PhD in Physics and Geology from Caltech in 1973.  His principal research interests are impact cratering, planetary tectonics, and the physics of earthquakes and landslides.  His recent research includes studies of the giant impact origin of the moon, the K/T impact that extinguished the dinosaurs, the ejection of rocks from their parent bodies and the origin and transfer of life between the planets.  He was a science team member of NASA’s Deep Impact mission that successfully cratered comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005 and flew by comet Hartley 2 on November 9, 2010.  He was also a Co-Investigator of the GRAIL mission that returned detailed data on the Moon’s gravity field.

Professor Melosh is a Fellow of the Meteoritical Society, the Geological Society of America the American Geophysical Union and American Association for the Advancement of Science.  He was awarded the Barringer Medal of the Meteoritical Society in 1999, the Gilbert prize of the Geological Society of America in 2001 and the Hess Medal of the American Geophysical Union in 2008.  He was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1996-1997 and a Humboldt Fellow at the Bavarian Geological Institute in Bayreuth, Germany, in 2005-2006.  Asteroid #8216 was named “Melosh” in his honor.  He was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2003 and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011.  In 2014 he received the McCoy award of Purdue University, Purdue’s highest science award.

He has published approximately 200 technical papers, edited two books and is the author of a major monograph, Impact Cratering:  A Geologic Process and a text “Planetary Surface Processes” with Cambridge University Press.

——————————————— 

Current State of U.S. Immigration: Trends, Policy Issues, and Public Opinion
Tuesday, October 2
4:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Neil G. Ruiz is associate director of global migration and demography at Pew Research Center. He studies the international movement of people across borders, the impact of migration on sending and receiving countries, high-skilled immigration to the U.S., and comparative immigrant visa systems. Prior to joining the Center, Ruiz was the executive director of the Center for Law, Economics & Finance at George Washington University, and he has also worked as a migration expert at the Brookings Institution, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. He received his doctorate in political science with a specialization in political economy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in economic history from Oxford University. Ruiz regularly speaks about U.S. immigration and international migration research with major print and broadcast media.

Free and open to the public | Refreshments will be served
Sponsored by the Inter-University Committee on International Migration

The Inter-University Committee on International Migration
Since its establishment in 1974, the Inter-University Committee on International Migration has been a focal point for migration and refugee studies at member institutions, which include Boston University, Brandeis University, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Harvard University, MIT, Tufts University, and Wellesley College. The committee is chaired by MIT as a program of the Center for International Studies (CIS).

Migration Seminar Series
During each academic year, the Committee sponsors a seminar series on international migration, The Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration, held at MIT's Center for International Studies. The seminars explore factors affecting international population movements and their impact upon sending and receiving countries and relations among them. 

———————————————

Tara Oceans: Cells, Embryos, and the Origins of Complexity in Life
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, 5 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Science, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Eric Karsenti, scientific director of the Tara Oceans expedition and codirector of the Tara Oceans Polar Circle expedition, Tara Expeditions; visiting group leader, European Molecular Biological Laboratory
COST  Free
CONTACT INFO	events at radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  How do complex living systems arise? Are there self-organizing principles that can explain the evolution from single-celled marine organisms to embryos and beyond? Drawing upon a vast database of plankton collected from the world’s seas by the research vessel "Tara," Eric Karsenti will show how these newly discovered life forms are offering clues about how complex marine organisms emerged over the past 4 billion years. Register online.
This talk coincides with the visit of the research vessel "Tara" to Boston Harbor and is cosponsored by the Consulate General of France in Boston.
LINK	https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-eric-karsenti-lecture

——————————————— 

Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup: A Special Evening with Author John Carreyrou
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, 5 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East BC (2036), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Business, Ethics, Information Technology, Law, Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics at Harvard Law School
SPEAKER(S)  Please join us for a conversation with John Carreyrou, investigative reporter for the Wall Street Journal and author of the New York Times bestseller "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup."
Panelists
I. Glenn Cohen, James A. Attwood and Leslie Williams Professor of Law, Harvard Law School and faculty director, Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School
Rakesh Khurana, Danoff Dean of Harvard College; Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, Harvard Business School; Professor of Sociology, Harvard University; and faculty dean of Cabot House
Akiko Mikumo - Fellow Harvard Advanced Leadership Initiative, Retired M & A Partner Weil, Gotshal & Manges
Moderator: Douglas Eby, Senior Fellow, Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics, Harvard Law School and CEO, Cambridge Science
Complimentary copies of "Bad Blood" will be available for audience members.
CONTACT INFO	petrie-flom at law.harvard.edu
DETAILS	
Please join us for a conversation with John Carreyrou, investigative reporter for the Wall Street Journal and author of the New York Times bestseller "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup.”
LINK  http://petrieflom.law.harvard.edu/events/details/bad-blood-secrets-and-lies-in-a-silicon-valley-startup

——————————————— 

Careers in Sustainability: The Evolution of the Sustainability Professional
Tuesday, October 2
5:30 PM – 7:00 PM EDT
Boston Architectural College, 320 Newbury Street, 2nd Floor, Cascieri Hall, 2nd Floor, Cascieri Hall, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/careers-in-sustainability-the-evolution-of-the-sustainability-professional-tickets-49347629087
Cost:  $0 – $10

The Emerging Professionals of Massachusetts are excited to share our next Careers in Sustainability panel discussion at the Boston Architectural College, covering the Evolution of the Sustainability Professional. We will cover the places where young professionals are entering into the sustainability industry today (degree programs and start-ups) and where we see opportunities for the future (entrepreneurial ventures, non-profits, public service). From 10 years ago, we had a rise in CSR professionals and we will discuss what has changed since then and where the future of green jobs are for upcoming graduates. We look forward to seeing you there!

Careers in Sustainability Series: 
The Careers in Sustainability Series began in 2017 by the USGBC MA Chapter’s Emerging Professionals of MA Committee, during the ramp up to GreenBuild in Boston. The goal of the series is to bring professionals of various stages of their careers in sustainability and help provide guidance and insight to students planning on entering a sustainability-related industry. Our series is structured as a panel discussion that we take to a new college every year to broaden our impact across Massachusetts colleges.

————————————  

The Politics of Dignity: Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Bus Boycott
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS Knafel Building, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Humanities, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Seminar on Cultural Politics, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Chair: Prof. Panagiotis Roilos
SPEAKER(S)  Michael Rosen, Senator Joseph S. Clark Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government, Department of Government, Harvard University.

———————————— 

Farsighted:  How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most
Tuesday, October 2
6:00 PM (Doors at 5:30)
Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/steven_johnson2/
Cost:  $6 - $29.75 (book included)

Harvard Book Store welcomes bestselling author STEVEN JOHNSON—host and co-creator of How We Got to Now—for a discussion of his latest book, Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most.
About Farsighted

Plenty of books offer useful advice on how to get better at making quick-thinking, intuitive choices. But what about more consequential decisions, the ones that affect our lives for years, or centuries, to come? Our most powerful stories revolve around these kinds of decisions: where to live, whom to marry, what to believe, whether to start a company, how to end a war.

Full of the beautifully crafted storytelling and novel insights that Steven Johnson's fans know to expect, Farsighted draws lessons from cognitive science, social psychology, military strategy, environmental planning, and great works of literature. Everyone thinks we are living in an age of short attention spans, but we've actually learned a lot about making long-term decisions over the past few decades. Johnson makes a compelling case for a smarter and more deliberative decision-making approach. He argues that we choose better when we break out of the myopia of single-scale thinking and develop methods for considering all the factors involved.

There's no one-size-fits-all model for the important decisions that can alter the course of a life, an organization, or a civilization. But Farsighted explains how we can approach these choices more effectively, and how we can appreciate the subtle intelligence of choices that shaped our broader social history.

———————————— 

AI and Human Augmentation in Healthcare
Tuesday, October 2
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
EPAM Continuum, 21 Drydock Avenue, #410w, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ai-and-human-augmentation-in-healthcare-tickets-50448077558

There is a lot of debate around whether machines will take human jobs. While some people believe that machines will replace human jobs, others are of the opinion that the application of machines will create more jobs than it will replace.
Come and learn with us whether technology and humans can together create robust healthcare solutions. 

Agenda:
Check-in and Networking: 6:00- 6:20 pm
Opening Remarks: 6:20- 6:25 pm
[NEW] Open mic: 6:25- 6:30 pm
Speaker session: 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Networking: After 7:30 pm

————————————

The Future of (Sustainable) Work
Tuesday, October 2
6:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Venture Cafe Kendall, One Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-future-of-sustainable-work-tickets-49009913972
Cost:  $8 – $12

Our next event is just ahead of the MA Green Careers Conference, so we thought we would take a look at the future of work and the place of sustainability in it. To do this, we have invited three inspiring guest speakers to inform and envision with us what the jobs of the future will be, what skills the future workforce will need, and which companies will attract the best talent with their sustainable concepts and environments. 
Come learn about the evolving job economy from Fernando Montejo of MIT - Solve

Fernando Montejo is the Community Relations Officer for Solve’s Economic Prosperity pillar. In this role, Fernando engages leaders from the private, public, non-profit, and academic sectors to identify and support solutions to economic prosperity challenges in cities and regions worldwide. He is passionate about advancing community and economic development through civic innovation, place-based initiatives, and impactful partnerships. He is currently working on the Work of the Future Challenge, the winners of which will be announced in late September.
Prior to joining Solve, Fernando worked with the executive team of the New York City Housing Authority, where he helped implement a portfolio of rigorous initiatives to improve quality of life for more than 400,000 working and low-income New Yorkers. He has also served as a researcher at the MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism, and was a Global Policy Fellow at the Institute of Technology & Society in Rio de Janeiro, where he investigated the social challenges and innovation opportunities of staging the 2016 Olympic Games. 
Fernando is of Peruvian descent, born and raised in Queens, New York City. He holds a Master in City Planning from MIT and a Bachelor of Science in Urban & Regional Studies from Cornell University.
Come hear about the workforce of the future, preparing this and the next generation of leaders, from Drew Bonfiglio, Co-founder of Emzingo

Drew is the co-founder of Emzingo, a social enterprise and Certified B Corp focused on creating the next generation of responsible leaders. He and his colleagues work with businesses, universities, and professionals to design and deliver experiential learning that instills a mindset of Responsible Leadership, drives purpose at work, promotes social innovation and environmental awareness, and creates a culture of collaboration. 
Drew is also co-founder and co-chair of the B Local Boston board (a professional working group of certified B Corps) where he is helping Greater Boston to use "Business as a Force for Good". Drew holds an M.S. in Engineering from Cornell University and an MBA from IE Business School. He lives in Somerville, MA with his wife, two kids and puppy. 
Come hear about B Corps and designing job places of the future with Anne Sherman of STAACH

Anne is a designer and Director of Sustainability & Operations at STAACH, a multidisciplinary design and manufacturing company with a specialty in creating inspired interiors and furniture for commercial spaces. She brings a passion for design, systems thinking, social impact, and management to her work re-imagine the ways in which businesses operate and interact with society. Her mission is to inform businesses how to build lasting value by demonstrating authenticity, integrity, and accountability to all stakeholders while supporting a sustainable future by employing a combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis tools with co-operative learning processes. 

Anne is also a champion for the community of Certified B Corps and an advocate for policies supporting sustainable business practices. 
Looking forward to seeing you all soon! Carol, Holly, Tilly and Eric

————————————

Professor Michael Meltsner in Conversation With Daniel Medwed
Tuesday, October 2
6:30pm to 8:30pm
Cambridge Public Library, Lecture Hall, 449 Broadway, Cambridge

Growing up in a depression battered family, one tangled by a mortal secret, With Passion tells the improbable story of an unsung hero of the civil rights movement who thought of himself as a “miscast” lawyer but ended up defending peaceful protesters, representing Mohammad Ali, suing Robert Moses, counseling Lenny Bruce, bringing the case that integrated hundreds of southern hospitals, and named “the principal architect of the death penalty abolition movement in the United States.” More than a meditation on often frustrating legal efforts to fight inequality and racism, Michael Meltsner—also a novelist and playwright—vividly recounts the life of a New York kid, struggling to make sense of coming of age amid the tumult of vast demographic and cultural changes in the city.

Professor Meltsners will be in conversation with Daniel Medwed. Professor Medwed teaches Criminal Law, Evidence, and Advanced Criminal Procedure: Wrongful Convictions and Post-Conviction Remedies. His research and pro bono activities revolve around the topic of wrongful convictions. His book, Prosecution Complex: America’s Race to Convict and Its Impact on the Innocent (New York University Press, 2012), explores how even well-meaning prosecutors may contribute to wrongful convictions because of cognitive biases and an overly-deferential regime of legal and ethical rules. His recently published Wrongful Convictions and the DNA Revolution: Twenty-Five Years of Freeing the Innocent (Cambridge University Press, 2017), discusses the lessons learned from a quarter century of DNA exonerations. Professor Medwed is the legal analyst for WGBH News, Boston’s local NPR and PBS affiliate.

—————————————— 

People who are changing the world & those who want to help them [video call]
Tuesday, October 2
9:00 PM
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/people-who-are-changing-the-world-those-who-want-to-help-them-video-calls-tickets-47137797421

This is your opportunity to connect over video with people who are working relentlessly to change the world and those who want to chip in and help.

No matter whether you're working 100's of hours or week or simply have an extra hour or two a week you want to contribute to a worthy cause, this is your chance to connect. After all, as Margaret Mead surmised: 'Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.'

We're running this event as a Meetaway. For anyone new to the Meetaway format, Meetaways are online events where you can choose who meet for a series of 1:1 video conversations. So, skip the commute and meet people from the comfort of your own home or office!

Don't forget, you'll want to join the event on a laptop or desktop with Chrome or Firefox because having everyone on a laptop or desktop results in a better overall experience for everyone.

If you want to help change the world, then RSVP today.

*****************
----------------------
Upcoming Events
----------------------
***************** 

———————————
Wednesday, October 3
———————————

Symposium: Microbiome in Human Disease
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
WHERE  Joseph B Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Conferences, Education, Health Sciences, Lecture, Research study, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Catalyst
SPEAKER(S)  Ashwin Ananthakrishnan, MBBS, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital
Emily Balskus, PhD, Harvard University
C. Ronald Kahn, MD, Joslin Diabetes Center
Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Hera Vlamakis, PhD, Broad Institute
Howard L. Weiner, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
COST	Free
TICKET WEB LINK	  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/microbiome-in-human-disease-symposium-registration-47959806071
TICKET INFO	Reservation Required
CONTACT INFO	Reactor at catalyst.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Human microbiota, the collection of microorganisms living inside and on the surface of our bodies, have been associated with various aspects of numerous diseases. These associations include susceptibility, causation, complications, and even prevention. While the impact of translational microbiological research, most dramatically in the cure and prophylaxis of infectious diseases, has been extraordinary, the relationship of the microbiome to other disease states remains under-investigated, as does the import of microbial ecology in normal and pathological states.
The Microbiome in Human Disease Symposium, sponsored by the Harvard Catalyst Reactor Program, will provide researchers with the opportunity to learn about current human microbiome research and promote a greater understanding of the role(s) microbiomes play in the manifestation and treatment of human disease in its broadest sense. Information about many of the microbiome-related cores and services from across the university and hospitals will be highlighted.
Confirmed Speakers
Ashwin Ananthakrishnan, MBBS, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital
Emily Balskus, PhD, Harvard University
C. Ronald Kahn, MD, Joslin Diabetes Center
Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Hera Vlamakis, PhD, Broad Institute
Howard L. Weiner, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Pilot Funding
An announcement will be made during the symposium about an upcoming funding opportunity that focuses on the role(s) microbiomes play in the manifestation and treatment of human disease in its broadest sense.
LINK  https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/reactor/event/microbiome-human-disease-symposium

—————————————

Massachusetts Farm to School Awareness Day
Wednesday, October 3
11:00AM
Grand Staircase, Massachusetts State House

We hope you will join Massachusetts Farm to School and other farm to school advocates for the second annual Farm to School Awareness Day. On October 3, 2018 partners from around the Commonwealth will come together at the Massachusetts State House to celebrate Massachusetts Farm to School Month, and all things farm to school! This day will be a great opportunity to meet with your legislators to share the exciting farm to school activities happening in your community, as well as visit with other farm to school organizations and congratulate this year's Kale Blazer Award recipient.

Schedule a meeting with your legislators that day! Check out our website for more information including opportunities to participate even if you can't make it to the event in person. The event is FREE & open to all, but please RSVP here if you plan to attend and let us know if you have any questions.  

Hope to see you there & please share this email widely!          

The Massachusetts Farm to School Team
http://www.massfarmtoschool.org

————————————— 

Can We Ever Get It Right? Voting Technology in 2018
Wednesday, October 3 
12:00 pm-1:00 pm 
MIT, Building 66-168, 25 Ames Street, Cambridge

Suzanne Mello-Stark, of the University of Rhode Island will address the vulnerabilities of voting technology.  

————————————— 

Geostructural Realism and the Return of Bipolarity in International Politics
Wednesday, October 3
12:00-1:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496, Pye Room, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Øystein Tunsjø, Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies, Norwegian Defence University College
This presentation first demonstrates that the current international system has returned to bipolarity by pointing to the narrowing power gap between China and the US, the widening power gap between China and any third ranking power, and the similar distribution of capabilities between the contemporary international system and the previous bipolar system. Second, it argues that Waltz's neorealist theory remains unfinished since he did not compare bipolar systems. Since no studies have compared states balancing behavior or examined the relative stability between two bipolar systems, the third objective is to refine Waltz's structural realist theory and present a new geostructural realist theory. 

Bio:  Øystein Tunsjø is Professor at the Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies at the Norwegian Defence University College. Tunsjø is author of The Return of Bipolarity in World Politics: China, the United States and Geostructural Realism (Columbia University Press, 2018); Security and Profits in China's Energy Policy: Hedging Against Risk (Columbia University Press, 2013), and US Taiwan Policy: Constructing the Triangle (London: Routledge, 2008). Tunsjø holds a Ph.D. in International Relations from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, an MSc from the London School of Economics, and an MA from Griffith University, Australia. Tunsjø was a visiting Fulbright scholar at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University, during spring term of 2010.

————————————

Pass-Through as a Test for Market Power: An Application to Solar Subsidies
Wednesday, October 3
4:15pm - 5:30pm
Harvard, Room L-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jacquelyn Pless, University of Oxford, and Arthur van Benthem, University of Pennsylvania.

Support from Enel Endowment for Environmental Economics and the Department of Economics is Gratefully Acknowledged.

casey_billings at hks.harvard.edu
Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/44157

—————————————

Screening and Filmmaker Discussion Featuring David Heilbroner '84 on "Traffic Stop"
Wednesday, October 3 
5:30pm to 7:30pm
Northeastern University School of Law, 250 Dockser Hall, 66 Forsyth Street, Boston

Join NUSL's Center for Public Interest Advocacy and Collaboration (CPIAC) and the Black Law Students Association (BLSA) for a special screening of Traffic Stop, an Oscar-nominated short film produced by David Heilbroner '84.

Traffic Stop tells the story of Breaion King, a 26-year-old African-American school teacher from Austin, Texas, who is stopped for a routine traffic violation that escalates into a dramatic arrest. Nominated for an Academy Award for Docllllentary Short Subject, Traffic Stop illuminates timely, resonant issues of race and law enforcement while offering an intimate portrait of one woman in the wake of her traumatic arrest. 

Presented by the Center for Public Interest Advocacy and Collaboration (CPIAC) & the Black Law Students Association (BLSA) at Northeastern University School of Law

————————————— 

Future Forward:  Leadership Lessons from Patrick McGovern, the Visionary Who Circled the Globe and Built a Technology Media Empire
Wednesday, October 3
6:00 PM
Singleton Auditorium at MIT Building 46, 43 Vassar Street, Cambridge

The McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT and Harvard Book Store welcome journalist and author GLENN RIFKIN for a discussion of Future Forward, his new biography of Patrick McGovern.
About Future Forward

Like Steve Jobs, Patrick McGovern built a worldwide multibillion-dollar industry by thinking differently, disrupting old business models, and embracing new technology trends. He drove the future forward and never looked back. With magazines such as Computerworld, PCWorld, and Macworld, his company, International Data Group (IDG), quickly became a global powerhouse with information technology publications in nearly 100 countries.
The story of IDG’s astonishing success has been a source of inspiration for entrepreneurs all around the world. No matter what industry you work in―whether you’re heading up a small startup, expanding a mid-sized company, or running a major global corporation―McGovern’s people-first principles, insights, and integrity will help you lead the way.
Learn how to:
Define a clear mission early in the game―for long-term success.
Identify new markets and stay ahead of the curve.
Expand your business globally but have it managed locally.
Listen to your customers and empower your people.
Hire the best and challenge them to do their best work.
Never stop learning and always remain curious.
Foster a let’s-try-it attitude throughout the company.
Lead with optimism and stay true to your values and vision.

In addition to these timeless lessons, you’ll learn how this future-forward leader broke new ground in the 1980s by opening offices in China, the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and other markets deemed off-limits. You’ll discover how his company thrived in spite of major industry shifts―from mainframe computers to minicomputers to personal computers, from print to digital to smartphones―that upended many rivals. Living at the intersection of these classic disruptions, McGovern never missed a beat. He understood well before most that a revolution in information technology was underway and not only was there money to be made but that this would soon become the world’s largest industry. Most important, he never forgot the human element that is so crucial to any company’s success. His leadership in the creation of one of the world’s leading brain research institutes at MIT only served to cement his legacy.

—————————————

Venezuela Today:  Challenges from Within and Abroad
Wednesday, October 3
6:30 to 8:00pm
BU, College of Arts and Sciences, Room B 12, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Steve Ellner, author of numerous books and professor at Universidad De Oriente in Venezuela from 1977 to 2003, is touring the US to give a presentation on the recent events in Venezuela and how people there are coping with hyper-inflation as well as food and medicine shortages.

The Bolivarian Revolution, initiated by Hugo Chavez in 1999 and now led by President Nicolas Maduro, has been in the bullseye of attacks by the Trump administration and the European Union. The US and European sanctions have been an economic stranglehold that has caused the Venezuelan economy to crumble. Economic sanctions prevent the normal flow of payments for goods, causing shortages and hyper-inflation that has reached over 1,000%. Venezuelans have resorted to migration to neighboring countries to look for a better life. The exodus has created a shortage of human talent in Venezuela impairing infrastructure (water, electricity, gas). The main Venezuelan industry, oil, has also suffered due to lack of talented resources and disinvestments, leading to a production decline of over 50%.

The Venezuelan Solidarity Committee is organizing a delegation to Venezuela in November. Information on the delegation will be available at this event.

Steve Ellner earned his Ph.D. in Latin American history at the University of New Mexico in 1980. Since 1977 he has taught economic history and political science at the Universidad de Oriente in Puerto La Cruz. He has been a visiting professor at Georgetown University (2004), Duke University (2005), Universidad de Buenos Aires (2010), Australian National University (2013), and Tulane University (2015) and has taught at Columbia University and Johns Hopkins, all in the field of Latin American history and political science. Among his book publications are:  Venezuela's Movimiento al Socialismo: From Guerrilla Defeat to 
Electoral Politics (Duke University Press, 1988);  Organized Labor in Venezuela, l958-l991: Behavior and Concerns in a Democratic Setting (Scholarly Resources, l993); /Rethinking Venezuelan Politics: Class, Polarization and the Ch?vez Phenomenon/. (Lynne Rienner, 2008).

Sponsored by: BU Center for Latin American Studies, Pardee School of Global Studies and US-Venezuelan Solidarity Committee

————————————— 

Young Benjamin Franklin:  The Birth of Ingenuity
Wednesday, October 3
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome author and historian NICK BUNKER—whose book An Empire on the Edge was a Pulitzer Prize finalist—for a discussion of his latest book, Young Benjamin Franklin: The Birth of Ingenuity.
About Young Benjamin Franklin

From his early career as a printer and journalist to his scientific work and his role as a founder of a new republic, Benjamin Franklin has always seemed the inevitable embodiment of American ingenuity. But in his youth he had to make his way through a harsh colonial world where he fought many battles: with his rivals, but also with his wayward emotions. Taking Franklin to the age of forty-one, when he made his first electrical discoveries, Bunker goes behind the legend to reveal the sources of his passion for knowledge.

Always trying to balance virtue against ambition, Franklin emerges as a brilliant but flawed human being, made from the conflicts of an age of slavery as well as reason. With archival material from both sides of the Atlantic, we see Franklin in Boston, London, and Philadelphia, as he develops his formula for greatness. A tale of science, politics, war, and religion, this is also a story about Franklin's forebears: the talented family of English craftsmen who produced America's favorite genius.

————————————— 

The Past and Future of Viral Outbreaks
Wednesday, October 3
7 to 9:00 p.m. 
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium (in Goldenson Hall), 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

——————————
Thursday, October 4
——————————

Hemlock Hospice: landscape ecology, art, and design
Thursday, October 4
12:00-1:00pm 
Tufts, Multi-purpose Room, Curtis Hall, 474 Boston Avenue, Medford

David Buckley Borden, Artist/Designer
Aaron Ellison, Senior Ecologist, Harvard Forest
Hemlock Hospice is an immersive site-specific science-communication project that tells the story of the ongoing demise of the eastern hemlock tree at the hands (and mouth) of a tiny aphid-like insect, the hemlock wooly adelgid. While telling the story of the loss of eastern hemlock, the project addresses larger issues of climate change, human impact, and the future of New England forests. The talk includes an overview of the Hemlock Hospice project from the complementary perspectives of science, art, and design, and also addresses the practical challenges of realizing such interdisciplinary projects. The authors will share their research-driven creative process, including challenges, and highlight the team’s collaborative approach to science communication at the intersection of landscape, creativity, and cultural event.
Hemlock Hospice: http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/hemlock-hospice

David Buckley Borden is a Cambridge-based interdisciplinary artist and designer known for his creative practice of making ecological issues culturally relevant to the general public by means of accessible art and design. David studied landscape architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design and worked with Sasaki Associates and Ground before focusing his practice at theintersection of landscape, creativity, and cultural event. David’s work now manifests in a variety of forms, ranging from site-specific landscape installations in the woods to data-driven cartography in the gallery. David’s place-based projects highlight both pressing environmental issues and everyday phenomena and have recently earned him residencies at the Santa Fe Art Institute, Teton Art Lab, Trifecta Hibernaculum, and MASS MoCA. David is an Associate Fellow at the Harvard Forest where he works with scientists to answer the question, “How can art and design foster cultural cohesion around
environmental issues and help inform ecology-minded decision making.”

Aaron M. Ellison is the Senior Research Fellow in Ecology in Harvard’s Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Senior Ecologist at the Harvard Forest, and a semi-professional photographer and writer. He studies the disintegration and reassembly of ecosystems following natural and anthropogenic disturbances; thinks about the relationship between the Dao and the intermediate disturbance hypothesis; reflects on the critical and reactionary stance of Ecology relative to Modernism, blogs as The Unbalanced Ecologist, and tweets as @AMaxEll17. He is the author
of A Primer of Ecological Statistics (2004), A Field Guide to the Ants of New England (2012; recipient of the 2013 USA Book News International Book Award in General Science, and the 2013 award for Specialty Title in Science and Nature from The New England Society in New York City), and Vanishing Point (2017), a collection of photographs and poetry from the Pacific Northwest). On weekends, he works wood.

——————————————

OEB Seminar Series - "What Glows Below: New Insights on Biodiversity and Biooptics of Deep-Sea Plankton"
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
WHERE	Biological Labs Lecture Hall, 16 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
SPEAKER(S) Dr. Steven Haddock, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
TICKET INFO  Free and Open to the Public
LINK  https://oeb.harvard.edu/event/oeb-seminar-series-steven-haddock

——————————————

A Fossil-Fuel-Free Economy is Entirely Possible
Thursday, October 4
3:30PM TO 4:45PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

The Harvard-China Project on Energy, Economy and Environment and Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute host a seminar by Prem Shankar Jha, journalist and author; former editor at the Times of India and the Hindustan Times; former information advisor to the Prime Minister of India, V.P.Singh; former member of the energy panel of the World Commission for Environment and Development.
https://chinaproject.harvard.edu/event/fossil-fuel-free-economy-entirely-possible

Contact Name:  Tiffany Chan
tiffanychan at seas.harvard.edu

———————————————

new media and civic arts series: daniel bacchieri
Thursday, October 4
5:00pm – 6:00pm
MIT, ACT Cube (Building E15-001), 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Daniel Bacchieri is an award-winning Brazilian journalist, documentary film maker and collaborative web developer/curator, whose visually inspiring StreetMusicMap platform has been widely praised for its curation of street performers from across the globe. Combining a documentarian vision with a trans-cultural appreciation of the public art of vernacular musicians, the StreetMusicMap collaborators are exploring the creative possibilities of collective story-telling through performance. The StreetMusicMap Instagram channel has more than 41,000 followers and 1,300 artists documented on videos in 97 countries, all filmed by more than 700 collaborators.

The Civic Arts Series, which is part of the CMS graduate program Colloquium, features talks by four artists and activists who are making innovative uses of media to reshape the possibilities of art as a source of civic imagination, experience and advocacy. Using a variety of contemporary media technologies–film, web platforms, game engines, drones–the series presenters have opened up new pathways to artistic expression that broaden public awareness around compelling civic issues and aspirations of our time.

Part of the New Media and Civic Arts Series, hosted with Comparative Media Studies

—————————————— 

Conserving Biodiversity: A Global Priority
Thursday, October 4
6:00PM
Harvard, Geo Lecture Hall (100), 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

The Harvard Museum of Natural History and Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology in collaboration with the Indianapolis Prize welcome Russell A. Mittermeier, Chief Conservation Officer, Global Wildlife Conservation; Chair, Primate Specialist Group, Species Survival Commission of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, who will examine strategies for setting conservation priorities, highlight successful initiatives from around the world, and demonstrate why biodiversity is so critical to human survival.

Biodiversity is the sum total of life on Earth and a living legacy to future generations. Sadly, it is declining almost everywhere on the planet. Russell A. Mittermeier, recipient of the 2018 Indianapolis Prize, is a biologist and lifelong conservationist who has traveled across 169 countries and discovered more than 20 species in his quest to save biodiversity hotspots. Focusing on nonhuman primates—our closest living relatives—Mittermeier will examine strategies for setting conservation priorities, highlight successful initiatives from around the world, and demonstrate why biodiversity is so critical to human survival. 

Contact Name:  hmnh at hmsc.harvard.edu
https://hmnh.harvard.edu/event/conserving-biodiversity-global-priority

—————————————— 

SPOTIFY & SOFAR SOUNDS PRESENT: THE FUTURE OF LISTENING - DATA AND MUSIC
Thursday, 4 October
6:15 – 8:30 pm EDT
Boston Public Library, Rabb Hall, Lower Level, Johnson Building, 700 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://generalassemb.ly/education/spotify-sofar-sounds-present-the-future-of-listening-data-and-music/boston/57803

Michelle Parsons , Product Owner, Recommendations and Personalization, Spotify
Nicole Barsalona , Artist Management & Entertainment Consultant, 525 Entertainment Group
Matt Brooks, Boston Director, Sofar Sounds
Laura Davidson, Eastern Retail Market Development Specialist, Shure Incorporated

About This Event
For this event, GA & the Boston Public Library will welcome Sofar Sounds, Spotify, Shure, and 525 Entertainment Group to speak about the Future of Listening: Data & Music.
Everyday, we enjoy innovation in music through personalised playlists, streaming and live videos accessible at the tap of a screen, and it has all been driven by an unlikely friend - data.
Join us for a series of lightning talks as we explore the intersection of big data with the music industry in a race to the future of musical entertainment. We’ll be featuring speakers from the music industry who have mastered the art of using data and technology to deliver an exciting and unique experience of music en masse. 

We'll learn more about:
The science behind data-driven music services
The challenge posed by big data to the traditional music industry
How data is empowering artists as well as listeners
Where data is taking the future of music
By signing up for this event, you’re giving our partners and sponsors for this event permission to contact you about upcoming events and promotions. Please note seating is on a first come first serve basis.

About the Instructors
Michelle Parsons, Product Owner, Recommendations and Personalization, Spotify
Michelle currently works at Spotify as the Product Owner of the Recommendations and Personalization Platform. She leads a cross-functional team of back-end and machine learning engineers focused on improving the recommendations that power many of the surfaces of Spotify; these include the popular playlists such as “Discover Weekly” and “Daily Mix” as well as features such as Search and Home. Prior to joining Spotify, Michelle spent 2.5 years at KAYAK as the Head of Product for Hotels, where she owned cross-platform product development for the end-to-end user journey from Search to Purchase. She has a passion for design, user experience, and machine learning, specifically as they relate to improving search, discovery and personalization.

Nicole Barsalona, Artist Management & Entertainment Consultant, 525 Entertainment Group
Nicole Barsalona is Director of Everyday Rebellion Entertainment, artist management firm and indie label specializing in North American market development for international artists, including Prateek Kuhad (India), Mark Wilkinson (Australia), and music-tech company Parlour Gigs (Melbourne). Born and raised in the music industry, Nicole graduated from BU's College of Communication and began her career at Steven Van Zandt's media company Renegade Nation, where she eventually became Chief of Staff, Director of Communications & Operations, and Road Manager to Van Zandt on tours with Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band. Highlights of her work include the CBGB Forever campaign, stakeholder development for the Rock and Roll Forever Foundation, Super Bowl XLIII, and international affiliate acquisition for the Underground Garage. Nicole has been a featured speaker at SXSW, Grammy Pro, Berklee College of Music, Northeastern University, Boston University, and G-Rock events, and has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, the Boston Globe and Mashable. Passionate about non-profit work, she serves on the Board of Directors for Women In Music where she leads Global Chapter Development. Instagram: @nicolebarsalona // Email: nicole at womeninmusic.org.

Matt Brooks, Boston Director, Sofar Sounds

Laura Davidson, Eastern Retail Market Development Specialist, Shure Incorporated
Laura Clapp Davidson is the eastern retail market development specialist for legendary Shure Incorporated. After initially forging her path as a singer/songwriter, Laura’s voice took her all over the world and eventually led her to a career in the MI industry. For the past twelve years she has worked with various manufacturers in product demonstration, global event coordination and marketing management. Since joining Shure last year, Laura has designed and created new initiatives to drive business and awareness in the retail segment and has been tasked with creating regular social media content for the brand. Her expertise is in fostering connections with customers through a focus on solution-based knowledge.

——————————————

The Field of Blood:  Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War
Thursday, October 4
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome Yale professor of history and American studies JOANNE B. FREEMAN for a discussion of her latest book, The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War.
About The Field of Blood

Joanne B. Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress in The Field of Blood. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, she shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions were often punctuated by mortal threats, canings, flipped desks, and all-out slugfests. When debate broke down, congressmen drew pistols and waved Bowie knives. One representative even killed another in a duel. Many were beaten and bullied in an attempt to intimidate them into compliance, particularly on the issue of slavery.
These fights didn’t happen in a vacuum. Freeman’s dramatic accounts of brawls and thrashings tell a larger story of how fisticuffs and journalism, and the powerful emotions they elicited, raised tensions between North and South and led toward war. In the process, she brings the antebellum Congress to life, revealing its rough realities―the feel, sense, and sound of it―as well as its nation-shaping import. Funny, tragic, and rivetingly told, The Field of Blood offers a front-row view of congressional mayhem and sheds new light on the careers of John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, and other luminaries, as well as introducing a host of lesser-known but no less fascinating men. The result is a fresh understanding of the workings of American democracy and the bonds of Union on the eve of their greatest peril.

——————————————————— 

History VS. Women: The Defiant Lives That They Don’t Want You to Know
Thursday, October 4
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Street, Brookline

Looking through the ages and across the globe, Anita Sarkeesian, founder of Feminist Frequency, along with Ebony Adams PHD, have reclaimed the stories of twenty-five remarkable women who dared to defy history and change the world around them. From Mongolian wrestlers to Chinese pirates, Native American ballerinas to Egyptian scientists, Japanese novelists to British Prime Ministers, History vs Women will reframe the history that you thought you knew.

Anita Sarkeesian is an award-winning media critic and the creator and executive director of Feminist Frequency, an educational nonprofit that explores the representations of women in pop culture narratives. Best known as the creator and host of Feminist Frequency’s highly influential series Tropes vs. Women in Video Games, Anita lectures at universities, conferences and game development studios around the world. Anita dreams of owning a life-size replica of Buffy’s scythe.

Ebony Adams, PhD, is an author, activist, and former college educator whose work highlights the lives and work of black women in the diaspora. She lives in Los Angeles with a steadily increasing collection of Doctor Who memorabilia. She writes widely on film criticism, social justice, and pop culture.

This event is in conversation with author Jaclyn Friedman.

—————————————————————————————
Friday, October 5, 7:00 PM – Saturday, October 6, 11:00 PM
—————————————————————————————

BU Global Music Festival
Friday, October 5,7:00 PM – Saturday, October 6, 11:00 PM EDT
BU, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bu-global-music-festival-registration-44225471576

Boston University invites the BU and greater Boston Community for the inaugural BU Global Music Festival on October 5 & 6, 2018. Enjoy extraordinary music, educational events, and a global bazaar – all free and open to the public of all ages with registration.
Easily accessible by MBTA Green B Line, so feel free to drop in on Friday or Saturday. Limited walk-up registration will be available day-of. As many performances are not in English, captioning services will only be available during workshops, not for performances.
SCHEDULE
Friday, October 5th
Performances from:
- Jupiter & Okwess (D.R. Congo)
- Fendika (Ethiopia)
- Debo Band (Local)
*Schedule subject to change - Additional scheduling details TBA*
Saturday, October 6th
Performances from:
- Zhou Family Band (China)
- Mamadou Diabete (Burkina Faso)
- Kaumakaiwa Kanaka'ole (Hawaii)
- Dina Elwedidi (Egypt)
- Orquesta El Macabeo (Puerto Rico)
- LADAMA (Pan South America)
- Balla Kouyaté (Local)
- Grooversity (Local)
- Gunk Kwok (Local)
- Palos De Peravia (Local)
- DJ Rekha (Local)

——————————————————
Friday, October 5 - Sunday, October 7
——————————————————

13TH ANNUAL Honk! Festival of ACTIVIST STREET BANDS
Friday, October 5 - Sunday, October 7
Various neighborhoods throughout Somerville, Cambridge, and Boston.
Rain or shine; free and open to all.
For further information: http://www.honkfest.org, info at honkfest.org, 617-383-HONK (4665).

Time to mark the calendar for the thirteenth annual HONK! Festival (www.honkfest.org), based in Davis Sq. Somerville, with events happening from October 5-7 throughout the neighborhoods of Somerville, as well as in Cambridge and Boston. HONK! is a rousing socio-political music spectacle which features social activist street bands from all over the world, who come together to share their different approaches in merrily instigating positive changes in their communities.

The full list of participating bands, along with an overview of all activities taking place, will be available soon after Labor Day weekend.

————————— 
Friday, October 5
—————————

A Tale of Two Satellites: Estimating carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from OCO-2 and GOSAT
Friday, October 5
12:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Professor Scot Miller, Johns Hopkins University
Satellite-based monitoring of greenhouse gases has expanded dramatically in the past decade, enabling new insight into greenhouse gas fluxes from regions of the world that were previously difficult to monitor. This talk will focus on insights from two satellites: carbon dioxide observations from NASA's OCO-2 satellite and methane observations from the Japanese GOSAT satellite. 

OCO-2 is NASA's first satellite dedicated to monitoring CO2 from space, and we evaluate the extent to which current OCO-2 observations can constrain monthly CO2 sources and sinks from the biosphere. Our goal is to guide top-down, inverse modeling studies and identify areas for future improvement. We find that a commonly-used version of the OCO-2 retrievals (ACOS version 7) has limited ability to detect or constrain regional carbon budgets, but recent advances in OCO-2 retrievals are are having a potentially transformative effect on the ability of satellite-based observations to constrain regional biospheric carbon balance.

In a separate study, we use GOSAT observations to examine recent trends in emissions of methane from the world's largest anthropogenic emitter of greenhouse gases — China. The largest fraction of China’s anthropogenic methane emissions is attributable to coal mining, but these emissions should be changing; China enacted a suite of regulations for coal mine methane (CMM) drainage and utilization that came into full effect in 2010. Here, we use methane observations from the GOSAT satellite to evaluate recent trends in Chinese emissions and the impact of China's ambitious CMM regulations. We further explore how China could use this CMM for electricity production or home heating and quantify the benefits of these different use cases for air quality and human health.

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar
https://www.seas.harvard.edu/events?field_calendar_tid=286

Contact Name:  Kelvin Bates
kelvin_bates at fas.harvard.edu

—————————————— 

The Increasingly United States:  How and Why American Political Behavior Nationalized
Friday, October 5
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes DANIEL J. HOPKINS—a professor in the Political Science Department at the University of Pennsylvania—for a discussion of his latest book The Increasingly United States: How and Why American Political Behavior Nationalized.

About The Increasingly United States
In a campaign for state or local office these days, you’re as likely today to hear accusations that an opponent advanced Obamacare or supported Donald Trump as you are to hear about issues affecting the state or local community. This is because American political behavior has become substantially more nationalized. American voters are far more engaged with and knowledgeable about what’s happening in Washington, DC, than in similar messages whether they are in the South, the Northeast, or the Midwest. Gone are the days when all politics was local.

In The Increasingly United States, Daniel J. Hopkins explores this trend and its implications for the American political system. The change is significant in part because it works against a key rationale of America’s federalist system, which was built on the assumption that citizens would be more strongly attached to their states and localities. It also has profound implications for how voters are represented. If voters are well informed about state politics, for example, the governor has an incentive to deliver what voters—or at least a pivotal segment of them—want. But if voters are likely to back the same party in gubernatorial as in presidential elections irrespective of the governor’s actions in office, governors may instead come to see their ambitions as tethered more closely to their status in the national party.

——————————————— 

Can Democracy Work?:  A Short History of a Radical Idea, from Ancient Athens to Our World
Friday, October 5
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed author and politics professor JAMES MILLER for a discussion of his latest book, Can Democracy Work?: A Short History of a Radical Idea, from Ancient Athens to Our World.

About Can Democracy Work?
Today, democracy is the world’s only broadly accepted political system, and yet it has become synonymous with disappointment and crisis. How did it come to this? In Can Democracy Work?, James Miller, the author of the classic history of 1960s protest Democracy Is in the Streets, offers a lively, surprising, and urgent history of the democratic idea from its first stirrings to the present. As he shows, democracy has always been rife with inner tensions. The ancient Greeks preferred to choose leaders by lottery and regarded elections as inherently corrupt and undemocratic. The French revolutionaries sought to incarnate the popular will, but many of them came to see the people as the enemy. And in the United States, the franchise would be extended to some even as it was taken from others. Amid the wars and revolutions of the twentieth century, communists, liberals, and nationalists all sought to claim the ideals of democracy for themselves―even as they manifestly failed to realize them.
Ranging from the theaters of Athens to the tents of Occupy Wall Street, Can Democracy Work?is an entertaining and insightful guide to our most cherished―and vexed―ideal.

——————————
Saturday, October 6
—————————— 

Let’s Talk About Food:  Feeding the Future
Saturday, October 6
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM EDT
The Plaza, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lets-talk-about-food-feeding-the-future-tickets-50460612049

Food is universal and unifying but also ever-changing. So where is it going next? Join Harvard University Dining Services and Let’s Talk About Food for a fun-filled and inspiring day of cooking, demonstrations, hands-on skills, head-to-head competitions and tastings, innovations and explorations. Join the Greater Boston community of eaters to explore “Feeding the Future.” Bring your culinarians, your kids, your scientists, your adventurers and hear, taste and experience the next generation of dining! The event is free and open to the public. 

On the MainStage:
Featured guests are front-and-center sharing their approach to feeding the future. These conversations and demonstrations, using our TriMark demo kitchen, will inspire and subliminally educate guests on key themes in sustainability, nutrition and the business of food.
10:15am – Down to the Last Peel: Reducing Food Waste
Millions of tons of edible food are lost annually at each stop in the supply chain, from the field to the market, the restaurant to the home. Food waste is a leading contributor to climate change while hunger remains a persistent problem worldwide. What can we do? Join Mei Mei Chef Irene Li, Clover Creative Director Lucia Jazayeri and Author Didi Emmons in the fight against food waste. 
11:15am – The Next Julia Child Contest
Local home cooks audition via YouTube submissions, and finalists share their “show” live! Sponsored by Whole Foods and boston.com
12:15pm – Rice and Beans: from the African Diaspora to the World
From Senegal to Siena, Haiti to Tel Aviv, regional seasonings and cooking methods can transform rice and beans into radically distinct dishes in a range of cuisines. Join Sara Baer‐Sinnott of Oldways Preservation Trust and Senegalese Chef Marie‐Claude Mendy of Teranga, along with Chef Tracy Chang of Pagu and Chef Avi Shemtov of the Chubby Chickpea food truck, as we start in an exploration of the flavors of the African diaspora, and branch out to examine how one simple dish and its many manifestations has transformed our global palate.
1:15pm – Growing Farmers: Sustainable Agriculture, Sustainable Careers?
In recent years, Americans have demonstrated an increased appreciation for local foods and farmers, embracing a connection to the earth, to funky produce and seasonal eating. But can we make farming a viable career option for generations to come? Jennifer Hashley of New Entry Sustainable Farming Project chats with Sean Cooney of Cornerstalk Farms and Chef Todd Heberlien and Farmer Ryan Conroy of Volante Farms and Chef Mike Pagliarini of Benedetto about how strong relationships and innovative techniques are allowing local farms to thrive today and how we can help them continue to thrive.
2:15pm – Iron Chef Kids – School age chefs with professional chef mentors; sponsored by Revolution Foods
3:15pm – Seafood: Learning to Love the Enemy
We know that overfishing threatens some of our most popular edible sea-dwellers. We want to support local fisheries, reduce our carbon footprint, and eat the freshest fish we can. But if we’re not eating tuna and cod, what are we eating? Led in conversation by Aaron Niederhelman, CEO & co-founder of OneHealthAg and host of Sourcing Matters podcast, Chef Charles Draghi of Erbaluce, Niaz Dorry of Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance, Arlene Richberg of Harvard University Dining Services and Michael Leviton of Region FoodWorks (former chef of Lumiere, Area 4) discuss how to make use of some of our least utilized and most delicious local seafood while preparing a signature dish. Green crabs, anyone?
4:15pm – The Hole Story: Our Love Affair with Doughnuts
What is it about doughnuts? In our final segment, we’ll hear Rebecca Gullo of Blackbird Doughnuts and Josh Danoff of Union Square Donuts in conversation by Rachel Herz, Adjunct Professor, Brown University and author of “Why You Eat What You Eat”

Competitions:
Crowd favorite/popular vote head-to-head tastings invite visitors to taste our region and the future of food as viewed through our next culinary stars!
Noon – Chili Beanpot – Best Vegan Chili Collegiate Competition (Harvard, BC, Northeastern, BU); sponsored by Bush’s, with Duke in attendance
1pm – Harvard House Better Burger
2pm – Mama’s Modern Meatballs – The meatball, updated for today's world cuisine; sponsored by Mushroom Council & Barilla
3pm – Chowder-fest – Classic New England Clam Chowder from the seafood-elite (Harvard, Legal Seafood, Summer Shack, Whole Foods)

All-Day Activities/Marketplace:
Interactive educational booths that invite passers-by to play with their food (system)!
Readable Feast Cookbooks Store with Author Signings
Commonwealth Kitchen Food Entrepreneurs 101 with Store
One-Minute Skills Center with Chefs (Cambridge Center for Adult Education) 
Kitchen Conversations Storytelling Booth
Science & Cooking ) – test and taste basic scientific principles, including spherification, emulsion and phase transitions, explained through food experiments with the faculty and students of Harvard’s Science & Cooking program. Learn how you can sit in on lectures with famed chefs and take online courses while you TASTE science!
Foodbetter Harvard – sustainability and wellness through food on campus
Introduction to the Herb Garden (Eva’s Garden with Didi Emmon)
HSPH Nutrition Source – throw away nutrition myths and misinformation with this simple approach to eating healthy, based on findings from Harvard researchers. Help kids connect to the simple rules of happy, tasty, healthy food. 
Whole Foods Marketplace - demos, artisans, tastings
And food artisans and thinkers helping to explore where our food is headed!

———————————————————— 
Monday, October 8 - Sunday, October 14
————————————————————

Hubweek

More information at https://2018.hubweek.org/

—————————— 
Monday, October 8
—————————— 

The Forgotten:  How the People of One Pennsylvania County Elected Donald Trump and Changed America
Monday, October 8
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed journalist and writer BEN BRADLEE, JR.—former reporter for Boston Globe and author of The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams—for a discussion of his latest book, The Forgotten: How the People of One Pennsylvania County Elected Donald Trump and Changed America.

About The Forgotten
In The Forgotten, Ben Bradlee Jr. reports on how voters in Luzerne County, a pivotal county in a crucial swing state, came to feel like strangers in their own land—marginalized by flat or falling wages, rapid demographic change, and a liberal culture that mocks their faith and patriotism.

Fundamentally rural and struggling with changing demographics and limited opportunity, Luzerne County can be seen as a microcosm of the nation. In The Forgotten, Trump voters speak for themselves, explaining how they felt others were 'cutting in line' and that the federal government was taking too much money from the employed and giving it to the idle. The loss of breadwinner status, and more importantly, the loss of dignity, primed them for a candidate like Donald Trump.
The political facts of a divided America are stark, but the stories of the men, women, and families in The Forgotten offer a kaleidoscopic and fascinating portrait of the complex on-the-ground political reality of America today.

——————————
Tuesday, October 9
——————————

Landing in the Drone Valley:  Entering Switzerland’s Drone Innovation Ecosystem
Tuesday, October 9
9:30 am to 11:00 am
District Hall 75 Northern Avenue, Boston

Join a panel of experts from swiss aeropole, GZA, GGBa, S-GE, and swissnex Boston to learn everything you need to know about the drone ecosystem in Switzerland and how you can take advantage of all it has to offer. Register now to reserve your spot.

Switzerland, Home of Drones
In Switzerland drone researchers, startups, and companies can rely on a welcoming and supporting ecosystem geared towards fostering excellence in the field of drone technology and applications. The country provides exceptional access to world-class education and research institutions with close ties to industry, successful peer companies and business friendly regulations, as well as a pioneering air traffic management and a sizeable pool of experts.

This panel is part of swissnex Boston’s overaching series, Aerial Futures: The Drone Frontier and is hosted in conjunction with our HUBweeek Open Doors Public Exhibit. Tickets to Ladning in the Drone Valley also provides access to our drone exhibit hall.

Speakers
Massimo Fiorin, Panelist
Director Business Park, swiss aeropole
Massimo Fiorin is responsible for the management and development of the swiss aeropole Business and Technology Park in Payerne, Switzerland. swiss aeropole, which is located next to a 2.8 km runway in the heart of Switzerland’s “Drone Valley”, aims to expand a thriving community of aviation and aerospace companies, with a particular focus on the UAV/UAS sector. With its partners WindShape, INVOLI, RelaSyS and CertX, swiss aeropole is developing the DronePole project. Its objective is to contribute to the safety and security of professional drones by providing testing, certification, and R&D services to drone manufacturers and operators. A trained economist with a keen interest in technology and innovation, Massimo holds a master’s degree in International Relations from Geneva’s Graduate Institute.
Lukas Sieber, Panelist
Executive Director North America, Greater Zurich Area
Lukas Sieber worked at the Embassy of Switzerland in Washington, D.C., USA and was responsible for all public diplomacy activities and programs for the Swiss government throughout the United States. With a background in political sciences from University of Zurich and postgraduate studies at Georgetown University, USA, he now acts as Executive Director North America of Greater Zurich Area (GZA), the official investment support agency of Zurich and surrounding areas, and is Co-Founder of the Mindfire Foundation, a Swiss based foundation that unites some of the smartest minds to develop human-level AI.
Matt Julian, Panelist
Director US, Greater Geneva Bern area
Matt Julian is Director USA for Invest Western Switzerland, where he represents the economic development interests in the United States of six contiguous Swiss cantons (states), a dense commercial region that ranges from Geneva to Bern. Having spent 25 years working on behalf of international economic development agencies around the world, guiding their investment promotion strategies and managing their cross-border business attraction activities, Matt is responsible for facilitating and supporting relationships between US and Swiss enterprises, and institutions, at the academic, research and commercial levels. Matt is also a drone enthusiast, holds a Part 107 certification, and is the primary contact point within the organization for matters related to the UAV/UAS sector.
Philippe Labouchere, Panelist
Project Leader for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, swissnex Boston
Philippe Labouchere holds a MSc and BSc in Physics from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ). After having explored the mysteries of quantum cryptography during his master, he did an internship at the Science & Technology office at the Embassy of Switzerland in Tokyo, Japan, where he got acquainted with the swissnex network. Upon his return home, he started a doctoral program with Prof. Grätzel at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), during which he worked on next-generation dye-sensitized solar cells. After having completed his Ph.D., Philippe moved to London and worked in the field of artificial intelligence applied to online marketing. In 2017, he joined the swissnex Boston team to foster the exchanges between Switzerland and the Greater Boston Area in the fields of Innovation and Entrepreneurship.
Sean Powers, Moderator
Trade Commissioner for Foreign Direct Investment, Swiss Business Hub USA
Sean Powers is a Trade Commissioner for Swiss Business Hub USA, part of Switzerland’s official trade and investment promotion agency, Switzerland Global Enterprise (S-GE). Sean promotes Switzerland as a highly attractive business and investment location for US companies looking to grow into Europe. Sean is an experienced economic development professional, previously leading the life science sector efforts for Scottish Development International, Scotland’s economic development agency. Sean is a Boston native and graduate from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Program
9.30am Welcome remarks by swissnex Boston and S-GE
9.45am Presentation by GZA and GGBa
10.00am Presentation by swiss aeropole
10.15am Testimonials from Swiss startups
10.30am Q&A

——————————————

Open Data, Grey Data, and Stewardship:  UNIVERSITIES AT THE PRIVACY FRONTIER
Tuesday, October 9
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard,  Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2018-10-09/open-data-grey-data-and-stewardship

Christine L. Borgman
The growth in availability of digital data resources is changing university practice in more ways than most faculty, administrators, and students are aware. Researchers provide open access to their data as a condition for obtaining grant funding or publishing results in journals, leading to an explosion of available scholarly content. Universities have automated many aspects of teaching, instruction, student services, libraries, personnel management, building management, and finance, leading to a profusion of discrete data about the activities of individuals. Many of these data, both research and operational, fall outside privacy regulations such as HIPAA, FERPA, and PII. Universities see great value of these data for learning analytics, faculty evaluation, strategic decisions, and other sensitive matters. Commercial entities, governments, and private individuals also see value in these data and are besieging universities with requests for access. These conflicts pose challenges in balancing obligations for stewardship, trust, privacy, confidentiality – and often academic freedom – with the value of exploiting data for analytical and commercial purposes. This talk, based on a new article in the Berkeley Law and Technology Journal, draws on the pioneering work of the University of California in privacy and information security, data governance, and cyber risk.

Related reading: Borgman, C. L. (2018). Open Data, Grey Data, and Stewardship: Universities at the Privacy Frontier. Berkeley Technology Law Journal, 33(2).

———————————————

Distinguished Speaker Series: Terry McAuliffe
Tuesday, October 9
6 PM 
Tufts, ASEAN Auditorium, Cabot Center, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://tischcollege.tufts.edu/content/terry-mcauliffe

Join Tisch College for a conversation with Terry McAuliffe about current events, policy and public service. From 2014 to 2018, McAuliffe served as the 72nd Governor of Virginia, where he significantly improved economic development, functionally ended veteran homelessness, prohibited discrimination against state employees on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, and fought to restore voting rights to 173,000 previously disenfranchised felons. McAuliffe entered national politics at the age of 23 as the national finance director for President Jimmy Carter, and he was elected Democratic National Committee chairman in 2000, serving until 2005. He co-chaired President Bill Clinton's 1996 campaign for reelection and his 1997 Presidential Inauguration. He was also chairman of the 2000 Democratic National Convention and chairman of Hillary Clinton's 2008 Presidential Campaign.

Cosponsored by the Political Science Department and JumboVote. Follow the conversation live at #McAuliffeAtTufts

————————————— 

THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION
Tuesday, October 9
6:30 – 8:30 pm EDT
GA Boston, 125 Summer Street 13th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://generalassemb.ly/education/the-future-of-education/boston/57368

Anne Bosman, Senior Regional Director, General Assembly
Heather Wetzler, Co-founder, COO, Cue Career
Helen Adeosun, CEO and President, Co-Founder, CareAcademy.com 

About This Event
Join us for a panel discussion around the changing landscape of education, with those at the forefront of both accredited and non-accredited learning.

These pioneers will share their voices and opinions through a thoughtful discussion on e-learning, bringing technology into the classroom, and teaching new and relevant skills for today's job market, led by our panel moderator.
Afterwards we will open up the floor for questions and networking with panelists and attendees.

————————————— 

Success Through Diversity:  Why the Most Inclusive Companies Will Win
Tuesday, October 9
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Harvard Book Store welcomes award-winning businesswoman CAROL FULP—President and CEO of The Partnership—for a discussion of her debut book, Success Through Diversity: Why the Most Inclusive Companies Will Win.

About Success Through Diversity
In our fast-changing demographic landscape, companies that proactively embrace diversity in all areas of their operations will be best poised to thrive. Renowned business leader and visionary Carol Fulp explores staffing trends in the US and provides a blueprint for what businesses must do to maintain their competitiveness and customer base, including hiring in new ways, aligning managers around diversity, providing new kinds of leadership development, and engaging employees to embrace differences. Using detailed case histories of corporate cultures such as the NFL, Eastern Bank, John Hancock, Hallmark Health, and PepsiCo, as well as her own experiences in the workplace and in advising companies on diversity practice, Fulp demonstrates how people of different races and ethnicities represent an essential asset to contemporary companies and organizations. 

————————————— 

Seaweed Chronicles
Tuesday, October 9
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Susan Hand Shetterly
"Seaweed is ancient and basic, a testament to the tenacious beginnings of life on earth," writes Susan Hand Shetterly in this elegant, fascinating book. "Why wouldn't seaweeds be a protean life source for the lives that have evolved since?" On a planet facing environmental change and diminishing natural resources, seaweed is increasingly important as a source of food and as a fundamental part of our global ecosystem.

In Seaweed Chronicles, Shetterly takes readers deep into the world of this essential organism by providing an immersive, often poetic look at life on the rugged shores of her beloved Gulf of Maine, where the growth and harvesting of seaweed is becoming a major industry. While examining the life cycle of seaweed and its place in the environment, she tells the stories of the men and women who farm and harvest it--and who are fighting to protect this critical species against forces both natural and man-made. Ideal for readers of such books as The Hidden Life of Trees and How to Read Water, Seaweed Chronicles is a deeply informative look at a little understood and too often unappreciated part of our habitat.

Susan Hand Shetterly has written about wildlife and wetlands for more than thirty years, in both articles and books, including Settled in the Wild, acollection of essays. She lives in rural Maine, where she works to save habitat.

************
——————
Opportunity
----------------
************

Announcing Destination 2040: The next long-range transportation plan for the Boston region

How would you improve the Boston region’s transportation system? That’s the question at the heart of the MPO’s preparations for Destination 2040, which the MPO expects to adopt in the spring of 2019.

Every four years, the MPO identifies the system’s strengths and weaknesses; forecasts changes in population, employment, and land use; and creates a plan to address existing and future mobility needs. The resulting long-range transportation plan (LRTP) allocates funding for major projects in the Boston region and guides the MPO’s funding of capital investment programs and studies.

Use the new Destination 2040 website at http://ctps.org/lrtp-dev to explore the state of the system; learn how the MPO will identify needs, revisit its vision and goals, and prioritize its investments; and share your own interests, concerns, and ideas.

*********
------------
Resource
------------
*********

Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://somervilleyogurtmakingcoop.wordpress.com

——————————

Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

———————————

Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

————————————

Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

———————————

The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

——————————

Boston Maker Spaces - 41 (up from 27 in 2016) and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
Solidarity Network Economy:  https://ussolidarityeconomy.wordpress.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

****************************************
------------------------------------------------------

Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://calendar.mit.edu
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 11 AM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


More information about the Act-MA mailing list