[act-ma] Energy (and Other) Events - October 7, 2018

gmoke gmoke at world.std.com
Sun Oct 7 10:35:00 PDT 2018


Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke at world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) EventsGeo
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Details of these events are available when you scroll past the index

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Index
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Monday, October 8 - Sunday, October 14
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Hubweek

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Monday, October 8 - Tuesday, October 9
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Aerial Futures: The Drone Frontier @ HUBweek - Public Exhibit Hall

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Monday, October 8
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9:30am  MIT Policy Hackathon: We the Future 
3pm  SnotBot: Drones Democratizing Science
5:30pm  Greenovate Boston Leaders Program Training
6pm  Drone Solutions to Real World Problems
6:30pm  The Notion of Vision: Dreaming and Seeing
7pm  The Forgotten:  How the People of One Pennsylvania County Elected Donald Trump and Changed America

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Tuesday, October 9
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7:30am  Technology and the Movement of Food
8:30am  How AI and Big Data are Disrupting Drug Discovery 
9:30am  Landing in the Drone Valley:  Entering Switzerland’s Drone Innovation Ecosystem
12pm  Are Computers Becoming Less General-Purpose? Deep Learning, Hardware Specialization, and the Fragmentation of Computing
12pm  Open Data, Grey Data, and Stewardship:  UNIVERSITIES AT THE PRIVACY FRONTIER
12pm  Future Directions and Strategic Thinking on China's Urban Development
12pm  Kendall Square: Innovation Playground
12:30pm  Political Origins of Cybersecurity Capacity: Lessons from Japan and East Asia
1pm  Garage @ NERD 
1pm  Learning Environments & Technology Showcase
4pm  The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence
4pm  HILR Convocation 2018 with Samantha Power
4pm  "Travels in Trumpland" with Ed Balls
4:30pm  Protest Power: Does Acceptable Protest Exist?
4:30pm  Book Talk: A Conversation With Roman David - Communists and Their Victims
4:30pm  Leonid Volkov: What is the Future of Russia's Opposition?
5pm  Technology Innovation & Public Purpose - A Hubweek Event
5pm  Film Screening and Q&A: Dark Money
5pm  Decentralizing Power Production with Solar and Blockchain Technology
5:15 pm  Native American Environmental History
5:30pm  CHINA Town Hall - Hosted by Suffolk University & WorldBoston
5:30pm  Horizon18 Conference Kick-off @ Greentown Labs
5:30pm  Greenovate Boston Leaders Program Training 1
6pm  Ancient Brews Rediscovered and Re-Created
6pm  Distinguished Speaker Series: Terry McAuliffe
6pm  Hammer and Silicon: The Soviet Diaspora in the US Innovation Economy
6pm  Above and Beyond: NASA's Journey to Tomorrow 
6pm  Workshop #1: Intellectual Commons event series - Academia and Agency in the Era of Global Change
6pm  Demystifying Lobbying
6:30pm  Christopher Hawthorne Lecture
6:30pm  THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION
7pm  Success Through Diversity:  Why the Most Inclusive Companies Will Win
7pm  Seaweed Chronicles
7pm  Food Literacy Project Open Meeting
7pm  The 7 Laws of Enough: Cultivating A Life of Sustainable Abundance

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Wednesday, October 10
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8am  Materials Day 2018
10am  IS&T Technology Fair
12pm  Women and the 2018 Elections
12pm  The Universal Declaration of Human Rights at 70: A Conversation with Professor James Loeffler
12pm  World War I Centenary
1pm  The November Elections: Thoughts and Considerations:  Women and the 2018 Elections
1pm  Cambridge Hearing on Zero Waste
3pm  xTalk with Keith Baker, MD:  The Cognitive Science of Teaching and Learning
3pm  Psychedelic Medicine: From Tradition to Science
4pm  Fall Distinguished Lecture:  "Lessons from Pelicans: Multilevel Theorizing for the Expertise Economy”
4pm  Audiofuturism: The Transatlantic Circuit of Science Fiction Radio Drama
4:15pm  Heat and Learning
4:30pm  Break of Day in the Trenches: The 21st Century Battlefield and the Dissolution of Front Lines
5pm  The Legacy of May 1968: Guy Hocquenghem and Queer Politics
5:30pm  The Challenges and Opportunities to Address Contaminants in Wastewater
6pm  "Rethink Creativity" Book Talk 
7pm  Freeman's:  Power
7pm  How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler
7pm  When Spirit Calls: A Healing Odyssey
7pm  Altered State of Mind: How Psychedelics Modify the Brain, Behavior, and Perception

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Thursday, October 11
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10am  IBM Community Day
11:45am  A Republican's Reflections on Environmental Policy
12pm  Trespassing across America: One Man's Epic, Never-Done-Before (and sort of Illegal) Hike along the Keystone XL Pipeline
1pm  A Big Data Revolution in Assessing Climate Risk
1pm  Energy and Water Policy and Reform in Central America
2pm  DSL Speaker Series: Donna Hicks on Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture that Brings Out the Best in People
3pm  Frontiers in Environmental Economics and Policy: A Symposium in Honor of Martin L. Weitzman
4pm  Gubernatorial Forum on Energy and the Environment
4:15pm  (Why) Reporting the Voices of African Women and Girls Matters (2018–2019 Rama S. Mehta Lecture)
4:30pm  Greenovate Boston Leaders Program Training 2
6pm  The Red and the Blue:  The 1990s and the Birth of Political Tribalism
6pm  Community Boating, Inc. 
6pm  A Panel Discussion and Pitch event hosted by MIT Climate CoLab and GSC Sustainability Group
6:30pm  Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen
7pm  Lest We Forget: A Doctor's Experience with Life and Death During the Ebola Outbreak 
7pm  Searching for Ancient Life on Mars

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Friday, October 12 – Saturday, October 13
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Boston Book Festival 2018
Humanities Approaches to the Opioid Crisis

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Friday, October 12
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7:30am  SPURs 50th Anniversary Conference The Reflective Practitioner Reconsidered
8:30am  Intro to Living Building Challenge (FREE)
9am  NE Restructuring Roundtable:  Regional Grid Modernization Developments & The Future of Residential Retail Choice
9am  AI, Media and the Threat to Democracy
12pm  The TROPOMI project: first results focusing on CO and CH4
12pm  Evolution and ecology in high dimensions
12pm  Can Democracy Survive 21st Century Capitalism?
12:30pm  The Big Promise and Harsh Realities of Waste-to-Value: Stories from the Front
1pm  Global Smart City Pitch Competition - Boston City Hall
1:30pm  Eric Horvitz: AI Advances and Aspirations
2pm  HUBWeek — Making Democracy Count: Changing U.S. Voting Culture
2:30pm  Globalization: Strategies and Effects
3pm  Committed to Memory:  The Art of the Slave Ship Icon
3:30pm  Atmospheric surprises: Why is monitoring trace gases so important now?
6pm  Crossing the Chasm: Why Now is the Time for Public Interest Technology
6:445pm  Somerville Laughter Club with Walter Ness
7pm  How Fascism Works:  The Politics of Us and Them
7pm  The Movement of Movements: Part 1: What Makes Us Move? 
7:30pm  Fifty Shades of Green: Tales from the Hothouse
7:30pm  The Therapeutic Potential of Psychedelics

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Saturday, October 13, 8:00 AM -Sunday, October 14, 6:00 PM
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MIT Hacking Arts Festival 2018

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Saturday, October 13
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8:14am  Disability & Intersectionality Summit (DIS)
2pm  Art in the Age of the Anthropocene, a Second Saturday BADA Event
7pm  The Pendulum: A Granddaughter's Search for Her Family's Forbidden Nazi Past 

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Sunday, October 14
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10am  2nd annual Robot Block Party - HUBWEEK
3pm  One cellist, one planet: A fundraiser for Jewish Climate Action Network (JCAN)

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Monday, October 15 - Friday, October 19
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Women Entrepreneurs Boston Week

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Monday, October 15
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12pm  PAOC Colloquium - Elizabeth Hunke (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
12pm  The Energy Efficiency Gap, Bounded Rationality, and the Role of Energy-related Financial Literacy
12:15pm  Interpretability, or Learning to Listen to Algorithms
12:30pm  Venus Fly Traps and Viruses: Exploring the Design and Effectiveness of National Climate Funds
6pm  Can Baby Corals Improve the Reefs of Tomorrow?
6pm  West Wingers: Personal Stories of Public Service
6pm  Contemporizing Traditional Water Architecture: Indigenous Ingenuity in Harvesting the Elusive Rain in the Indian Desert
6pm  Mass Innovation Nights 115
6:30pm  CONNECTING MIGRATION AND DEFENDING NATURAL RESOURCES - ORGANIZING WISDOM FROM EL SALVADOR
7pm  Invisible:  The Forgotten Story of the Black Woman Lawyer Who Took Down America's Most Powerful Mobster
7pm  These Truths: A History of the United States 

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Tuesday, October 16
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12pm  Plant hydraulic traits and drought responses: insights from three continents
12pm  Determining Disability:  MEDICAID WORK REQUIREMENTS AND WHAT THE LIMITS OF DIGITAL HEALTH MEAN FOR RECIPIENTS, PROVIDERS, AND STATES JUSTICE, EQUITY, & INCLUSION
3pm  xTalk with Loic Tallon on:  "If Open is the Answer, What Was the Question?”
4:15pm  Dragonfly Eyes: What Counts as Art Today?
4:30pm  Calamity’s Reward: The Elusive Art of Resilience and Repair
4:30pm  Jake Sullivan: Can America Still Lead the World?
5pm  Claude Lévi-Strauss, Our Contemporary
5:30pm  Screening of: Miss Representation Documentary
5:30pm  Boston University's Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environmental Film Festival Present - The New Fire: A Documentary by David Schumacher
6pm  Nature vs. Fiction in Sci-Fi Movies
6pm  Public Conversation: David Hogg
6pm   Profiles in Service: President Obama's White House Change Makers
6pm  Theodore H. White Lecture on Press and Politics with Jill Abramson and Jane Mayer
6pm  Schindler's List Holocaust Survivor: Rena Finder 
7pm  Future Politics:  Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech
7pm  Cambridge Forum: Rebecca Traister discusses Good and Mad:  The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger
7pm  The Wake of The Whale by Russell Fielding

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

Personal Power Supply
https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2018/10/3/1801318/-Personal-Power-Supply

My Name Escapes Me:  Alec Guinness’ Diary
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2018/10/my-name-escapes-me-alec-guinness-diary.html

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Monday, October 8 - Sunday, October 14
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Hubweek
RSVP at https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register
More information at https://2018.hubweek.org/

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Monday, October 8 - Tuesday, October 9
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Aerial Futures: The Drone Frontier @ HUBweek - Public Exhibit Hall
Session 1: Monday, Oct. 8, 12pm - 5pm
Session 2: Tuesday, Oct. 9, 9am - 1pm
Session 3: Tuesday, Oct. 9, 1pm - 5pm
In addition to our public exhibit hall, we will have a networking reception on Monday evening. 
District Hall, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/aerial-futures-the-drone-frontier-hubweek-public-exhibit-hall-tickets-48633869212

Explore the future of drones with Swiss Touch and swissnex Boston
With the support of Swiss Touch, we are bringing the Drone Frontier to Boston’s HUBweek on October 8 and 9. Join us as we showcase some of the most exciting drone technologies and applications. We’ll be bringing a “flying cage” to our exhibition space at District Hall, allowing for visitors to experience live drone demos.
Come see for yourself as some of the most exciting drones and applications from Switzerland and the United States take flight and explore the Drone Frontier at HUBweek 2018. Our space will also include the Swiss Touch table, a collaborative interactive installation that has traveled all over the United States. The table creates space for conversation and exchange as we explore the future together.
Our public exhibit hall will have three sessions available. Please select one session to attend from the below during registration. 

Session 1: Monday, Oct. 8, 12pm - 5pm
Session 2: Tuesday, Oct. 9, 9am - 1pm
Session 3: Tuesday, Oct. 9, 1pm - 5pm

In addition to our public exhibit hall, we will have a networking reception on Monday evening. 

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Monday, October 8
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MIT Policy Hackathon: We the Future 
Monday, October 8
9:30am to 4:30pm
City Hall Plaza, Boston
RSVP at https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register 

Join us for an interdisciplinary hackathon convening people with backgrounds in data science, public policy, urban planning, and more to tackle societal challenges by proposing data-driven policy solutions. 

Please note: all HUBweek Open Doors sessions require either a free or paid pass to HUBweek 2018. You can register for a pass here and add this session to your agenda during the registration process.  If you have already registered, you may add this session to your agenda by clicking here.

HUBweek showcases, celebrates, and convenes the most inventive minds making an impact in Boston and around the world. 

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SnotBot: Drones Democratizing Science
Monday, October 8
3:00 PM – 4:30 PM 
District Hall, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/snotbot-drones-democratizing-science-tickets-50418960468

Join Dr. Iain Kerr, CEO of Ocean Alliance, for an exploration of how the SnotBot drones are helping us better understand the health of whales and, by extension, the ocean. Following the showing of two breath-taking videos of the SnotBot in action, Iain Kerr will talk in depth about how drones have helped democratize science and, in particular, oceanography. The session will conclude with an audience Q&A. 

SnotBots are custom-built drones created in partnership between Ocean Alliance and Olin College of Engineering. They hover in the air above a surfacing whale and collect the blow (or snot) exhaled from its lungs. SnotBots then return that sample back to researchers a significant distance away. These drones fly well above the surface of the water and into the blow, so the subjects are never touched or approached closely. Dozens of technological hurdles had to be overcome in order to make the drones capable of collecting a physical sample at this distance in an uncontrolled marine environment. 

Ocean Alliance, based in Gloucester MA, is dedicated to the conservationof whales and their marine environment through research and education. They generate innovative, groundbreaking, multi-ocean initiatives and advise educators and policy makers on wise stewardship of the oceans.

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Greenovate Boston Leaders Program Training
Monday, October 9
5:30pm - 8:30pm
Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building, 2300 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.greenovateboston.org/greenovate_boston_leaders_program_training_1

The Greenovate Boston Leaders Program aims to increase understanding of the climate impacts in Boston and the actions required to mitigate the impacts. We want to involve Bostonians as part of the collective action needed in advancing the citywide initiatives. Our program gives you the materials and support you need to lead conversations about climate change and climate action.

This program is a great opportunity to network with a wide variety of leaders, learn how to format community discussions around climate change, and to make a positive impact on Boston.

If you are interested in attending this training date, please submit an RSVP below. There are limited spaces left, so sign-up as soon as you can! 

You will be contacted by David Corbie, Greenovate Boston Outreach Manager, once your space at the training is confirmed.

Questions or concerns? Email Greenovate Boston at Greenovate at boston.gov.

CONTACT  David Corbie · david.corbie at boston.gov

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Drone Solutions to Real World Problems
Monday, October 8
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM 
District Hall, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/drone-solutions-to-real-world-problems-tickets-49451735472

Drone Solutions to Real World Problems: Networking Reception
Today’s world is full of new, complex issues for our society and our environment. Problems like polluted oceans, dwindling bee populations, oversaturated urban areas, insufficient sustainable energy sources, and more challenges for researchers and innovators. Commercial drone technology, a burgeoning global industry, is attempting to solve these real world problems with innovative drone solutions.

Join swissnex Boston and Swiss Touch for an evening of discovery, drones and networking as we explore how drone technology is creatively addressing complex issues. This event is held as part of the overarching series, Aerial Futures: The Drone Frontier @ HUBweek.

The evening will start with a keynote from Iain Kerr, the inventor of SnotBot, a drone that is pushing the frontiers of whale and ocean research.

Problem solving pitches from an international cohort of drone startups will follow, highlighting the many different fields and applications in which drones can make a difference. 

We will conclude with a networking reception featuring drone demos and interactions with the Swiss Touch table – an interactive installation and campaign traveling all over the United States, fostering meaningful conversations about innovation and technology across borders.

Follow our exploration online
#DroneFrontier  #SwissTouch  #HUBweek2018

Program
6:30 pm Opening Keynote
7:00 pm Problem Solving Pitches
7:30 pm Networking Reception & Drone Demos

Keynote
Dr. Iain Kerr, CEO, Ocean Alliance – Inventor of SnotBot
Dr. Iain Kerr is the CEO of Ocean Alliance (OA), an organization recognized as an international leader in whale research and ocean conservation since its founding in 1971 by renowned scientist Dr. Roger Payne. Ocean Alliance’s programs include a groundbreaking global pollution study termed The Voyages of the Odyssey; the longest continuous study of a great whale species, The Patagonia Right Whale Program; and a number of education initiatives that fall under the heading of Ocean Encounters. Under Iain and Roger’s leadership, OA has also maintained a reputation for developing innovative benign research tools and techniques that engage scientists and conservationists alike. 

Problem Solving Pitches
A selection of drone tech entrepreneurs will pitch investors. 

Skypull is a high-altitude drone able to produce low-cost electricity from more energetic winds in almost any location on the globe. 
Quantifly uses high-resolution aerospatial imagery to observe, measure, and quantify changes in the urban environment.
AirWorks creates highly accurate aerial maps and 3D models to make construction and development projects more efficient and reduce costs.
The foldable PackDrone is Dronistics' last-centimeter human-friendly and safe drone delivery system
Leading expert in aerial pollination technology, Dropcopter, performed the world's first apple pollination with drones in May 2019 [?].

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The Notion of Vision: Dreaming and Seeing
Monday, October 8
6:30pm to 7:30pm
Broad Institute 415 Main Street, Cambridge

Catalyst Conversations was founded in late 2012 to open a critical path for dialogue between the arts and sciences. For HUBweek 2018, we are partnering with the Broad Institute to present The Notion of Vision: Dreaming and Seeing. Speakers will discuss both internal and external ways of seeing, perceiving and imagining, among other topics. This promises to be a terrific investigation of how you see what you see by way of a fascinating conversation.

Please note: all HUBweek Open Doors sessions require either a free or paid pass to HUBweek 2018. You can register for a pass at https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register and add this session to your agenda during the registration process.  If you have already registered, you may add this session to your agenda.

HUBweek showcases, celebrates, and convenes the most inventive minds making an impact in Boston and around the world. 

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The Forgotten:  How the People of One Pennsylvania County Elected Donald Trump and Changed America
Monday, October 8
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed journalist and writer BEN BRADLEE, JR.—former reporter for Boston Globe and author of The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams—for a discussion of his latest book, The Forgotten: How the People of One Pennsylvania County Elected Donald Trump and Changed America.

About The Forgotten
In The Forgotten, Ben Bradlee Jr. reports on how voters in Luzerne County, a pivotal county in a crucial swing state, came to feel like strangers in their own land—marginalized by flat or falling wages, rapid demographic change, and a liberal culture that mocks their faith and patriotism.

Fundamentally rural and struggling with changing demographics and limited opportunity, Luzerne County can be seen as a microcosm of the nation. In The Forgotten, Trump voters speak for themselves, explaining how they felt others were 'cutting in line' and that the federal government was taking too much money from the employed and giving it to the idle. The loss of breadwinner status, and more importantly, the loss of dignity, primed them for a candidate like Donald Trump.
The political facts of a divided America are stark, but the stories of the men, women, and families in The Forgotten offer a kaleidoscopic and fascinating portrait of the complex on-the-ground political reality of America today.

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Tuesday, October 9
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Technology and the Movement of Food
Tuesday, October 9
7:30am to 11:30am
EchelonSeaport Sales & Experience Center, 101 Seaport Blvd, 6th Floor, Suite 608, Boston

The Boston Seaport today is a vibrant neighborhood, filled with diverse culture, people, and, of course, food. Farmers markets abound and restaurants tout their local food bonafides, but getting food to people where they need it, when they need it, in an economical way, and avoiding food waste, remains a challenge.

Join us for a discussion with Cynthia Graber, host of Gastropod podcast, about the challenges and opportunities for businesses in the current food landscape.

HOSTED BY: Cottonwood Group and MIT designX 

Please note: all HUBweek Open Doors sessions require either a free or paid pass to HUBweek 2018. You can register for a pass here and add this session to your agenda during the registration process.  If you have already registered, you may add this session to your agenda by clicking here.

HUBweek showcases, celebrates, and convenes the most inventive minds making an impact in Boston and around the world. 

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How AI and Big Data are Disrupting Drug Discovery 
Tuesday, October 9
8:30am to 9:30am
Broad Institute 415 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register

Drug development is costly and uncertain. Companies spend billions developing new drugs only to find they don't work well in the real world. But, artificial intelligence is promising to make this work cheaper, faster, and more effective.

Over breakfast, we'll discuss how the ability to process huge stores of data is enabling drug makers to identify the precise mechanisms of disease, target new therapies to address them, and build more detailed biological profiles of the types of patient who could benefit.

Please note: all HUBweek Open Doors sessions require either a free or paid pass to HUBweek 2018. You can register for a pass at https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register

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Landing in the Drone Valley:  Entering Switzerland’s Drone Innovation Ecosystem
Tuesday, October 9
9:30 am to 11:00 am
District Hall 75 Northern Avenue, Boston

Join a panel of experts from swiss aeropole, GZA, GGBa, S-GE, and swissnex Boston to learn everything you need to know about the drone ecosystem in Switzerland and how you can take advantage of all it has to offer. Register now to reserve your spot.

Switzerland, Home of Drones
In Switzerland drone researchers, startups, and companies can rely on a welcoming and supporting ecosystem geared towards fostering excellence in the field of drone technology and applications. The country provides exceptional access to world-class education and research institutions with close ties to industry, successful peer companies and business friendly regulations, as well as a pioneering air traffic management and a sizeable pool of experts.

This panel is part of swissnex Boston’s overaching series, Aerial Futures: The Drone Frontier and is hosted in conjunction with our HUBweeek Open Doors Public Exhibit. Tickets to Ladning in the Drone Valley also provides access to our drone exhibit hall.

Speakers
Massimo Fiorin, Panelist
Director Business Park, swiss aeropole
Massimo Fiorin is responsible for the management and development of the swiss aeropole Business and Technology Park in Payerne, Switzerland. swiss aeropole, which is located next to a 2.8 km runway in the heart of Switzerland’s “Drone Valley”, aims to expand a thriving community of aviation and aerospace companies, with a particular focus on the UAV/UAS sector. With its partners WindShape, INVOLI, RelaSyS and CertX, swiss aeropole is developing the DronePole project. Its objective is to contribute to the safety and security of professional drones by providing testing, certification, and R&D services to drone manufacturers and operators. A trained economist with a keen interest in technology and innovation, Massimo holds a master’s degree in International Relations from Geneva’s Graduate Institute.
Lukas Sieber, Panelist
Executive Director North America, Greater Zurich Area
Lukas Sieber worked at the Embassy of Switzerland in Washington, D.C., USA and was responsible for all public diplomacy activities and programs for the Swiss government throughout the United States. With a background in political sciences from University of Zurich and postgraduate studies at Georgetown University, USA, he now acts as Executive Director North America of Greater Zurich Area (GZA), the official investment support agency of Zurich and surrounding areas, and is Co-Founder of the Mindfire Foundation, a Swiss based foundation that unites some of the smartest minds to develop human-level AI.
Matt Julian, Panelist
Director US, Greater Geneva Bern area
Matt Julian is Director USA for Invest Western Switzerland, where he represents the economic development interests in the United States of six contiguous Swiss cantons (states), a dense commercial region that ranges from Geneva to Bern. Having spent 25 years working on behalf of international economic development agencies around the world, guiding their investment promotion strategies and managing their cross-border business attraction activities, Matt is responsible for facilitating and supporting relationships between US and Swiss enterprises, and institutions, at the academic, research and commercial levels. Matt is also a drone enthusiast, holds a Part 107 certification, and is the primary contact point within the organization for matters related to the UAV/UAS sector.
Philippe Labouchere, Panelist
Project Leader for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, swissnex Boston
Philippe Labouchere holds a MSc and BSc in Physics from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ). After having explored the mysteries of quantum cryptography during his master, he did an internship at the Science & Technology office at the Embassy of Switzerland in Tokyo, Japan, where he got acquainted with the swissnex network. Upon his return home, he started a doctoral program with Prof. Grätzel at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), during which he worked on next-generation dye-sensitized solar cells. After having completed his Ph.D., Philippe moved to London and worked in the field of artificial intelligence applied to online marketing. In 2017, he joined the swissnex Boston team to foster the exchanges between Switzerland and the Greater Boston Area in the fields of Innovation and Entrepreneurship.
Sean Powers, Moderator
Trade Commissioner for Foreign Direct Investment, Swiss Business Hub USA
Sean Powers is a Trade Commissioner for Swiss Business Hub USA, part of Switzerland’s official trade and investment promotion agency, Switzerland Global Enterprise (S-GE). Sean promotes Switzerland as a highly attractive business and investment location for US companies looking to grow into Europe. Sean is an experienced economic development professional, previously leading the life science sector efforts for Scottish Development International, Scotland’s economic development agency. Sean is a Boston native and graduate from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Program
9.30am Welcome remarks by swissnex Boston and S-GE
9.45am Presentation by GZA and GGBa
10.00am Presentation by swiss aeropole
10.15am Testimonials from Swiss startups
10.30am Q&A

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Are Computers Becoming Less General-Purpose? Deep Learning, Hardware Specialization, and the Fragmentation of Computing
Tuesday, October  9
12:00 pm
Northeastern, 177 Huntington Avenue, 11th floor, Boston

NEIL C. THOMPSON, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, MIT
It is a triumph of technology and of economics that our computer chips are so universal - the staggering variety of calculations they can compute make countless applications possible. But, this was not always the case. Computers used to be specialized, doing only narrow sets of calculations. Their rise as a ‘general purpose technology (GPT)’ only happened because of ground-breaking technical advancements by computer scientists like Von Neumann and Turing, and virtuous economics common to general purpose technologies, where product improvement and market growth fuel each other in a mutually reinforcing cycle.

This paper argues that technological and economic forces are now pushing computing in the opposite direction, making computer processors less general-purpose and more specialized. This process has already begun, driven by the slow down in Moore’s Law and the algorithmic success of Deep Learning. This threatens to fragment computing into those applications that get to be in 'fast lane' because special customized chips are developed for them, while other applications get stuck in the 'slow lane' using general-purpose chips whose progress fades.

The rise of general purpose computer chips has been remarkable. So, too, could be its fall. This paper outlines the forces already starting to fragment this general purpose technology.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
I am a Research Scientist at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab and a Visiting Professor at the Lab for Innovation Science at Harvard. I am also an Associate Member of the Broad Institute, and was previously an Assistant Professor of Innovation and Strategy at the MIT Sloan School of Management, where I co-directed the Experimental Innovation Lab (X-Lab). I have advised businesses and government on the future of Moore’s Law and have been on National Academies panels on transformational technologies and scientific reliability. I did my PhD in Business and Public Policy at Berkeley, where I also did Masters degrees in Computer Science and Statistics. I have a masters in Economics from the London School of Economics, and undergraduate degrees in Physics and International Development. Prior to academia, I worked at organizations such as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Bain and Company, The United Nations, the World Bank, and the Canadian Parliament.

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Open Data, Grey Data, and Stewardship:  UNIVERSITIES AT THE PRIVACY FRONTIER
Tuesday, October 9
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard,  Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2018-10-09/open-data-grey-data-and-stewardship

Christine L. Borgman
The growth in availability of digital data resources is changing university practice in more ways than most faculty, administrators, and students are aware. Researchers provide open access to their data as a condition for obtaining grant funding or publishing results in journals, leading to an explosion of available scholarly content. Universities have automated many aspects of teaching, instruction, student services, libraries, personnel management, building management, and finance, leading to a profusion of discrete data about the activities of individuals. Many of these data, both research and operational, fall outside privacy regulations such as HIPAA, FERPA, and PII. Universities see great value of these data for learning analytics, faculty evaluation, strategic decisions, and other sensitive matters. Commercial entities, governments, and private individuals also see value in these data and are besieging universities with requests for access. These conflicts pose challenges in balancing obligations for stewardship, trust, privacy, confidentiality – and often academic freedom – with the value of exploiting data for analytical and commercial purposes. This talk, based on a new article in the Berkeley Law and Technology Journal, draws on the pioneering work of the University of California in privacy and information security, data governance, and cyber risk.

Related reading: Borgman, C. L. (2018). Open Data, Grey Data, and Stewardship: Universities at the Privacy Frontier. Berkeley Technology Law Journal, 33(2).

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Future Directions and Strategic Thinking on China's Urban Development
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gund Hall, Room 122, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Research study, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard East Asia Urban Forum
The Loeb Fellowship at Harvard
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
SPEAKER(S)  Lin Wang, Professor, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, researcher of China Urban Governance Institute, and the director of Center for Urban Studies focusing on regeneration, preservation and innovation of cities. Loeb Fellow 2009 of Harvard University.

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Kendall Square: Innovation Playground
Tuesday, October 9
12:00pm to 8:00pm
292 Main Street, Cambridge

Unlock your imagination by teleporting around the world to various tech hubs, immersing yourself in a life-size coloring book, creating visual effects through augmented reality,  interacting with a digital art installation created by MIT alumnus Karl Sims, or dropping a beat on the turntables. Don't miss this interactive celebration of community, arts, and technology, culminating in a groundbreaking ceremony at 5:30pm for 314 Main Street, the future home of technology innovators and the MIT Museum. 

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Political Origins of Cybersecurity Capacity: Lessons from Japan and East Asia
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Bowie-Vernon Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  Benjamin Bartlett, Postdoctoral Fellow, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University
Moderated by Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics and Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University
COST   Free and open to the public
LINK  https://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/calendar/upcoming

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Garage @ NERD 
Tuesday, October 9
1:00pm to 4:00pm
1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

The Microsoft Garage at NERD is built to optimize the connection between Microsoft and the broader community. With nearly 15,000 square feet of space, the new Garage at NERD provides room to congregate, a makerspace, an advance makerspace and a reality room. Join us to tour the space, participate in maker activities and see demos of work recently completed in the Garage.

Please note: all HUBweek Open Doors sessions require either a free or paid pass to HUBweek 2018. You can register for a pass at https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register and add this session to your agenda during the registration process.  If you have already registered, you may add this session to your agenda.

HUBweek showcases, celebrates, and convenes the most inventive minds making an impact in Boston and around the world. 

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Learning Environments & Technology Showcase
Tuesday, October 9
1pm-5pm
MIT- Brain and Cognitive Sciences Complex, 43 Vassar Street, Atrium, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/learning-environments-technology-showcase-tickets-48616366862

This event is a condensed 1/2 day showcase for Higher Education audiovisual and classroom technologists, interior designers and facilities managers. The partners, Biamp, ERDL and FSR, will illustrate the confluence of technology, aesthetics and usability in a variety of successful, education-focused rooms.

The showcase will include an open discussion between the attendees, with guidance from experts in technology, facilities and interiors groups. The open discussion will allow for sharing of ideas and a better understanding of the challenges and successes of designing classrooms that are functional, comfortable and future-resistant but that also contribute to pedagogical and campus-wide goals and successful student outcomes.

Often, the magic of technology is that it enables engagement, comprehension and retention through impactful classroom experiences. But when designing modern classroom environments, AV technology may not be a consideration until the room layout has already been designated, resulting in questions about functionality and overall effect once technology is then considered. Let’s discuss!

UPDATED SCHEDULE:
1-2:30pm- showcase open, food and refreshments served
2:30-3:30pm- Roundtable Discussion
3:30- 5pm- showcase open, food and refreshments served
5:30pm- Happy hour- local bar/ restaurant TBD
Add it to your calendar and bring colleagues! Limited Space Available. 

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The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence
Tuesday, October 9
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
UMass Club, Lowell Room, One Beacon St, 32nd Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register

From Waze and smart speakers to self-driving cars and financial services, artificial intelligence (AI) is becoming more and more central to our lives. What are some of the moral concerns raised by these new AI technologies?

Join leaders in the fields of ethics and technology as they search for answers to the tough moral questions surrounding the rise of AI. What is the impact AI on economic inequality? On privacy? On our moral development? More speculatively, what happens when machines become as smart as us?

Please note: all Open Doors sessions require either a free or paid pass to HUBweek 2018. You can register for a pass here and add this session to your agenda during the registration process.   If you have already registered, you may add this session to your agenda by clicking here.

Speakers
Nir Eisikovits, Director of the Center for Applied Ethics, UMass Boston
Giorgos Zacharia, Chief Technology Officer, Kayak
Dan Feldman, Senior Fellow at the Center for Applied Ethics, UMass Boston
Lisa Rivera, Associate Professor of Philosophy, UMass Boston
Adam Beresford, Associate Professor of Philosophy, UMass Boston

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HILR Convocation 2018 with Samantha Power
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement
SPEAKER(S)  Former UN Ambassador Samantha Power
COST  Free to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.boxoffice.harvard.edu/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle::permalink=hilr
TICKET INFO  Available September 18
CONTACT INFO	Steven Leon, Administrative Manager, HILR, 617-495-4072
DETAILS  The Harvard Institute of Learning in Retirement is pleased to announce the 2018 Robert C. Cobb Memorial Lecture presented by Samantha Power, “Lessons for Dark Times."
Power is the Anna Lindh Professor of the Practice of Global Leadership and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and professor of practice at Harvard Law School. She also served on President Barack Obama’s cabinet, becoming the public face of US opposition to Russian aggression in Ukraine and Syria, negotiating sanctions on North Korea, lobbying to release political prisoners, and supporting Obama’s actions to end the Ebola crisis.
Now, in a talk sponsored by the Harvard Institute of Learning in Retirement, she will draw from her experiences at the forefront of diplomatic crises to offer hard-earned insights on how we can all engage in support of a humane future.
“People are feeling so oppressed, like the odds are stacked against doing what’s smart as well as what’s right, but I think that others have conquered much steeper odds with less company… We can accomplish more. We just have to throw ourselves into the task, mobilize compassion and — let’s say — make America good again,” Power told the Washington Post.
This event is free and open to the public, but tickets must be obtained from the Harvard Box Office. Tickets available beginning Tuesday, Sept. 18, at noon.
LINK  https://www.extension.harvard.edu/hilr/2018-robert-c-cobb-sr-memorial-lecture

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"Travels in Trumpland" with Ed Balls
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Building, Bell Hall, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Film
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at the Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Ed Balls, fellow at M-RCBG
CONTACT INFO	mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Ed Balls, Fellow of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, is hosting a screening of the first of his "Travels in Trumpland" documentary, recently shown on the BBC to great critical and audience acclaim. The show follows Ed as he travels around America's Deep South, where he immersed himself in the lives of those who put Trump in power, to learn how this reality TV businessman won them over. Highlights of Episode One include Ed joining 15,000 working-class Americans in Saint-Jo, Texas, for the wild Rednecks with Paychecks festival; and the return of the “British Bruiser,” as Ed, this time in a leotard, trains with former WWE star Johnny Slaughter of Southern Legacy Wrestling, Alabama.

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Protest Power: Does Acceptable Protest Exist?
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 4:30 – 5:45 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Littauer 150, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  Brittany Packnett (IOP Fall 2018 Resident Fellow) and DeRay McKesson (Activist, Educator and Host, Pod Save The People)
DETAILS  Kneeling during the anthem. Breaking a store window. Blocking traffic with a human chain. Shutting down a store. Interrupting a presidential candidate. Disrupting a SCOTUS hearing. Occupying the lawn of a mayor. All of these have been tactics of protest we’ve seen in 2018. Yet, the debate rages on — what protest is acceptable, and what is not? Is violence ever welcome or necessary in the revolution? And is the question of the “acceptability” of protest beside the point- and irrelevant for progress? Together with our guest, we will debate these topics not just in theory, but applied to the social issues of greatest importance to us. Confirmed Guest: DeRay McKesson, Activist, Educator and Host, Pod Save The People. This event is closed to press and not for attribution.
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/study-groups-0

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Book Talk: A Conversation With Roman David - Communists and Their Victims
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 4:30 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Rubenstein 429 CID Conference Room, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops, Education, Humanities, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Carr Center for Human Rights
SPEAKER(S)  Roman David, Professor and Head of the Sociology & Social Policy Department at Lingnan University
CONTACT INFO	Sarah Peck
DETAILS  Join us for a book talk with Roman David, Professor and Head of the Sociology & Social Policy Department at Lingnan University, as he discusses his findings in his recent work Communists and Their Victims. The discussion will be facilitated by Carr fellow, Stephan Parmentier.
In Communists and Their Victims, Roman David identifies and examines four classes of justice measures—retributive, reparatory, revelatory, and reconciliatory—to discover which, if any, rectified the legacy of human rights abuses committed during the communist era in the Czech Republic. Conducting interviews, focus groups, and nationwide surveys between 1999 and 2015, David looks at the impact of financial compensation and truth-sharing on victims' healing and examines the role of retribution in the behavior and attitudes of communists and their families. Emphasizing the narratives of former political prisoners, secret collaborators, and former Communist Party members, David tests the potential of justice measures to contribute to a shared sense of justice and their ability to overcome the class structure and ideological divides of a formerly communist regime.
LINK  https://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/event/book-talk-conversation-roman-david-communists-and-their-victims-0

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Leonid Volkov: What is the Future of Russia's Opposition?
Tuesday, October 9
4:30 PM – 6:00 PM EDT
Tufts, The Fletcher School, Cabot 102, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/leonid-volkov-what-is-the-future-of-russias-opposition-registration-50049014951

Please join the Russia and Eurasia Program at The Fletcher School for a talk by Leonid Volkov, former Chief of Staff for Alexei Navalny's campaign for the 2018 Russian presidential election. He will discuss how opposition political parties campaign in Russia and what the future holds for them. Refreshments will be provided. Attendance is by registration only on Eventbrite.

Since 2016, Leonid Volkov served as Chief of Staff and Campaign Manager for the initiative to get Alexey Navalny registered for the 2018 presidential election in Russia. Volkov is the co-founder, with Navalny and Vladimir Ashurkov, and member of the Central Committee of the Progress Party, Russia's leading opposition political party. In 2013, during the Moscow mayor election, Volkov was campaign manager for Navalny, who came in second with 28 percent of the popular vote. From 2009 to 2013, Volkov was elected and served at the Ekaterinburg City Council as its only independent member.

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Technology Innovation & Public Purpose - A Hubweek Event
Tuesday, October 9
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM EDT
The Harvard Innovation Labs, Batten Hall, 125 Western Avenue, Allston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/technology-innovation-public-purpose-a-hubweek-event-tickets-50368102350

Emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, IoT, and gene editing will bring immeasurable benefits and advances to billions around the globe. Yet what happens when things go wrong - or new technologies fall into the hands of bad actors? Join this lively discussion among senior leaders on how business, government, and academia can work together to ensure the next generation of technologies serve overall human good. 

Co-presented by Technology and Public Purpose (TAPP) Project and the Harvard Innovation Labs.

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Film Screening and Q&A: Dark Money
Tuesday, October 9
5:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Harvard, Wiener Auditorium, Taubman G-1, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
RSVP Required at http://forms.shorensteincenter.org/view.php?id=78253

Film screening and Q&A with Director/Producer Kimberly Reed and investigative reporter John Adams.

DARK MONEY, a political thriller, examines one of the greatest present threats to American democracy: the influence of untraceable corporate money on our elections and elected officials. The film takes viewers to Montana—a frontline in the fight to preserve fair elections nationwide—to follow an intrepid local journalist working to expose the real-life impacts of the US Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision. Through this gripping story, DARK MONEY uncovers the shocking and vital truth of how American elections are bought and sold. This Sundance award-winning documentary is directed/produced by Kimberly Reed (PRODIGAL SONS) and produced by Katy Chevigny (E-TEAM).

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Decentralizing Power Production with Solar and Blockchain Technology
Tuesday, October 9
5:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
WeWork St. James, 31 Saint James Avenue. Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/decentralizing-power-production-with-solar-and-blockchain-technology-tickets-50503293711

The era of centralized control over our electricity supply is approaching its end, with the growth of solar microgrids promising a more cost-efficient and reliable energy future.

Photovoltaic solar microgrids are easy to install and operate in small towns, cities, and other locations that have space for solar panel arrays, such as highways, roof tops, parking lots, etc. The Brooklyn Microgrid is one example of a city-based microgrid supplying power to the local community. Elsewhere, community solar farms are also growing in numbers.

Everywhere you look, in public and private sectors alike, interest in clean energy is growing; expanding market caps for companies in renewable energy generation reflect this fact. One new space this demand has helped cultivate is in peer-to-peer energy transaction, particularly via microgrids supported by blockchain-enabled trading platforms.

Energy transaction is an ideal application of blockchain technology: numerous companies are now using blockchain for peer-to-peer transaction of solar power between microgrids and households.

Moreover, the growth of solar microgrids with blockchain-enabled transaction platforms are creating an exciting new energy ecosystem, with decentralized power enabling newfound energy independence in local communities.

We have assembled an amazing panel of experts with decades of experience in the renewable energy sector to share their thoughts both on the growth of solar microgrids, as well as what the future may hold. Be sure to join us for this lively and informative discussion!

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Native American Environmental History
Tuesday, October 9
5:15PM
Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston St., Boston

The Massachusetts Historical Society hosts "Native American Environmental History," a panel featuring Lisa Brooks, Amherst College; Strother Roberts, Bowdoin College; Ashley Smith, Hampshire College; Thomas Wickman, Trinity College. Moderated by Cedric Woods, Institute for New England Native American Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston.

Attendance is free, but you can subscribe online ($25) for the convenience of advance online access to the papers in FOUR series: this, our new Boston African American History Seminar, the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, and the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture.

Boston Seminar on Environmental History
https://www.masshist.org/2012/calendar/seminars/environmental-history

Contact Name:  Alex Buckley
abuckley at masshist.org

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CHINA Town Hall - Hosted by Suffolk University & WorldBoston
Tuesday, October 9
5:30 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Suffolk University Law School, Faculty Dining Room #495, 120 Tremont Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/china-town-hall-hosted-by-suffolk-university-worldboston-tickets-50092029609

A national conversation about China that provides Americans the opportunity to discuss issues in the relationship with leading experts.

About this Event
Suffolk University and WorldBoston are excited to again partner in hosting CHINA Town Hall 2018!
China's rapid development and Sino-American relations have a direct impact on the lives of nearly everyone in the United States. CHINA Town Hall is a national conversation about China that provides Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss issues in the relationship with leading experts.

The twelfth annual CHINA Town Hall will take place on Tuesday, October 9, 2018, at 95+ venues across the United States and Greater China (our location is Suffolk University Law School), and feature Condoleezza Rice, former secretary of state and national security advisor, as the national webcast speaker. Following the webcast are remarks by and a discussion with our Boston-based speaker, Dr. Joseph Fewsmith, Professor of International Relations and Political Science at Boston University's Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies. 

The event is free and refreshments will be provided. 

Schedule of Events: 
5:30 - Doors open, refreshments, introductions
6:00 - Webcast with Secretary Condoleezza Rice
6:45 - Discussion with Dr. Joseph Fewsmith

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Horizon18 Conference Kick-off @ Greentown Labs
Tuesday, October 9
5:30 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Greentown Labs, 444 Somerville Avenue, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/horizon18-conference-kick-off-greentown-labs-tickets-49225018355

Join us for a Horizon18 kickoff event at the Greentown Labs Global Center for Cleantech Innovation. Greentown Labs, the largest cleantech startup incubator in the United States, along with World Climate Ltd., NECEC, and MassCEC would like to welcome all of the cleantech and climate leaders from around the world to Boston for an exciting few days of discussion, collaboration, innovation, and community.
This event will serve as an entry-point to the conference, helping to facilitate connections, partnerships, and fun! Attendees will hear brief remarks from:
Dr. Emily Reichert, Greentown Labs' CEO
Jens Nielsen, World Climate Ltd CEO 
Peter Rothstein, NECEC President
Stephen Pike, MassCEC CEO
You will also have an opportunity to tour the incubator facility. Refreshments and appetizers will be provided.

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Greenovate Boston Leaders Program Training 1
Tuesday, October 9
5:30pm - 8:30pm
Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building, 2300 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.greenovateboston.org/greenovate_boston_leaders_program_training_1

The Greenovate Boston Leaders Program aims to increase understanding of the climate impacts in Boston and the actions required to mitigate the impacts. We want to involve Bostonians as part of the collective action needed in advancing the citywide initiatives. Our program gives you the materials and support you need to lead conversations about climate change and climate action.

This program is a great opportunity to network with a wide variety of leaders, learn how to format community discussions around climate change, and to make a positive impact on Boston.

If you are interested in attending this training date, please submit an RSVP below. There are limited spaces left, so sign-up as soon as you can! 

You will be contacted by David Corbie, Greenovate Boston Outreach Manager, once your space at the training is confirmed.

Questions or concerns? Email Greenovate Boston at Greenovate at boston.gov.

CONTACT David Corbie david.corbie at boston.gov

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Ancient Brews Rediscovered and Re-Created
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Education, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard Semitic Museum, Harvard Museum of Natural History, and Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology
SPEAKER(S)  Patrick E. McGovern, Scientific Director, Biomolecular Archaeology Project for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages, and Health, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology; Adjunct Professor of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
COST  $8 members/$10 nonmembers
TICKET WEB LINK  https://reservations.hmsc.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?EventID=21
CONTACT INFO	(617) 495-4631, semiticm at fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The makers of the earliest fermented beverages must have marveled at the “magical” process by which mixtures of wild fruits, honey, and cereals produced mind-altering drinks. In this special event, Patrick McGovern will venture back to the origins of brewing in the ancient world. Drawing on archaeology, chemistry, and other sciences, he will explore the earliest known fermented beverages and discuss how his research and travels have informed the making of the Ancient Ales and Spirits of Dogfish Head Brewery. Following the lecture, enjoy a tasting of “ancient” beer paired with Mesopotamia-inspired treats.
Lecture, Special Event & Book Signing.
Presented by the Harvard Semitic Museum, the Harvard Museum of Natural History, and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology.
Advance tickets required: $8 members/$10 nonmembers. You can purchase tickets at https://reservations.hmsc.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?EventID=21
Visit hmsc.harvard.edu for event details
Free event parking available at 52 Oxford Street Garage
Reception at the Harvard Semitic Museum, 6 Divinity Avenue
LINK  https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/ancient-brews-rediscovered

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Distinguished Speaker Series: Terry McAuliffe
Tuesday, October 9
6 PM 
Tufts, ASEAN Auditorium, Cabot Center, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://tischcollege.tufts.edu/content/terry-mcauliffe

Join Tisch College for a conversation with Terry McAuliffe about current events, policy and public service. From 2014 to 2018, McAuliffe served as the 72nd Governor of Virginia, where he significantly improved economic development, functionally ended veteran homelessness, prohibited discrimination against state employees on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, and fought to restore voting rights to 173,000 previously disenfranchised felons. McAuliffe entered national politics at the age of 23 as the national finance director for President Jimmy Carter, and he was elected Democratic National Committee chairman in 2000, serving until 2005. He co-chaired President Bill Clinton's 1996 campaign for reelection and his 1997 Presidential Inauguration. He was also chairman of the 2000 Democratic National Convention and chairman of Hillary Clinton's 2008 Presidential Campaign.

Cosponsored by the Political Science Department and JumboVote. Follow the conversation live at #McAuliffeAtTufts

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Hammer and Silicon: The Soviet Diaspora in the US Innovation Economy
Tuesday, October 9
6:00 – 8:00pm EDT
CIC, 101 Main Street, 15th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hammer-and-silicon-the-soviet-diaspora-in-the-us-innovation-economy-tickets-50646916290

Come celebrate the launch of the book & enjoy a conversation with the authors moderated by CIC director, Stas Gayshan!

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Above and Beyond: NASA's Journey to Tomorrow 
Tuesday, October 9
6:00pm to 8:00pm
John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum Columbia Point Boston

The Kennedy Library and Discovery partner for an exclusive preview and discussion of Above and Beyond: NASA’s Journey to Tomorrow, a new documentary by Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Rory Kennedy. Meghna Chakrabarti, host of NPR and WBUR’s On Point, moderates. This program is presented in conjunction with the 2018 GlobeDocs Film Festival and HUBweek. Register here to see the film.

Please note: all HUBweek sessions require either a free or paid pass to HUBweek 2018. You can register for a pass https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register and add this session to your agenda during the registration process.  If you have already registered, you may add this session to your agenda.

HUBweek showcases, celebrates, and convenes the most inventive minds making an impact in Boston and around the world. 

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Workshop #1: Intellectual Commons event series - Academia and Agency in the Era of Global Change
Tuesday, October 9
6:00pm to 8:00pm
MIT, Building 7-429, Long Lounge, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This fall, SA+P Dean Hashim Sarkis and Architecture's Mark Jarzombek invite you to participate in a series of talks and workshops organized under the theme Intellectual Commons. On Tuesday, October 9, at 6 PM, join us in Long Lounge (7-429) for the next installment in the series, a workshop with SA+P’s Rania Ghosn, Jason Jackson, Gabriella Carolini, and Arindam Dutta, moderated by Saskia Sassen and Mark Jarzombek.

"Intellectual Commons
At a time when digital communications are growing, the need for direct interaction is all the more vital. At a time when MIT is building bridges across schools and disciplines, we can no longer operate primarily at the scale of micro-units. This reflects neither the interests of the new generation nor the nature of the problems that the world is leaving at our doorstep.

I invite you to come up with ideas that reflect the values that we hold in common. The vitality of the School—a community invested in shaping better commons for the world, from the environment to cities to public spaces and public art—is the extent in which we can exercise our collective imaginary.” — Hashim Sarkis

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Demystifying Lobbying
Tuesday, October 9
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
WeWork Beacon Hill, 1 Beacon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/demystifying-lobbying-tickets-50096780820

American citizens are granted a number of rights in the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment, including free speech and the ability to “petition the government for redress of grievances” — this is lobbying. Advocating for a specific idea, topic, or cause–whether to a local or federal elected official–is something most of us will do at some point in our lives. And this relationship is two-way: elected officials rely on active, knowledgeable citizens to keep them abreast of specific issues. For better or worse, “clicktavisim” –the ability to just click an online petition or tweet at an elected official–is now part of the way we communicate and advocate ideas. But is this the most effective way to get your voice heard in the halls of power? Regardless of what issue you are advocating for, it’s clear that there’s a strategy to be successfully heard and understood–whether you are a lone voice in the street or a massive K Street lobbying firm. This session will help you become a better advocate for your ideas.

Join Civic Series for this special HUBWeek event to better understand lobbying and how you can be more effective communicating to your elected officials. You’ll hear what it’s like to be on the other side of the lobbying and learn how to:
Effectively communicate to elected officials
Become a reliable advocate for your issues
Act and followup when the time is right 
Encourage other citizens to rally around your ideas
This session will feature short presentations, a panel discussion, and plenty of time for your questions. The panelists in this session are:
Stefanie Coxe is an activism trainer and political consultant who worked as a “political insider” for nearly 15 years, including serving as an aide to two Massachusetts state representatives and a Member of Congress. She kept meeting people who couldn’t afford a lobbyist – non-profit leaders, town administrators, and community activists – but earnestly wanted to learn how to navigate the world of politics and effectively advocate for their priorities. She has created the Learn to Lobby series to do just that.
Christie Getto Young is the Chief of Staff for Senator DiDomenico.  Prior to this position, Christie worked for 10 years as Senior Director of Public Policy at United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley, where she lobbied on behalf of low-income children and their families, managed grant making for policy and advocacy agencies, and authored several policy reports. Before joining United Way’s staff, Christie practiced law, representing low-income parents in family law cases and working as a law clerk for the Massachusetts Probate & Family Court.  Prior to attending law school, she worked as a Research Analyst for the Massachusetts Legislature’s Joint Committee on Human Services & Elderly Affairs.
Rebecca Wolfson is the Executive Director of the Boston Cyclist’s Union. She works with residents, advocates, municipal staff and policymakers to help transform the region’s streets so everyone can feel safe and comfortable riding a bike as transportation. Her experience liaising in local government and community, environmental ethic, and grassroots organizing skills were honed in the six years she spent on Cape Cod working for Barnstable County’s Resource Development Office and environmental AmeriCorps program.
**Stay for snacks from LIFE ALIVE after the event to talk further about the topic with attendees & the speakers!** 

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Christopher Hawthorne Lecture
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Gund Hall, Piper Auditorium, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Harvard University Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Christopher Hawthorne
CONTACT INFO	Anyone requiring accessibility accommodations should contact the events office at (617) 496-2414 or events at gsd.harvard.edu.
DETAILS  Christopher Hawthorne is the Chief Design Officer for the city of Los Angeles, a position appointed by Mayor Eric Garcetti. Prior to joining City Hall, Hawthorne was architecture critic for the Los Angeles Times from 2004 to early 2018. He is Professor of the Practice at Occidental College, where since 2015 he has directed the Third Los Angeles Project, a series of public conversations about architecture, urban planning, mobility, and demographic change in Southern California. He has also taught at U.C. Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, Columbia University, and the Southern California Institute of Architecture. A frequent collaborator with KCET-TV, the PBS affiliate in Los Angeles, Hawthorne wrote and directed the hour-long documentary “That Far Corner: Frank Lloyd Wright in Los Angeles,” which had its broadcast debut earlier this year, and received an L.A.-area Emmy Award as Executive Producer for the 2016 KCET program “Third L.A. with Architecture Critic Christopher Hawthorne.” He has been a Mid-Career Fellow at Columbia University's National Arts Journalism Program and a Resident in Criticism at the American Academy in Rome. Hawthorne grew up in Berkeley and holds a bachelor's from Yale College, where he studied political science and architectural history.
LINK  https://www.gsd.harvard.edu/event/christopher-hawthorne/

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THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION
Tuesday, October 9
6:30 – 8:30 pm EDT
GA Boston, 125 Summer Street 13th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://generalassemb.ly/education/the-future-of-education/boston/57368

Anne Bosman, Senior Regional Director, General Assembly
Heather Wetzler, Co-founder, COO, Cue Career
Helen Adeosun, CEO and President, Co-Founder, CareAcademy.com 

About This Event
Join us for a panel discussion around the changing landscape of education, with those at the forefront of both accredited and non-accredited learning.

These pioneers will share their voices and opinions through a thoughtful discussion on e-learning, bringing technology into the classroom, and teaching new and relevant skills for today's job market, led by our panel moderator.
Afterwards we will open up the floor for questions and networking with panelists and attendees.

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Success Through Diversity:  Why the Most Inclusive Companies Will Win
Tuesday, October 9
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Harvard Book Store welcomes award-winning businesswoman CAROL FULP—President and CEO of The Partnership—for a discussion of her debut book, Success Through Diversity: Why the Most Inclusive Companies Will Win.

About Success Through Diversity
In our fast-changing demographic landscape, companies that proactively embrace diversity in all areas of their operations will be best poised to thrive. Renowned business leader and visionary Carol Fulp explores staffing trends in the US and provides a blueprint for what businesses must do to maintain their competitiveness and customer base, including hiring in new ways, aligning managers around diversity, providing new kinds of leadership development, and engaging employees to embrace differences. Using detailed case histories of corporate cultures such as the NFL, Eastern Bank, John Hancock, Hallmark Health, and PepsiCo, as well as her own experiences in the workplace and in advising companies on diversity practice, Fulp demonstrates how people of different races and ethnicities represent an essential asset to contemporary companies and organizations. 

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Seaweed Chronicles
Tuesday, October 9
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Susan Hand Shetterly
"Seaweed is ancient and basic, a testament to the tenacious beginnings of life on earth," writes Susan Hand Shetterly in this elegant, fascinating book. "Why wouldn't seaweeds be a protean life source for the lives that have evolved since?" On a planet facing environmental change and diminishing natural resources, seaweed is increasingly important as a source of food and as a fundamental part of our global ecosystem.

In Seaweed Chronicles, Shetterly takes readers deep into the world of this essential organism by providing an immersive, often poetic look at life on the rugged shores of her beloved Gulf of Maine, where the growth and harvesting of seaweed is becoming a major industry. While examining the life cycle of seaweed and its place in the environment, she tells the stories of the men and women who farm and harvest it--and who are fighting to protect this critical species against forces both natural and man-made. Ideal for readers of such books as The Hidden Life of Trees and How to Read Water, Seaweed Chronicles is a deeply informative look at a little understood and too often unappreciated part of our habitat.

Susan Hand Shetterly has written about wildlife and wetlands for more than thirty years, in both articles and books, including Settled in the Wild, acollection of essays. She lives in rural Maine, where she works to save habitat.

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Food Literacy Project Open Meeting
WHEN  Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, 7 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South S050, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Food Literacy Project
SPEAKER(S)  Bill Creelman, Founder of Spindrift Beverage Co.
COST  Free
TICKET WEB LINK  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/food-entrepreneurship-with-bill-creelman-founder-spindrift-beverage-co-tickets-49427914222
DETAILS  Bill Creelman is on a mission to use all traceable ingredients and fruit from family farms. Whether your favorite Spindrift flavor is grapefruit, cucumber or orange mango, you’ll enjoy hearing this Massachusetts native talk about the origins of America’s first sparkling water made with just real squeezed fruit.
LINK   https://dining.harvard.edu/food-literacy-project

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The 7 Laws of Enough: Cultivating A Life of Sustainable Abundance
Tuesday, October 9
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/meet-the-authors-gina-laroche-jennifer-cohen-tickets-50025867717

Gina LaRoche and Jennifer Cohen
Here is this book in a nutshell: You are enough. You do enough. You have enough, already.
THE 7 LAWS OF ENOUGH is about the most radical kind of change, at the personal, organizational, and societal level: a shift from scarcity to sustainable abundance. These seven principles, pioneered by leadership consultants Gina LaRoche and Jennifer Cohen, guide readers on a transformational journey of self-discovery, towards new leadership strategies and a renewed sense of fulfillment and purpose. It starts with law number one: stories matter. We are all living in the story of scarcity—the story that tells us we don’t have enough. We want more and more, perpetuating a vicious cycle of consumption that lowers our own well-being and irreparably damages the Earth. This book is an invitation to live in another story, the story of sustainable abundance. The ripples from making this shift are profound—it will change your relation to your loved ones, your work, and the planet. Essential for business leaders, executive coaches, spiritual seekers, and environmentalists alike.

About The Authors:
GINA LAROCHE is cofounder of Seven Stones Leadership Group and a leading organizational consultant, executive coach, speaker, author and artist. She is noted for executive programs that challenge leaders, teams and entrepreneurs to accelerate results and develop mindfulness and presence for themselves and their organizations. A popular keynote speaker, Gina is a graduate of Spirit Rock’s Community Dharma Leaders Program and a board member of Insight Meditation Society. She holds a BSBA from Georgetown University and an MBA from Harvard Business School.
JENNIFER COHEN is cofounder of Seven Stones Leadership Group and an engaging speaker and author, well known for coaching world-class leaders from institutions including Harvard Business School and Simmons. Quantum physics, ontology, neuroscience, somatics and systems thinking inform her innovative and embodied approaches to curriculum design and facilitation. She holds a master’s degree in Applied Psychology from the Antioch New England Graduate School and is certified as a Master Somatic Coach by The Strozzi Institute.

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Wednesday, October 10
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Materials Day 2018
Wednesday, October 10
8:00am - 6:00pm
MIT Campus, Kresge Auditorium (Bldg. W16), 48 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://mrl.mit.edu/index.php/form/20-materials-day-symposium-registration-2018

On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 the Materials Research Laboratory will host the Materials Day 2018 Symposium & Research Review Poster Session. The symposium will
be held at MIT in the Kresge Auditorium (Bldg. W16). Registration check-in begins
at 8:00am.

The theme of this year’s meeting will largely be focused on imaging-enabled nanoscale research on the structure, properties and processing of materials. Invited speakers will describe new tools and methods for atomic-scale structural and chemical characterization of materials, and application of these methods to optimization of processing and properties of materials for a wide range of applications. Results from imaging-based in situ studies of vapor- and liquid-phase processes for synthesis of nanostructured materials and in situ studies of nano- and micro-scale phenomena that can be used to engineer properties of bulk materials will be presented. Development of compact high-brilliance X-ray sources that can provide synchrotron-level materials analyses with laboratory-scale systems will also be discussed. Studies of nanoscale electronic, photonic, mechanical and catalytic properties of materials will be included and discussion of prospects for development of new state-of-the-art tools and methods for imaging-based and x–ray based materials research will be featured.

Invited Speakers
Keynote:  Application of advanced microscopy to industrial problems: New tools give new insights
Matt Kulzick, Senior Research Scientist, BP
Imaging and controlling nanoscale crystal growth using electron
microscopy
Frances Ross, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, MIT
Compact synchrotron radiation sources enabling advanced x-ray imaging and diffraction methods in a laboratory setting
David Moncton, Director, NRL, MIT
Accelerating the pace of materials characterization at the atomic scale: from machine learning to novel detectors
James M. LeBeau, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, MIT
An electron walks into a bar... Electron microscopy beyond imaging
Sylvija Gradecak, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, MIT
Nanoscale insights for macroscale solutions: Exploring novel damage-resistance mechanisms in metals
Cem Tasan, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, MIT
Using quantum mechanics to hack the electron microscope
Karl Berggren, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, MIT

For additional event information and registration, visit our website at mrl.mit.edu.

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IS&T Technology Fair
Wednesday, October 10
10:00 am to 2:00 pm
BU, George Sherman Union, 775 Commonwealth Avenue, Metcalf Hall Grand Ballroom, Boston

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Women and the 2018 Elections
Wednesday, October 10 
12:00 pm-1:00 pm 
MIT, Building 66-168, 25 Ames Street, Cambridge

Mary Anne Marsh, an internationally recognized political analyst, will lead a discussion on the role of women--as both candidates and voters, in this fall's election.

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights at 70: A Conversation with Professor James Loeffler
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wexner 102, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Ethics, Humanities, Law, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Carr Center for Human Rights Policy
SPEAKER(S)  James Loeffler, Jay Berkowitz Professor of Jewish History at the University of Virginia
DETAILS  This fall, the Carr Center celebrates the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a milestone document in the history of human rights that has been translated into over 500 languages.
Join us in a conversation with Professor James Loeffler of the University of Virginia and Carr Center Senior Fellow Judge Mark Wolf on the history of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and its relevance to the human rights and anti-corruption movements today.
LINK  https://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/event/universal-declaration-human-rights-70-conversation-professor-james-loeffler

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World War I Centenary
Wednesday, October 10
12:00pm to 1:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496 (Pye Room), 1 Ammherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Sephen Van Evera

SSP Wednesday Seminar

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The November Elections: Thoughts and Considerations:  Women and the 2018 Elections
Wednesday, October 10
1:00pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building 66-168

A Conversation with Mary Anne Marsh: Ms Marsh, an internationally recognized political analyst, will lead a discussion on the role of women--as both candidates and voters, in this fall's election.

Join us for a series of Wednesday lunch-time discussions beginning on October 3 focusing on the upcoming elections and how we might work towards a more just and civil society. Topics will include redistricting, the dramatic increase of women candidates, the vulnerabilities of voting technology, how to talk across the political divide with civility, and how tech and tech workers can become a political movement.

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Cambridge Hearing on Zero Waste
Tuesday, October 10
1 PM – 3 PM
Sullivan Chamber, Cambridge City Hall, 795 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

The Health and Environmental Committee will conduct a public hearing, chaired by Councillor Zondervan, to receive an update on progress towards the Zero Waste goals and to discuss successes and challenges of the citywide composting and recycling programs to date.

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xTalk with Keith Baker, MD:  The Cognitive Science of Teaching and Learning
Wednesday, October 10
3:00pm to 4:00pm
MIT, Building 1-190 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This xTalk will review key studies on how people learn and demonstrate strategies that lead to better learning in adults. This evidence-based approach to improving learning will likely lead to better teaching. Discussion of the material will enhance the attendee’s understanding of how to use this evidence for better learning.

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:
Identify and use two strategies to improve retention of information by learners.
Describe how working memory capacity (WMC) severely limits use of new information in novice learners. This informs our expectations of novice learners.
Use constructivism as a strategy to enhance deeper-level learning.
Describe what is meant by ‘metacognition’ and how the ‘feeling of knowing’ can mislead learners.
Dr. Baker obtained his M.D., Ph.D. from Washington University. He is Vice Chair for Education in the Department of Anesthesiology at MGH. His peer-reviewed articles focus on evaluation and feedback, attributes of excellent clinical teachers, deliberate practice and the development of expertise, and the cognitive science of teaching and learning.

Pre-Reading
Attendees are encouraed to read "The Cognitive Science of Learning: Concepts and Strategies for the Educator and Learner" before the session at https://openlearning.mit.edu/sites/default/files/CognitiveScienceOf%20Learning-ConceptsAndStrategiesForTheEducatoR%20AndLearner.PDF

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Psychedelic Medicine: From Tradition to Science
Wednesday, October 10
3:00pm Panel;  6:00pm Reception
Broad Institute, Main Auditorium, 415 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://psychedelicmedicine.splashthat.com
Livestreaming available through RSVP

Panel discussion and audience Q+A featuring:
Michael Pollan, Best-selling Author, Professor of Journalism and Practice of Non-Fiction, Harvard & UC Berkeley
Rick Doblin, PhD, Founder & Executive Director, Multidisciplinary Association For Psychedelic Studies (MAPS)
Robin Carhart-Harris, PhD (joining via video link), Head of Psychedelic Research, Centre for Neuropsycho-pharmacology, Division of Brain Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London
Anja Loizaga-Velder, PhD, Director of Research and Psychotherapy & Adjunct Professor, Nierika Institute For Intercultural Medicine &  Faculty Of Medicine, National Autonomous University of Mexico- UNAM
Matthew Johnson, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Franklin King, MD, Attending Psychiatrist and Instructor in Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School
Moderated by:  Julie Holland, MD, Psychiatrist and Author, Ecstasy: The Complete Guide, The Pot Book: A Complete Guide to Cannabis
Opening remarks:  Leo Raderman, President, The Grof Holotropic Foundation
Delara Chizari, PhD Candidate, Harvard Medical School & The Broad Institute

This event is presented by The Grof Holotropic Foundation, Harvard Medical School, The Harvard Brain Science Initiative, The Broad Institute, and The Multidisciplinary Association For Psychedelic Studies (MAPS). 

Learn more at: http://psychedelicmedicine.info

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Fall Distinguished Lecture:  "Lessons from Pelicans: Multilevel Theorizing for the Expertise Economy"
Wednesday, October 10
4:00 pm to 5:00 pm
BU, 213 Bay State Road (Hillel House), Castle/Bay State Room (4th floor), Boston

Dr. Janet Fulk 
The recent proliferation of multilevel models and research in management-related fields provides a stimulus for enriching our understanding of organizational phenomena that have not previously been conceptualized as primarily multilevel in nature. One such concept is expertise. In an “expertise economy” where crowds are wise and organizational technology such as enterprise social media offer glimpses into how collective knowledge can be a harnessed, what is multilevel expertise? Drawing on evolutionary theory, Dr. Janet Fulk (Professor of Communication in the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Professor of Management & Organization in the USC Marshall School of Business) builds a model of multilevel expertise and suggests how research can address the cross-level and multilevel processes involved in the communication and practice of multilevel expertise in organizations.

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Audiofuturism: The Transatlantic Circuit of Science Fiction Radio Drama
Wednesday, October 10
4:00 pm
Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge

Part of the 2018–2019 Fellows' Presentation Series
Lecture by andré m. carrington RI '19
Free and open to the public.
The research project andré m. carrington is undertaking as a Radcliffe fellow extends his investigation of the nexus of race and genre to the tradition of science fiction radio drama. This study examines legacies of race thinking in radio plays derived from speculative fiction texts by black diasporic, British, and US authors, from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy to Kindred. It treats speculative fiction and literary adaptation as transatlantic world-making practices that both influence and respond to the modern sensorium.

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Heat and Learning
Wednesday, October 10
4:15PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard, Room L-382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy

Joshua Goodman, Harvard University; Michael Hurwitz, College Board; Jisung Park, UCLA; and Jonathan Smith, Georgia State University. 

Support from Enel Endowment for Environmental Economics and the Department of Economics is Gratefully Acknowledged.

casey_billings at hks.harvard.edu
https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/44157

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Break of Day in the Trenches: The 21st Century Battlefield and the Dissolution of Front Lines
WHEN  Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, 4:30 – 5:45 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Littauer 163 (Faculty Dining Room), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Classes/Workshops
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics
SPEAKER(S)  John Noonan (IOP Fall 2018 Resident Fellow) and Colonel James Hickey (Senior Adviser to the Senate Armed Services Committee Majority)
DETAILS  IOP Fall 2018 Resident Fellow John Noonan's Study Group. In this session we will be joined by Colonel James Hickey, U.S. Ret., who led the operation to capture Saddam Hussein and served as a senior adviser to the Senate Armed Services Committee. How are modern changes similar to those of the Industrial Revolution? What will be the effects of new technology that has eradicated the "front lines?" How will changes in the battlefield impact soldiers and civilians? Confirmed Guest: Colonel James Hickey, U.S. Army Retired, Former Commander of 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, and Senior Adviser to the Senate Armed Services Committee Majority. This event is closed to press and not for attribution.
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/get-involved/study-groups-0

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The Legacy of May 1968: Guy Hocquenghem and Queer Politics
Wednesday, October 10
5:00pm to 6:30pm
MIT, Building 14 E-304, 160 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Antoine Idier, Director of study and research, École nationale supérieure d'arts de Paris-Cergy
Activist, journalist and philosopher Guy Hocquenghem was one of the most prominent figure of the French gay liberation movement. Antoine Idier will explore his legacy, and that of the student revolution of May 1968. Radical homosexual movements did more than questioning sexual norms, they shattered the traditional meaning of politics.

Free and open to the public

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The Challenges and Opportunities to Address Contaminants in Wastewater
Wednesday, October 10 
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
MIT Stata Center, Room 32-155, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge
Pre-registration is required at http://www.mitforumcambridge.org/event/water-and-wastewater-technologies/
Cost:  Non-members: $20; Livestream non-members: $20; Members: $10, Livestream Members: $10; Students: $5, livestream students: $5; Student members: Free

Wastewater systems were designed to treat human organic waste. However, as the waste generated by our society has increased in complexity, so have the challenges of handling it. Pathogens, nutrients, metals, pharmaceuticals and microplastics are some of the most threatening contaminants in our wastewaters. This expert panel will address which contaminants are of highest priority, whether treatment options are available, and the trade-offs and opportunities involved. Wastewater treatment is highly varied, reflecting more than a century of solutions developed in response to different geographic settings. Communities along coastlines, on the prairies, in urban settings, and in remote locations face different challenges in addressing this common concern.

Speakers 
Phil Guerin, Director of Water & Sewer Operations, City of Worcester
Marisol Labrecque, President, Technologies ECOFIXE
Dr. Preston McEachern, Founder and CEO, PurLucid Treatment Solutions
John Sullivan, Chief Engineer, Boston Water & Sewer Commission
Moderator
Michael Murphy, Director of Water Innovation, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center

Agenda
5:30 - 6:00pm Registration
6:00 - 7:15pm Panel discussion
7:15 - 8:00pm Networking Reception

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"Rethink Creativity" Book Talk 
Wednesday, October 10
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
BU, Pardee School of Global Studies, 121 Bay State Road, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rethink-creativity-book-talk-boston-ma-tickets-50642777912
Cost:  $0 – $25

Join us for a celebration of creativity and new friends at the Rethink Creativity Book Launch in Boston! 

Have you ever felt stuck at work? You’re not alone.

Monica H. Kang, Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox®, wrote Rethink Creativity: How to Innovate, Inspire, and Thrive at Work because she knows this feeling all too well. Rethink Creativity proves that by reconnecting with your own innate creativity you can enhance your personal and professional life. Through proven strategies and personal stories, Monica offers tips and tricks on how to enjoy your work more, be a better leader, and find new ways to be creative every day.

After working with various corporations and clients like Facebook, Johns Hopkins University and WBENC (Women Business Enterprises National Council), Monica wrote the book to empower more people outside of the limitations of in-person workshops.

Our Rethink Creativity Book Launch event will consist of an engaging discussion of Rethink Creativity with Author Monica Kang and Dr. Raul Fernandez, Program Director & Lecturer at Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development. Whether you’re a young professional, job seeker, or a senior executive, you’ll learn some valuable insights about your own creativity. 

There will also be time to have your book signed, ask questions, network, and celebrate the great community of creativity in Boston!

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Freeman's:  Power
Wednesday, October 10
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed writer and literary critic JOHN FREEMAN—editor of the literary journal Freeman's—for a discussion of the latest volume, Power

About Freeman's: Power
From the voices of protestors to the encroachment of a new fascism, everywhere we look power is revealed. Spouse to spouse, soldier to citizen, looker to gazed upon, power is never static: it is either demonstrated or deployed. Its hoarding is itself a demonstration. This thought-provoking issue of the acclaimed literary annual Freeman’s explores who gets to say what matters in a time of social upheaval.

Many of the writers are women. Margaret Atwood posits it is time to update the gender of werewolf narratives. Aminatta Forna shatters the silences which supposedly ensured her safety as a woman of color walking in public space. Power must often be seized. The narrator of Lan Samantha Chang’s short story finally wrenches control of the family’s finances from her husband only to make a fatal mistake. Meanwhile, the hero of Tahmima Anam’s story achieves freedom by selling bull semen. Australian novelist Josephine Rowe recalls a gallery attendee trying to take what was not offered when she worked as a life-drawing model. Violence often results from power imbalances―Booker Prize winner Ben Okri watches power stripped from the residents of Grenfell Tower by ferocious neglect. But not all power must wreak damage. Barry Lopez remembers fourteen glimpses of power, from the moment he hitched a ride on a cargo plane in Korea to the glare he received from a bear traveling with her cubs in the woods, asking―do you plan me harm?

Featuring work from brand new writers Nicole Im, Jaime Cortez, and Nimmi Gowrinathan, as well as from some of the world’s best storytellers, including US poet laureate Tracy K. Smith, Franco-Moroccan writer Leïla Slimani, and Turkish novelist Elif Shafak, Freeman’s: Power escapes from the headlines of today and burrows into the heart of the issue.

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How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler
Wednesday October 10
7:00 pm
Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Street, Brookline

What would you do if a time machine hurled you thousands of years into the past… and then broke? How would you survive? Could you improve on humanity’s original timeline? And how hard would it be to domesticate a giant wombat? Don’t worry: in How to Invent Everything, bestselling author and time-travel enthusiast Ryan North has figured out the answers to those four questions - and more - just for you. 

Ryan North is the New York Times-bestselling author of two chooseable-path Shakespeare books, Romeo and/or Juliet and To Be or Not to Be. He’s the creator of Dinosaur Comics and the Eisner Award-winning writer of Adventure Time, Jughead, and The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl for Marvel Comics, and he has a master’s in computational linguistics from the University of Toronto. Ryan lives in Toronto with his wife, Jenn, and their dog, Noam Chompsky.

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When Spirit Calls: A Healing Odyssey
Wednesday, October 10
7:00pm
Trident Bookseller, 338 Newbury Street, Boston

Joan Diver
When Spirit Calls is at once an adventure story and meditation on the healing journey that traces Joan Diver's odyssey from Boston foundation executive to spiritual healer. Imbued with the wisdom of great spiritual teachers from both East and West, Joan Diver shares a remarkable journey through urban violence, family crisis, physical pain and spiritual awakening.

Joan Diver’s family is one of three profiled in J. Anthony Lukas' Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Common Ground: A Turbulent Decade in the Lives of Three American Families. A national bestseller in 1985, it is still taught in classrooms today. Joan and Colin Diver continue to be treated as celebrities by Boston media and those touched by the pain of their story and the school-busing crisis of the 1970s and '80s.

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Altered State of Mind: How Psychedelics Modify the Brain, Behavior, and Perception
Wednesday, October 10
7 to 9:00 p.m. 
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium (in Goldenson Hall), 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Thursday, October 11
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IBM Community Day
Thursday, October 11
10am-4pm EDT
Webinar
RSVP at https://ibmaicommunity.bemyapp.com

TALKS
Mandy Chessell, Master Inventor, Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering
AI's Elephant in the Room 
AI is driven by data. Where is this data? Is it the right data for the situation and how do we ensure the AI remains true to its purpose as it learns from new incoming data?
In this talk, we will look at the structure of the data ecosystem needed to feed AI and review how the industry efforts around the Egeria Open Source project are aiming to support it.

Animesh Singh, Sr. Technical Staff
AI and Deep Learning Platform
Building a Secure and Transparent ML Pipeline Using Open Source Technologies
The application of AI algorithms in domains such as criminal justice, credit scoring, and hiring holds unlimited promise. At the same time, it raises legitimate concerns about algorithmic fairness there’s now a growing demand for fairness, accountability, and transparency from machine learning (ML) systems. And we need to remember that training data isn’t the only source of possible bias and adversarial contamination. It can also be introduced through inappropriate data handling, inappropriate model selection, or incorrect algorithm design. 

What we need is a pipeline that is open, transparent, secure and fair, and  that fully integrates into the AI lifecycle. Such a pipeline requires a robust set of bias and adversarial checkers,  “de-biasing” and ""defense"" algorithms, and explanations. In this talk we are going to discuss how to build such a pipeline leveraging open source projects such as AI Fairness 360 (AIF360), Adversarial Robustness Toolbox (ART), and Fabric for Deep Learning (FfDL), and Seldon

Margriet Groenendijk, Developer Advocate
No Data, No AI
AI is rapidly growing, being used to increase sales, make better decisions faster and even potentially safe lives through combining data from a lot of different sources. AI is build with models, but these machine learning or deep learning models are only as good as the data they are trained on. What is good data, and is more data better data? In this talk we will explore what good data is, how to turn bad data into useful data and how to store and access the data when it grows into big data with practical examples.

Zlati Garde, Advisory Software Engineer
Building Custom AI Web Services
Artificial Intelligence turns insights from your data into recommended actions. The AI process consists of a few key steps: preparing data, building and training a model, deploying the model as web services and retraining the model with new data. 

Applications are relying on model predictions to forecast a future behavior. As the incoming data changes its distribution over time, predictions accuracy can suffer. To tackle this challenge, the model needs to be retrained and redeployed. Models can be retrained manually or automatically. Retraining and redeploying the model unlocks continuous learning which is key to AI and AI-based web services. 

This session will explore how to build ready to consume, custom AI based web services. 
Join developers and their advocates as they talk about projects and technologies they contribute to and depend upon

Deepak Rangaroo, Executive IT Specialist, IBM Hybrid Cloud 
Governed Data Science
Move to a digital enterprise requires that we collect more data and use it to help serve our customers better. Whilst this is a great opportunity, it also comes with increased responsibility on how we handle our data/analytics and remain compliant with regulatory requirements. Data science has been rapidly growing over the past few years with organizations using new tools/technologies/algorithms to leverage historical data and make smarter decisions. In this talk, we will walk through the key aspects of establishing a governance framework, the need for governance and how we can apply it in the context of data science. 

Loïc Julien, Software Architect
Fast Data Ingest and Analytics
In this session, we will review an end to end example running on the new IBM Fast Data Platform. Combining multiple open source services: Kakfa, Spark or Grafana, we will expose how IBM and Lightbend joint solutions provide a complete toolchain for Java and Scala developers. You will learn how to easily build and deploy AI and cognitive applications in both on-premises or cloud-based environments.  The IBM Fast Data Platform brings together Lightbend's Fast Data Platform, Db2 Event Store & IBM Data Science Experience Local to enable a new era of event-driven business insight and opportunity. This session is the perfect place to learn how to manage data in motion for your streaming applications.

Chuck Calio, Offering Manager, IBM PowerAI Team
Infrastructure to AI
This is an overview of IBM’s PowerAI  ecosystem. PowerAI makes deep learning and machine learning more accessible to your staff, and the benefits of AI more obtainable for your business. It combines popular open source deep learning frameworks, efficient AI development tools, and accelerated IBM® Power Systems™ servers. Now your organization can deploy a fully optimized and supported AI platform that delivers blazing performance, proven dependability and resilience. IBM PowerAI Enterprise is a complete environment for data science as a service, enabling your organization to bring new applied AI applications into production. We will also spend time discussing client use cases and best practices. 

Rohan Vaidyanathan, Offering Manager, AI OpenScale
Putting AI to Work: Extending Beyond the Lab
Businesses everywhere are exploring AI’s potential. But it’s not as simple as deploying traditional software. Businesses need to overcome a variety of hurdles to scaling their AI, from incorporating new skills and tools, to establishing new methodologies and overcoming a lack of visibility into the decisions AI systems produce. As AI deployment accelerates, compliance and trust are critical. We’ll discuss lessons learned from thousands of AI engagements across 
industries and how to foster collaboration between the teams that operate AI and the users of these applications.

John Morrell, Senior Director
An Agile Data Preparation and Exploration Process for AI and Machine Learning
While advanced AI and machine learning has created the ability to identify even deeper insights than ever, data science processes are still hamstrung by the fact that data science teams spend 80% or more of their time preparing, exploring and managing data. Eliminating this bottleneck can cut analytic cycles by up to 98%, and reduce the time to go from concept to operational model from months to days or even hours.

Often times the data preparation process is not hindered by transforming data.  The most time-consuming aspects involve getting access to the right datasets, determining if a dataset can contribute to the model, the feature engineering of the dataset for the model, and validating model results in an extremely detailed manner.

Join us for this session where we will examine how to create an agile, iterative data preparation and exploration process using platforms designed to speed up AI and machine learning analytic cycles, and not be a burden on your data scientists.  We will explore:
How to use a data preparation platform to expose more datasets to the data science teams in a secure, well-governed manner
Methods to iteratively explore and model datasets in the data preparation process to determine their applicability to the analytic problem at hand
Easy, advanced transformation functions that can help with feature engineering and creation of the final dataset for the AI and ML models
Ways to explore model test results in an unconstrained manner along any attribute and value to validate results in an agile manner

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A Republican's Reflections on Environmental Policy
WHEN  Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Building, Bell Hall, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Law, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Regulatory Policy Program at the Mossavar Rahmani Center for Business & Government at HKS.
SPEAKER(S)  This seminar will be given by Jeff Holmstead, partner and head of the Environmental Strategies Group at Bracewell. He is also the former assistant administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for Air and Radiation.
Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu
CONTACT INFO	Please RSVP to mrcbg at hks.harvard.edu

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Trespassing across America: One Man's Epic, Never-Done-Before (and sort of Illegal) Hike along the Keystone XL Pipeline
Thursday, October 11
12:00-1:00pm
Tufts, Multi-purpose Room, Curtis Hall, 474 Boston Avenue, Medford

Ken Ilgunas, journalist, author, and backcountry park ranger
In 2012 and 2013, Ken Ilgunas walked nearly 2,000 miles across North America, following the proposed route of the Keystone XL pipeline, from Hardisty, Alberta, to the Gulf Coast of Texas. On his journey, he encountered stampedes of cows, charging moose, and climate change deniers. his adventure, which was featured in NYT, Huff Post, Mother Jones, CBC News, Men’s Journal, and more, is the world's first modern journey across private property, on which he trespassed over one of the most ignored, yet beautiful, regions of our continent—the Great Plains. He will talk about the people of the heartland, the right to roam, and the stories that form the basis of his book, Trespassing across America.

Ken Ilgunas has hitchhiked 10,000 miles across North America, traveled 1,000 miles across Ontario, Canada in a birch bark canoe, and worked as a backcountry ranger at national parks in Alaska. He’s written for the New York Times, Time, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and his adventures and book have been featured on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, the New Yorker, National Geographic, and NPR. His first book, Walden on Wheels, is a travel memoir about student debt and living in a van for two years when he was enrolled at Duke University. His second book, Trespassing across America, is about his 1,700-mile hike following the Keystone XL Pipeline. He has a B.A. from SUNY Buffalo in history and English, and an M.A. in liberal studies from Duke.

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A Big Data Revolution in Assessing Climate Risk
Thursday, October 11
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm ET
MIT, Building 56-114 and webcast live at https://www.povertyactionlab.org/d2p2
RSVP at https://www.povertyactionlab.org/d2p2

Michael Greenstone, Milton Friedman Professor of Economics, University of Chicago;  Co-Chair, J-PAL’s Environment and Energy sector 
Climate change is one of the greatest risks facing humanity. However, most of what we know about its economic impacts come from models that were developed before the modern empirical literature on climate impacts emerged. This new literature has been made possible by recent advances in remote sensing, climate models, and computing power.

On October 11, 2018, Professor Michael Greentstone, co-chair of J-PAL's Energy and Environment sector, will discuss his work with the Climate Impact Lab, a team of more than 25 researchers who are combining climate science, econometrics, and big data analytics to quantify climate change risks. His talk will focus on the health and energy impacts of climate change and outline the Climate Impact Lab's ongoing work.

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Energy and Water Policy and Reform in Central America
Thursday, October 11
1:00pm to 2:00pm
MIT, Building 56-162, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Carlos de la Torre is an advisor with a fiscal transparency program in Central America that has as partners several key stakeholders, including the Ministry of Finance, USAID and Deloitte. Using a stakeholders' centered approach, this program focuses on making more transparent in budget documents and financial statements the subsidies between the state-owned enterprises such as the electricity company and the water utility and other government agencies, consumers and private producers. These subsidies include, but are not limited to, tariff subsidies, uncollected accounts receivable, government loan guarantees, tax subsidies and concessional loans.

Carlos holds a master's degree from Georgetown University and was a SPURS Fellow '15 and Visiting Scholar '16 with the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning.

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DSL Speaker Series: Donna Hicks on Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture that Brings Out the Best in People
Thursday, October 11
2:00pm to 4:00pm
MIT, Building 50: Walker Memorial, 142 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

The Division of Student Life Speaker Series is proud to present Donna Hicks, Ph.D., who will lecture on her latest book:
Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture that Brings Out the Best in People

In her new book, Hicks explores the under recognized role of dignity in workplace culture. She argues that the extent to which leaders pay attention to, recognize, and understand the dignity concerns underlying people’s grievances makes an enormous difference as to whether leaders can resolve conflicts, have better relationships, and remedy toxic workplace cultures.

In this landmark book, Hicks extends the reach of her award winning book
Dignity: Its Essential Role in Resolving Conflict, and offers leaders a specific, practical guide to achieving a culture of dignity.

Currently an associate at Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Hicks has worked extensively on international conflict resolution in the Middle East, Sri Lanka, Columbia, Cuba, and Northern Ireland (with Archbishop Desmond Tutu). In her current work, she and has found that although dignity is our highest common denominator and plays a critical role in the well-being and health of a workplace culture, most of us – including leaders – know very little about it. Often confused with the concept of “respect,” dignity goes much deeper, and reflects our inherent value and worth. Everyone wants to be treated in a way that shows they matter. Without a working knowledge of dignity, leaders unknowingly fail to honor it in others and unintentionally cause emotional pain, conflict, and distrust – which can ultimately create a toxic work environment.

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Frontiers in Environmental Economics and Policy: A Symposium in Honor of Martin L. Weitzman
Thursday, October 11
3:00PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard, Room Nye ABC, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://heep.hks.harvard.edu/Weitzman

In honor of Martin L. Weitzman, a symposium will be held with Keynote Speaker, William D. Nordhaus, Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University. A reception with refreshments will follow the symposium.

Panelists:
Robert Stavins, Harvard University (Moderator)
Maureen Cropper, University of Maryland
Lawrence Goulder, Stanford University
Michael Greenstone, University of Chicago
Charles Kolstad, Stanford University
Richard Newell, Resources for the Future
Robert Pindyck, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
James Stock, Harvard University

Please RSVP online or contact Casey Billings by email at Casey_Billings at hks.harvard.edu or phone (617) 384-8415. 

This symposium is hosted by the Harvard Environmental Economics Program, with support for the Harvard University Center for the Environment, and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard Kennedy School.

Contact Name:  Casey Billings
casey_billings at hks.harvard.edu

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Gubernatorial Forum on Energy and the Environment
Thursday, October 11
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM EDT
Cahner's Theater, Museum of Science, 1 Science Park, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gubernatorial-forum-on-energy-and-the-environment-tickets-50782857895

Join ELM and our partner organizations for our Gubernatorial Forum on Energy and the Environment. Governor Charlie Baker and Democratic nominee Jay Gonzalez will answer questions regarding their vision for the future of energy and environmental policy in Massachusetts. If you have a question you would like to submit for consideration, please tweet using the hashtag #gogreengovMA or submit them at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1tSp9qqJAAG7LKzwiWwxAUpcJZuu8eykUegY6Ncku4LQ/viewform

Follow Environmental League of Massachusetts (ELM) on Facebook to watch the live stream of the event at https://www.facebook.com/EnvironmentalLeagueOfMassachusetts/ 

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(Why) Reporting the Voices of African Women and Girls Matters (2018–2019 Rama S. Mehta Lecture)
Thursday, October 11
4:15 pm
Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-ofeibea-quist-arcton-lecture

An all-purpose Africa reporter, National Public Radio’s Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is often to be found—in open-air markets, on the front line, in the boardroom, in educational institutions, in urban and village settings, in creative spaces and sacred places—listening to women and girls talk about the continent, the world, and what matters to them. And to us all.
Free and open to the public.
Please register and join us. 

SPEAKERS:
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, Africa correspondent, NPR
Discussant: Marco Werman, host, The World, Public Radio International
The Rama S. Mehta Lecture at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study was established by Catherine Atwater Galbraith, John Kenneth Galbraith, and the Mehta family, in memory of Rama S. Mehta. Each event includes a distinguished woman in public affairs, the sciences, or the arts who has a deep understanding of the challenges of women in developing countries. The Radcliffe Institute is grateful to the Benazir Bhutto Leadership Program of ClassACT HR ’73 and members of the Harvard-Radcliffe Class of 1973 for their leadership support of the 2018–2019 Rama S. Mehta Lecture.

This program is scheduled to complement the reunions of the Harvard and Radcliffe Classes of 1973, 1978, and 1988. We hope to welcome many alumnae/i from these classes to the Radcliffe Institute as part of their reunion activities when they return to Cambridge in the fall.

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Greenovate Boston Leaders Program Training 2
Thursday, October 11
4:30pm - 7:30pm
The Great Hall, 6 Norfolk Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.greenovateboston.org/greenovate_boston_leaders_program_training_2

The Greenovate Boston Leaders Program aims to increase understanding of the climate impacts in Boston and the actions required to mitigate the impacts. We want to involve Bostonians as part of the collective action needed in advancing the citywide initiatives. Our program gives you the materials and support you need to lead conversations about climate change and climate action.

This program is a great opportunity to network with a wide variety of leaders, learn how to format community discussions around climate change, and to make a positive impact on Boston.

If you are interested in attending this training date, please submit an RSVP below. There are limited spaces left, so sign-up as soon as you can! 

You will be contacted by David Corbie, Greenovate Boston Outreach Manager, once your space at the training is confirmed.

Questions or concerns? Email Greenovate Boston at Greenovate at boston.gov.

CONTACT  David Corbie david.corbie at boston.gov

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The Red and the Blue:  The 1990s and the Birth of Political Tribalism
Thursday, October 11
6:00 PM (Doors at 5:30)
Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/steve_kornacki/
Cost:  $6 - $32.00 (book included) 

Harvard Book Store welcomes national political correspondent STEVE KORNACKI for a discussion of his debut book, The Red and the Blue: The 1990s and the Birth of Political Tribalism. He will be joined in conversation by JON KELLER, political analyst for WBZ-TV.

About The Red and the Blue
In The Red and the Blue, cable news star and acclaimed journalist Steve Kornacki follows the twin paths of Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich, two larger-than-life politicians who exploited the weakened structure of their respective parties to attain the highest offices. For Clinton, that meant contorting himself around the various factions of the Democratic party to win the presidency. Gingrich employed a scorched-earth strategy to upend the permanent Republican minority in the House, making him Speaker. 
The Clinton/Gingrich battles were bare-knuckled brawls that brought about massive policy shifts and high-stakes showdowns—their collisions had far-reaching political consequences. But the ’90s were not just about them.  Kornacki writes about Mario Cuomo’s stubborn presence around Clinton’s 1992 campaign; Hillary Clinton’s star turn during the 1998 midterms, seeding the idea for her own candidacy; Ross Perot’s wild run in 1992 that inspired him to launch the Reform Party, giving Donald Trump his first taste of electoral politics in 1999; and many others. 

With novelistic prose and a clear sense of history, Steve Kornacki masterfully weaves together the various elements of this rambunctious and hugely impactful era in American history, whose effects set the stage for our current political landscape.

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Community Boating, Inc. 
Thursday, October 11
6:00pm
Trident Books Cafe, 338 Newbury Street, Boston

Anthony Sammarco
Community Boating, Inc. (CBI), now in its seventh decade as a public community sailing program in Boston, has taught several generations of the city’s youth how to sail on the Charles River Basin. At the start of the program, it was Joseph Lee Jr., a lifelong proponent of outdoor recreation and public service, who espoused the idea that all children, rich and poor, should know how to handle a sailboat not just for their own enjoyment but also for the attainment of useful life skills, like learning to cooperate with others on and off the water and taking responsibility for their work.  This book offers a glimpse at how Community Boating, Inc., is achieving its mission of “Sailing for All.”

Anthony M. Sammarco, author of over 70 books on Boston, has outlined the history of Community Boating, Inc., and with CBI’s help, he has selected many fascinating and never-before-published photographs from the nonprofit organization’s archives, as well as from private collections.

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A Panel Discussion and Pitch event hosted by MIT Climate CoLab and GSC Sustainability Group
Thursday, October 11
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM CEST
MIT, Building W20-2nd floor, Lobdell Dining Hall, 84 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-panel-discussion-and-pitch-event-hosted-by-mit-climate-colab-and-gsc-sustainability-tickets-49620434054

The goal of Climate CoLab is to harness the collective intelligence of thousands of people from all around the world to address complex societal problems, starting with global climate change. 

As part of the Climate CoLab initiative, MIT regularly awards prizes to outstanding projects and research findings on selected environmental issues. At the event on Thursday, Oct. 11 2018, twelve contest winners will present their ideas and engage in panel discussions. Attendees may come for one panel, both panels, or stay for the whole evening to enjoy free desserts and for the chance to meet and network directly with the Climate CoLab winners.

Agenda:
6:00-6.30PM Reception
6:30-7:15PM Panel Sessions 1
Mobilizing individuals and groups for social and policy change: Student-Led Solutions
Start-ups for developing economies: Solutions for Families and Homes
7:30-8:15PM Panel Sessions 2
Mobilizing individuals and groups for social and policy change: Community-Led Solutions
Start-ups for developing economies: Solutions for Communities and Cities
8:15-9:00PM Networking and Discussions

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Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen
Thursday October 11
6:30 pm
Brookline Village Library, 361 Washington Street, Brookline

Jose Antonio Vargas In conversation with Nicco Mele.
This event is free and open to the public, but please note that there are limited seats available. 

Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms.

“This is not a book about the politics of immigration. This book––at its core––is not about immigration at all. This book is about homelessness, not in a traditional sense, but in the unsettled, unmoored psychological state that undocumented immigrants like myself find ourselves in. This book is about lying and being forced to lie to get by; about passing as an American and as a contributing citizen; about families, keeping them together, and having to make new ones when you can’t. This book is about constantly hiding from the government and, in the process, hiding from ourselves. This book is about what it means to not have a home.

After 25 years of living illegally in a country that does not consider me one of its own, this book is the closest thing I have to freedom.” —Jose Antonio Vargas, from Dear America

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Lest We Forget: A Doctor's Experience with Life and Death During the Ebola Outbreak 
Thursday, October 11
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Kwan Kew Lai, 
In 2014 after fighting through yards of bureaucratic red tape, leaving her family, and putting her own health at risk in order to help suffering strangers, Kwan Kew Lai finally arrived in Africa to volunteer as an infectious disease specialist in the heart of the largest Ebola outbreak in history. What she found was not only blistering heat, inadequate working conditions, and deadly, unrelenting illness, but hope, resilience, and incredible courage.

Lest We Forget chronicles the harrowing and inspiring time spent serving on the front lines of the ongoing Ebola outbreak--the complicated personal protective equipment, the chlorine-scented air, the tropical heat, and the heartbreaking difficulties of treating patients she could not touch. Dr. Lai interweaves original diary entries to create a gripping narrative about life, death, and human relationships that will leave no reader unmoved.

This book exposes the raw brutality of Ebola, as well as the chaotic nature of the undersupplied and understaffed health infrastructure in the developing world. At once a memoir of triumphs and failures and a memorial, this book will ensure that the victims of Ebola and the fighters who sought to heal them will not be forgotten.

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Searching for Ancient Life on Mars
Thursday, October 11
7pm
NE Aquarium, Simons IMAX
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=107766&view=Detail

John P. Grotzinger, Fletcher Jones Professor of Geology; Ted and Ginger Jenkins Leadership Chair, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology

This is the eighth annual John H. Carlson Lecture presented by Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lorenz Center and the New England Aquarium. The registration list will be shared with MIT.

Over the past 20 years, NASA has built and sent to Mars a series of orbiters, landers, and rovers designed to explore the red planet’s earliest history and seek signs of life. These missions discovered that in contrast to its current harsh environment, the ancient surface of Mars was wet, with a warmer climate, and thought to have been habitable by simple microorganisms. Nutrients, sources of energy, and all the key ingredients to sustain life appear to have been present. The remaining question for future missions is now to determine if life ever originated on Mars. The next rover mission, due to launch in 2020, will collect rock samples for return to Earth, where they can be examined with our most technologically advanced scientific instruments, giving us our best chance to date to search for fossils of ancient life.

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Friday, October 12 – Saturday, October 13
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Boston Book Festival 2018
Friday, October 12, 7:30 PM – Saturday, October 13, 7:30 PM EDT
Old South Church, 645 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-book-festival-2018-tickets-50085234284
Cost:  $10

Join us in Copley Square on October 12-13, 2018, for the tenth annual Boston Book Festival, New England's largest literary event. You can see our full lineup on our website. Most events at the BBF are free and first-come, first-served and do NOT require tickets, but this year we are also offering two paid events:
7:30pm Friday, October 12: Kickoff Keynote with Michael Pollan
3:15pm Saturday, October 13: "On Leadership" with Doris Kearns Goodwin, John Kerry, and Samantha Power
Questions? Email us at info at bostonbookfest.org

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Humanities Approaches to the Opioid Crisis
Friday, October 12, 5:30 PM – Saturday, October 13, 5:00 PM EDT
BU, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/humanities-approaches-to-the-opioid-crisis-tickets-48557864881

Friday, October 12, 2018
BU Trustee Center Ballroom, 1 Silber Way, 9th floor
5:30PM-7:30PM — The Public Face of the Crisis
Introducer: Robert Brown, President, Boston University
Moderator: Martha Bebinger, WBUR Health Care Reporter
Panelists: 
Sandro Galea, Robert A. Knox Professor and Dean, School of Public Health, Boston University
Samuel Kelton Roberts, Associate Professor of History (School of Arts & Sciences), and Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences (Mailman School of Public Health), Columbia University
Elaine Scarry, Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and General Theory of Value, Harvard University
Nora Volkow, Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse
7:30PM-8:30PM — Public Reception for Audience and Speakers

Saturday, October 13, 2018
BU School of Law
Alumni Auditorium, 767 Commonwealth Avenue &
Barristers Hall, 765 Commonwealth Avenue*
9:00AM-12:30PM — The Crisis, Its Internal Language
Introducer: Wendy Gordon, William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor, Boston University School of Law
Moderator: Richard Saitz, Professor, Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health and Chair, Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health
Panelists:
Michael Botticelli, Boston Medical Center Executive Director of the Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine  
The Role of Personal Narrative in Changing Policy – When Science Is Not Enough
Rafael Campo, Professor of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Award-winning Poet
Hurts So Good: Poetry in Response to the Opioid Crisis
Eoin Cannon, Chief Speechwriter, City of Boston 
The Role of Storytelling in Addiction Recovery
Jessica Miller, Chair, Department of Philosophy and Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Interdisciplinary Programs, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Maine
Clinical Ethics and Substance Use Disorder: Autonomy, Trust, and Hope
12:30PM-1:30PM — Lunch (map of local restaurants will be provided)
1:30PM-5:00PM — The Crisis, Its History and Culture
Introducer: James Uden, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, Boston University
Moderator: Amy Appleford, Associate Professor of English and Director, Medieval Studies Program, Boston University
Panelists:
Susan Mizruchi, William Arrowsmith Professor in the Humanities, Director of the Center for the Humanities, and Professor of English, Boston University
Democratizing Addiction: The Epic Ambitions of “Infinite Jest” and “Breaking Bad”
John Rosenthal, Co-Chairman of the Board of Directors, The Police Assisted Addiction Recovery Initiative and President of Meredith Management
Rethinking Police Work: Non-Arrest Pathways to Treatment and Recovery
Benjamin Siegel, Assistant Professor of History, Boston University
The International Origins of the US Opioid Crisis
Paul Summergrad, Dr. Frances S. Arkin Professor, Chair of Department of Psychiatry, and Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
The Second Arrow: Opioid Addiction and Mental Disorders
*Panels in Alumni Auditorium. Coffee and tea served in Barristers Hall at the midpoint of both the morning and afternoon sessions.
Tickets are not necessary but are strongly encouraged.
Saturday reservation is valid for the morning panel, afternoon panel, or both.

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Friday, October 12
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SPURs 50th Anniversary Conference The Reflective Practitioner Reconsidered
Friday, October 12
7:30am to 5:00pm
MIT,  Building E14: Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

The Special Program for Urban and Regional Studies (SPURS)/Humphrey Program will celebrate its 50th anniversary on October 12, 2018. The theme for the celebratory conference is: “The Reflective Practitioner Reconsidered.” For more information please see: https://www.spurs50.com/ 

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Intro to Living Building Challenge (FREE)
Friday, October 12
8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
50 Milk Street, Room Edison, 16th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-living-building-challenge-tickets-50132683205

With this training course you will learn the basic knowledge of the Living Building Challenge - a philosophy, advocacy tool and certification program that addresses development at all scales. The Living Building Challenge is the built environment's most rigorous performance standard. It calls for the creation of building projects that operate as cleanly, beautifully and efficiently as nature's architecture.To be certified projects must meet a series of ambitious performance requirements, including net zero energy and waste and water, over a minimum of 12 months of continuous occupancy.

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NE Restructuring Roundtable:  Regional Grid Modernization Developments & The Future of Residential Retail Choice
Friday, October 12
9:00 am-12:30 pm
Foley Hoag, 155 Seaport Boulevard, Boston
RSVSP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/regional-grid-modernization-developments-the-future-of-residential-retail-choice-tickets-47959927434
Cost:  $40 - $80
Lifestream available, RSVP at https://signup.clickstreamtv.net/event/raab/events/neer/

Convener/Moderator: Raab Associates, Ltd.
Regional Grid Modernization Developments
Chairman Angie O'Connor, Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities 
Chair Katie Dykes, Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority 
Chairman Martin Honigberg, New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission
Commissioner Abigail Anthony, Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission

Future of Residential Retail Choice
Rebecca Tepper, Energy Chief, MA Attorney General's Office
Chris Kallaher, Senior Director Gov't & Regulatory Affairs, Direct Energy
Janet Gail Besser, Executive VP, Northeast Clean Energy Council 
Paul Gromer, CEO, Peregrine Energy Group

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AI, Media and the Threat to Democracy
Friday, October 12
9:00am to 4:00pm
Northeastern, Raytheon Amphitheater, 120 Forsyth Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ai-media-the-threat-to-democracy-tickets-49862815022

Join a group of award-winning journalists, innovative scholars and practitioners for a conference on the impact of AI on democracy.

Artificial intelligence is a potent force in media for both good and evil. It is used both to spread disinformation through social media platforms – yet also used to is combat the spread of “fake news” and for more benign purposes, such as connecting readers to content they like.

Yet most people have only the dimmest of ideas what AI is. They may have an inkling it is somehow tied to the spread of Russian disinformation and “fake news.” Commentators talk ominously about its corrosive effect on democracy.

For all that, the influence of AI is growing in fields ranging from journalism to law, from business to teaching. What will its effect be on media and democracy? How much of a threat to democracy does AI represent? Join our distinguished speakers and panelists in a broad-ranging discussion of the issues.

Panels:
1. AI on the Beat: How journalists are using -- and covering -- bots, algorithms and whatever comes next
2. AI, big data, and bias in sociotechnical systems
3. Legal and Policy Responses to AI and the Media

Organizers:
Matt Carroll, Professor of the Practice, School of Journalism
Aleszu Bajak, Graduate Programs Manager, School of Journalism
Meg Heckman, Assistant Professor, School of Journalism
Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law and Computer Science
David Lazer, Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Computer and Information Science

Sponsored by the School of Law's Center for Center for Law, Innovation and Creativity (CLIC), Northeastern University College of Arts, Media and Design, Northeastern’s School of Journalism and the Northeastern College of Computer and Information Science. 

This conference is free but registration is required.

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The TROPOMI project: first results focusing on CO and CH4
Friday, October 12
12:00pm
Harvard, Pierce 100F, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Prof. Ilse Aben, Netherlands Institute for Space Research
In 2002 a few partners in the Netherlands (KNMI, SRON, ADSN and TNO) started to discuss potential follow-on instruments after SCIAMACHY and OMI. This ultimately led to the successful launch of TROPOMI on 13 October 2017 on-board the European Sentinel-5 Precursor mission. TROPOMI is an imaging spectrometer developed by the Netherlands and ESA for monitoring the atmospheric composition, for air quality, climate and the ozone layer monitoring. The launch of TROPOMI marks the start of operational atmospheric composition measurements from space within the European Copernicus programme.
 
TROPOMI is a UV-VIS-NIR-SWIR grating spectrometer measuring various species in the Earth’s atmosphere a.o. NO2, O3, SO2, HCHO, CO and CH4, with unprecedented high spatial resolution of 3.5-7 x 7 km2 at daily global coverage. After a commissioning phase of 6 months, routine operations started end of April 2018. The first set of products were released early July 2018, and more products will follow soon.
 
SRON’s role during the project was twofold. On one hand SRON was part of the industrial team where we were responsible a.o. for producing the immersed grating critical for the SWIR channel. On the other hand SRON is the co-Principal Investigator institute responsible throughout the project for safeguarding the SWIR scientific performance. As such the focus at SRON from the start has been on the SWIR products CO and CH4.
 
In this presentation I will give an overview of the project, the status of the mission and show some exciting early results illustrating the new capabilities of TROPOMI. In particular I will focus on some early results regarding CO and CH4.

Atmospheric & Environmental Chemistry Seminar

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Evolution and ecology in high dimensions
Friday, October 12
12pm
Harvard Medical School, Warren Alpert 563, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

Daniel Fisher, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University

Abstract
Can the complexities of possible phenotypes and interactions of organisms with their environments lead to simplicities that enable understanding? Taking advantage of the high-dimensionality of biology and approximate randomness of the net effects of mutations and of small environmental changes, attempts to approach via simple models two basic questions will be outlined. Must evolution in a constant environment continually slow down? Why is there so much coexisting micro-diversity within single bacterial species?

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Can Democracy Survive 21st Century Capitalism?
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 12, 2018, 12 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South, Room S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Weatherhead Research Cluster on Global Populism/Threats to Democracy
SPEAKER(S)	
Sheri Berman, professor of Political Science, Barnard College 
Torben Iversen, professor of Government, Harvard University 
Robert Kuttner, editor, The American Prospect; Ida and Meyer Kirstein Chair, Brandeis University 
CONTACT INFO	jbarnard at wcfia.harvard.edu
LINK	http://populism.wcfia.harvard.edu

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The Big Promise and Harsh Realities of Waste-to-Value: Stories from the Front
Friday, October 12
12:30-1:30pm
MIT, Building 26-210, 60 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Matthew Nordan, Managing Director PRIME Impact Fund
Matthew Nordan is co-founder of PRIME Coalition, a pioneering nonprofit focused on breakthrough energy innovation, and Managing Director of the PRIME Impact Fund. The most game-changing energy technologies are often least likely to attract early-stage financing due to long time-frames, large capital requirements, and high risk. PRIME brings a new funding source to these start-ups in the form of philanthropic capital.

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Global Smart City Pitch Competition - Boston City Hall
Friday, October 12
1:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT
Boston City Hall, City Council Chambers, City Hall Square, 5th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/global-smart-city-pitch-competition-boston-city-hall-tickets-50358762414

Join us for a unique event hosted inside Boston City Council Chambers! 
We invite you to participate in the Pitch Day Competition and AcceliCITY 2018 Awards Ceremony. 
See more than a dozen of the world's most promising Smart City startups from 7 countries.
AcceliCITY is an accelerator program to leverage the Leading Cities network of forward thinkers in the public, private, academic, and non-profit sectors to connect cities across the world with innovations that improve quality of life.

For more details visit: https://leadingcities.org/accelicity/accelicity-2018-semi-finalists/

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Eric Horvitz: AI Advances and Aspirations
Friday, October 12
1:30pm to 2:30pm
MIT, Building 32-123, Kirsch Auditorium,  32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Abstract:  Progress on AI has been slow. We have a poor understanding of the computational foundations of human intellect. Nonetheless,  we’re at an inflection point, powered by a confluence of several factors, including leaps in computational capabilities, growth in data resources, and advances in algorithms. After sharing reflections about the long-term pursuit of artificial intelligence, I will focus on recent developments in AI and on opportunities and hard challenges ahead. I will discuss key aspirations spanning theory and practice, including the pursuit of more general artificial intelligence, the mastery of human-AI collaboration, and on understanding and addressing the influences of AI advances on people and society.
 
Bio:   Eric Horvitz is a technical fellow and director of Microsoft Research Labs. His lifelong curiosity about brains and minds has fueled his pursuit of principles of computational intelligence. Beyond theory, he has worked to field AI advances in the open world, with the joint goals of exploring the behavior of systems in realistic settings and of developing applications that can enhance the quality of peoples' lives. He received the Feigenbaum Prize and the Allen Newell Prize for contributions to the field of artificial intelligence and has been elected fellow of the AAAI, ACM, NAE and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Additional background and publications can be accessed at http://erichorvitz.com

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HUBWeek — Making Democracy Count: Changing U.S. Voting Culture
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 12, 2018, 2 – 3 p.m.
WHERE  The Ideas Dome, HubWeek, Boston City Hall Plaza, 1 City Hall Square, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Archon Fung, Winthrop Laflin McCormack Professor of Citizenship and Self-Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Kathryn Peters, Co-founder and COO, Democracy Works
Corley Kenna, Senior Director of Global Communications and Public Relations, Patagonia
John Horton, Senior Manager of Community Affairs, Lyft
COST  Free, Registration Required
TICKET WEB LINK  https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register
CONTACT INFO	info at ash.harvard.edu
DETAILS  A persistent and deeply troubling problem of American democracy is low voter participation. The U.S. ranks 28th out 35 OECD countries in voting turnout—55 percent of voting age population in 2016. On the presumption that this is unacceptable, and we want the widest possible participation in American democracy, what would it take to seriously move the needle on this issue, to have 80 percent of Americans voting? What policies could really work? What cultural shifts do we need to make? How can new technologies and platforms be best utilized? How can young people become a new civic generation? Join us for a conversation with members of academia, technology and business, who are pushing the envelope and sparking the cultural shifts and technology advances we will need to increase voter participation in a major way for our country’s future.
Please note: all Ideas Dome sessions require either a free or paid pass to HUBweek 2018. You can register for a pass and add this session to your agenda during the registration process here: 2018.hubweek.org…
If you have already registered, you may add this session to your agenda by clicking: 2018.hubweek.org…
LINK  https://ash.harvard.edu/event/making-democracy-count-changing-us-voting-culture

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Globalization: Strategies and Effects
Friday, October 12
2:30 – 4PM
Tufts, The Fletcher School, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford

Prof. Carsten Kowalczyk 
Refreshments will be served.

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Committed to Memory:  The Art of the Slave Ship Icon
Friday, October 12
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, and Mass Humanities welcome art historian and Cornell associate professor CHERYL FINLEY for a discussion of her latest book, Committed to Memory: The Art of the Slave Ship Icon. She will be joined in conversation by HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR.—the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center.

About Committed to Memory
One of the most iconic images of slavery is a schematic wood engraving depicting the human cargo hold of a slave ship. First published by British abolitionists in 1788, it exposed this widespread commercial practice for what it really was—shocking, immoral, barbaric, unimaginable. Printed as handbills and broadsides, the image Cheryl Finley has termed the "slave ship icon" was easily reproduced, and by the end of the eighteenth century it was circulating by the tens of thousands around the Atlantic rim. Committed to Memory provides the first in-depth look at how this artifact of the fight against slavery became an enduring symbol of black resistance, identity, and remembrance.

Finley traces how the slave ship icon became a powerful tool in the hands of British and American abolitionists, and how its radical potential was rediscovered in the twentieth century by black artists, activists, writers, filmmakers, and curators. Finley offers provocative new insights into the works of Amiri Baraka, Romare Bearden, Betye Saar, and many others. She demonstrates how the icon was transformed into poetry, literature, visual art, sculpture, performance, and film―and became a medium through which diasporic Africans have reasserted their common identity and memorialized their ancestors.
Beautifully illustrated, Committed to Memory features works from around the world, taking readers from the United States and England to West Africa and the Caribbean. It shows how contemporary black artists and their allies have used this iconic eighteenth-century engraving to reflect on the trauma of slavery and come to terms with its legacy.

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Atmospheric surprises: Why is monitoring trace gases so important now?
Friday, October 12
3:30pm to 4:45pm
Harvard, HUCE 440, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jim Elkins
Jim Elkins, Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species Group Group Chief, Global Monitoring Division/Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Abstract: The speaker will discuss CFC-11, SF6, N2O, and HFC-365mfc with links to probable Chinese and U.S. emissions and transport.

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Crossing the Chasm: Why Now is the Time for Public Interest Technology
WHEN  Friday, Oct. 12, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Ash Carter, Vanita Gupta, Reid Hoffman, Latanya Sweeney, David Eaves (Moderator)
CONTACT INFO	IOP Forum Office, 617-495-1380
DETAILS	
Ash Carter, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Professor of Technology and Global Affairs, HKS, Former United States Secretary of Defense (2015-2017)
Vanita Gupta, President and CEO, The Leadership Conference
Reid Hoffman, Partner, Greylock Partners, Co-Founder and Executive Chairman, LinkedIn
Latanya Sweeney, Professor of Government and Technology in Residence, Department of Government, Director, Data Privacy Lab, Harvard University, Former Chief Technologist, Federal Trade Commission
David Eaves (Moderator), Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
LINK  http://iop.harvard.edu/forum/crossing-chasm-why-now-time-public-interest-technology

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Somerville Laughter Club with Walter Ness
Friday, October 12
6:45 PM to 8:00 PM Actual event begins at 7:00.
Unity Somerville, 6 William Street, Somerville
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/SocialFun/events/254772846/
Cost: $5.00 donation

Laughter therapy groups are in 106 countries around the globe, and their purpose is to help heal, besides laughter giving people a lasting natural sense of euphoria and relief from stress. Check out the videos at this link,
http://www.somervillelaughterclub.com/

This fun and educational evening will include:
Interactive Laughter Exercises, (including gentle stretching, self massage and breathing).

Some of the principles of Laughter Energy that will be explored include:
Chi-Energy Awareness with Interactive Mindfulness, Muscle Memory, and the Mind/Body Connection.

The laugh you take is equal to the laugh you make!
He who laughs last, thinks slowest!

Editorial Comment:  Walter is an old friend and laughter is indeed healing, baby laughter especially so.

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How Fascism Works:  The Politics of Us and Them
Friday, October 12
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes JASON STANLEY—the Jacob Urowsky Professor of Philosophy at Yale—for a discussion of his latest book, How Fascism Works: The Politics of Us and Them. He will be joined in conversation by ELIZABETH HINTON, Associate Professor of History and of African and African American Studies at Harvard.

About How Fascism Works
As the child of refugees of World War II Europe and a renowned philosopher and scholar of propaganda, Jason Stanley has a deep understanding of how democratic societies can be vulnerable to fascism: Nations don’t have to be fascist to suffer from fascist politics. In fact, fascism’s roots have been present in the United States for more than a century. Alarmed by the pervasive rise of fascist tactics both at home and around the globe, Stanley focuses here on the structures that unite them, laying out and analyzing the ten pillars of fascist politics—the language and beliefs that separate people into an “us” and a “them.” He knits together reflections on history, philosophy, sociology, and critical race theory with stories from contemporary Hungary, Poland, India, Myanmar, and the United States, among other nations. He makes clear the immense danger of underestimating the cumulative power of these tactics, which include exploiting a mythic version of a nation’s past; propaganda that twists the language of democratic ideals against themselves; anti-intellectualism directed against universities and experts; law and order politics predicated on the assumption that members of minority groups are criminals; and fierce attacks on labor groups and welfare. These mechanisms all build on one another, creating and reinforcing divisions and shaping a society vulnerable to the appeals of authoritarian leadership.

By uncovering disturbing patterns that are as prevalent today as ever, Stanley reveals that the stuff of politics—charged by rhetoric and myth—can quickly become policy and reality. Only by recognizing fascists politics, he argues, may we resist its most harmful effects and return to democratic ideals.

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The Movement of Movements: Part 1: What Makes Us Move? 
Friday, October 12
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Jai Sen
Our world today is not only a world in crisis but also a world in profound movement, with increasingly large numbers of people joining or forming movements: local, national, transnational, and global. The dazzling diversity of ideas and experiences recorded in this collection capture something of the fluidity within campaigns for a more equitable planet. This book, taking internationalism seriously without tired dogmas, provides a bracing window into some of the central ideas to have emerged from within grassroots struggles from 2006 to 2010. The essays here cross borders to look at the politics of caste, class, gender, religion, and indigeneity, and move from the local to the global.

Jai Sen is an activist/researcher/author on and in movement. Earlier an organiser, then a researcher into popular movement, for the past decade and more he has worked to promote critical engagement with the World Social Forum and emerging world movement - as moderator of the listserv WSFDiscuss and as coeditor of several books including World Social Forum: Challenging Empires and World Social Forum: Critical Explorations. He helped found and remains associated with CACIM and with OpenWord.

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Fifty Shades of Green: Tales from the Hothouse
Friday, October 12
7:30–8:30pm
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain
RSVP at http://my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.
Cost:  $5 member, $10 nonmember

Terry Huang, MSc, Living Collections Fellow, Arnold Arboretum
Back by popular demand with more content! Terry Huang’s bawdy botanical review delves into the sex lives of plants, dramatically explaining the challenges of courtship and consummation for those rooted in place. Alluring suitors with a pungent rotten odor, promising nectar for the exchange of goods, or going at it alone, plants have evolved interesting strategies to ensure their continued existence. From mutualistic partnerships to deceit-filled ones that would rival the most twisted romance, his vivid pollination stories reveal the ingenious ways flowers deal with one of life’s (most) important needs. Sex. 
(Adult content: Rated PG)

Terry Huang earned a Bachelor of Science in Plant Biology at the University of Washington and a Master of Science in Biodiversity and Taxonomy of Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh and University of Edinburgh. He enjoys sharing his passion for plants with anyone who will listen. He performed Fifty Shades of Green at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2017.

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The Therapeutic Potential of Psychedelics
Friday, October 12
7:30pm 
Old South Church, 645 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-book-festival-2018-tickets-50085234284
Cost:  $10 

Kickoff Keynote of Boston Book Festival with Michael Pollan

Questions? Email us at info at bostonbookfest.org

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Saturday, October 13, 8:00 AM -Sunday, October 14, 6:00 PM
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MIT Hacking Arts Festival 2018
Saturday, October 13, 2018 at 8:00 AM - Sunday, October 14, 2018 at 6:00 PM (EDT)
MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, 6th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-hacking-arts-festival-2018-tickets-49122126603
Cost:  $37.33 - $79.13

Apply to be a Hacker and get free entrance to the Hacking Arts Festival! Apply Now
Hacking Arts 2018 will mark the sixth annual festival held at the MIT Media Lab, fostering community and celebrating innovation in the creative industries: Design, Fashion, Film/Video, Gaming, Music, Performing Arts, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Visual Arts.

This year's theme is the future of co-creation: the act of collaboratively creating something—a product, a process, or a possibility—and actively involving the end-users in its development. While ‘co-creation’ has primarily been the purview of the business sector, artists are now collaborating with their ‘customers’ to create work that further resonates with the motivations and emotions of all contributors. Today’s emerging technologies are rewiring the ways we use our creative minds and are dissolving the divide between creator and viewer

At Hacking Arts 2018, we are calling together creative technologists, artists, innovators, and hackers to redefine collaboration for the future of creative enterprise.  What is the role of the artist and the audience, and therefore what is the role of art? What are the tools and media altering art as we know it? How does interaction between a piece of work and the participant change the meaning of art? How is participatory art impacting business models in the industry? Is art the last frontier for tech, and are we dissolving the space between participant and consumer? If so, what are the new opportunities that emerge as we close the gap?

Join us for this conversation on October 13 - 14, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab. 
Learn more at hackingarts.com and sign up for the Hacking Arts newsletter for more news.

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Saturday, October 13
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Disability & Intersectionality Summit (DIS)
Saturday, October 13
8:15am to 5:00pm
MIT, Building W20, 84 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.disabilityintersectionalitysummit.com
Cost:  $5 - $40

The Disability & Intersectionality Summit (DIS) is a biennial one-day conference that centers the experiences and knowledge of multiply marginalized disabled people such as, queer disabled people of color, undocumented transgender disabled people, or formerly incarcerated disabled people among others. This conference serves as a platform to highlight the multiple oppressions that shape the lived experiences of disabled individuals, as told by disabled people, in a setting organized by disabled activists. DIS aims to create dialogue on how our society must address systemic oppressions using an intersectional approach.

All related conference information including ticket sales will be made available on the website. 

We are open to student volunteers (may contact Sandy Ho directly), and related academic and or student activities programs with an interest in equity / diversity / social justice. This conference is organized by volunteer disabled activists from across the country with support from sponsors at the national, and state level. 100% of sponsorship dollars go directly towards presenter honorariums, CART/ASL, accessibility accommodations, and related organizing costs.

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Art in the Age of the Anthropocene, a Second Saturday BADA Event
Saturday, October 13
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM EDT
Kingston Gallery, 450 Harrison Avenue #43, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/art-in-the-age-of-the-anthropocene-a-second-saturday-bada-event-tickets-50605249664

Second Saturday BADA Event: October 13, 2018, 2:00-4:00 pm, Art in the Age of the Anthropocene: a Boston Art Dealers Association panel discussion Moderated by Sam Toabe, Gallery Director at UMass Boston's University Hall Gallery.
This panel discussion, titled in reference to Walter Benjamin’s essay Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, will focus on how our current ecological age, the Anthropocene, has influenced the solo-exhibitions on view at the Kingston Gallery: Linda Leslie Brown’s “Plastiglomerate” and Phyllis Ewen’s “Deep Time.” Brown and Ewen will be joined by artist Evelyn Rydz and moderator Sam Toabe in a discussion that will investigate the temporal and ecological scales in which contemporary art is taking form, to talk about how these artists’ practices relate to one another and are influenced by current issues surrounding art and the environment within personal, art historical, and social narratives.

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The Pendulum: A Granddaughter's Search for Her Family's Forbidden Nazi Past 
Saturday, October 13
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Julie Lindahl & Rachel Kadish
This powerful memoir traces Brazilian-born American Julie Lindahl's journey to uncover her grandparents' roles in the Third Reich as she is driven to understand how and why they became members of Hitler's elite, the SS. Out of the unbearable heart of the story--the unclaimed guilt that devours a family through the generations--emerges an unflinching will to learn the truth.

In a remarkable six-year journey through Germany, Poland, Paraguay, and Brazil, Julie uncovers, among many other discoveries, that her grandfather had been a fanatic member of the SS since 1934. During World War II, he was responsible for enslavement and torture and was complicit in the murder of the local population on the large estates he oversaw in occupied Poland. He eventually fled to South America to evade a new wave of war-crimes trials. The pendulum used by Julie's grandmother to divine good from bad and true from false becomes a symbol for the elusiveness of truth and morality, but also for the false securities we cling to when we become unmoored. As Julie delves deeper into the abyss of her family's secret, discovering history anew, one precarious step at a time, the compassion of strangers is a growing force that transforms her world and the way that she sees her family--and herself.

Julie Lindahl is an author and educator living in Sweden. She is a contributor to WBUR Cognoscenti and has been featured on National Public Radio. Julie holds a BA from Wellesley College, an MPhil in international relations from Oxford University, and was a Fulbright Scholar in Frankfurt. She is the founder of Stories for Society, a nonprofit organization for renewing the art of story-making among youth for social transformation. WBUR 90.9 won the 2018 Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in innovation and the 2018 Associated Press Media Editor's Award for innovation in storytelling based on a program series featuring her story.

Rachel Kadish is the award-winning author of the novels The Weight of Ink, From a Sealed Room, and Tolstoy Lied: A Love Story, and of the novella I Was Here. Her work has appeared on NPR and in the New York Times, Ploughshares, and Tin House. She lives in the Boston area. 

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Sunday, October 14
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2nd annual Robot Block Party - HUBWEEK
Sunday, October 14
10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Boston City Hall, 1 City Hall Square, Boston
RSVP at https://2018.hubweek.org/page/1343124/register

The robots return! On Sunday, October 14, as part of Future Innovators Day, dozens of robots will descend on The HUB for the 2nd annual Robot Block Party.

From our homes to the office, warehouse floor to city streets, robots are more and more a part of our everyday lives. Boston is a leader in supporting the development, testing, and adoption of some of these game-changing technologies. Bring your family to check out the latest in robotics and experience exciting demos of the products that will shape our future.

Future Innovators Day requires a FREE General Admission Pass or paid to HUBweek. Kids under 16 years of age do not have to register for HUBweek. Come by to ask questions, interact with robots, and inspire our next generation of innovators!

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One cellist, one planet: A fundraiser for Jewish Climate Action Network (JCAN)(https://www.jewishclimate.org/) 
A Solo Benefit Recital Presented by Cellist Judith Glixon
Sunday, October 14
3:00 P.M.
Edwards Hall, Open Spirit, 39 Edwards Street, Framingham
RSVP at RSVP:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeuksyQ4RCc7xw8rLqH-rNlv1wut3foQ4Wzy2V29qTIYNI6OQ/viewform
Suggested donation: $25 or more

"One Cellist, One Planet" is one woman’s response to climate change and environmental destruction. 
This one hour concert with cellist Judith Glixton will plunge you into the beginnings of life on Earth, carry you through centuries of progress, and drop you off in the present state of affairs. The program includes the music of J. S. Bach (Unaccompanied Suites #1 & 3), Benjamin Britten (final movement of Suite for Cello, Op.72), and Ravel. Glixon has assigned each piece on the program - and every movement of each piece - a subtitle intended to draw you into a story of humanity's relationship with the land, inviting you to answer the question, “Where do we go from here?”
Eighty percent of the proceeds will be donated to the Jewish Climate Action Network and the gardens at Open Spirit and Edwards Church.

Please forward to others who may be interested.

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Monday, October 15 - Friday, October 19
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Women Entrepreneurs Boston Week
More information at http://we-bos.com

WE BOS Week 2018 is just around the corner! Register for FREE events, workshops, panels, funding opportunities and more — happening all throughout the week!

iFundWomen x WE BOS: Crowdfunding 101 Boot Camp at WeWork South Station – 10/15/18 at 12:30 PM
WE BOS Week Kick-Off: Mass Innovation Nights 115 at District Hall – 10/15/18 at 6:00 PM
Prototypes & Proofs of Concept for Non-Tech Founders at BUild Lab IDG Capital Student Innovation Center – 10/16/18 at 8:00 AM
Golden Seeds Boston Office Hours at Nutter, McClennen, & Fish – 10/16/18 at 2:30 PM
City of Boston Open House for Women Entrepreneurs at Boston City Hall – 10/17/18 at 11:00 AM
#AtTheTable Ice Cream Social at JP Licks – 10/17/18 at 5:00 PM
MAKE BREAD Presents "Dream Big" ft. Julissa Calderon of Buzzfeed at Roxbury Innovation Center – 10/17/18 at 6:30 PM

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Monday, October 15
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PAOC Colloquium - Elizabeth Hunke (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
Monday, October 15
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-915/923, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Elizabeth Hunke (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
 
About this Series

The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars generally take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Lunch is provided to encourage students and post-docs to meet with the speaker. Besides the seminar and lunch, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged.

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The Energy Efficiency Gap, Bounded Rationality, and the Role of Energy-related Financial Literacy
Monday, October 15
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Massimo Filippini, ETH Zurich and Universita della Svizzera Italiana. Lunch is provided.

Energy Policy Seminar
https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/energyconsortium/seminars

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
louisa_lund at hks.harvard.edu

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Interpretability, or Learning to Listen to Algorithms
Monday, October 15
12:15–2 pm
Harvard, CGIS South S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

Nick Seaver (Tufts, Anthropology)

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Venus Fly Traps and Viruses: Exploring the Design and Effectiveness of National Climate Funds
Monday, October 15
12:30 – 1:45 pm
Crowe Room, Goddard 310, 419 Boston Avenue, Medford

CIERP Research Seminar with Rishikesh Bhandary
How successful have the efforts of developing countries been to mobilize climate finance? This study examines the design and use of national climate funds to shed light on the strategies pursued by developing countries to gain access to and channel climate finance. By focusing on the national climate funds as a policy instrument, this study fills a gap in the climate policy literature that has otherwise mostly focused on role of donor agencies and their preferences.
This talk will bring together key findings from field work on the Amazon Fund, Bangladesh Climate Change Resilience Fund, Climate Resilient Green Economy Facility in Ethiopia, and Indonesia Climate Change Trust Fund.

Rishikesh Ram Bhandary is a doctoral candidate at the Fletcher School and a predoctoral fellow at the Climate Policy Lab at CIERP. His research interests include the architecture of climate finance, climate negotiations, the linkages between governance of climate change and sustainable development.

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Can Baby Corals Improve the Reefs of Tomorrow?
Monday, October 15
6:00pm
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Aaron Hartmann, 2017–2018 Sarah and Daniel Hrdy Visiting Fellow in Conservation Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Coral reefs are one of Earth’s most biodiverse and imperiled ecosystems. Corals form the foundation of this ecosystem. Substantial effort is being invested to help adult corals survive environmental degradation, but less attention is paid to their offspring and how they establish themselves on the seafloor. Unlike adult corals, baby corals move about in the water column, perhaps allowing them to find better environments. Aaron Hartmann will highlight the importance of these juvenile corals for the long-term survival and conservation of coral reefs in a changing world.
Free and open to the public.

This event will be livestreamed on the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture Facebook page. A recording of this program will be available on our YouTube channel appoximately three weeks after the lecture.

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West Wingers: Personal Stories of Public Service
WHEN  Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION	Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR	Institute of Politics, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Rumana Ahmed, Ned Price, Gautam Raghavan, Raina Thiele, Stephanie Valencia, Aneesh Raman ’01
CONTACT INFO	IOP Forum Office 617-495-1380
DETAILS  Rumana Ahmed, Harvard Kennedy School, M.P.A./M.C. ’19, Senior Advisor, Office for Global Engagement and Strategic Communications, National Security Council (2011–16)
Ned Price, Special Assistant to the President, Spokesperson and Senior Director, National Security Council (2016–17), Harvard Kennedy School, M.P.P. ‘10
Gautam Raghavan, White House LGBTQ & AAPI Liaison, White House (2011–14)
Raina Thiele, Liaison for Intergovernmental Affairs, White House, Harvard Kennedy School, M.P.P. ‘09
Stephanie Valencia, Former Special Assistant to the President and Principal Deputy Director of Public Engagement
Aneesh Raman ’01, Speechwriter to President Barack Obama (2011–13)
LINK	iop.harvard.edu

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Contemporizing Traditional Water Architecture: Indigenous Ingenuity in Harvesting the Elusive Rain in the Indian Desert
Monday, October 15
6pm 
MIT:  TBA

A. Mridul 

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Mass Innovation Nights 115
Monday, October 15
6pm-8:30pm 
District Hall, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://mass.innovationnights.com/events/mass-innovation-nights-115

It's hard to believe that our 5th Annual Women Founders event is just a few weeks away- where does time go? MONDAY, October 15th we are kicking off WeBOS week with Boston Scientific as our main sponsor and Brownmed as our supporting sponsor. It is a night of all medical & combination devices and digital health products from over ten women founders.  Our event #MIN115 will be at District Hall! You will not want to miss it! 

Check out the new PRODUCTS and
VOTE for your favorites - click on the words VOTE HERE (found on this page to the immediate left) and once on the product voting page, click LOVE IT to vote for your favorite product!     
RSVP to attend the event on MONDAY, October 15th (free to attend and open to all)    
See who else is planning on attending (click the ATTENDEES tab)   
Help spread the word - blog, tweet (using the #MIN115 hashtag), like and post!  
Support local innovation -- network and have fun at the same time! 

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CONNECTING MIGRATION AND DEFENDING NATURAL RESOURCES - ORGANIZING WISDOM FROM EL SALVADOR
Monday, October 15
6:30 - 9. Presentation and comments 7- 9
Saint Peter's Episcopal Church, 838 Mass. Avenue (enter on Sellars Street), Cambridge

Bernardo Belloso, president of CRIPDES (the organization of the Salvadoran popular movement.) and  Zulma Tobar, Salvadoran coordinator for US-El  Salvador Sister Cities will be joined by Elena Letona from Neighbor to Neighbor,  Lena Entin from Toxic Action Center and Mina Reddy from Mothers Out Front

Come and invite others.

If you would like to donate on-line to keep our efforts afloat, we would welcome it.
https://www.networkforgood.org/donation/MakeDonation.aspx?ORGID2=043235656

More information? 
cambridgeelsalvador at gmail.com

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Invisible:  The Forgotten Story of the Black Woman Lawyer Who Took Down America's Most Powerful Mobster
Monday, October 15
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome acclaimed novelist, columnist, and Yale law professor STEPHEN L. CARTER for a discussion of his latest book, Invisible: The Forgotten Story of the Black Woman Lawyer Who Took Down America's Most Powerful Mobster.

About Invisible
She was black and a woman and a prosecutor, a graduate of Smith College and the granddaughter of slaves, as dazzlingly unlikely a combination as one could imagine in New York of the 1930s―and without the strategy she devised, Lucky Luciano, the most powerful Mafia boss in history, would never have been convicted. When special prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey selected twenty lawyers to help him clean up the city’s underworld, she was the only member of his team who was not a white male.
Eunice Hunton Carter, Stephen Carter’s grandmother, was raised in a world of stultifying expectations about race and gender, yet by the 1940s, her professional and political successes had made her one of the most famous black women in America. But her triumphs were shadowed by prejudice and tragedy. Greatly complicating her rise was her difficult relationship with her younger brother, Alphaeus, an avowed Communist who―together with his friend Dashiell Hammett―would go to prison during the McCarthy era. Yet she remained unbowed.

Moving, haunting, and as fast-paced as a novel, Invisible tells the true story of a woman who often found her path blocked by the social and political expectations of her time. But Eunice Carter never accepted defeat, and thanks to her grandson’s remarkable book, her long forgotten story is once again visible.

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These Truths: A History of the United States 
Monday, October 15
7:00pm
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Jill Lepore
In the most ambitious one-volume American history in decades, award-winning historian and New Yorker writer Jill Lepore offers a magisterial account of the origins and rise of a divided nation, an urgently needed reckoning with the beauty and tragedy of American history.

Written in elegiac prose, Lepore’s groundbreaking investigation places truth itself—a devotion to facts, proof, and evidence—at the center of the nation’s history. The American experiment rests on three ideas—"these truths," Jefferson called them—political equality, natural rights, and the sovereignty of the people. And it rests, too, on a fearless dedication to inquiry, Lepore argues, because self-government depends on it. But has the nation, and democracy itself, delivered on that promise?

These Truths tells this uniquely American story, beginning in 1492, asking whether the course of events over more than five centuries has proven the nation’s truths, or belied them. To answer that question, Lepore traces the intertwined histories of American politics, law, journalism, and technology, from the colonial town meeting to the nineteenth-century party machine, from talk radio to twenty-first-century Internet polls, from Magna Carta to the Patriot Act, from the printing press to Facebook News.

Along the way, Lepore’s sovereign chronicle is filled with arresting sketches of both well-known and lesser-known Americans, from a parade of presidents and a rogues’ gallery of political mischief makers to the intrepid leaders of protest movements, including Frederick Douglass, the famed abolitionist orator; William Jennings Bryan, the three-time presidential candidate and ultimately tragic populist; Pauli Murray, the visionary civil rights strategist; and Phyllis Schlafly, the uncredited architect of modern conservatism.

Americans are descended from slaves and slave owners, from conquerors and the conquered, from immigrants and from people who have fought to end immigration. "A nation born in contradiction will fight forever over the meaning of its history," Lepore writes, but engaging in that struggle by studying the past is part of the work of citizenship. "The past is an inheritance, a gift and a burden," These Truths observes. "It can’t be shirked. There’s nothing for it but to get to know it."

Jill Lepore is the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History at Harvard University and a staff writer at The New Yorker. Her many books include The Secret History of Wonder Woman, a national bestseller, and Book of Ages, a finalist for the National Book Award. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Tuesday, October 16
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Plant hydraulic traits and drought responses: insights from three continents
Tuesday, October 16
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Harvard, 22 Divinity Avenue, HUH Seminar Room 125, Cambridge
Dr. Robert Skelton, Postdoctoral Researcher, Dept. of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley

Abstract:  Droughts cause major damage to plant communities, and reduce primary productivity. Since maintaining hydration to a plant’s leaves is essential to maintaining cellular functioning, plant hydraulics are a major determinant of crop growth and yield, and mediate how plants die during drought. Yet our appreciation of these crucial factors is hindered by an incomplete understanding of how and when water transport through xylem breaks down, and what the implications are for plant functionality. I will present insights into key processes involved in plant response to drought, drawing upon detailed physiological observations from diverse plant communities occurring in South Africa, Australia and North America. My goal is to explore the diversity of mechanisms underlying plant hydraulic function and leaf productivity, and how these influence plant water management and growth in diverse natural plant communities. 

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Determining Disability:  MEDICAID WORK REQUIREMENTS AND WHAT THE LIMITS OF DIGITAL HEALTH MEAN FOR RECIPIENTS, PROVIDERS, AND STATES JUSTICE, EQUITY, & INCLUSION
Tuesday, October 16
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard,  Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (Room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScFLEPMkoV6Jn5rTd27EKgNZbrjixyaSxhUn_xtcPGEx-a0Zg/viewform

Rachel Gershon
Event will be live webcast and recorded at 12:00 pm on day of event.
This year, several states applied for and received permission from the federal government to implement work requirements in their Medicaid programs.  Policy designs vary by state, but all states build in considerations for people with disabilities. These considerations include exemptions and exceptions from work requirements for individuals unable to work due to a disability.
Due to the nature of disability and the nature of disability determination processes, states will face limitations in identifying all individuals who are unable to work due to a disability.  Medical claims do not necessarily provide enough information to determine a person’s ability to work. Medical diagnoses and disability determinations both can lag symptoms by months or years.  As a result, relying on claims or disability determination data could leave out individuals who are unable to work due to a disability. At the same time, waiting for a diagnosis or a disability determination is a critical time period for individuals with disabilities to be able to access health care.   

This luncheon will discuss the nature of disability and disability determination; the resulting limitations in data availability; and implications for public policy.

About Rachel
Rachel Gershon is a Senior Associate at the Center for Health Law and Economics at UMass Medical School where she performs legal and policy analysis regarding Medicaid, health reform, and social services. Specific areas of work include health care affordability, Accountable Care Organizations, long-term supports and services, housing supports, language access, and consumer protections.

Gershon brings experience advising and representing individuals who receive public benefits, including Medicaid, Medicare, prescription assistance, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Social Security. While in law school, she worked on Medicaid access issues with the AARP Foundation as a Herbert Semmel Elder Law Fellow. Gershon holds a law degree and a master's degree in public health from Harvard University, and a bachelor's degree in psychology from Whitworth University.

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xTalk with Loic Tallon on:  "If Open is the Answer, What Was the Question?"
Tuesday, October 16
3:00pm to 4:00pm
MIT, Building 35-225, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

For 148 years, The Metropolitan Museum of Art has been connecting audiences to knowledge, creativity, and ideas through the 5,000 years of human history represented by The Met’s global collection. For the vast majority of those years, this mission-serving work was concentrated to within the walls of the museum’s Manhattan venues. Digital, and the digitization of collections, changed that.

Over the last decade, The Met has developed an ambitious digital program whose goal is to extend the reach and relevance of The Met collection to a global audience. One of the most significant milestones in the development of this program was the museum’s decision, in 2017, make all high-resolution images – approximately 375,000 images – of public-domain artworks available for users to use, share, mix and remix unrestricted, under CC0 (Creative Commons).

In this xTalk, Loic Tallon will review the reasoning for that decision, the impacts of it, and the larger role of open content in helping The Met become one of the most accessible and relevant cultural voices for the world and in the world.

Tallon is Chief Digital Officer at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, where he leads digital transformation and the Digital department for one of the largest cultural institution’s in the world. Each year, The Met serves over 31 million users on its website, reaches over 100 million users on third-party platforms, makes accessible content related to the 440,000 digitized artworks from around the world, and channels over $20M in online transactions.

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Dragonfly Eyes: What Counts as Art Today?
Tuesday, October 16
4:15 pm
Radcliffe, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2018-xu-bing-lecture

Xu Bing, Dragonfly Eyes, 2017. 81min, color and sound. 
The world-renowned artist Xu Bing will join in conversation with the Harvard faculty members Eugene Wang RI ’17, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, and Jennifer L. Roberts, Johnson-Kulukundis Family Faculty Director of the Arts at the Radcliffe Institute and Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities.

Xu’s work reflects on the simultaneous power and fragility of the visual and textual systems that hold societies together. Working at the forefront of Chinese contemporary art, he has focused with particular intricacy on the challenges of translation between East and West. The discussion will delve into the range of Xu’s art and its multifaceted impact on the global contemporary art world.
The program at the Radcliffe Institute will be preceded by a screening of Xu’s recent film Dragonfly Eyes (2017), a work of fiction composed of surveillance camera footage sourced from streaming websites, at the Harvard Film Archive on Monday, October 15, 2018, at 7 PM.

For further information on the film screening, please see https://library.harvard.edu/film/films/2018sepnov/dragonfly.html.
Please register and join us.
Free and open to the public.

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Calamity’s Reward: The Elusive Art of Resilience and Repair
Tuesday, October 16
4:30pm to 6:00pm
Northeastern, Renaissance_Park, 909, 1135 Tremont Street, Boston

Please join us for a presentation by Jeff Howe, Assistant Professor of Journalism and Founding Director of the Media Innovation Program at Northeastern University, for the second Fall semester event in the Contemporary Issues in Security and Resilience Studies speaker series.

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Jake Sullivan: Can America Still Lead the World?
Tuesday, October 16
4:30 PM – 6:00 PM EDT
Tufts, Cheryl A. Chase Center, 200 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/jake-sullivan-can-america-still-lead-the-world-registration-50132166660

Please join the Russia and Eurasia Program at The Fletcher School for a talk by American policymaker Jake Sullivan about U.S. leadership in the world. Can America still lead the world, should it, and how? Refreshments will be provided. Attendance is by registration only on Eventbrite.

Jake Sullivan is a Senior Fellow Martin R. Flug visiting lecturer in law at Yale Law School and a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Sullivan served in the Obama administration as national security adviser to Vice President Joe Biden and director of policy planning at the U.S. Department of State, as well as deputy chief of staff to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. He helped lead the secret diplomacy that paved the way for the Iran nuclear deal in 2015. Following his service in government, he was the senior policy adviser on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign. Sullivan also serves as Co-Chair of National Security Action, a leading national security advocacy organization.

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Claude Lévi-Strauss, Our Contemporary
Tuesday, October 16
5:00pm to 6:30pm
MIT, Building 14E-304, 160 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Emmanuelle Loyer is Professor of Contemporary History at Sciences-Po, Paris. Her biography of Lévi-Strauss was awarded the Prix Femina essai in 2015.

Academic, writer, figure of melancholy, aesthete – Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) not only transformed his academic discipline, he also profoundly changed the way that we view ourselves and the world around us. Emmanuelle Loyer’s award winning biography of this fascinating figure tells the story of a true intellectual adventurer whose unforgettable voice invites us to rethink questions of the human and the meaning of progress. Lévi-Strauss was less of a modern than he was our own great and disquieted contemporary.

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Screening of: Miss Representation Documentary
Tuesday, October 16
5:30 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Alley powered by Verizon, 10 Ware Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/screening-of-miss-representation-documentary-tickets-50746416899

Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Miss Representationexposes how mainstream media and culture contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America.

The film draws back a curtain to reveal a glaring reality we live with every day but fail to see – how the media’s limited and often disparaging portrayals of women and girls makes it difficult for women to feel powerful and achieve leadership positions.
In a society where media is the most persuasive force shaping cultural norms, the collective message we receive is that a woman’s value and power lie in her youth, beauty, and sexuality, and not in her capacity as a leader. While women have made great strides in leadership over the past few decades, the United States is still 33rd out of the 49 highest income countries when it comes to women in the national legislature. And it’s not better outside of government. Women make up only 4.6% of S&P 500 CEOs and 17% of directors, executive producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working on the top 250 domestic grossing films.

Stories from teenage girls and provocative interviews with politicians, journalists, entertainers, activists, and academics, like Katie Couric, Rosario Dawson, Gloria Steinem, Margaret Cho, Condoleezza Rice, Rachel Maddow, and Nancy Pelosi, build momentum as Miss Representationaccumulates startling facts and statistics that will leave the audience shaken, but armed with a new perspective.
More about the film: http://therepresentationproject.org/film/miss-representation/about-the-film

About Alley powered by Verizon: Alley powered by Verizon locations are developed by Verizon, the world’s leading technology company, in collaboration with Alley, a membership-only community workspace for creators. Each location is a curated community powered by the emerging technologies and thought-leadership of Verizon.

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Boston University's Institute for Sustainable Energy and the Environmental Film Festival Present - The New Fire: A Documentary by David Schumacher
Tuesday, October 16
5:30 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
BU, Rajan Kilachand Auditorium, 610 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-university-and-the-environmental-film-festival-present-the-new-fire-tickets-50288423027

About the Film: 
What if the solution to climate change is hiding in plain sight?
Nuclear power has been vilified in popular culture and among much of the environmental community. Yet the next-generation reactors currently in development may actually be key to avoiding global catastrophe. The young entrepreneurs heading this energy revolution realize they’re up against more than the climate clock – they need to convince all of us that the new nuclear is safe and achievable.
The New Fire is an independent documentary that introduces audiences to young nuclear engineers who are developing next-generation reactors which they hope will provide clean and safe solutions to the world’s future energy needs. With unprecedented access to key people, places, and events, Emmy-winning director David Schumacher’s film focuses on how the generation facing the most severe impact of climate change is fighting back with ingenuity and hope. The New Fire tells a provocative and startlingly positive story about a planet in crisis and the young heroes who are trying to save it.

Introductions from Peter Fox-Penner
Peter Fox-Penner is a Professor of Practice in the Questrom School of Management and the Director of Boston University’s Institute for Sustainable Energy. His research and writing interests are in the areas of electric power strategy, regulation, and governance; energy and climate policy; and the relationships between public and private economic activity. He is the author of Smart Power, a book widely credited with foreseeing the future transformation of the power industry now used and cited all over the world, as well as other books in this area. He also teaches courses on sustainable energy and electric power in the Questrom School of Business. In addition, he is Chief Strategy Officer of Energy Impact Partners, Academic Advisor to The Brattle Group, and on the Advisory Board of EOS Energy Storage.

A Q&A Panel with Conclude the Event
The Panelists:
Lisbeth Gronlund: Senior Scientist and Co-director, Global Security Program, Union of Concerned Scientists
Lisbeth Gronlund has worked on technical and policy issues related to nuclear weapons, ballistic missile defenses, and space weapons for 30 years.
She holds a Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University.

David Schumacher, Director and Producer
After receiving his B.Mus. from Berklee College of Music, David Schumacher began his career touring the US and Canada as a rock and jazz guitarist. He entered the world of film and television as a sound recordist, working with such esteemed filmmakers as Barbara Kopple and Ken Burns. Inspired by their example and drawn to environmental issues, he has since gone into producing and directing. THE NEW FIRE marks David’s first turn directing a feature film. David earned a 2010 New York Emmy for creating, producing and directing the TV series NYCMusicShow. He has produced award-winning branding and identity campaigns for leading media companies, and has made documentary, educational and promotional films for clients including Columbia University and The World Economic Forum.

Michael Short, Class ’42 Career Development Assistant Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering
Michael Short is the MIT Class of '42 Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering. Prof. Short has earned four degrees from MIT, in Nuclear Science and Engineering and Material Science and Engineering. His work covers a broad range of topics where materials and nuclear engineering intersect. He is particularly interested in corrosion in hostile environments, adhesion mechanisms that cause fouling, and the fundamentals of radiation damage. Professor Short's current research is focused on identifying a fundamental and measurable unit of radiation damage, which forms the basis of an LNSP project in which novel methods are being developed to forensically reconstruct the radiation-exposure histories of materials. Prof. Short also works on spectroscopic measurements of uranium particulates for the detection of clandestine nuclear facilities.

Doors at 5:30pm - screening at 6:00pm EST

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Nature vs. Fiction in Sci-Fi Movies
Tuesday, October 16
6:00pm
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Miaki Ishii, Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University
Recent volcanic eruptions in Hawaii and Guatemala remind us of how devastating these geological eruptions can be. Popular culture depictions of volcanic disasters found in movies like Dante’s Peak and Volcano can strongly distort the public’s understanding of volcanic activity and its immediate effects. As with many science-fiction films, Hollywood depictions of natural phenomena don’t always align with the scientific facts. Seismologist Miaki Ishii will illustrate this point by looking at popular films that depict both scientifically accurate and inaccurate volcanic events. Her comparison will show how volcanoes really affect our lives.

Free and open to the public.

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Public Conversation: David Hogg
Tuesday, October 16
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Boston Public Library, Rabb Hall, 700 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/public-conversation-david-hogg-tickets-50372372121

David Hogg joins BPL President David Leonard to discuss civic activism, gun control, and the impacts of the March for Our Lives movement on communities across the country.

The Co-Founder of March for Our Lives, on February 14, 2018, David Hogg’s life changed forever. As a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, David survived the largest school shooting in American history. Having lost friends, classmates and teachers, David decided to take action, so no other young person would have to experience what he went through on that fateful day. Since then, David’s activism has taken him around the country, meeting with impacted families and diverse communities to deepen his knowledge on gun safety and the politics surrounding the issue.
David is a prolific voice on social media with more than a million followers. He uses his platform to raise the voices of others who have stood up against violence to create an alliance through their shared loss to end gun violence everywhere. With his younger sister, Lauren, also a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, he co-wrote #NeverAgain, a New York Times bestseller. David is a proud member of the 2018 graduating class of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. David is a proud member of the 2018 graduating class of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

This discussion is part of the BPL's Public Conversation Series, which features President David Leonard in conversation with academics, writers, and intellectuals to discuss events and issues of the national collective conscience.

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Profiles in Service: President Obama's White House Change Makers
Tuesday, October 16
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
John Hancock Back Bay Conference Center, 197 Clarendon Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/profiles-in-service-president-obamas-white-house-change-makers-tickets-49851718833

Join the Kennedy Library Foundation's New Frontier Network (NFN) for a conversation with the authors of: "West Wingers: Stories from the Dream Chasers, Change Makers, and Hope Creators Inside the Obama White House," due out on September 25th. From the triumphs of Obamacare and marriage equality to the tragedy of the Charleston shooting, this book tells the history of the Obama presidency through the men and women who worked tirelessly to support his vision for America.
We’re pleased several of the authors will be able to join us for this event: West Winger's Editor Gautam Raghavan who directed LGBTQ outreach for President Obama at the White House as well as former Muslim American liaison Rumana Ahmed, former NSC spokesperson Ned Price, former Presidential speechwriter Aneesh Raman, former tribal liaison Raina Thiele, and former deputy director of public engagement Stephanie Valencia.

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Theodore H. White Lecture on Press and Politics with Jill Abramson and Jane Mayer
Tuesday, October 16
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Harvard, JFK Jr. Forum, Littauer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Jill Abramson and Jane Mayer will deliver the 29th annual Theodore H. White Lecture on Press and Politics.
Jill Abramson is a journalist and the first woman to serve as The New York Times’ Washington Bureau Chief, Managing Editor, and Executive Editor. Before joining the Times, she spent nine years at The Wall Street Journal as the Deputy Washington Bureau Chief and an investigative reporter covering money and politics. She is the author of three books including “Strange Justice,” which she co-authored with Jane Mayer. In addition to her current position as a senior lecturer in Harvard’s English Department, Jill Abramson has taught at both Princeton and Yale, where she led undergraduate writing seminars for five years. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and The American Philosophical Society.

Jane Mayer has been a New Yorker staff writer since 1995. She covers politics, culture, and national security for the magazine. Previously, she worked at the Wall Street Journal, where she covered the bombing of the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut, the Gulf War, and the fall of the Berlin Wall. In 1984, she became the paper’s first female White House correspondent. She is the author of the 2016 Times best-seller “Dark Money,” which the Times named as one of the ten best books of the year, and which began as a 2010 New Yorker piece about the Koch brothers’ deep influence on American politics. She also wrote the 2008 Times best-seller “The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned into a War on American Ideals,” which was based on her New Yorker articles and was named one of the top ten works of journalism of the decade by N.Y.U.’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, and one of the ten best books of the year by the Times. She is the co-author, with Jill Abramson, of “Strange Justice,” and, with Doyle McManus, of “Landslide: The Unmaking of the President 1984-1988.” In 2009, Mayer was chosen as Princeton University’s Ferris Professor of Journalism. Her numerous honors include the George Polk Prize, the John Chancellor Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Goldsmith Book Prize; the Edward Weintal Prize, the Ridenhour Prize, two Helen Bernstein Book Awards for Excellence in Journalism, the J. Anthony Lukas Prize, the Sidney Hillman Prize, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, the James Aronson Award for social justice journalism, the Toner Prize for political reporting, the I. F. Stone Medal for Journalistic Independence, and, most recently, the Frances Perkins Prize for Courage.

Editorial Comment:  Jane Mayer is one of the best investigative reporters working today.  

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Schindler's List Holocaust Survivor: Rena Finder 
Tuesday, October 16
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
BC, Devlin Hall 008, 255 Beacon Street, Chestnut Hill
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/schindlers-list-holocaust-survivor-rena-finder-tickets-50413796021

The Emerging Leader Program welcomes guest speaker, Schindler's List Holocaust survivor, Rena Finder, to campus for the third year in a row. Space is limited so please RSVP via Eventbrite, and have your confirmation email ready to show at the door.

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Future Politics:  Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech
Tuesday, October 16
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes author, speaker, and practicing barrister JAMIE SUSSKIND for a discussion of his new book, Future Politics: Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech.

About Future Politics
Future Politics confronts one of the most important questions of our time: how will digital technology transform politics and society? The great political debate of the last century was about how much of our collective life should be determined by the state and what should be left to the market and civil society. In the future, the question will be how far our lives should be directed and controlled by powerful digital systems—and on what terms?

Jamie Susskind argues that rapid and relentless innovation in a range of technologies—from artificial intelligence to virtual reality—will transform the way we live together. Calling for a fundamental change in the way we think about politics, he describes a world in which certain technologies and platforms, and those who control them, come to hold great power over us. Some will gather data about our lives, causing us to avoid conduct perceived as shameful, sinful, or wrong. Others will filter our perception of the world, choosing what we know, shaping what we think, affecting how we feel, and guiding how we act. Still, others will force us to behave in certain ways, like self-driving cars that refuse to drive over the speed limit.

Those who control these technologies—usually big tech firms and the state—will increasingly control us. They will set the limits of our liberty, decreeing what we may do and what is forbidden. Their algorithms will resolve vital questions of social justice, allocating social goods and sorting us into hierarchies of status and esteem. They will decide the future of democracy, causing it to flourish or decay.

A groundbreaking work of political analysis, Future Politics challenges readers to rethink what it means to be free or equal, what it means to have power or property, what it means for a political system to be just or democratic and proposes ways in which we can—and must—regain.

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Cambridge Forum: Rebecca Traister discusses Good and Mad:  The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger
Tuesday, October 16
7:00 PM
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Cambridge Forums are free and open to the public.
Cambridge Forum welcomes journalist and author REBECCA TRAISTER for a discussion of her book, Good and Mad, a history of feminism and the #Metoo movement. 

About Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger
From Rebecca Traister, the New York Times bestselling author of All the Single Ladies—whom Anne Lamott called “the most brilliant voice on feminism in this country”—comes a vital, incisive exploration into the transformative power of female anger and its ability to transcend into a political movement. 

In the year 2018, it seems as if women’s anger has suddenly erupted into the public conversation. But long before Pantsuit Nation, before the Women’s March, and before the #MeToo movement, women’s anger was not only politically catalytic—but politically problematic. The story of female fury and its cultural significance demonstrates the long history of bitter resentment that has enshrouded women’s slow rise to political power in America, as well as the ways that anger is received when it comes from women as opposed to when it comes from men.

With eloquence and fervor, Rebecca tracks the history of female anger as political fuel—from suffragettes chaining themselves to the White House to office workers vacating their buildings after Clarence Thomas was confirmed to the Supreme Court. Here Traister explores women’s anger at both men and other women; anger between ideological allies and foes; the varied ways anger is perceived based on its owner; as well as the history of caricaturing and delegitimizing female anger; and the way women’s collective fury has become transformative political fuel—as is most certainly occurring today. She deconstructs society’s (and the media’s) condemnation of female emotion (notably, rage) and the impact of their resulting repercussions.

Highlighting a double standard perpetuated against women by all sexes, and its disastrous, stultifying effect, Traister’s latest is timely and crucial. It offers a glimpse into the galvanizing force of women’s collective anger, which, when harnessed, can change history.

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The Wake of The Whale by Russell Fielding
Tuesday, October 16
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/meet-the-author-russell-fielding-tickets-50026760387

Despite declining stocks worldwide and increasing health risks, artisanal whaling remains a cultural practice tied to nature’s rhythms. The Wake of the Whale presents the art, history, and challenge of whaling in the Caribbean and North Atlantic, based on a decade of award-winning fieldwork.

Sightings of pilot whales in the frigid Nordic waters have drawn residents of the Faroe Islands to their boats and beaches for nearly a thousand years. Down in the tropics, around the islands of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, artisanal whaling is a younger trade, shaped by the legacies of slavery and colonialism but no less important to the local population. Each culture, Russell Fielding shows, has developed a distinct approach to whaling that preserves key traditions while adapting to threats of scarcity, the requirements of regulation, and a growing awareness of the humane treatment of animals.

Yet these strategies struggle to account for the risks of regularly eating meat contaminated with methylmercury and other environmental pollutants introduced from abroad. Fielding considers how these and other factors may change whaling cultures forever, perhaps even bringing an end to this way of life.
A rare mix of scientific and social insight, The Wake of the Whale raises compelling questions about the place of cultural traditions in the contemporary world and the sacrifices we must make for sustainability.

About The Author:  Russell Fielding is Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at The University of the South. A Fulbright scholar, he has been awarded fellowships from the Nansen Fund, the Faroese Research Council, the University of Montana Global Leadership Initiative, and the American Geographical Society and has been interviewed by National Geographic, PBS, and 18 Degrees North. He served as a consultant on two documentary films, The Archipelago, by Benjamin Huguet, and Faroe Islands: Message from the Sea, by PBS Frontline/World. Since 2005 Fielding has been studying artisanal whaling traditions throughout the Atlantic, with field sites in the Faroe Islands, Newfoundland, and St. Vincent.


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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, October 17
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Film Screening and Panel Discussion: Semper Fi
Wednesday, October 17
11:30am to 2:00pm
Northeastern Crossing 1175 Tremont Street, Boston

Lunch will be provided. Open to the public and all of the NU community. Panel discussion by three prominent speakers on their personal experience with, and knowledge of, the Marine Corps cover-up of one of the largest water contamination incidents in US history: Camp LeJeune, North Carolina. A NU Veteran will moderate the panel. Panel discussion will take place from 11:30-12:15, followed by the 90 minute film. Please join us and help publicize this important event. 

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Fairness in Redistricting: What Is a Gerrymander Anyway?  And How Can It Effect the Elections?   
Wednesday, October 17 
12:00 pm-1:00 pm 
MIT, Building 66-168, 25 Ames Street, Cambridge

Moon Duchin, Associate Professor, Math and Director of the Science, Technology and Society program,Tufts University will discuss gerrymandering and its effect on the 2018 elections.

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How to Reduce Your Risks of Becoming a Cybervictim (Webinar)
Wednesday, October 17
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Webinar
RSVP at http://bostonu.imodules.com/s/1759/2-bu/2col.aspx?sid=1759&gid=2&pgid=5830&cid=10741&ecid=10741&crid=0&calpgid=1050&calcid=2086

Join us online on October 17, 2018, at 12:00 p.m. ET as Chris Kayser (MET '16), Cybercriminologist, Founder, President, and CEO of Cybercrime Analytics Inc. explores the growing threat of cybercrime and its rise across the globe. 

Did you know that 50% of small and medium businesses have suffered at least one cyberattack in the past 12 months? 60% of small businesses will close within six months of a cybersecurity attack. 

Over the course of 60 minutes, Kayser will tackle these topics: Examining cybercrime risks - malware, ransomware, social engineering, hacking and more;
How to determine if your organization is vulnerable to attack; How to mitigate the risks of a cyberattack; Recovering from a cyberattack, and What to consider when using / implementing the cloud in your business.

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TransitX: Flying Solar Pods to Replace Cars, Buses, Trains, and Truck
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17
12 – 1PM
Tufts, Sophia Gordon Hall, 15 Talbot Avenue, Somerville

Join us for a discussion with Mike Stanley, CEO of TransitX 

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Achieving Equitable Access to Vaccines:  FROM POLICIES TO PROVISIONS
Wednesday, October 17
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM ET
Harvard, Pound Hall, Room 101, 1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfQP1d0YTZWwM2IIFgCC9EMx6phftKHjJEQaTLlSdWYCn61Lw/viewform

Julia Barnes-Weise
The series is co-sponsored by the Global Access in Action, a project at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. 
In order to achieve the objectives of global health organization policies those policies must be translated into actionable provisions and agreements. The Global Healthcare Innovation Alliance Accelerator endeavors to provide tools and guidance to organizations involved in those efforts. As the founder of GHIAA, Julia Barnes-Weise began consulting for the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) over a year ago.
Following the Ebola crisis and the regulatory hurdles faced by the international community for an effective response, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was launched in 2017. CEPI’s mission is to prevent epidemics by supporting the development of vaccines against diseases with epidemic potential in cases where market incentives fail, and to support the capability to respond to novel pathogens with rapid vaccine development, if needed. CEPI has promoted access to epidemic vaccines to ensure the right vaccines are accessible to all people. CEPI has invited consultation on its revision of its Equitable Access policy paperwith a wide range of stakeholders with the following objectives: accelerate the process from development to delivery of quality vaccines; and establish effective procurement mechanisms for vaccines to all populations, and has very recently published its revised policy.
Julia Barnes-Weise will discuss the challenges of achieving equitable access to vaccines in preparation for and in times of outbreak and CEPI’s approach in working towards its objectives.


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Rising Nuclear Threats in a Disrupted World
Wednesday, October 17
12:00-1:30pm
MIT, Building E40-496, Pye Room, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Lori Murray, Council on Foreign Relations
Nuclear Threats are on the rise, as regional state actors proliferate, non-state actors continue to threaten the use of these weapons and great powers modernize with rapidly advancing technologies and destabilizing nuclear policies that could potentially undermine strategic stability. These challenges are among those contributing to the break-down and potential collapse of the global order that sought to control the growth and spread of these weapons. How dangerous are these threats? Is the global arms control and non-proliferation regimes about to collapse? What is the role of the United States in determining that future? These are among the central questions that will be addressed in this seminar.

Bio:  Dr. Murray is an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Prior to joining CFR, she held the distinguished national security chair at the U.S. Naval Academy. She is also an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut and president emeritus of the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA), the largest nonpartisan, nonprofit grassroots organization dedicated to educating and engaging the American public on global issues. 

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The Life of Giuseppe Garibaldi (Gonson Lecture)
Wednesday, October 17
1-2pm. 
Cambridge Center for Adult Education, 56 Brattle Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-life-of-giuseppe-garibaldi-gonson-lecture-tickets-47516653590
Cost:  $5 

Albert Muggia, MD
Giuseppe Garibaldi was a fascinating Italian general, politician, and nationalist who played a large role in the history of Italy. A great general and one of Italy’s "fathers of the fatherland,” Garibaldi was a hero of the 19th Century, both as a liberator of Italy, Uruguay, and Southern Brazil, and as a sailor for the US. Though he remains unknown to many, Al will discuss the many ways in which Garibaldi was a major influence on the history of Italy and the New World.

This talk is part of the Gonson Daytime Lecture Series at Cambridge Center for Adult Education. To view the full series lineup, go to http://ccae.org/gonsonlectures

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Does Clean Air Increase the Demand for the Consumer City? Evidence from Beijing
Wednesday, October 17
4:15PM TO 5:30PM
Harvard, Littauer 382, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Matthew Kahn, University of Southern California; Cong Sun, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics; Jianghao Wang, Chinese Academy of Sciences; and Siqi Zheng, MIT. 

Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy 
https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/44157

casey_billings at hks.harvard.edu

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Taproot: Stories of Nature & Restoration
Wednesday, October 17
5:30PM TO 7:30PM
Harvard, Andover Hall, Sperry Room, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge

On October 17, we will feature three unique voices from several different traditions and life experiences — Stacy Bare, an Iraq war veteran, Founder of Adventure Not War, Co-Founder of the Great Outdoors Lab, and National Geographic Adventurer; Prathima Muniyappa, a researcher at the MIT Media Lab exploring the use of space technology to advance issues of social justice; and Andrew Nalani, a Steinhardt Doctoral Fellow at New York University designing and evaluating transformative learning contexts that support positive youth development and multicultural competence — to reflect on their personal relationship with Nature and the role of their experiences in informing that relationship. This event is part of a larger collaboration between the Planetary Health Alliance and the Harvard Divinity School called “The Constellation Project,” led by Dr. Sam Myers and Terry Tempest Williams, which brings together science, faith, arts, and indigenous communities to explore larger questions about our place in the world and imagine a better future.

We see that this is an opportunity to open the dialogue about some of the deeper moral questions about how we connect with the people and places around us and see our role in the world — important considerations for any sort of lasting bottom-up change that addresses our global environmental and health challenges. What is the authority of the awe and reverence we feel in natural settings? How do we support a different narrative about our place in the world that honors an emotional/spiritual relationship to Nature and recognizes that, just as nature takes care of us, we also need to take care of nature?

Co-sponsored by the Planetary Health Alliance, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University Center for the Environment, Center for the Study of World Religions.

Contact Name:   Erika Veidis
erikaveidis at fas.harvard.edu

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Dispatches from Planet 3:  Thirty-Two (Brief) Tales on the Solar System, the Milky Way, and Beyond
Wednesday,October 17
6:00 PM
Harvard Science Center, (Hall A) 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Harvard's Cabot Science Library and Harvard Book Store welcome award-winning author, journalist, and MIT professor MARCIA BARTUSIAK for a discussion of her latest book, Dispatches from Planet 3: Thirty-Two (Brief) Tales on the Solar System, the Milky Way, and Beyond.
About Dispatches from Planet 3
The galaxy, the multiverse, and the history of astronomy are explored in this engaging compilation of cosmological “tales” by multiple award‑winning science writer Marcia Bartusiak. In thirty‑two concise and engrossing essays, the author provides a deeper understanding of the nature of the universe and those who strive to uncover its mysteries. Bartusiak shares the back stories for many momentous astronomical discoveries, including the contributions of such pioneers as Beatrice Tinsley and her groundbreaking research in galactic evolution, and Jocelyn Bell Burnell, the scientist who first discovered radio pulsars. An endlessly fascinating collection that you can dip into in any order, these pieces will transport you to ancient Mars, when water flowed freely across its surface; to the collision of two black holes, a cosmological event that released fifty times more energy than was radiating from every star in the universe; and to the beginning of time itself.

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STARTUPS USING TECH FOR SOCIAL IMPACT
Wednesday, 17 October
6:30 – 8:30 pm EDT
GA Boston, 125 Summer Street 13th Floor, Boston
RSVP at https://generalassemb.ly/education/startups-using-tech-for-social-impact/boston/57909

In October, we are inviting some of Boston's most impressive social entrepreneurs and startups to General Assembly to share how they are leveraging technology to make the world a better place. From platforms that promote civic engagement to tools that help us lower our carbon footprint, we are seeing innovative solutions pop-up everywhere to help solve the world's most complex problems.

Why It Matters:
With the introduction of technology to the social sector, we are starting to see organizations increase efficiencies, cast a wider net of donors, and increase awareness for their cause. It has also empowered entrepreneurs to solve social problems in new and creative ways. The more the tech industry and the social sector intersect, the better our world will be.

By signing up for this event, you're giving our sponsors permission to contact you about upcoming events and promotions.

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MAKE BREAD Presents "Dream Big" ft. Julissa Calderon of Buzzfeed
Wednesday, October 17
6:30 PM to 9:30 PM
Roxbury Innovation Center, 2300 Washington Street, Boston
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/make-bread-presents-dream-big-ft-julissa-calderon-of-buzzfeed-tickets-50328922161

Julissa Calderon is a writer and actor currently bringing her Dominican background and comedic flare to BuzzFeed’s Pero Like. Julissa is passionate about Afro-Latino representation and challenging Latino stereotypes. Recent videos such as “Pelo Bueno, Pelo Malo,” “Sammy Sosa’s skin color rant” and “How I Went from Waitress to Buzzfeed Producer” have been featured in numerous news outlets, including The Huffington Post and CNN Español. As an actress, you might recognize Julissa from her guest starring role in ABC’s hit show Revenge- or if you’re a Miami native like her, you might have caught some of her favorite onstage performances, including The Donkey Show (Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts) and Road Through Heaven (New Theater). Julissa currently lives in Los Angeles, CA and its safe to say the Miami native is taking her career in her own hands and carving a lane for herself in Hollywood. Her overall vision for creating content: bringing the Afro-Latino community to the forefront and opening doors that were never meant to be closed.

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A Star Trek: A Voyage to Discover Sources of Cosmic Signals in Our Universe
Wednesday, October 17
7 to 9:00 p.m. 
Harvard Medical School, Armenise Auditorium (in Goldenson Hall), 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

More information at http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Science for the People
Wednesday, October 17
7-9 PM
MIT, Building E53-208, 30 Wadsworth Street, Cambridge

You can find the draft agenda for the meeting https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dLIVY8-4LYQqqAt1HobHTiked2Gn6LoIFZbkx_HVOgs/edit
If you have any additions, feel free to add them or email Mara at <mara.freilich at gmail.com>. 

Note that we are planning a discussion about the state of geoengineering at this meeting, led by Nick Lutsko. There are two suggested readings (also in the agenda document):
(1) http://climate.envsci.rutgers.edu/pdf/20Reasons.pdf
(2) http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2016/01/jeff_goodell_and_raymond_t_pierrehumbert_take_questions_about_geoengineering.html

And here are a few more details about the discussion from Nick:
I will give a broad introduction to geoengineering, covering the two main options: solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal. For each option I will give some background on the science, especially with regards to open questions, and then discuss policy issues associated with implementing each option.

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Thursday, October 18
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The Wake of the Whale: Hunter Societies in the Caribbean and North Atlantic
Thursday, October 18
12:00-1:00pm 
Tufts, Room 745B, Dowling Hall, 419 Boston Avenue, Medford

Russell Fielding, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, The University of the South
In the Faroe Islands and St. Vincent & the Grenadines, people hunt pilot whales and other dolphins to produce food for human consumption. This presentation describes whaling activities and cultures in both locations, explores the histories of whaling in these places and worldwide, and addresses the idea of “culturally embedded conservation strategies”—the largely unwritten body of customary rules that develops gradually, through processes of cultural adaptation to a local natural environment, and performs regulatory function in the context of natural resource use and conservation. Newly emerged environmental crises, however, threaten to surpass the ability of these conservation strategies and may even lead to the end of these
traditional methods of subsistence.

Russell Fielding is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies
at The University of the South. A Fulbright scholar, he has been awarded fellowships from the Nansen Fund, the Faroese Research Council, the University of Montana Global Leadership Initiative, and the American Geographical Society. Since 2005 Fielding has been studying artisanal whaling traditions throughout the Atlantic, with field sites in the Faroe Islands, Newfoundland, and St. Vincent.

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 Can Regenerative Agriculture Save our Land & the Planet?
Thursday, October 18
12:00 - 2:00 PM
Mintz Levin, One Financial Center, 38th Floor, Boston
RSVSP at https://members.e2.org/ext/jsp/controller?id=6904089166&sv=NE_Carbon_Farming&reply=yes

Imagine a safe, sustainable way to dramatically reduce total annual U.S. carbon emissions from the atmosphere – without any geo-engineering or new technology breakthroughs.  According to the USDA, this is not a fantasy. Using regenerative agriculture techniques, we could sustainably offset much of the country’s carbon footprint— while at the same time making soils healthier, increasing yields, and boosting resilience to climate change. Legislation to incentivize these practices is now pending at both the state and federal level. 
 
Please join E2 and our experts to discuss this innovative approach to reducing carbon emissions while strengthening the farm economy here and around the world.
 
This is an invitation-only event, and space is prioritized for E2 members. Registration is required for all guests and must be made prior to the event. 

If have any questions about this event, please contact Noah Dubin at ndubin at e2.org 
 
About the Speakers:
Ethan Soloviev is a farmer, entrepreneur, and the Executive Vice President of Research at the sustainability data and ratings firm HowGood.com. He and his family farm a diversified 32 acres in New York, producing apples, sheep, mushrooms, eggs, and specialty crops. Ethan is the author of Regenerative Enterprise and the Levels of Regenerative Agriculture. As a consultant for multinational and Fortune 100 companies, Ethan has helped transform risk and implement regenerative agriculture systems across thousands of acres in 34 countries. Read his latest articles on regenerative agriculture, business, and life at ethansoloviev.com 

Lara Bryant promotes soil health practices and policies that protect water quality, use water more efficiently, and help farms to be more resilient to climate change. Prior to joining NRDC, she worked on sustainable agricultural policy at the National Wildlife Federation and World Resources Institute and was a chemist at a private environmental laboratory. Bryant holds a bachelor’s degree in plant and soil science from the University of Tennessee and a master’s degree in public administration in environmental science and policy from Columbia University. 

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg:  A Life
Thursday, October 18
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome JANE SHERRON DE HART—professor emerita of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara—for a discussion of her latest book, Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life.

About Ruth Bader Ginsburg
In this large, comprehensive, revelatory biography, Jane De Hart explores the central experiences that crucially shaped Ginsburg’s passion for justice, her advocacy for gender equality, her meticulous jurisprudence: her desire to make We the People more united and our union more perfect. At the heart of her story and abiding beliefs—her Jewish background. Tikkun olam, the Hebrew injunction to “repair the world,” with its profound meaning for a young girl who grew up during the Holocaust and World War II. We see the influence of her mother, Celia Amster Bader, whose intellect inspired her daughter’s feminism, insisting that Ruth become independent, as she witnessed her mother coping with terminal cervical cancer (Celia died the day before Ruth, at seventeen, graduated from high school).

From Ruth’s days as a baton twirler at Brooklyn’s James Madison High School, to Cornell University, Harvard and Columbia Law Schools (first in her class), to being a law professor at Rutgers University (one of the few women in the field and fighting pay discrimination), hiding her second pregnancy so as not to risk losing her job; founding the Women's Rights Law Reporter, writing the brief for the first case that persuaded the Supreme Court to strike down a sex-discriminatory state law, then at Columbia (the law school’s first tenured female professor); becoming the director of the women’s rights project of the ACLU, persuading the Supreme Court in a series of decisions to ban laws that denied women full citizenship status with men.
Her years on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, deciding cases the way she played golf, as she, left-handed, played with right-handed clubs—aiming left, swinging right, hitting down the middle. Her years on the Supreme Court . . .

A pioneering life and legal career whose profound mark on American jurisprudence, on American society, on our American character and spirit, will reverberate deep into the twenty-first century and beyond.

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OKAY FINE WHATEVER 
Thursday, October 18
7:00pm
Trident Books Cafe, 338 Newbury Street, Boston

with Courtenay Hameister
OKAY FINE WHATEVER is the chronicle of Courtenay finally taking charge of the anxiety that had ruled her for so long. She embarked on a year-long quest of seeking out (and writing about) the kind of uncomfortable
experiences she’s spent her life avoiding. The result is a poignant, empowering, and laugh-out-loud funny book for women of all ages who struggle with the anxiety exacerbated by our impossible cultural standards. So, what
did Courtenay do that year?
Here is a sample:
Spent 90 minutes in a sensory deprivation tank
Went on 28 first dates
Took a fellatio class
Spent an hour with a professional cuddler
Went to a sex club (spoiler alert: it was Build-Your-Own-Burrito night and they ran out of tortillas)

Whether you remember being eight years old at the edge of a diving board afraid to jump or are forty years old and creating an online dating profile, OKAY FINE WHATEVER is a book for anyone who has ever been afraid of
trying something new. With each page and adventure, you’ll root for Courtenay to succeed. Courtenay writes, “The book is proof for anyone who fights complacency that we can beat it when we realize that awkward, scared,
and humiliated are temporary, but boredom lasts a lifetime. It’s a clarion call to anyone who’s lost faith in their own ability to change: grand gestures aren’t necessary. The tiniest amount of bravery is still bravery.” At a time when strong women are sharing their personal stories more than ever before, I urge you to dip into the world of OKAY FINE WHATEVER and immerse yourself in Courtenay’s own story of strength, awkwardness, and tortilla-less sex club burritos (also known as beans and rice).

About the author:
Courtenay Hameister is a professional nervous person. During her 12 years as host and head writer for Live Wire, a nationally syndicated public radio show, she interviewed over 500 intimidating people and wrote 200 personal essays in bursts of anxiety-fueled inspiration at midnight the night before each show. Her work has also been featured in McSweeney’s, APM’s Marketplace, More magazine, and some scathing emails to the customer service department at Macy’s.

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The Habit of Turning the World Upside Down: Our Belief in Property and the Cost of That Belief 
Thursday, October 18
7:00pm 
Porter Square Books, 25 White Street, Cambridge

Howard Mansfield
While reporting on citizens fighting natural gas pipelines and transmission lines planned to cut right across their homes, Howard Mansfield saw the emotional toll of these projects. "They got under the skin," writes Mansfield. "This was about more than kilowatts, powerlines, and pipelines. Something in this upheaval felt familiar. I began to realize that I was witnessing an essential American experience: the world turned upside down. And it all turned on one word: property.

Howard Mansfield is the author of nine books about preservation, architecture, and history, most recently Summer over Autumn. He has contributed to the New York Times, the Washington Post, Historic Preservation, and Yankee. He and his wife, writer Sy Montgomery, live in a 130-year-old house in Hancock, New Hampshire.

A PSB Be the Change event 

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Friday, October 19 @ 9:00 am - Saturday, October 20 @ 7:00 pm
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Diversity Challenge 2018, Making Race and Culture Work in the STEM Era: Bringing All People to the Forefront
October 19 @ 9:00 am - October 20 @ 7:00 pm
Boston College Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture
Boston College,  140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill
RSVP at http://www.bc.edu/bc-web/schools/lsoe/sites/isprc/diversity-challenge.html

The Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture (ISPRC) at Boston College invites you to be a part of the Institute’s 18th Annual Conference. Join our interdisciplinary forum in which researchers, practitioners, educators, government officials, and social activists explore a variety of perspectives and issues and interact with each other while addressing mutual concerns related to race, ethnic culture, and STEM defined in various ways.

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Friday, October 19
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Atmospheric and Environmental Chemistry Seminar
Friday, October 19
12:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Professor Kerri Pratt, University of Michigan, will give a talk. Title TBA.

Contact Name:   Kelvin Bates
kelvin_bates at fas.harvard.edu

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The Hell of Good Intentions:  America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S. Primacy
Friday, October 19
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed author STEPHEN M. WALT—the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University—for a discussion of his latest book, The Hell of Good Intentions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S. Primacy.

About The Hell of Good Intentions
In 1992, the United States stood at the pinnacle of world power and Americans were confident that a new era of peace and prosperity was at hand. Twenty-five years later, those hopes have been dashed. Relations with Russia and China have soured, the European Union is wobbling, nationalism and populism are on the rise, and the United States is stuck in costly and pointless wars that have squandered trillions of dollars and undermined its influence around the world.

The root of this dismal record, Walt argues, is the American foreign policy establishment’s stubborn commitment to a strategy of “liberal hegemony.” Since the end of the Cold War, Republicans and Democrats alike have tried to use U.S. power to spread democracy, open markets, and other liberal values into every nook and cranny of the planet. This strategy was doomed to fail, but its proponents in the foreign policy elite were never held accountable and kept repeating the same mistakes.
Donald Trump won the presidency promising to end the misguided policies of the foreign policy “Blob” and to pursue a wiser approach. But his erratic and impulsive style of governing, combined with a deeply flawed understanding of world politics, are making a bad situation worse. The best alternative, Walt argues, is a return to the realist strategy of “offshore balancing,” which eschews regime change, nation-building, and other forms of global social engineering. The American people would surely welcome a more restrained foreign policy, one that allowed greater attention to problems here at home. This long-overdue shift will require abandoning the futile quest for liberal hegemony and building a foreign policy establishment with a more realistic view of American power.

Clear-eyed, candid, and elegantly written, Stephen M. Walt’s The Hell of Good Intentions offers both a compelling diagnosis of America’s recent foreign policy follies and a proven formula for renewed success.

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MIT Energy Night
Friday, October 19
6:30-9:30 pm
MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

More information at https://mitenergynight.org

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We Can't Breathe:  On Black Lives, White Lies, and the Art of Survival
Friday, October 19
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Harvard Book Store welcomes JABARI ASIM—author, poet, playwright, and associate professor at Emerson College—for a discussion of his latest book, We Can't Breathe: On Black Lives, White Lies, and the Art of Survival.

About We Can't Breathe
In We Can’t Breathe, Jabari Asim disrupts what Toni Morrison has exposed as the “Master Narrative” and replaces it with a story of black survival and persistence through art and community in the face of centuries of racism. In eight wide-ranging and penetrating essays, he explores such topics as the twisted legacy of jokes and falsehoods in black life; the importance of black fathers and community; the significance of black writers and stories; and the beauty and pain of the black body. What emerges is a rich portrait of a community and culture that has resisted, survived, and flourished despite centuries of racism, violence, and trauma. These thought-provoking essays present a different side of American history, one that doesn’t depend on a narrative steeped in oppression but rather reveals black voices telling their own stories.

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Saturday, October 20 - Sunday, October 21
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The Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo 
Saturday, October 20 ato Sunday, October 21
Lesley University, University Hall, 1815 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

The Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo was established in 2010 to create a showcase space for artists and writers in the greater-Boston area working in the field of comics. The event is produced by the Boston Comic Arts Foundation and hosted by Lesley University College of Art and Design. Unlike traditional comics shows, which emphasize commerce and memorabilia, MICE puts a focus on the art of making comics. We connect local creators with local audience. We also run a number of workshops for children and adults, as well as panel discussions on the craft and relevance of the comics form. We’ll be featuring several special guest creators, along with an expanded line-up of programming.
When & Where is MICE?

More information at http://www.micexpo.org

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The 23rd Annual Boston Veg Food Fest
Saturday, October 20 at 11 AM to Sunday, October 21 at 4 PM
Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center, Roxbury

More information at https://www.facebook.com/events/424388091408844/'

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Saturday October 20
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Greenovate Boston Leaders Program Training
Saturday, October 20
10:30am - 1:30pm
East Boston Public Library, 365 S Bremen Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.greenovateboston.org/greenovate_boston_leaders_program_training_3

The Greenovate Boston Leaders Program aims to increase understanding of the climate impacts in Boston and the actions required to mitigate the impacts. We want to involve Bostonians as part of the collective action needed in advancing the citywide initiatives. Our program gives you the materials and support you need to lead conversations about climate change and climate action.

This program is a great opportunity to network with a wide variety of leaders, learn how to format community discussions around climate change, and to make a positive impact on Boston.

If you are interested in attending this training date, please submit an RSVP below. There are limited spaces left, so sign-up as soon as you can! 

You will be contacted by David Corbie, Greenovate Boston Outreach Manager, once your space at the training is confirmed.

Questions or concerns? Email Greenovate Boston at Greenovate at boston.gov.

CONTACT  David Corbie · david.corbie at boston.gov


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Lose Well
Saturday October 20
7:00 pm
Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Street, Brookline

Chris Gethard
Let’s face it: we all want a seat at the cool table, a great job, and loads of money. But most of us won’t be able to achieve this widely accepted, black-or-white, definition of winning, which makes us feel like failures, that we’re destined to a life of loserdom. That’s the conventional wisdom. It’s also crap, according to comedian and cult hero Chris Gethard, who knows a thing of two about losing. Failing is an art form, he argues; in fact, it’s the only the way we’re ever going to discover who we are, what we really want, and how to live the kind of life we only dreamed about.

Chris Gethard is a comedian and creator of The Chris Gethard Show and host of the popular weekly podcast Beautiful Stories from Anonymous People. His Judd Apatow-produced one-man show, Career Suicide, premiered on HBO and was nominated for the Lucille Lortel award for its off-Broadway run. He lives in Queens, New York.

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Sunday October 21
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Digital Colonialism, Domestic Terrorism, & Transformative Justice
Sunday October 21
5:30 PM
City School, 614 Columbia Road #R, Dorchester

Please Save the Date! On , we will have three amazing speakers, music, and break out
groups for discussion
on repression and self determination in our communities.

"Digital Colonialism" Mike Vincent

"When the Wars Come Home: the Domestic Front of the War on Terror"
Michael Prentice

"We are the ones we've been waiting for: Transformative Justice and
Community Self-Determination" Dara Bayer

Please spread the word and save the date!

"Nobody in the world, nobody in history, has ever gotten their freedom
by appealing to the moral sense of the people who were oppressing
them." -- Assata Shakur

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Monday, October 22
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Speaker Series on Misinformation: Claire Wardle
Monday, October 22
11:30 am - 1:00 pm
Harvard, Wexner Conference Room, Wexner Building, Room 434AB, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Speaker Series on Misinformation, co-sponsored by the NULab at Northeastern University.

Claire Wardle is a research fellow at the Shorenstein Center, leading First Draft, a non-profit working on solutions to challenges associated with trust & truth in the digital age. Previously, she was the Research Director at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia Journalism School, head of social media for the UN Refugee Agency and Director of News Services for Storyful. She is an expert on user-generated content, and has led two substantial research projects investigating how it is handled by news organizations. She also sits on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on the Future of Information and Entertainment.

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The Case for a Slow and Steady "Tortoise" Approach for US Nuclear Research and Development
Monday, October 22
12:00pm to 1:30pm 
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Michael J. Ford, Ph.D., French Environmental Fellow, Harvard University Center for the Environment

Lunch will be served.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar
https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/energyconsortium/seminars

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A Rational Framework for What? Race and the Ethos of Science from the Modern Synthesis to Genomicsudies
Monday, October 22 
12:15PM TO 2:00PM
Harvard, CGIS South S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

Tito Brige de Carvalho (Harvard, STS).
The STS Circle at Harvard is a group of doctoral students and recent PhDs who are interested in creating a space for interdisciplinary conversations about contemporary issues in science and technology that are relevant to people in fields such as anthropology, history of science, sociology, STS, law, government, public policy, and the natural sciences. We want to engage not only those who are working on intersections of science, politics, and public policy, but also those in the natural sciences, engineering, and architecture who have serious interest in exploring these areas together with social scientists and humanists.

There has been growing interest among graduate students and postdocs at Harvard in more systematic discussions related to STS. More and more dissertation writers and recent graduates find themselves working on exciting topics that intersect with STS at the edges of their respective home disciplines, and they are asking questions that often require new analytic tools that the conventional disciplines don’t necessarily offer. They would also like wider exposure to emerging STS scholarship that is not well-represented or organized at most universities, including Harvard. Our aim is to try to serve those interests through a series of activities throughout the academic year.

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to via the online form by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

The Harvard STS Circle is co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

sts at hks.harvard.edu

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AI for Good
Monday, October 22
6:00 PM to 9:30 PM
Cambridge Innovation Center - Venture Cafe, One Broadway, 5th Floor, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.meetup.com/Boston-Virtual-Reality/events/254614673/
Cost: $6.00 /per person

How one company is using AI for good.

More information at virtuality.show http://virtuality.show/


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Gandhi:  The Years That Changed the World, 1914–1948
Monday, October 22
7:00 PM  (Doors at 6:30)
First Parish Church, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge,
RSVP at http://www.harvard.com/event/ramachandra_guha1/
Cost:  $8 - $42.50 (book included) - On Sale Now

Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed writer and professor RAMACHANDRA GUHA—the award-winning author of India After Gandhi—for a discussion of his latest book, Gandhi: The Years That Changed the World, 1914-1948. 

About Gandhi
The second and concluding volume of the magisterial biography that began with Gandhi Before India, Gandhi: The Years That Changed the World is the definitive portrait of the life and work of one of the most abidingly influential—and controversial—men in world history.

This volume opens with Mohandas Gandhi's arrival in Bombay in January 1915 and takes us through his epic struggles over the next three decades: to deliver India from British rule, to forge harmonious relations between India's Hindu and Muslim populations, to end the pernicious Hindu practice of untouchability, and to develop India's economic and moral self-reliance. We see how in each of these campaigns, Gandhi adapted methods of nonviolence—strikes, marches, fasts—that successfully challenged British authority, religious orthodoxy, social customs, and would influence non-violent, revolutionary movements throughout the world.

In reconstructing Gandhi's life and work, Ramachandra Guha has drawn on sixty different archival collections, the most significant among them, a previously unavailable collection of papers belonging to Gandhi himself. Using this wealth of material, Guha creates a portrait of Gandhi and of those closest to him—family, friends, political and social leaders—that illuminates the complexity inside his thinking, his motives, his actions and their outcomes as he engaged with every important aspect of social and public life in the India of his time.

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The Magdalene in the Reformation 
Monday, October 22
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
The Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/meet-the-author-margaret-arnold-tickets-50026894789

Margaret Arnold
Prostitute, apostle, evangelist—the conversion of Mary Magdalene from sinner to saint is one of the Christian tradition’s most compelling stories, and one of the most controversial. The identity of the woman—or, more likely, women—represented by this iconic figure has been the subject of dispute since the Church’s earliest days. Much less appreciated is the critical role the Magdalene played in remaking modern Christianity.

In a vivid recreation of the Catholic and Protestant cultures that emerged in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, The Magdalene in the Reformation reveals that the Magdalene inspired a devoted following among those eager to find new ways to relate to God and the Church. In popular piety, liturgy, and preaching, as well as in education and the arts, the Magdalene tradition provided both Catholics and Protestants with the flexibility to address the growing need for reform. Margaret Arnold shows that as the medieval separation between clergy and laity weakened, the Magdalene represented a new kind of discipleship for men and women and offered alternative paths for practicing a Christian life.

Where many have seen two separate religious groups with conflicting preoccupations, Arnold sees Christians who were often engaged in a common dialogue about vocation, framed by the life of Mary Magdalene. Arnold disproves the idea that Protestants removed saints from their theology and teaching under reform. Rather, devotion to Mary Magdalene laid the foundation within Protestantism for the public ministry of women.

About The Author:  Margaret Arnold is Associate Rector of Grace Episcopal Church in Medford, Massachusetts. She received her Ph.D. in Religious and Theological Studies from Boston University and was awarded the 2017 Duke Divinity Innovation Grant for the development of Episcopal curriculum material. She blogs at gracemedford.org, and she has written about faith and women’s lives in the work of Jane Austen and L. M. Montgomery for the literary website sarahemsley.com.

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Tuesday, October 23
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Models for Drawings; Drawings for Models.
Tuesday, October 23
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, HUH Seminar Room 125, 22 Divinity Ave., Cambridge

Gretchen Kai Halpert, Illustrator, Educator, Scientific Illustration Distance Program,
Abstract: Scientific illustrators employ whatever means help accomplish their goals. They design models to help visualize and draw their subjects, and they make careful observational drawings in order to create models. This presentation explores both, with a focus on the historic drawings and glass models of marine invertebrates and botanical specimens by Rudolf and Leopold Blaschka. Examples of maquettes, plaster and paper models, and glass flame-working techniques may inspire you to add drawing or model-making to your repertoire.

Herbaria Seminar
https://huh.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/taxonomy/term/20301

Contact Name:   Claire Gallagher
cgallagher at fas.harvard.edu

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Automating Inequality: HOW HIGH-TECH TOOLS PROFILE, POLICE, AND PUNISH THE POOR ETHICS AND GOVERNANCE OF AI
Tuesday, October 23
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM ET
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (room 2036, second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSePM1H8BEZAdPEwxgPTGXfajD3E01ZCkBn0v_-UFUMj5s5C0w/viewform

Virginia Eubanks
Event will be live webcast and recorded at 12:00 pm on day of event.
In Automating Inequality, Virginia Eubanks systematically investigates the impacts of data mining, policy algorithms, and predictive risk models on poor and working-class people in America. The book is full of heart-wrenching and eye-opening stories, from a woman in Indiana whose benefits are literally cut off as she lays dying to a family in Pennsylvania in daily fear of losing their daughter because they fit a certain statistical profile. "This book is downright scary,” says Naomi Klein, “but with its striking research and moving, indelible portraits of life in the ‘digital poorhouse,’ you will emerge smarter and more empowered to demand justice.” Join us for a rousing conversation about this timely and provocative book.

About Virginia
Virginia Eubanks is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University at Albany, SUNY. She is the author of Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor; Digital Dead End: Fighting for Social Justice in the Information Age; and co-editor, with Alethia Jones, of Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith. Her writing about technology and social justice has appeared in The American Prospect, The Nation, Harper’s and Wired. For two decades, Eubanks has worked in community technology and economic justice movements. Today, she is a founding member of the Our Data Bodies Project and a Fellow at New America. She lives in Troy, NY.

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BU Connect
Tuesday, October 23
4:00 PM to 8:00 PM EDT 
BU, George Sherman Union, Metcalf Ballroom, 775 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07efhj42k8bc4b1d84&oseq=&c=&ch=

A research and innovation showcase designed to "connect" BU faculty and students with like-minded people in the local industrial/entrepreneurial ecosystem.
The event will include:
Innovator of the Year: One exceptional faculty member will be presented the award by the Vice President and Associate Provost for Research of Boston University Gloria Waters.
Innovation Showcase: Representatives from the Boston University research community will display the latest advancements and technologies in their field.
Problem-Solution Think Tanks: Join the conversation in our breakout sessions where thought leaders will address both pressing challenges and solutions to unmet needs in a given field.
Student Ventures: Organized by Innovate at BU. Learn about the problems that BU students are working to solve through formation of new enterprises! 
...And More! Lively conversations, great music, appetizing food and a special appearance by our favorite mascot Rhett the Terrier.

More information at http://www.bu.edu/research/news-events/featured-events-2/bu-connect/

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Lincoln's White House
Tuesday, October 23
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
The Harvard Coop, 1400 Mass Avenue, Cambridge 
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/meet-the-author-james-conroy-tickets-50027016152


James Conroy
LINCOLN’S WHITE HOUSE: THE PEOPLE’S HOUSE IN WARTIME is the first book devoted to the look, feel, and scent of the Civil War White House. Going behind the scenes through the keen eyes and ears of its residents, servants, guards, and aides and the constant stream of generals, celebrities, and ordinary citizens who passed through its open doors, the book brings the house to life, unveils its military, political, and domestic operations, and explores Lincoln’s use of the Executive Mansion as a rallying point for the war and an engine for social change.

“Gripping, atmospheric, and at times spellbinding, Conroy’s masterful work does much more than recollect the fraught public and private lives that Lincoln and his family endured in the Civil War White House. Not only are Conroy’s research and analysis impressive, but with the flair of a novelist or playwright, he brings the story alive by skillfully evoking its anxiety-riven characters and its grand but dilapidated locale. I know of no other book since the original recollections of Lincoln’s White House secretaries that does a better job of re-imagining America’s most famous landmark during the war for the nation’s soul.” - HAROLD HOLZER, author of Lincoln and the Power of the Press, winner of the Lincoln Prize

About The Author:  Jim Conroy practices law in Boston as a co-founder of Donnelly, Conroy & Gelhaar, LLP, one of the city’s leading litigation firms. In 2014 he was elected a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society in recognition of his first book, Our One Common Country: Abraham Lincoln and the Hampton Roads Peace Conference of 1865, the only book ever devoted to Lincoln’s little-known peace negotiations with Confederate leaders on a riverboat in Virginia near the end of the Civil War. Our One Common Country was a finalist for the Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize, awarded to the author of the best book of the year on Lincoln, a Civil War soldier, or the Civil War era. Conroy’s second book, Lincoln’s White House: The People’s House in Wartime, won the Lincoln Prize and the Abraham Lincoln Institute’s annual book award.

Conroy is a graduate of the University of Connecticut and served for six years in anti-submarine aviation units in the United States Navy Reserve. While working on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. as a speechwriter and a press secretary in the 1970’s and early 1980’s, he earned a master’s degree in international relations at George Washington University and a law degree, magna cum laude, at the Georgetown University Law Center.

Conroy has lived in Hingham, Massachusetts with his wife, Lynn since 1982.

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Opportunity
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Announcing Destination 2040: The next long-range transportation plan for the Boston region

How would you improve the Boston region’s transportation system? That’s the question at the heart of the MPO’s preparations for Destination 2040, which the MPO expects to adopt in the spring of 2019.

Every four years, the MPO identifies the system’s strengths and weaknesses; forecasts changes in population, employment, and land use; and creates a plan to address existing and future mobility needs. The resulting long-range transportation plan (LRTP) allocates funding for major projects in the Boston region and guides the MPO’s funding of capital investment programs and studies.

Use the new Destination 2040 website at http://ctps.org/lrtp-dev to explore the state of the system; learn how the MPO will identify needs, revisit its vision and goals, and prioritize its investments; and share your own interests, concerns, and ideas.

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://somervilleyogurtmakingcoop.wordpress.com

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

Solar map of Cambridge, MA
http://www.mapdwell.com/en/cambridge

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha at sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info at bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 41 (up from 27 in 2016) and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
Solidarity Network Economy:  https://ussolidarityeconomy.wordpress.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://calendar.mit.edu
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 11 AM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.


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